Skip to main content

Full text of "A brief history of the Association from its founding in 1848 to 1940, its present organization and operation : summarized proceedings for the period from January, 1934, to January 1940, and a directory of its members"

See other formats


Marine Biological Laboratory Library 

Woods Hole, Massachusetts 




Gift of Bostwick H. Ketchum - 1976 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



FOR THE 



ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE 



A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ASSOCIATION 

FROM ITS FOUNDING IN 1848 TO 1940 

ITS PRESENT ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION 



<X 



A 
A 






SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS 

FOR THE PERIOD FROM 
JANUARY, 1934, TO JANUARY, 1940 



AND 

A DIRECTORY OF MEMBERS 

AS OF JULY 1, 1940 



MARINE 

BIOLOGICAL 

LABORATORY 



LIB 



WOODS HOLE, MASS. 
W. H. 0. I. 



Published by the 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT 

OF SCIENCE 

Smithsonian Institution Building 

Washington, D. C. 

1940 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE 

FROM THE 

OFFFICE OF THE PERMANENT SECRETARY 

IN THE 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION BUILDING 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

1940 

[5000 copies printed] 



THE WILLIAM BYRD PRESS, INC. 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, U. S. A. 



8000 
6000- 

\4OO0- 

2000- 
1850 




/860 



1870 



1880 



1890 



1900 



/9/0 



MEMBERSHIP FOR PERIOD I850-I9IO 




1920 



MEMBERSHIP FOR PERIOD 1910-1940 



Horizontal and vertical scales are so chosen that equal slopes in the upper and lower 
graphs correspond to the same rate of change in membership. 

No meetings were held in 1860-1865; Science became the official journal of the Asso- 
ciation in 1900; records of membership are not available during the period of the World 
War; the effects of the depression on membership began in 1931. 



ill 



vi Preface 

ceedings of the Association for the period from 1934 to 1940, the reports of 
its meetings for these years contain much more information than do those 
for earlier years. The titles listed include not only those of the addresses of 
presidents and vice presidents but also all those that were open to the public 
as general sessions, with references to the places of their publication. The 
titles of more than two hundred and fifty addresses and papers are given. 
This volume also contains the titles of all the symposia presented at the 
twenty-one meetings of the Association and its divisions from 1934 to 1940, 
a total of more than two hundred at which nearly fourteen hundred papers 
were read. 

In short, this volume contains sketches of the science of our predecessors 
and much of that which is recent. Those whose memories reach back a few 
decades will feel as they read of the youth of the Association a certain 
nostalgia for simpler days and attitudes that have passed. It is hoped that 
they will catch enough echoes from the historical part of this record to 
awaken in them many happy memories and only pleasant anticipations for 
the future. Those who are in the early parts of their scientific careers will be 
most interested in current progress in science. They may even be a little 
amused at what now seem naive ideas that were held in earlier days. Yet it 
is hoped that for them the historical sections of this book will sometimes 
serve as a little mirror, like that in the front of a motor car, in which they 
may catch enough glimpses of the road science has traversed to assist them 
in steering it wisely into the future. 

Forest Ray Moulton, 
Permanent Secretary 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Preface v 

Brief History of the Association i 

The Period to 1850 1 

The Period from 1851 to i860 8 

The Period from 1861 to 1870 13 

The Period from 1871 to 1880 20 

The Period from 1881 to 1890 28 

The Period from 1891 to 1900 33 

The Period from 1901 to 1910 38 

The Period from 191 1 to 1920 44 

The Period from 1921 to 1940 46 

Statistical Data — Annual Meetings 50 

Statistical Data — The Pacific Division 50 

Statistical Data — The Southwestern Division 51 

Annual Sigma Xi Lectures 52 

Annual Phi Beta Kappa Lectures 52 

Annual Maiben Lectures 53 

The John Wesley Powell Lectures 53 

Meetings, 1848-1940 54 

Meetings of the Association 54 

Meetings of the Pacific Division , 55 

Meetings of the Southwestern Division 55 

General Officers, 1848-1940 56 

Roll of the Presidents 56 

Permanent Secretaries 57 

General Secretaries 57 

Assistant Secretaries 57 

Treasurers 57 

Articles of Incorporation 60 

Constitution of the Association 61 

By-Laws and Rules of Procedure 63 

Officially Associated Societies 66 

Organization and Operation of the Association 71 

History of the Constitution 7 1 

Classes of Members 7-' 

Annual Dues of Members 74 

The Council 74 

Election of the President 75 

The Executive Committee 75 

The Sections 76 

Divisions of the Association 76 

Local Branches ~ 77 

Affiliated and Associated Societies 78 

vii 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ASSOCIATION 

I. THE PERIOD TO 1850 1 

Although the American Association for the Advancement of Science was 
formally organized in 1848, and held its first meeting in Philadelphia on 
September 20 of that year, it had innumerable earlier beginnings in so- 
cieties that were local or of limited ranges of interests, and in the hearts of 
many men engaged in the adventure of developing a civilization in this new 
continent. These societies and aspirations had antecedents, sometimes in 
America and sometimes across the sea in Europe. And they, in turn, had 
antecedents in more distant times and in more varied places. The waters of 
every stream come from innumerable sources. 

European Antecedents to 1700 

With the Crusades (1096-1 271) horizons expanded to include much of 
Europe; with the voyages of Columbus (1492) and Magellan (1518-1521), 
they began to encompass the earth ; with the publication of Copernicus' 
Revolutions (1543) and Galileo's Dialogues (1632), they reached out into 
the celestial spaces; and with Newton's Principia (1687), the universe be- 
came orderly. Science was definitely on the march. In its ranks were 
Tycho Brahe (1546-1604), Napier (1550-1617), Francis Bacon (1560- 
1626), Kepler (1571-1630), Harvey (1578-1657), Descartes (1596-1650), 
von Guericke (1602-1686), Boyle (1627-1691), Huyghens (1629-1695), 
Hooke (1635-1703), Leibnitz (1646-1716) and many other men of lesser 
rank. The various origins of these names prove the breadth of the develop- 
ment of science in Europe. 

But science did not inarch alone: the human mind moves in many col- 
umns. Students of law assembled in Bologna (1100), three schools were 
founded in Paris (1100), a medical faculty was organized in Bologna 
(1156), Roman law began to be taught in Montpellier (1160), students set- 
tled in Oxford (1167), paper was made in Spain (1189), University of 
Paris was granted a charter (1200), Peterhouse College, Cambridge, was 
founded (1284), spectacles were invented (1289), University of Vienna 

1 For an excellent history of the background, origin and first days of the Association, see "The 
Background and Origin of the American Association for the Advancement of Science" by Austin H. 
Clark, assisted by Leila Forbes Clark, Summarized Proceedings of the Association for the period 
June, 1929, to January, 1934, published by the Association in 1934, pp. 15-30. For an even more 
complete account of the origin and history of the Association, see "The History of the American As- 
sociation for the Advancement of Science'' by Herman L. Fairchild, Science 59: 365-369, 385-390, 
410-415. 1924. 



4 The Period to 1850 

commerce, trades, manufactures, and a natural history of the country . . ." 
Under this constitution of Massachusetts the American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences was incorporated in the same year ( 1780) . 

Thomas Jefferson, known primarily as the author of the Declaration of 
Independence and secondarily as a president of the United States, founded 
the University of Virginia and was an amateur scientist and a promoter of 
science. When he went to Philadelphia in 1797 to be inaugurated as Vice 
President of the United States he took with him a collection of fossil bones 
of a large mammal and the manuscript of a memoir on them to be read be- 
fore the American Philosophical Society, of which he had been elected 
president the preceding year. He was also president of the American Phi- 
losophical Society during his term of office as President of the United States 
(1801-1809). He once wrote, "Nature intended me for the tranquil pursuit 
of sciences by rendering them my supreme delight." The plans of the build- 
ings for the University of Virginia and the scientific equipment Jefferson 
designed and installed in lovely Monticello, his home looking down upon 
Charlottesville, attest the sincerity of these sentiments. 

Attempts at Founding National Scientific Societies 

In 1816 an ambitious organization was launched under the name of the 
Columbian Institute for the Promotion of Arts and Sciences for many and 
diverse purposes, including the introduction and distribution of plants, in- 
vestigations of plant, mineral and other resources, promotion of agriculture 
and foreign trade, the production of a topographical and statistical survey 
of the different natural divisions of the country, the founding of a national 
museum and library, etc. Among its officers and members were such men 
as John Quincy Adams, John C. Calhoun, Daniel Webster, Henry Clay and 
Edward Everett. Meetings were held twice a year for several years, but 
with the passing of its original moving spirits the society became moribund 
after 1825 and eventually passed into the National Institution for the Pro- 
motion of Science, which was organized and incorporated by an Act of 
Congress in 1840. This latter society held monthly meetings and issued a 
volume of Proceedings in three bulletins between 1840 and 1845. 

In April, 1844, the National Institution for the Promotion of Science 
held in Washington a great congress of scientists to which were invited the 
members of the American Philosophical Society and of all other learned 
societies, and eminent citizens throughout the United States. The opening 
address was by John Tyler, President of the United States. The principal 
address was by Senator Robert J. Walker, of Mississippi. Ex-President 
|ohn Quincy Adams, then Member of Congress from Massachusetts, Sen- 
ator Woodbury of New Hampshire, the Hon. J. R. Ingersoll, of Pennsyl- 
vania, and the Hon. John C. Spencer, Secretary of War, served as chairmen 



The Period to 1850 5 

from session to session throughout the meeting, at which 43 papers were 
presented. 

In spite of this auspicious beginning, the National Institution never held 
another general meeting and it passed out of existence technically, as well 
as actually, with the expiration of its charter in 1861. Its founding was a 
valiant attempt to organize the science of the country more or less under 
central political sponsorship, but it failed without appreciable effect upon 
American science and culture. 

The American Journal of Science 

An event of major importance for the progress of science in America was 
the founding, in 1818, of the American Journal of Science and Arts (the 
words "and Arts" omitted after the year 1880) by Benjamin Silliman. No 
other scientific periodical in this country has enjoyed uninterrupted publi- 
cation for so long a period, now 122 years. The American Journal of 
Science owes everything to Silliman, for he was not only its founder and its 
editor for many years, but its financial backer as well. Silliman's Journal, 
as it was often called, drew together as contributors, and after 1851 as 
associated editors, most of the leading scientists of the country. It pro- 
vided them a place in which to publish their writings and made them ac- 
quainted with one another during a period in which travel was difficult 
and costly. It contributed greatly to solidarity among American scientists. 1 

Natural Philosophy and Natural History 

In the early part of the nineteenth century science was almost universally 
classified as Natural Philosophy and Natural History. Although Benjamin 
Franklin had made many important contributions to what later became 
known as physics, geology was the first of the branches of Natural Philoso- 
phy to be vigorously cultivated in America. Interest in geology was partly 
utilitarian, for a new continent was to be explored and its mineral riches 
brought to light. Seventeen states made provisions for geological surveys 
between 1823 and 1839. This rapidly expanding interest in geology led to 
attempts at forming national geological societies. The first was the Ameri- 
can Geological Society, incorporated in Connecticut in 18 19. Silliman was 
one of its vice-presidents, and men from every state in the Union were in- 
cluded in its membership. The society died in 1826, but its spirit reappeared 
in the Association of American Geologists, organized in 1840. 

Origin of the American Association 

Interest in natural history was not lacking, for provisions for it were in- 
cluded in the organization of general scientific societies, such as the Ameri- 

1 For an extended account of the origin and history of the American Journal of Science, see A 
Century of Science in America (1818-1918). Yale University Press. 19 18. 



6 The Period to 1850 

can Philosophical Society, and papers on subjects in biological fields were 
welcomed in Silliman's Journal. In 1836, New York established a Natural 
History Survey, and Massachusetts a Zoological and Botanical Survey, in 
1837. There rapidly developed an interest in organizing a society including 
both Natural Philosophy and Natural History, an interest that was doubt- 
less stimulated by the founding of the British Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, in 1831. 

Dr. John Collins Warren, a leading citizen of Boston, read a paper at a 
meeting of the British Association in 1837. Upon his return to the United 
States in August, 1838, he actively undertook to promote the organization 
of a similar society in this country. A Committee of Correspondence of the 
American Association was formed, which late in October notified the Amer- 
ican Philosophical Society of their activities and invited cooperation in or- 
ganizing the proposed new society. On February 15, 1839, the American 
Philosophical Society passed a resolution declaring that in its opinion it 
was inexpedient for it to undertake the organization of the proposed Asso- 
ciation. In spite of this action interest continued in establishing a general 
scientific society national in scope. In April, 1842, the Association of Amer- 
ican Geologists, which had been organized in 1840, became The Associa- 
tion of American Geologists and Naturalists. Charles (later Sir Charles) 
Lyell, distinguished author of Principles of Geology, was present and took 
an active part in the meeting. This society held its last meeting in Boston 
in September, 1847 ; on September 24, under the chairmanship of William 
C. Redfield, the society passed a resolution to transform itself into the 
American Association for the Promotion of Science, an organization "de- 
signed to embrace all laborers in Physical Science and Natural History." 

The new association held its first regular meeting in the library room of 
the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia on September 20, 1848, 
at 10 a.m. At noon the meeting was called to order by Professor William B. 
Rogers who read the draft of a Constitution and Rules of Order which had 
been drawn up by a committee appointed for the purpose at the meeting the 
preceding year. In this report the name of the organization was changed to 
the American Association for the Advancement of Science ; upon its adop- 
tion the American Association for the Advancement of Science was born. 
At 4 p.m. the new society convened and the chairman, Professor Rogers, 
introduced the first president of the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, Mr. William C. Redfield. There were 461 original mem- 
bers of the Association. 

The Meetings of the Association 1848-1850 

The first meeting of the Association was held from 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 
September 20, 1848, until Monday, September 25, excluding Sunday, Sep- 



The Period to 1850 7 

tember 24. The scientific program of the meeting consisted of three papers 
on fossils read at the first session, of a communication on ocean winds and 
currents, of a General Session on Friday evening on subjects of wide in- 
terest, and of sessions daily of the two sections of the Association, namely, 
the "Section of Natural History, Geology, etc." and the "Section of General 
Physics, etc." 

At the general session on Friday evening Professor William B. Rogers 
delivered an "annual address" which was not written out or printed. Then 
Benjamin Peirce read a paper "On the General Principles of Analytical 
Mechanics," followed by a paper by Louis Agassiz "On the Classification 
of the Animal Kingdom." These papers are not published in the Proceed- 
ings of the meeting and probably not anywhere else. 

About 30 papers and communications of various kinds were presented 
before the Section of Natural History, Geology, etc., and about as many 
before the Section of General Physics, etc., few of which are printed in the 
Proceedings of the meeting. A list of the 461 members of the Association, 
including all the leading American scientists of the time, closes the volume 
of 156 pages. 

The meeting in 1849 (the second meeting of the Association) was held 
in Cambridge, Massachusetts, from August 14 to August 20, inclusive (ex- 
cluding Sunday, August 19), a total of six days, under the presidency of 
Joseph Henry. No presidential address was delivered, but there were sev- 
eral sessions of the Association as a whole and sessions of the sections of 
"Natural History, Geology, etc.," "General Physics, etc.," "Mathematics, 
Physics, and Astronomy," "Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Meteorology," "Ge- 
ology and Paleontology," "Zoology," "Chemistry and Meteorology," "Nat- 
ural History, Zoology, etc.," the new sections having been organized as a 
consequence of a great increase in the number of papers presented and the 
progressive specialization of science. This second Proceedings comprised 
459 pages. 

In 1850 the Association held two meetings, an intermediate meeting in 
Charleston, S. C, from March 12 to March 16, inclusive, and its annual 
meeting in New Haven, Conn., from August 19 to August 24, inclusive. In 
meeting in various places the Association was fulfilling one of its purposes 
as expressed in its Rules, namely, to hold ". . . periodical and migratory 
meetings, to promote intercourse between those who are cultivating science 
in different parts of the United States . . ." At the Charleston meeting about 
60 papers and informal communications were presented. At the New 
Haven meeting six General Sessions were held before which 26 papers and 
addresses were delivered. At the section meetings 1 14 papers were pre- 
sented, 46 of which were in the general fields of geology and natural history 
and 68 in the fields of the physical sciences. The Proceedings of the third 



8 The Period from 185 i to i860 

(Charleston) meeting consist of 215 pages, while there are 414 pages in the 
Proceedings of the New Haven meeting. The membership of the Associa- 
tion at the Charleston meeting was 634 ; at the New Haven meeting it had 
become 684. On August 22 Joseph Henry, president of the Association for 
the preceding year, delivered an address as retiring president, but it was not 
written and the title of it is unknown. 

II. THE PERIOD FROM 185 1 TO i860 

In order not to become involved in the endless details of individual meet- 
ings which have lost much of their importance with the passing of time, the 
history of the Association and the progress of science will be sketched by 
decades. The decade 1850- 1860 is the first one after the Association had 
been organized and the pattern of its meetings established. 

Several great scientific discoveries and generalizations had been made 
in the decades immediately preceding the one under consideration. One of 
the most important of these generalizations was Dalton's atomic theory 
(1808) based on Proust's experimental discovery of the law of multiple 
proportions in chemical reactions. This basic theory for chemistry was 
supplemented in 181 1 by Avogadro's inference, or hypothesis, that equal 
volumes of different gases at the same temperature and under the same pres- 
sure contain the same number of molecules. The synthesis of urea by 
Wohler, in 1828, assured chemists that the laws of their science hold also in 
the organic field. 

In the field of geology a new era was inaugurated by the publication of 
the three volumes of Lyell's Principles of Geology in 1830, 1832, and 1833. 
A reasonable basis- for the long periods of time required by Lyell for the 
geological processes was provided in the Nebular Hypothesis of Laplace, 
published first in 1796 and in a somewhat expanded form in 1806. The law r 
of the conservation of energy was formulated almost simultaneously by 
Robert Mayer and James P. Joule, in 1842. In 1847 Helmholz extended it 
to the organic world. It was in the middle part of the first half of this 
century that Faraday and Joseph Henry discovered the relations between 
electricity and magnetism. It was in this period that the cell theory of the 
structure- and functioning of living organisms took form, the papers of 
Schleiden and Schwann appearing in 1838-39. It was in the latter part of 
this half century that the principles of organic evolution began to take form 
in the minds of Darwin, Wallace and Spencer. As to inventions, Morse pro- 
duced the telegraph in 1836; Daguerre first made photographs in 1839; 
and Long, Wells, Morton, and Simpson introduced the use of ether, nitrous 
oxide and chloroform, for producing anesthesia, in the years 1842 to 1847. 
Great scientific discoveries in the half century preceding the organization of 



The Period from 185 i to i860 9 

the Association naturally influenced its programs during the decade under 
consideration. 

Presidential Addresses 
A. D. Bache (geography), president of the Association for 1851, nor- 
mally would have delivered his retiring address at the meeting scheduled 
for Cleveland, Ohio, in August of 1852; but this meeting was postponed 
because of the prevalence of cholera along the approaches to Cleveland from 
the South. At the postponed meeting, held in July, 1853, Bache delivered 
his address, without formal title, saying that it would be "a few remarks in 
relation to the circumstances attending its (the Association's) organization, 
and to its progress, and some considerations of the direction in which we 
may look for its greatest usefulness." It is printed in the Proceedings for 
1852, vol. 6. A short quotation will illustrate its tone. 

But is it true that genius is beyond or above the stimulus of association? Let the 
man among us who has, if ever man had the true "divine breath," tell us, in simple and 
single-heartedness, whether he left that meeting of the British Association the same 
man who went there; whether the effect of that simple and single figure on the black- 
board, which showed to the geologists of the day discoveries to be made, founded on 
principles which created a new era in classification, was limited to his auditors, or even 
to cultivators of science through whom they spread with lightning rapidity and vivid- 
ness : did it not react on him ? 

Benjamin Peirce (mathematics), president of the Association in 1853 
and distinguished for his work in abstract mathematics, delivered his ad- 
dress as retiring president at the meeting held in Washington in May, 1854. 
Like the address of his predecessor, it was without an explicit title but re- 
ferred in eloquent terms to the Association and of its relations to the prog- 
ress of science. It is printed in the Proceedings for 1854, vol. 8. Its style 
may be inferred from its opening paragraph, which is by no means the most 
ornate. 

In most offices, the duties terminate with the office, and the thing of the past, the 
ex-officer, is to the present an unknown quantity. But it is not so with your President. 
Science, with its time-annihilating power, which gives life to the fossil, which hurries 
the embryo future into premature birth, which ventures beyond the grave even to the 
foot of the invisible throne, sternly drags forward its reluctant presidents to their hard- 
est trial when they have ceased to be, to a judgment after death severer than that of 
Rhadamanthus. This calling out of the actor upon the stage after the night of perform- 
ance, when the blood is no longer warm, is all the worse to him who has never before 
made a set speech, all whose habits of thought are unknown to aesthetic display, and 
the Arctic latitudes of whose frigid studies are impenetrable to the God of eloquence 
and to the Muses who vibrate the silver-toned chords of human sympathy. 

James D. Dana (geology), president of the Association in 1854, de- 



io The Period from 185 i to i860 

livered his address as retiring president at the meeting held in Providence, 
R. I., in August, 1855. This address, also without a title, was an excellent 
exposition of the geological history of the earth, including "the progress of 
life from its earliest dawn to the appearance of man." All of it was on a 
high scientific, literary and philosophic plane. In the concluding paragraphs 
of his address Dana referred to the future of man as follows : 

Another of our number has shown in eloquent language how the diversified features 
and productions of the Old World conspired to adapt it for the childhood and develop- 
ment of the race ; and that, when beyond his pupilage, having accomplished his rescue 
from himself and the tyranny of forces around him, and broken the elements into his 
service, he needed to emerge from the trammels of the school-house in order to enjoy 
his fullest freedom of thought and action, and social union. Professor Guyot observes 
further, that America, ever free, was the appointed land for this freedom and union, — 
of which its open plains, and oneness of structure, were a fit emblem ; and that, al- 
though long without signs of progress or hope in its future, this land is to be the 
centre of hope and light to the world. 

In view of all these arrangements, man may well feel exalted. He is the last of the 
grand series. At his approach, the fierce tribes of the earth drew back, and the race 
dwindled to one fourth its bulk and ferocity, — the huge Mastodons, Lions, and Hyenas 
yielding place to other species, better fit to be his attendants, and more in harmony with 
the new creation. 

Partaking of the Divine image, all nature pays him tribute ; the universe is his field 
of study ; an eternity his future. Surely it is a high eminence on which he stands. (Pro- 
ceedings, vol. 9.) 

John Torrey (botany), president in 1855, does not appear to have de- 
livered an address as retiring president. His successor, James Hall (geol- 
ogy), delivered his address as retiring president at the Montreal meeting in 
August, 1857; it was published in 1882. (Proceedings, vol. 31, pp. 29-71.) 

Professor J. W. Bailey (chemistry), elected president of the Association 
for 1857, died on February 27 at 46 years of age, the first president of the 
Association to die in office. Professor Alexis Caswell (astronomy) served 
in his place at the meeting held in Montreal in August, 1857, and also in 
place of Jeffries Wyman, president of the Association for the meeting held 
in Baltimore in May, 1858, but which he did not attend. On retiring from 
the duties of president of the Association, Caswell delivered an address at 
the meeting held in Springfield, Mass., in August, 1859. The first part of 
his address consisted of tributes to the members who had died during the 
year and brief sketches of their lives ; the last part, to a discussion of current 
problems in astronomy. 

There is no record that Stephen Alexander, president of the Association 
for the Springfield, Mass., meeting in August, 1859, delivered an address as 
retiring president at the meeting in Newport, R. I., in August, i860. Nor 
did Isaac Lea, president for this meeting, deliver an address as retiring 



The Period from 1851 to i860 11 

president ; the Association suspended activities during the period of the 
Civil War, 1861 to 1865. 

Papers of Especial Interest Presented at the Meetings 1 

The Cincinnati Meeting, May, 18 51. ( Vol. 5) 

1. On the Azoic System, as Developed in the Lake Superior Land Dis- 
trict. J. W. Foster and J. D. Whitney. 

2. On the Constitution of Saturn's Ring. Benjamin Peirce. 

3. Notice of the Ancient Human Skulls, and other Bones, found in a 
Cave near Elyria, Ohio. Chas. Whittlesey, Sr. 

The Albany Meeting, August, 18 51. ( Vol. 6) 

1. On a New Form of Microscope, with a New Mode of Measurement 
of Dimensions and Angles. J. Lawrence Smith. 

2. Remarks upon the Unconformahility of the Palaeozoic Formations of 
the United States. Louis Agassiz. 

3. Description of Samples of Ancient Cloth from the Mounds of Ohio. 
J. W. Foster. 

The Cleveland Meeting, July, 1853. ( Vol. 7) 

1. On the Binocular Microscope. J. L. Riddell. 

2. On the Geology of the Choctaw Bluff. A. Winchell. 

3. On the Wheat-Fly and its Ravages. R. Howell. 

The Washington Meeting, May, 1854. {Vol. 8) 

1. Results of Some Investigations Respecting Biela's Double Comet. J. S. 
Hubbard. 

2. On the Distribution of Temperature in and near the Gulf Stream, off 
the Coast of the United States, from Observations made in the Coast Sur- 
vey. A. D. Bache. 

3. An Account of a Tornado which passed over the State of Connecticut 
on the 9th of August, 185 1. John Brocklesby. 

4. Experimental Observations on Taste and Smell. Theodore C. Hilgard. 

The Providence Meeting, August, 1855. (Vol. 9) 

1. Improvements in the Electric Telegraph, whereby two or more Ter- 
minal Stations can make Simultaneous Use of the Same Wire. Moses G. 
Farmer. 

2. On the Occurrence of the Ores of Iron in the Azoic System. J. D. 
Whitney. 

1 All references are to the Proceedings. 



12 



The Period from 185 i to i860 



The Albany Meeting, August, 18 j6. (Vol. 10) 

1. On Acoustics Applied to Public Buildings. Joseph Henry. 

2. On the Spirality of Motion in Whirlwinds and Tornadoes. W. C. 
Redfield. 

3. On the Agency of the Gulf-Stream in the Formation of the Peninsula 
of Florida. Joseph Le Conte. 

The Montreal Meeting, August, 1857. (Vol. 11) 

1. Zodiacal Light. Charles Wilkes, U.S.N. 

2. Fluctuations of Level in the North American Lakes. Charles Whit- 
tlesey. 

3. Thoughts on Species. James D. Dana. 

4. Laws of Descent of the Iroquois. Lewis H. Morgan. 

The Baltimore Meeting, May, 1858. (Vol. 12) 

1. On the Mean Distances of Periodic Comets. Daniel Kirkwood. 

2. On the Australian Weapon called the Boomerang. Joseph Lovering. 

The Springfield, Mass., Meeting, August, 1859. (Vol. 15) 

1. On the Secular Variations of the Eccentricities and Perihelia of Cer- 
tain of the Asteroids. Simon Newcomb. 

2. On the Supposed Lunar Origin of Aerolites. B. A. Gould, Jr. 

3. Contributions to the History of Gypsums and Magnesium Rocks. T. 
Sterry Hunt. 

4. The Indian Mode of Bestowing and Changing Names. Lewis H. 
Morgan. 

The Newport, R. I., Meeting, August, i860. (Vol. 14) 
1. The American Reindeer. L. E. Chittenden. 

Membership 

During the early years of the Association its membership was published 
only at the close of the meetings. For the decade under consideration the 
memberships at the close of the meetings were as follows : 



Year 


Meeting Place 1 


I ember 'ship 


] ear 


Meeting Place 


Membership 


1851 


Cincinnati 


800 


1856 


Albany 


722 


1851 


Albany 


769 


1857 


Montreal 


946 


1853 


Cleveland 


940 


1858 


Baltimore 


962 


1854 


Washington 


1004 


1859 


Springfield 


862 


i855 


Providence 


605 


i860 


Newport 


644 



The Period from 1861 to 1870 13 

III. THE PERIOD FROM 1861 TO 1870 

During' the twelve years between the organization of the Association in 
1848 and the beginning of the period now to be considered the Association 
held 14 meetings. Many addresses delivered at these meetings contained 
enthusiastic and eloquent passages concerning the progress of civilization, 
the dissipation of dark superstitions, the increase in understanding of the 
beneficent purposes of the Creator and confident predictions of a Utopian 
future. Alas for their dreams that they were almost at the gates of Paradise ! 
The Civil War broke out ! 

In the tragic hours in which these words are being written (May 17, 
1940) a large fraction of the peoples who have made the greatest contribu- 
tions to science, who through science have created unlimited comforts, 
stamped out diseases, revealed the majesty of the universe, taught us the 
long course of our evolution, pointed the way to unlimited progress — these 
are the peoples who are engaged in a struggle that appears about to destroy 
civilization. Our present apprehensions about the future should help us to 
understand conditions in 1861. 

In April, 1861, the blood of men ran hot. Those who together had won 
their political freedom became bitter enemies ; the aid of the Almighty was 
invoked in plans for slaughter ; mutual hatreds flamed in the hearts of those 
who had been friends ; families were divided by undying enmities ; large 
sections of the country were laid waste and all of it was impoverished. For 
six years the Association held no meetings. 

The first meeting of the Association after the termination of the Civil 
War was held at Buffalo, N. Y., in August, 1866. But it was not such a 
meeting as the previous ones had been. It was not such a meeting as the 
one scheduled for Nashville, Tenn., for April, 1861, would have been if it 
had not been for the outbreak of the war. Yet 79 members of the Associa- 
tion attended the meeting and 67 papers were presented, 18 of which were 
printed in the Proceedings of the meeting. Of these 18 papers, only one was 
in zoology and only one was in botany. 

Presidential Addresses 

Isaac Eea (geology) was president of the Association for the meeting- 
held at Newport, R. I., in August, i860, and was consequently retiring 
president at the next meeting held six years later at Buffalo, in August, 
1866. Instead of delivering an extended formal address, he made a few re- 
marks, in part as follows, in introducing F. A. P. Barnard, president at this 
meeting in Buffalo (vol. 15, p. 108) : 

In opening this meeting, it may be my duty to say that when we adjourned last, in 
Newport, R. I., in i860, it was then proposed that we should meet in 1861, at Nashville, 



14 The Period from 1861 to 1870 

Tenn. At the same time the distinguished President of Columbia College, N. Y., Prof. 
Barnard, was appointed to preside at that meeting. In the meantime, the great rebellion 
breaking out, the meeting was not, of course, called together, as that place was not 
either a fit or a safe one for loyal members to visit. It was also judged proper that our 
meetings should be in abeyance, as our minds and our time were occupied by duties of 
the utmost importance in the assistance of the restoration of that peace which has 
caused our beloved Union four eventful years of war. 

F. A. P. Barnard, retiring president at the meeting held at Burlington, 
Vermont, in August, 1867, was not present at the meeting and did not de- 
liver his address until the following year. However, the president for the 
meeting, J. S. Newberry (geology), delivered his retiring address which 
normally would have come at the following meeting. In it are evidences of 
the profound effects that were gradually being produced by the publication 
of Darwin's Origin of Species in 1859 (vol. 16, pp. 1-15.) : 

Although the progress of the age to which I have referred has been a matter of 
wonder and delight to all students of humanity and civilization, many of our best men 
have been somewhat alarmed and dizzied by it ; and, while accepting the achievements 
of modern industry and thought as full of present good and future promise, they are 
not a little concerned lest our railroad speed of progress should lead to its legitimate 
consequences, a final crash — not of things material, but of those of infinitely more 
value— of opinions and of faith. As often as it is boasted that this is pre-eminently an 
age of progress, that boast is met by the inevitable "but" (which qualifies our praise of 
all things earthly) "it is equally an age of scepticism." For the truth of this assertion 
the proof is nearly as palpable as of the other ; and in view of the ruthlessness with 
which the man of the present removes ancient landmarks and profanes shrines hallowed 
by the faith of centuries, it is not surprising that many of the good and wise among us 
should deplore a liberty of thought leading, in their view, inevitably to license, and 
mourn over this wide-spread scepticism as an evil and inscrutable disease that has 
fallen upon the minds and hearts of men. . . . 

It would be impossible for any one to discuss in a fair and intelligent manner the 
great question of the origin of species, in anything less than a bulky volume. The 
merest mention is, therefore, all we can give to it at the present time. Although the 
appearance of Darwin's book on the Origin of Species communicated a distinct shock 
to the prevalent creeds, both religious and scientific, the hypothesis which it suggests, 
though now for the first time distinctly formularized, was by no means new ; as it en- 
ters largely into the less clearly stated development theories of Oken, Lamarck, De 
Maillet, and the author of the "Vestiges of Creation." There was this difference, how- 
ever, that in the developmental theories of the older writers the element of evolution 
had a place; the process of development had its main-spring in an inherent growth, or 
tendency, such as produces the evolution of the successive parts in plant-life, while, 
according to Darwin, the beautiful symmetry and adaptation which we see in nature is 
simply the form assumed by plastic matter in the mould of external circumstances. 

Although this Darwinian hypothesis is looked upon by many as striking at the root 
of all vital faith, and is the bete noire of all those who deplore and condemn the mate- 
rialistic tendency of modern science, still the purity of life of the author of the "Origin 
of Species," his enthusiastic devotion to the study of truth, the industry and acumen 
which have marked his researches, the candor and caution with which his suggestions 



The Period from 1861 to 1870 15 

have been made, aJl combine to render the obloquy and scorn with which they have been 
received in many quarters peculiarly unjust and in bad taste. It should also be said of 
Mr. Darwin that his views on the origin of species are not inconsistent with his own 
acceptance of the doctrine of Revelation ; and that many of our best men of science 
look upon his theory as not incompatible with the religious faith which is the guide of 
their lives, and their hope for the future. To these men it seems presumption that any 
mere man should restrict the Deity in His manner of vitalizing and beautifying the 
earth. To them it is a proof of higher wisdom and greater power in the Creator that 
He should endow the vital principle with such potency that, pervaded by it, all the 
economy of nature, in both the animal and vegetable worlds, should be so nicely self- 
adjusting that, like a perfect machine from the hands of a master maker, it requires no 
constant tinkering to preserve the constancy and regularity of its movements. 

F. A. P. Barnard (astronomy, physics), president of the Association for 
the meeting at Buffalo in August, 1866, delivered his address as retiring 
president at the meeting in Chicago in August, 1868. This address ranged 
widely over the then recent advances in the physical sciences — astronomy 
and celestial mechanics, electromagnetic phenomena, electrochemistry, solar 
parallax, the planetoids, the distance of Sirius, eclipses of the sun, sunspots, 
meteors, comets, glaciation, coal deposits in China, chemistry, the conserva- 
tion of energy- — and, finally, the speaker examined the properties of living 
organisms, including the activities of the mind, in the light of the physical 
laws he had discussed. A few paragraphs, all of which are well written and 
not one of which is dull, will illustrate the tenor of the address (vol. 17, pp. 
57-101): 

The philosophy therefore which makes thought a form of force, makes thought a 
mode of motion ; converts the thinking being into a mechanical automaton, whose 
sensations, emotions, intellections, are mere vibrations produced in its material sub- 
stance by the play of physical forces, and whose conscious existence must forever cease 
when the exhausted organism shall at length fail to respond to these external im- 
pulses. If the law of conservation of force is therefore to be extended to mental phe- 
nomena, the immortality of the soul can be no longer maintained. On this hypothesis 
indeed man has no soul. Life is but a momentary phenomenon, a casual condition of 
matter, to be classed with combustion, incandescence, sound, odor, anything most acci- 
dental and evanescent. More than this, the living being, while his brief consciousness 
endures, is the mere sport of forces foreign to himself. His conscious freedom of will 
is nothing but an illusion. His thoughts, his feelings, his acts, are all links in a chain 
of inevitable events, determined by unalterable physical laws. He ceases to be a moral 
agent or an accountable being. Let it be observed moreover that the doctrine of neces- 
sity here forced upon us, differs from that which has been inculcated by necessitarian 
philosophers heretofore. The necessity which fetters the will by making it the slave of 
motive, is one in which the coercion is moral and not physical ; and which leaves us 
room at least to respect poor human nature though we may compassionate. That which 
presents will and motive together as two modes of motion, of which the first is but the 
second under a new form, is a necessity of which the slave has lost even respectability, 
and is reduced to the humble level of a piece of mechanism. 

But it is not because of these consequences that I reject a doctrine so derogatory to 



i6 The Period from 1861 to 1870 

the dignity of humanity. The business of the philosopher is to follow on the trace of 
truth wherever it may lead. He must not suffer feeling, or preference, or preposses- 
sion, or prejudice, for a moment to bias his judgment. If the law of the conservation 
of force, rightly interpreted, conducts us of necessity to materialism, we must accept 
the conclusion, however humiliating we may find it to our pride or however ruinous to 
our hopes. To my mind no such necessity exists. 

In proof of this position it is of course no argument, and I do not present it as one, 
to allege the utter incongruity which every mind uninfluenced, I was about to say 
unperverted, by favorite philosophical preconceptions, feels to exist between mental 
and physical phenomena. Consciousness, to any mind, is a mystery sufficiently pro- 
found ; but to suggest that it may be only a mode of motion, is to an ordinary mind 
little less than a self evident absurdity. But, as just remarked, this is no argument. 

It is an argument, however, to say that thought cannot be a physical force, because 
thought admits of no measure. I think it will be conceded without controversy that 
there is no form of material substance, and no known force of a physical nature (and 
there are no other forces) of which we cannot in some form definitely express the 
quantity, by reference to some conventional measuring unit. Even while heat and light 
and electricity continued to be regarded as independent and unconvertible forces, they 
were still subjected to measurement, each after a manner peculiar to itself; and the 
ratio between the amount of latent heat of a pound of water and that of a pound of 
steam was as well known as it is now. The minutest quantities of electricity were de- 
termined by the most delicate of balances, and the intensities of different lights were 
numerically expressed by means of experimental and instrumental comparisons. Now 
no such means of measuring mental action has been suggested. No such means can be 
conceived. 

Benjamin Apthorp Gould (astronomy), who was president at the meet- 
ing of the Association held at Chicago in August, 1868, delivered his presi- 
dential address at the meeting held at Salem, Mass., in August, 1869. Gould 
devoted considerable attention to the principal theme of his predecessor, 
but, in contrast to -earlier presidents of the Association, he sharply warned 
his fellow members against overestimating American achievements in 
science (vol. 18, pp. 1-37) : 

We are accustomed to regard ourselves as belonging to a new country, and to palliate 
in our own hearts, even if not openly, our intellectual short-comings and our deficiences 
in learning or culture, by this plea. And just as men who have attained eminence, not- 
withstanding an absence of early opportunities, are often accustomed to glory in this 
want of advantages, as though it had been a merit rather than a misfortune, — judging 
themselves always by a relative, instead of an absolute, standard, — so we American 
lovers of science are too much inclined to take note of the difficulties against which we 
have struggled or are struggling, rather than of the actual level which we have attained 
by the effort. Of course there is much to extenuate in this proclivity; how much, you 
all know. The want, until a recent date, of books of reference; the want of access to 
such implements of research as are beyond the reach of most private men; the want of 
time and energy to spare from the grand "struggle for existence" ; and above all, the 
want of competent scientific counselers and guides for the beginner in scientific re- 
search ; all these are well known to those of you who have attained an age at all ap- 



The Period from 1861 to 1870 ij 

proaching the meridian of life. Before the omniscient Judge, they will surely be credited 
to each individual in the great account. But if we consider not the individuals but the 
people, and hold the community responsible for its collective failures, while we give 
it credit for its collective achievements, in the intellectual field, I am sometimes appre- 
hensive that we are given to pluming ourselves too much, and to estimating our progress 
rather by the number of obstacles which we know to have been surmounted, than by 
the mile-stones which have been left behind. Communities have merits and failings, 
as individuals have ; they are but the integral of their many constituent individuals ; 
and among our national failings can scarcely be counted that of judging ourselves too 
harshly. Our aim should not be to overcome difficulties, except so far as this is a 
necessary means of advance ; it is progress, toward which our efforts should be directed, 
and if the obstacles are serious, we have, as a people, no right to credit merely for 
having surmounted them, provided we possess, and do not employ, the power to remove 
them. Can the intellectual standing and rank of a nation be fairly measured by the 
highest achievements of its ablest and most devoted men, if so be that these men or 
their deeds are not the legitimate fruit of the tendencies and influences at work, but, on 
the contrary, are exceptional cases, which have maintained their existence and even 
blossomed out by virtue of the humanity that was in them, notwithstanding hindrances 
and discouragements? . . . 

"Two hundred and forty years," I hear some one say, "what are they in the de- 
velopment of a nation, or of its scientific character? Twenty-five centuries have passed 
since Thales predicted an eclipse of the sun ; nineteen, since Sosigenes reformed the 
calendar for Julius Caesar ; fourteen hundred years have rolled over the University of 
Bologna. What to you occidentals seems a hoary antiquity, is a mere yesterday for 
the dweller by the Tiber, the Thames, the Seine, the Danube or the Rhine." Be it so ! 
Yet Hans Lippersheim's first suggestion of a telescope was eighteen months after New- 
port had sailed up the James River with his infant colony. The idea of a logarithm 
was then not born : Napier and Briggs were names unknown to fame. The oaks and 
beeches had been cleared from these hills, and our ancestors had built their rustic 
homes, at the time when Galileo was tortured into adjuring the profane doctrine that 
the earth moved, and not the sun. When Harvard endowed the college that bears his 
name, there was no such thing as a barometer or a thermometer. It is within these 
very two hundred and forty years that modern science has come into existence, and 
the world's intellect been turned from speculation to investigation. It is within this 
period that our implements of research have been devised, that the air-pump, the elec- 
trical machine and the clock have been invented, that every public chemical laboratory, 
every astronomical or physical observatory, and every academy of sciences has been 
founded. Boston had been settled when Keppler died. The grandchildren of the origi- 
nal colonists of Plymouth and the Massachusetts Bay were born, when the law of 
universal gravitation was first proclaimed by Newton. 

Therefore it is that we must confess our scientific progress to have been far inferior 
to that of several European nations. And I fear that the confession might truthfully 
be made much broader, and include our progress in all purely intellectual studies, which 
hold forth no promise of immediate utility in promoting physical well-being or material 
convenience. If this is true, my friends, it is time that it should be so no longer. And 
before you, the declared lovers of science, — in this Association formed to promote her 
welfare and advancement, — here in the earliest seat of that colony, whence has geo- 
graphically radiated what of culture and of science our country has possessed, — I would 
fain say some few words which, however crude or ill-arranged, might find a congenial 
soil within your hearts — to bear fruit, perhaps, when all of us have disappeared from 
the stage — and which might aid, in however small a degree, to avert the day when the 



1 8 The Period from 1861 to 1870 

highest recognized aims shall be toward material prosperity, rather than toward in- 
tellectual development and progress. 

J. W. Foster (geography), president at the Salem meeting in August, 
1869, delivered his address as retiring president of the Association at the 
meeting held at Troy, Xew York, in August, 1870. Foster's address was 
devoted to the wide variations in climate, including the glacial advances and 
retreats, that characterized the Tertiary and later periods almost down to 
the present time. His remarks on the resulting changes in plant and animal 
forms, and on prehistoric man, are interesting illustrations of the mixtures 
of fact and fancy that followed the first glimpses into an enormous and al- 
most entirely unsuspected long past of geological, hiological and human his- 
tory. Referring to man during the Ice Age, he said (vol. 19, pp. 1-19) : 

In such a climate and on such a soil we can well imagine that agriculture formed no 
part of the occupation of the primitive man. He gathered not the kindly fruits of the 
earth, but was essentially a predaceous animal. The few skulls that have been re- 
covered, would indicate that he was low in the scale of intellectual organization, — a 
small brain, a retreating forehead, and oblique jaws. In capacity he was below the 
Australian and New Zealander. In stature he was dwarfed, but was broad-shouldered 
and robust, — the result of vigorous exertion and out-door exposure. He was carni- 
vorous, and, perhaps, a raw flesh-eater ; for in the jaws which have been disinterred, 
the incisor teeth are much worn, — a peculiarity which has been noticed in those of the 
flesh-eating Esquimaux. This fact ought not to be cited to his disadvantage, for in an 
Arctic climate where the animal heat is so rapidly abstracted, man requires a highly 
nitrogenous food. Thus we find our own countryman, Kane, when imprisoned in the 
ice of Rensselaer Harbor, resorting to raw walrus-meat, and rolling it as a sweet 
morsel under his tongue. . . . 

But we must accord to him one redeeming trait. That homage which in all ages and 
among all nations, the living pay to the dead ; those ceremonies which are observed at 
the hour of final separation; that care which is exerted to protect the manes from all 
profane intrusion; and those delicate acts, prompted by love or affection, which we 
fondly hope, will smooth the passage of the parting spirit to the happy land, — all these 
observances our rude ancestors maintained. These facts show that, deep as man may 
sink in barbarism, brutal as he may become in his instincts, there is still a redeeming 
spirit which prompts to higher aspirations, and that to him, even, there is no belief so 
dreary as that of utter annihilation. 

Foster closed his address with a survey of possible causes of glaciation, 
concluding that they are almost certainly extra-terrestrial. 

On the subject of cooperation among scientists from various fields he 
said : 

There is such an intimate connection between the several branches of science, that 
the researches in one held often throw light upon the obscure points in another. In 
the solution of this difficult problem, the geologist may invoke, and I trust not un- 
successfully, the aid of the astronomer. 



The Period from i8(h to 1870 19 

Although scientists have cooperated in investigating the problem of the 
causes of glaciation during the 70 years since Foster's address, they have 
not yet reached a generally accepted explanation of the successive periods 
of glaciation that the middle latitudes of the earth have experienced. 

Papers of Interest Presented at the Meetings 

The Buffalo, N. Y., Meeting, August, 1866. ( J'ol. 75) 

1. On the Theory of Meteors. Daniel Kirk wood. 

2. On the Physical Condition of the Sun's Surface and the Motion of 
the Solar Spots. Elias Loomis. 

The Burlington, J't., Meeting, August, 186/. (Vol. 16) 

1. Observations of Venus near Inferior Conjunction. C. S. Lyman. 

2. On the Periodicity of the Aurora Borealis. Joseph Lovering. 

3. Considerations Relating to the Climate of the Glacial Epoch in North 
America. Edward Hungerford. 



i &* 



The Chicago Meeting, August, 1868. (Vol. if) 

1. The Nature of Electric Discharge. O. N. Stoddard. 

2. On Hansen's Theory of the Physical Constitution of the Moon. Simon 
Newcomb. 

3. On the Source of Free Hydrochloric Acid in the Gastric Juice. E. N. 
Horsford. 

The Salem; Mass., Meeting, August, icS'do. {Vol. 18) 

1. Spectrum Observations at Burlington, Iowa, during the Eclipse of 
August 7, 1869. C. A. Young. 

2. On the Relation between the Intensity of Light Produced from the 
Combustion of Illuminating Gas and the Volume of Gas Consumed. Ben- 
jamin Silliman. 

3. Notice of some New Tertiary and Cretaceous Fishes. O. C. Marsh. 

4. On the Distribution of the Native Tribes of Alaska and the Adjacent 
Territory. W. H. Dall. 

The 'Troy, X. Y., Meeting, August, 1870. (Vol. ip) 

1. On Dispersion and the Possibility of Attaining Perfect Acromatism. 
Edward C. Pickering. 

2. On the Former Existence of Local Glaciers in the White Mountains. 
Louis Agassiz. 

3. On the Relations of the Order of Mammals. Theodore Gill. 

4. Investigations of the Development of Yeast or Zymatic Fungus. Theo- 
dore Hilgard. 



20 The Period from 1871 to 1880 





Statistical Data 






Year 


Meeting Place 


Registration 


Papers 


Membership 


1866 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


— 


65 


637 


1867 


Burlington, Vt. 


73 


75 


415 


1868 


Chicago, 111. 


259 


151 


686 


1869 


Salem, Mass. 


244 


162 


511 


1870 


Troy, N. Y. 


188 


144 


536 



IV. THE PERIOD FROM 1871 TO 1880 

On the whole, the decade under consideration was one in which the im- 
plications of previous theories were being tested by observation and experi- 
ment. Astronomers were making spectroscopic observations of the sun; 
physicists were investigating the consequences of the relations between elec- 
tric currents and magnetism ; chemists were rapidly developing analytic 
chemistry and discovering new elements ; geologists were reading the strata 
of the rocks in the light of the uniformitarian theory as expounded by Lyell 
(1836-35) ; and biologists were coming to realize the profound significance 
of Darwin's Origin of Species (1859). It was a period in which many 
scientists, with the enthusiasm of pioneers, were entering and exploring vast 
regions the masters had opened. 

Theoretical chemistry received a great impetus during this period by the 
publication just before its beginning of Mendeleeff's periodic table of the 
chemical elements. An equally great contribution to chemistry and physical 
science was the publication, in 1877, of J. Willard Gibb's paper "On the 
Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Solution," a profound work which was not 
generally understood or appreciated for many years. On the other hand, 
Maxwell's electromagnetic theory (1873) was almost immediately accepted. 

Presidential Addresses 

William Chauvenet (mathematician), who was elected president of the 
Association for 1870, died early in the year and was succeeded by T. Sterry 
Hunt, vice-president of the Association. Hunt (geologist) delivered his 
address as retiring president at the meeting held in Indianapolis, Ind., in 
August, 1 87 1. Instead of delivering a general philosophical discussion on 
science and the role the Association might play in its advancement, as many 
of his predecessors had done, he limited himself to his own field, the funda- 
mental problems relating to the crystalline stratified rocks in the north- 
eastern part of the United States. After describing the rocks that are ex- 
posed in the region, he entered into a lengthy discussion of their origin, opin- 
ions concerning which were rapidly changing at the time. He closed his 
address as follows (vol. 20, pp. 1-59) : 



The Period from 1871 to 1880 21 

I have thus endeavored to sketch, in a concise and rapid manner, the history of the 
earlier rock-formations of eastern North America, and of our progress in the knowl- 
edge of them ; while I have, at the same time, dwelt upon some of the geognostical and 
chemical questions which their study suggests. With the record of the last thirty years 
hefore them, American geologists have cause for congratulation that their investigations 
have been so fruitful in great results. They see, however, at the same time, how much 
yet remains to be done in the study of the Appalachians and of our northeastern coast, 
before the history of these ancient rock-formations can be satisfactorily written. Mean- 
while our adventurous students are directing their labors to the vast regions of western 
America, where the results which have already been obtained are of profound interest. 
The progress of these investigations will doubtless lead us to modify many of the 
views now accepted in science, and cannot fail greatly to enlarge the bound of geologi- 
cal knowledge. 

Asa Gray (botany), president of the Association in 1871, delivered his 
address as retiring president at the meeting held in Dubuque, Iowa, in 
August, 1872. Like his predecessor, Gray limited his discussion to his own 
field. This change from general philosophical subjects to narrower fields 
for addresses of retiring presidents of the Association may have been due to 
the rapidly increasing richness of science or to an increasing humility of 
scientists, only to be carried to such an extreme in later times that specialists 
boasted of their ignorance respecting everything outside their own narrow 
fields. 

Gray made a journey across the continent in preparation, as he said, for 
his address. He chose for his subject the Sequoia trees of California. That 
he spoke about them not as an awe-struck tourist but as a scientist grap- 
pling with the great problems of evolution of life on the earth will be evi- 
dent from the following excerpt from his address (vol. 21, pp. 1-31) : 

One notable thing about these Sequoia trees is their isolation. Most of the trees asso- 
ciated with them are of peculiar species, and some of them are nearly as local. Yet 
every Pine, Fir, and Cypress in California is in some sort familiar, because it has near 
relatives in other parts of the world. But the Redwoods have none. The Redwood — 
including in that name the two species of "big-trees" — belongs to the general Cypress 
family, but is sni generis. Thus isolated systematically, and extremely isolated geo- 
graphically, and so wonderful in size and port, they more than other trees suggest 
questions. 

Were they created thus local and lonely, denizens of California only; one in limited 
numbers in a few choice spots on the Sierra Nevada, the other along the coast range 
from the Bay of Monterey to the frontiers of Oregon? Are they veritable Melchizedeks, 
without pedigree or early relationship, and possibly fated to be without descent ? 

Or are they now coming upon the stage — or rather were they coming but for man's 
interference — to play a part in the future? 

Or are they remnants, sole and scanty survivors of a race that has played a grander 
part in the past, but is now verging to extinction? Have they had a career, and can 
that career be ascertained or surmised, so that we may at least guess whence they came, 
and how, and when? 



22 The Period from 1871 to 1880 

Time was, and not long ago, when such questions as these were regarded as useless 
and vain, — when students of natural history, unmindful of what the name denotes, were 
content with a knowledge of things as they now are, but gave little heed as to how 
they came to be so. Now, such questions are held to be legitimate, and perhaps not 
wholly unanswerable. It cannot now be said that these trees inhabit their present re- 
stricted areas simply because they are there placed in the climate and soil of all the 
world most congenial to them. These must indeed be congenial, or they would not sur- 
vive. But when we see how Australian Eucalyptus trees thrive upon the Californian 
coast, and how these very Redwoods flourish upon another continent ; how the so-called 
wild oat (Avena sterilis of the Old World) has taken full possession of California ; 
how that cattle and horses, introduced by the Spaniard, have spread as widely and 
made themselves as much at home on the plains of La Plata as on those of Tartary ; and 
that the cardoon-thistle seeds, and others they brought with them, have multiplied there 
into numbers probably much exceeding those extant in their native lands ; indeed, 
when we contemplate our own race, and our own particular stock, taking such recent 
but dominating possession of this New World ; when we consider how the indigenous 
flora of islands generally succumbs to the foreigners which come in the train of man; 
and that most weeds (i.e., the prepotent plants in open soil) of all temperate climates 
are not "to the manner born," but are self-invited intruders, — we must needs abandon 
the notion of any primordial and absolute adaptation of plants and animals to their 
habitats, which may stand in lieu of explanation, and so preclude our inquiring any 
further. 

J. Lawrence Smith (chemistry), president at the meeting in Dubuque, 
Iowa, in 1872, delivered his address as retiring president at the meeting at 
Portland, Maine, in August, 1873. Smith's address consisted of three parts, 
the first a defense of pure research, stimulated no doubt by the popular fame 
of technicians and inventors. The second part was devoted to a discussion 
of the methods of science in which he spoke very critically of a tendency 
among scientists to abandon the Baconian method and to indulge in specu- 
lations, pyramiding one on another until they had little relationship to ex- 
perience. He closed with remarks about the habit of claiming that science 
supports religion, a habit that still lingers. A quotation will make clear his 
point of view (vol. 22, pp. 1-26) : 

Reference has already been made to the tendency of quitting the physical to revel in 
the metaphysical, which, however, is not peculiar to this age, for it belonged as well to 
the times of Plato and Aristotle as it does to ours. More special reference will be 
made here to the proclivity of the present epoch among philosophers and theologians to 
parade science and religion side by side; talking of reconciling science and religion, as 
if they had ever been unreconciled. Scientists and theologians may have quarrelled, but 
never science and religion. At dinners they are toasted in the same breath, and calls 
made on clergymen to respond, who, for fear of giving offence, or lacking the fire and 
firmness of St. Paul, utter a vast amount of platitudes about the beauty of science and 
the truth of religion, trembling in their shoes all the time, fearing that science, falsely 
so called, may take away their professional calling, instead of uttering in voice of 
thunder, like the Boanerges of the gospel, that "the world by wisdom knew not God." 
And it never will. Our religion is made so plain by the light of faith that the way- 
faring man, though a fool, cannot err therein. 



The Period from 1X71 to t88o 23 

No, gentlemen; I firmly believe that there is less connection between science and 
religion than there is between jurisprudence and astronomy, and the sooner this is 
understood the better it will be for both. 

Joseph Lovering (physics), president of the Association at the meeting 
held in Portland, Maine, in [873, and permanent secretary of the Associa- 
tion from [854 to 1X72, inclusive, delivered his address as retiring president 
at the meeting held at Hartford, Conn., in August, 1X74. 

After preliminary remarks, Lovering announced the subject of his ad- 
dress as follows ( vol. 23, pp. [-36) : 

The point of view which I have chosen for reviewing the close and advancing 
columns of the physical sciences is this: — Are there any improvements in the weapons 
of attack, or have any additions been made to them? These are of two kinds: — i. In- 
struments for experiment, and 2. The logic of mathematics. These are the lighter and 
the heavier artillery in this peaceful service. 

This statement, however, gives only a hint of Covering's sweeping sur- 
vey of physical science from the days of ( lalileo until the year of his address. 
Jt did not consist of general comments, hut was a comprehensive record of 
the progress of experiments and the evolution of the physical theories to 
which they were related. It would be difficult to find a better brief sum- 
mary of physical science of the period, and it is especially interesting be- 
cause it was written when many of the subjects discussed were still novel 
or controversial. Lovering gave excellent surveys of such subjects as, (1) 
the various measurements of the velocity of light and their bearing on the 
nature of light, (2) the work of Ohm in electricity, (3) the determination 
of the astronomical unit, (4) the work of Angstrom, Balfour" Stewart and 
Kirchhoff on the principles of spectrum analysis, (5) the constitution of 
nebulae, (6) the origin of the planets, (7) the Doppler effect in sound and 
light, ( 8) the problem of ether, ( 9) the velocity of gravitation, ( to) the work 
of Faraday, Maxwell and others on the experimental and theoretical prin- 
ciples of electricity and magnetism, ( 1 1 ) the nature of gravitation, (12) the 
conservation of energy, ( 13) the nature of heat and the kinetic theory of 
gases, (14) Helmholtz's work on vortices. 

John L. Le Conte (entomology), president of the Association at the meet- 
ing held in Hartford, Conn., in August, 1X74, delivered his address as re- 
tiring president at the meeting held in Detroit, Michigan, in August, 1875. 
He undertook to show that "by proper methods we can discover in our flora 
and fauna the remnants of former geologic times, which remain unchanged 
and have escaped those influences of variation which are supposed to ac- 
count for the differences in the organic beings of different periods." He 
illustrated his views by references to a species of Tiger-beetle and other 



24 The Period from 1871 to 1880 

insects. Then he discussed the difficulties persons have of understanding 
others of different antecedents and culture, and went on to explanations of 
reasons why such varied views are held respecting the relations between 
science and religion. He arrived at the conclusion that "there is no occa- 
sion for strict Science and pure Religion to be in conflict. . . ." (Vol. 24, 
pp. 1-18.) 

Julius E. Hilgard (geography), president of the Association at the meet- 
ing held at Detroit in August, 1875, delivered his address as retiring presi- 
dent at the meeting held at Buffalo, New York, in August, 1876. Casting 
aside the temptation to present a general review of a century of science on 
the centennial of the Declaration of Independence of the American colonies, 
and refraining from a further discussion of the relations between science and 
religion, he took for the subject of his address Geodosy and Topography, the 
measurement of the size and form of the earth and the mapping of its sur- 
face. He gave a straightforward historical and critical account of these two 
related fields. In his concluding paragraphs, however, he presented some re- 
flections on the role "abstract thought and pure mathematics have had 
... in the development of human knowledge," and terminated his address 
rather abruptly with the sentence: "Friends, to my mind this insatiate 
desire to know the causes of things, and to understand the ways of creation, 
is the strongest evidence that there is a Divine mind from which the human 
mind is derived, and that man has been made in the image of God." (Vol. 
25, pp. 1-16.) 

William B. Rogers (geology), president of the Association at the meeting 
held at Detroit in August, 1875, was ill at the time of the following meeting 
held at Nashville, Tenn., in August, 1876, and did not deliver an address as 
retiring president. 

Simon Newcomb (astronomy) delivered his address as retiring president 
of the Association at the meeting held at St. Louis, Mo., in August, 1878. 
In describing the subject and purpose of his address, he said : 

... I have been led to present to you some thoughts on the Course of Nature as 
seen in the light of modern scientific and philosophic research. . . . 

The key-note of my discourse is found in a proposition which is fundamental in the 
history of modern science, and without a clear understanding of which everything I 
say may be entirely misunderstood. This proposition is, that science concerns itself 
only with phenomena and the relations which connect them, and does not take account 
of any questions which do not in some way admit of being brought to the test of ob- 
servation. The only universe it knows is that made known by the telescope, the micro- 
scope and other appliances of observation. That this is the whole universe we should 
all be very sorry to suppose, and none more so than he who has the honor to address 
you. But, should I pretend to a scientific knowledge of what lies behind this visible 
frame, I should be acting the part of the rash speculator rather than of the cautious 
thinker. Only into a single field of thought do I dare to venture. 



The Period from 1871 to 1880 25 

The severe limitations Newcomb imposed upon himself did not prevent 
his delivering a profound and interesting address. (Vol. 27, pp. 1-28.) 

0. C. Marsh (geology) delivered his address as retiring president of the 
Association at its meeting held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., in August, 
1879. The first paragraph and the next to the last one in his scholarly ad- 
dress will give an idea of both the subject matter and the method of its 
treatment. (Vol. 28, pp. 1-42.) 

In the rapid progress of knowledge, we are constantly brought face to face with the 
question, What is Life? The answer is not yet, but a thousand earnest seekers after 
truth seem to be slowly approaching a solution. This question gives a new interest to 
every department of science that relates to life in any form, and the history of life 
offers a most suggestive field for research. One line of investigation lies through em- 
bryology, and here the advance is most encouraging. Another promising path leads 
back through the life history of the globe, and in this direction we may hope for in- 
creasing light, as a reward for patient work. . . . 

I have endeavored to define clearly the different periods in the history of Palaeontol- 
ogy. If I may venture, in conclusion, to characterize the present period in all depart- 
ments of science, its main feature would be a belief in universal laws. The reign of Law, 
first recognized in the physical world, has now been extended to Life, as well. In re- 
turn, Life has given to inanimate nature the key to her profounder mysteries — Evolution, 
which embraces the universe. 

George F. Barker (chemistry) delivered his address as retiring president 
of the Association at its meeting held at Boston, Mass., in August, 1880. 
For the first time a retiring president of the Association gave his address a 
formal title, "Some Modern Aspects of the Life-Question." The discussion 
was concerned largely with transformations of energy in the cells, and the 
transmission of impulses along nerve fibers in animals. It was, of course, 
brought out that the ultimate source of energy on the earth is the sun, a 
fact that provided occasion for a beautiful closing paragraph. (Vol. 29, pp. 
1-30.) 

Papers of Interest Presented at the Meetings 
The Indianapolis, hid., Meeting, August, i8ji. {Vol. 20) 

1. On the Geological History of the Gulf of Mexico. E. W. Hilgard. 

2. On the Characteristics of the Primary Groups of the Class of Mam- 
mals. Theodore Gill. 

3. The Great Mound on the Etowah River, Georgia. Charles Whittlesey. 

The Dubuque, Iowa, Meeting, August, 18J2. (Vol. 21) 

1. On Soil Analyses and their Utility. Eugene W. Hilgard. 

2. Ancient Mounds of Dubuque and its Vicinity. H. T. Woodman. 



26 The Period from 1871 to 1880 

The Portland, Maine, Meeting, August, 1873. ( / 'ol. 22) 

1. The Relation of the Dissipation of Energy to Cosmical Evolution. 
H. F. Walling. 

2. Artificial Shell-Heaps of Fresh-Water Mollusks. C. A. White. 

3. On the duty of Governments in the Preservation of Forests. Franklin 
B. Hough. 

The Hartford, Conn., Meeting, August, 1874. ( Vol. 23) 

1. On the Inner Satellites of Uranus. Edward S. Hoklen. 

2. The Recency of Certain Volcanoes of the Western United States. 
G. K. Gilbert. 

3. Studies in the Formation of Mountains in the Sierra Nevada. John 
Muir. 

4. Cremation among North American Indians. John L. LeConte. 

The Detroit, Mich., Meeting, August, 1875. ( Vol. 24 ) 

For some years before the meeting in Detroit, the programs of the Asso- 
ciation had been organized under two sections: Section A. Mathematics, 
Physics, and Chemistry; Section 15, Natural History; and there was a vice- 
president of the Association for each of these sections. At the meeting in 
1874, at the time of the adoption of a new constitution and the incorpora- 
tion of the Association under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, the policy was inaugurated of having a formal general address by 
each of the vice presidents. As a rule, the reports herein on later meetings 
of the Association will contain references only to the addresses of vice 
presidents. When the addresses were without formal titles the subjects are 
indicated in parentheses. 

1. Vice presidential address, Section A. H. A. Newton (mathematics). 

2. Vice presidential address. Section II. J. W. Dawson (paleontology). 

The Buffalo, A'. )'., Meeting, . hu/itst, 1876. ( / 'ol. 25 ) 

1. Vice presidential address. Section on Mathematics, Physics and Chem- 
istry. C. A. Young (astronomy ). 

2. Vice presidential address, Section on Natural History. Edward S. 
Morse: "What American Scientists have done for Evolution." 

3. Address of chairman of Subsection on Chemistry. ( \. F. Parker 
( molecules). 

4. "On the Post-Glacial History of Sequoia Gigantea." John Muir. 

The Nashville, Term., Meeting, August, 1877. ( Vol. 26) 
1. Vice presidential address. Section on Mathematics. Physics and Chem- 
istry. E. C. Pickering (research). 



The Period from 1X71 to 1880 27 

2. Vice presidential address, Section on Natural History. O. C. Marsh: 
"Introduction and Succession of Vertebrate Life in America." 

3. Address of chairman of Subsection on Anthropology. Daniel Wilson 
1 Historical). 

The St. Louis, Mo., Meeting, . lugiist, i8j8. ( / 01. 27) 

1. Vice presidential address. Section 011 Mathematics, Physics and Chem- 
istry. Robert 11. Thurston: "Science of the Advancement of Science." 

2. Vice presidential address, Section on Natural History. August R. 
Crote : "Education and the Succession of Experiences." 

3. Address of chairman of Subsection on Chemistry. F. W. Clarke (re- 
search in chemistry). 

The Saratoga Springs, X . )'., Meeting, August, 18 jq. {Vol. 28) 

1. Vice presidential address, Section on Mathematics. Physics and Chem- 
istry. S. P. Langley: "Solar Physics." 

2. Nice presidential address. Section on Natural History. John W. 
Powell: "Mythologic Philosophy." 

3. Address of chairman of Subsection on Chemistry. Ira Remsen (or- 
ganic chemistry ). 

4. "Experimental Determination of the Velocity of Light." Albert A. 
Michel son. 

The Boston Meeting, August, 18S0. ( \'ol. 2p) 

1. Vice presidential address. Section on Mathematics, Physics and Chem- 
istry. Asaph Hall (astronomical observations). 

2. Nice presidential address. Section on Natural History. Alexander 
Agassiz: "Paleontological and Embryological Development." 

3. Address of chairman of Subsection of Chemistry. John M. Ordway 
( historical ). 

4. Address of chairman of Subsection of Anthropology. J. W. Powell: 
"Wyandotte ( iovernment. A Short Study of Tribal Society." 

Statistical Data 



)'car 


\i eeting Place 


Registration 


Papers Read 


Member 


1 87 1 


Indianapolis, bid. 


196 


107 


668 


1872 


Dubuque, rpwa 


164 


ICI 


610 


[873 


Portland, Me. 


195 


146 


670 


[874 


Hartford, Conn. 


224 


[65 


722 


1X75 


Detroit, Mich. 


165 


136 


807 


1876 


Buffalo. X. Y. 


-'•5 


N7 


867 


[877 


Nashville, Tenn. 


' 73 


78* 


953 


1878 


St. Louis, Mo. 


134 


i"3 


<j()2 


1X7' > 


Saiatoga Springs, X. Y. 256 


136 


1030 


1880 


Boston, Mass. 


997 


276 


•555 



Epidemic of yellow fever in Southern States was "alarming.' 



28 The Period from 1881 to 1890 

V. THE PERIOD FROM 1881 TO 1890 

The advancements of science during this period were of the same gen- 
eral nature as those in the preceding decade — the completion by observation 
and experiment of the implications of earlier general theories, such as those 
of spectrum analysis, uniformitarianism in geology, evolution in biology, the 
conservation of energy, etc. There were, however, several scientific achieve- 
ments of the first order of importance, such as Hertz's experimental verifica- 
tion of Maxwell's electromagnetic theory, the Michelson-Morley ether drift 
experiment in 1887, Pasteur's conquering of rabies, Koch's work in Berlin, 
development of aseptic surgery by Lister, discovery of the structure and 
mode of division of germ cells by Flemming (1882) and Waldeyer (1888), 
Weismann's theory of heredity through the continuity of the germ-plasm, 
and the discovery of the existence of vitamins. 

Presidential Addresses 

L. H. Morgan (geology), retiring president at the meeting held in Cin- 
nati, Ohio, in August, 1881, was unable to deliver an address because of 
age and infirmities. 

George J. Brush (mineralogy) delivered his address as retiring president 
of the Association at the meeting held in Montreal, Canada, in August, 1882, 
on "A Sketch of the Progress of American Mineralogy." (Vol. 31, pp. 
1-20.) 

J. W. Dawson (geology) delivered his address as retiring president of 
the Association at the meeting held at Minneapolis, Minn., in August, 1883. 
The title of the address was "On Some Unsolved Problems in Geology." 
After sketching the unsolved problems relating to the origin of various 
series of rocks, he covered similarly the succession of life forms and con- 
cluded with references to glaciation. (Vol. 32, pp. 1-27.) 

. . . Geology as a science scarcely dates from a century ago. We have reason for 
surprise in these circumstances, that it has learned so much, but for equal surprise that 
so many persons appear to think it a complete and full-grown science and that it is 
entitled to speak with confidence on all the great mysteries of the earth that have been 
hidden from the generations before us. Such being the newness of man and of his 
science of the earth, it is not too much to say that humility, hard work in collecting 
facts, and abstinence from hasty generalization should characterize geologists, at least 
for a few generations to come. 

Charles A. Young (astronomy) delivered his address as retiring presi- 
dent of the Association at the meeting held at Philadelphia, Pa., in Septem- 
ber, 1884, on "Pending Problems in Astronomy." (Vol. 33, pp. 1-27.) 

J. P. Lesley (geology) delivered his address as retiring president at the 
meeting held at Ann Arbor, Mich., in August, 1885. He gave the address 



The Period from 1881 to 1890 29 

no formal title, but discussed defects in attitudes and methods of scientists. 
(Vol. 34, pp. 1 -2 1.) 

H. A. Newton (mathematics) delivered his address as retiring president 
at the meeting held at Buffalo, New York, in August, 1886. Although there 
was no formal title to his address, the subject was Meteorites. (Vol. 35, pp. 
1-18.) 

E. S. Morse (zoology), retiring president at the meeting held at New 
York in August, 1887, delivered an address without formal title, but the 
general subject was Variation. (Vol. 36, pp. I_ 43-) 

S. P. Langley (physics), at the meeting held at Cleveland, Ohio, in 
August, 1888, delivered his address as retiring president on "The History of 
a Doctrine" (radiant energy). (Vol. 37, pp. 1-23.) 

J. W. Powell (geology) chose as the subject for his address as retiring 
president at the meeting held at Toronto, Ontario, in August, 1889, "Evolu- 
tion of Music from Dance to Symphony." (Vol. 38, pp. 1-21.) 

T. C. Mendenhall (physics), retiring president at the meeting held in 
Indianapolis, Ind., in August, 1890, delivered his retiring presidential ad- 
dress on "The Relations of Men of Science to the General Public." (Vol. 
39, pp. 1-15.) 

Addresses of Vice Presidents of Sections and of Others 1 

The Cincinnati Meeting, August, 188 1. ( Vol. 50) 

1. Address of chairman of Subsection of Entomology. John G. Morris 
(historical). 

2. Address of chairman of Subsection of Anthropology. Garrick Mallery : 
"The Gesture Speech of Man." 

3. A Lawgiver of the Stone Age. Horatio Hale. 

At this meeting the Standing Committee voted that beginning with the 
following meeting only abstracts of papers (other than those of officers) 
would be printed in the Proceedings, except in special cases in which a sec- 
tion might request that a paper be printed in full. 

After this meeting the work of the Association was carried on in nine 
sections, each with a vice president, one of whose duties was to deliver an 
address to the section over which he presided. The nine sections were : 
Mathematics and Astronomy (A), Physics (B), Chemistry (C), Mechan- 
ical Science (D), Geology and Geography (E), Biology (F), Histology and 
Microscopy (G), Anthropology (H), and Economic Science and Statistics 

(I)- 

The Montreal Meeting, August, 1882. {Vol. 31) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. William Harkness (distance to the sun). 

1 When an address had no formal title its general subject is indicated in parentheses. 



30 The Period erom 1881 to 1890 

Physics* T. G. Mendenhall (advancement of physics). 

Chemistry. H. Carrington Bolton : "Chemical Literature." 
Mechanical Science. W. P. Trowbridge (engineering). 
Biology. William H. Dall (mollusks). 
Histology and Microscopy. A. H. Tuttle ( microscopes ) . 
Anthropology. Daniel Wilson: "Some Physical Characteristics of Na- 
tive Tribes of Canada." 

The Minneapolis Meeting, August, 1883. ( I'ol. 32) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. W. A. Rogers : "The German Survey of 
the Northern Heavens." 

Physics. Henry A. Rowland : "A Plea for Pure Science." 
Geology and Geography- C. H. Hitchcock : "The Earl)- History of the 
North American Continent." 

Biology. W. J. Beal : "Agriculture: Its Needs and Opportunities." 
Anthropology. Otis T. Mason : 'The Scope and Value of Anthropologi- 
cal Studies." 

Economic Science and Statistics. Franklin P. Hough: "The Methods of 
Statistics." 

The Philadelphia Meeting, September, 1884. ( J'ul. 33) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Henry T. Eddy: "College Mathematics." 
Physics. John Trowbridge: "What Ts Electricity?" 
Chemistry. John W. Langley: "The Conception of Chemical Affinity." 
Mechanical Science. Robert H. Thurston: 'The Mission of Science." 
Geology and Geography. N. PI. Winchell: "The Crystalline Rocks of 

the Northwest." 

Biology. Edward D. Cope: "On Catagenesis." 

Histology and Microscopy. T. G. Wormley: "The Applications of the 

Microscope." 

Anthropology. Edward S. Morse: "Man in the Tertiaries." 

Economic Science and Statistics. John Eaton : "Scientific Method and 

Scientific Knowledge in Common Affairs." 

The Ann . trbor Meeting, . lugust, 1885. < / '0/. 34) 

Chemistry. William Ripley Nichols: "Chemistry in the Service of Pub- 
lic Health." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. J. Burkitt Webb: "The Second 
Law of Thermodynamics." 

Geology and Geography. Edward Orton (geological problems). 

Biology. Burt G. Wilder: "Educational Museums of Vertebrates." 

Histology and Microscopy. Simon Henry Gage: "The Limitations and 



The Period from i88i to iN</> 31 

Value of Histological Investigation, illustrated by a Consideration of the 

Structure of a Respiratory Membrane in the Pharynx of Soft-Shelled 

Turtles. " 

Anthropology. William II. Dall : "The Native Tribes of Alaska." 
Economic Science and Statistics. Edward Atkinson: 'The Application 

of Science to the Production and Consumption of Food." 

The Buffalo Meeting, August, 1886. (Vol. 35) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. J. Willard Gibbs : "Multiple Algebra." 

Physics. C. F. Brackett : "The Flectromotive Force of the Voltaic Cell." 

Chemistry. Harvey \Y. Wiley: "The Economic Aspects of Agricultural 
Chemistry." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. O. Chanute : "Scientific Inven- 
tion." 

Geology and Geography. T. C. Chamberlin : "An Inventory of our 
Glacial Drift." 

Biology. H. P. Powditch: "What Is Xerve-F'orce?" 

Anthropology. Horatio Hale: "The Origin of Panguages, and the 
Antiquity of Speaking Man." 

Fconomic Science and Statistics. Joseph Cummings : "Capitalists and 
Laborers." 

The \ r ew York Meeting, August, 1887. (Vol. 36) 

Physics. W. A. Anthony (value of applications of science). 

Chemistry. A. B. Prescott : "The Chemistry of Nitrogen as Disclosed 
in the Constitution of the Alkaloids." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. E. B. Coxe (engineers). 

Geology and Geography. G. K. Gilbert : "The Work of the International 
Congress of Geologists" ( at Berlin in 1885). 

Biology. William G. Farlovv : "Vegetable Parasites and Evolution." 

Anthropology. Daniel G. Brinton : "A Review of the Data for the Study 
of the Prehistoric Chronology of America." 

Economic Science and Statistics. Henry E. Alvord: "Economy in the 
Management of the Soil." 

The Cleveland Meeting, August, 1888. {Vol. 37) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Orniorid Stone: "Motions of the Solar 

System." 

Physics. Albert A. Michelson : "A Plea for Light Waves." 

Chemistry. Charles E. Munroe : "Some Phases in the Progress of 

Chemistry." 



3 2 The Period from 1881 to 1890 

Geology and Geography. George H. Cook : "On the International Geo- 
logical Congress, and Our Part in It as American Geologists." 

Biology. Charles V. Riley: "On the Causes of Variation in Organic 
Forms." 

Anthropology. Charles C. Abbott: "Evidences of the Antiquity of Man 
in Eastern North America." 

Economic Science and Statistics. Charles W. Smiley: "Altruism Con- 
sidered Economically." 

The Toronto Meeting, August, i88p. (Vol. 38) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Robert Simpson Woodward : "The Math- 
ematical Theories of the Earth." 

Physics. Henry S. Carhart : "Review of Theories of Electrical Action." 

Chemistry. William L. Dudley : "The Nature of Amalgams." 

Geology and Geography. Charles A. White: "The North American 
Mesozoic." 

Biology. George L. Goodale: "Some Recent Investigations Relative to 
Cell-Contents." 

Anthropology. Garrick Mallery: "Israelite and Indian. A Parallel in 
Planes of Culture." 

Economic Science and Statistics. Charles S. Hill : "Economic and So- 
ciologic Relations of the Canadian States and the United States, Prospec- 
tively Considered." 

The Indianapolis Meeting, August, 1890. ( Vol. 39) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Seth Carlo Chandler: "The Variable 
Stars." 

Physics. Cleveland Abbe: "A Plea for Terrestrial Physics." 

Chemistry. Robert B. Warder : "Recent Theories of Geometrical Isomer- 



ism." 



Mechanical Science and Engineering. James E. Denton: "History of 
Attempts to Determine the Relative Value of Lubricants by Mechanical 
Tests." 

Geology and Geography. John C. Branner : "The Relations of the State 
and National Geological Surveys to Each Other and to the Geologists of 
the Country." 

Biology. Charles Sedgwick Minot : "On Certain Phenomena of Grow- 
ing Old." 

Anthropology. Frank Baker: "The Ascent of Man." 

Economic Science and Statistics. J. Richard Dodge: "The Standard of 
Living in the United States." 



The Period from 1891 to 1900 33 

Statistical Data 



Year 

1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 



Meeting Place 


Registration 


Papers Read 


Membership 


Cincinnati 


500 


182 


1699 


Montreal 


579 


255 


1922 


Minneapolis 


328 


168 


2033 


Philadelphia 


1 261 


305 


1981 


Ann Arbor 


364 


184 


1956 


Buffalo 


445 


217 


1886 


New York 


729 


250 


1956 


Cleveland 


342 


215 


1964 


Toronto 


424 


211 


1952 


Indianapolis 


364 


244 


1944 



VI. THE PERIOD FROM 1891 TO 1900 



There were several scientific discoveries of the first order of importance 
during the decade from 1891 to 1900, inclusive. Perhaps the first that 
should be mentioned was Ostwald's discovery, in 1892, of the profound 
nature of Gibb's paper "On the Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Substances," 
published in 1877. In 1894 Bateson found that a great number of exam- 
ples of large variations in living organisms seemed to indicate that evolu- 
tion proceeds by finite jumps rather than gradually, as had generally been 
believed, and de Vries announced his mutation theory at about the close of 
the decade. In 1895 Roentgen discovered X-rays. The life history of the 
malarial parasite was worked out by Ross in 1898, and Reed demonstrated 
the mode of transmission of yellow fever in 1900. Naturally these impor- 
tant scientific discoveries had little immediate effect upon the meetings of 
the Association. 

Presidential Addresses 

George Lincoln Goodale (botany), retiring president at the meeting held 
in Washington, D. C, in August, 1891, delivered an address on "Useful 
Plants of the Future — Some of the Possibilities of Economic Botany." (Vol. 
40, pp. 1-38.) 

Albert B. Prescott (chemistry) chose as the subject for his address as 
retiring president at the meeting held in Rochester, N. Y., in August, 1892, 
"The Immediate Work in Chemical Science." (Vol. 41, pp. 1-14.) 

Joseph LeConte (geology), retiring president at the meeting held at 
Madison, Wisconsin, in August, 1893, delivered an address on "Theories 
of the Origin of Mountain Ranges." (Vol. 42, pp. 1-27.) 

William Harkness (astronomy) delivered his address as retiring presi- 
dent of the meeting held at Brooklyn, N. Y., in August, 1894, on "The Mag- 
nitude of the Solar System. (Vol. 43, pp. 1-23.) 

Daniel G. Brinton (anthropology), retiring president at the meeting held 



34 The Period from 1891 to 1900 

at Springfield, Mass., in August-September, 1895, delivered an address on 
"The Aims of Anthropology." (Vol. 44, pp. 1-17. ) 

Edward W. Morley (chemistry), retiring president at the meeting held 
at Buffalo, New York, in August, 1896, delivered an address on "A Com- 
pleted Chapter in the History of the Atomic Theory." (Vol. 45, pp. 1-22.) 

Theodore Gill (zoology), successor, as senior vice president, to Edward 
D. Cope, president, who died on April 12, 1897, by action of the Council 
"was requested to prepare an address to take the place of the one which 
would have been delivered by President Cope had his life been spared," 
chose for the subject of his retiring address at the meeting held at Detroit, 
Michigan, in August, 1897, "Edward Drinker Cope, Naturalist — A Chapter 
in the History of Science." ( Vol. 46, pp. 1-30.) 

Walcott Gibbs (chemistry), retiring president at the meeting held at 
Poston, Mass., in August, 1898, did not announce a formal title for his ad- 
dress but spoke on "some theoretical points connected" with his work. (Vol. 
47. PP- i -16.) 

Erederic Ward Putnam (anthropology), retiring president at the meet- 
ing held at Columbus, Ohio, in August. 1899. in his address spoke on "A 
Problem in American Anthropology.'" ( Vol. 48. pp. 1-17.) 

Grove Karl Gilbert (geology), successor to Edward Urton who died Oc- 
tober 16, 1899, chose for the subject of his address as retiring president at 
the meeting held in Xew York, X. Y., in June, 1900, ''Rhythms and Geo- 
logic Time." ( Vol. 49, pp. 1 -[9.) 

Addressesof Vice Presidents 

The Washington Meeting, August, 1891. 1 Vol. 40) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. E. W. Hyde : "The Evolution of Algebra." 

Physics. Erancis E. Xipher : "The Ether." 

Chemistry. R. C. Kedzie : "Alchemy." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. Thomas Gray: "Problems in Me- 
chanical Science." 

Geology and Geography. John J. Stevenson: "The Chemung and Cats- 
kill (Upper Devonian) on the Eastern Side of the Appalachian Pasin." 

Biology. John M. Coulter: "The Future of Systematic Botany." 

Anthropology. Joseph Jastrow : "The Natural History of Analog}." 

Economic Science and Statistics. Edmund J. James: "The Farmer and 
Taxation." 

The Rochester Meeting, August, iSgj. (Vol. ji) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. J. R. Eastman: "The Neglected Field of 
Fundamental Astronomy." 



The Period from 1891 to i<po 35 

Physics. Benjamin F. Thomas: "Technical Education in Colleges and 
Universities.?' 

Chemistry. Alfred Springer: "The Micro-organisms of the Soil." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. John P>. Johnson: "The Applied 
Scientist." 

Geology and Geography. Henry S. Williams: "The Scope of Paleontol- 
ogy and Its Value to Geologists." 

Biology: Simon Henry Gage.! "The Comparative Physiology of Respira- 
tion." 

Anthropology. \V. H. Holmes: "Evolution of the Aesthetic." 

Economic Science and Statistics. Lester P. Ward : "The Psychologic 
Pasis of Social Economics." 

The Madison Meeting, August, 1893. (Y°h 4 2 ) 
Mathematics and Astronomy. C. P. Doolittle : "Variations of Latitude." 
1 'hysics. E. L. Nichols : "Phenomena of the Time-Infinitesimal." 
Chemistry. Edward Hart: "Twenty-five Years' Progress in Analytical 
Chemistry." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. S. \Y. Robinson: "Training in 
Pmgineering Science." 

Geology and Geography. Charles D. Walcott : "Geologic Time : as Indi- 
cated by the Sedimentary Rocks of Xorth America." 

Zoology. Henry Eairheld Osborn : "The Rise of the Mammalia in Xorth 
America." 

Botany. Charles E. Bessey : "Evolution and Classification." 
Anthropology. James Owen Dorsey : "The Biloxi Indians of Louisiana." 
Economic Science and Statistics. \Y. H. Brewer: "The Mutual Rela- 
tions of Science and Stock Breeding." 

The Brooklyn Meeting, August, 189 7. ( J'ol. yj) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. George C. Comstock: "Binary Stars." 
Physics. William A. Rogers : "Obscure Heat as an Agent in Producing 
Expansion in Metals, under Air Contact." 

Chemistry. Thomas H. Norton: "The Battle with Firej or the Contribu- 
tions of Chemistry to the Methods of Preventing and Extinguishing Con- 
flagration." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. Mansfield Merriman : "The Re- 
sistance of Materials under Impact." 

Geology and Geography. Samuel Calvin: "The Niobrara Chalk." 
Botany. Lucien M. Underwood: "The Evolution of the Hepaticae." 
Anthropology. Franz Boast "'Human Faculty as Determined by Race." 
Economic Science and Statistics. Henry Farquhar : "A Stable Monetarv 
Standard." 



36 The Period from 1891 to 1900 

The Springfield, Mass., Meeting, Aug. -Sept., 1895. (Vol. 44) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Edgar Frisby. (No address.) 
Physics. W. LeConte Stevens : "Recent Progress in Optics." 
Chemistry. William McMurtrie: "The Relations of the Industries to 
the Advancement of Chemical Science." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. William Kent: "The Relation of 
Engineering to Economics." 

Botany. J. C. Arthur : "Development of Vegetable Physiology." 
Anthropology. Frank Hamilton Cushing: "The Arrow." 
Social and Economic Science. B. E. Fernow : "The Providential Func- 
tions of Government with Special Reference to Natural Resources." 

The Buffalo Meeting, August, 1896. (Vol. 45) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Alexander Macfarlane. (No address.) 

Physics. Carl Leo Mees (electrolysis). 

Chemistry. William A. Noyes: "The Achievements of Physical Chemis- 
try." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. Frank O. Marvin : "The Artistic 
Element in Engineering." 

Geology and Geography. Benjamin K. Emerson: "Geological Myths." 

Zoology. Theodore Gill : "Some Questions of Nomenclature." 

Botany. N. L. Britton: "Botanical Gardens." 

Anthropology. Alice C. Fletcher : "The Emblematic Use of the Tree in 
the Dakotan Group." 

Social and Economic Science. W. R. Lazenby : "Horticulture and 
Health." 

The Detroit Meeting, August, 1897. ( Vol. 46) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. W. W. Beman : "A Chapter in the His- 
tory of Mathematics." 

Physics. Carl Barus : "Long Range Temperature and Pressure Va- 
riables in Physics." 

Chemistry. W. P. Mason : "Expert Testimony." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. John Galbraith : "The Ground- 
work of Dynamics." 

Geology and Geography. I. C. White : "The Pittsburg Coal Bed." 
Zoology. L. O. Howard : "The Spread of Land Species by the Agency 
of Man ; with Especial Reference to Insects." 

Botany. G. F. Atkinson : "Experimental Morphology." 
Anthropology. W. J. McGee: "The Science of Humanity." 
Social and Economic Science. R. T. Colburn : "Improvident Civiliza- 
tion." 



The Period from 1891 to 1900 37 

The Boston Meeting, August, 1898. {Vol. 47) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Edward E. Barnard : "The Development 
of Photography in Astronomy." 

Physics. Frank P. Whitman : "Color- Vision." 

Chemistry. Edgar F. Smith : "The Electric Current in Organic Chem- 
istry." 

Geology and Geography. Herman L. Fairchild : "Glacial Geology in 
America." 

Zoology. Alpheus S. Packard : "A Half-Century of Evolution with Spe- 
cial Reference to the Effects of Geological Changes on Animal Life." 

Botany. William G. Farlow : "The Conception of Species as Affected by 
Recent Investigations on Fungi." 

Anthropology. J. McKeen Cattell : "The Advance of Psychology." 

Social and Economic Science. Archibald Blue : "The Historic Method 
in Economics." 

The Columbus Meeting, August, 1899. (Vol. 48) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Alexander Macfarlane: "The Funda- 
mental Principles of Algebra." 

Physics. Elihu Thomson: "The Field of Experimental Research." 

Chemistry. F. P. Venable : "The Definition of the Element." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. Storm Bull: "Engineering Edu- 
cation as a Preliminary Training for Scientific Research Work." 

Geology and Geography. J. F. Whiteaves : "The Devonian System in 
Canada." 

Zoology. Simon Henry Gage : "The Importance and the Promise in the 
Study of the Domestic Animals." 

Botany. Charles R. Barnes: "The Progress and Problems of Plant 
Physiology." 

Anthropology. Thomas Wilson : "The Beginnings of the Science of 
Prehistoric Anthropology." 

Social and Economic Science. Marcus Benjamin : "The Early Presi- 
dents of the American Association." 

The New York Meeting, June, 1900. (Vol. 49) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Asaph Hall, Jr. "On the Teaching of 
Astronomy in the United States." 

Physics. Ernest Merritt : "On Kathode Rays and Some Related Phe- 
nomena." 

Chemistry. Jas. Lewis Howe : "The Eighth Group of the Periodic Sys- 
tem and Some of Its Problems." 



3$ Thk Period from 1901 to 1910 

Geology and Geography. J. F. Kemp: "Pr.e-Cambrian Sediments in the 

Adirondack's." 

Botany. William Trelease : '"Some Twentieth Century Problems." 

Statistical Data 



Year 


Meeting Place 


Registration 


Papers Read 


Membership 


1891 


Washington 


653 


227 


2054 


1892 


Rochester 


45'' 


198 


-2037 


1893 


Madison 


290 


168 


■939 


1894 


Brooklyn 


490 


211 


1802 


1895 


Spring-held 


368 


-'M 


•913 


1896 


Buffalo 


333 


279 


1890 


1897 


Detroit 


292 


30i 


1782 


1898 


Boston 


903 


-143 


1729 


1899 


Columbus 


353 


273 


1 721 


1900 


New York 


447 


253 


1925 



Xll. THE PERIOD FROM 190 1 TO igio 

In 1900 the weekly journal Science became the official organ of the Asso- 
ciation. Thereafter the principal addresses at the meetings were published 
in Science, and since 1907 the Proceedings are simply summaries without 
any details of addresses or papers. Partly as a consequence of this arrange- 
ment and partly because of a rapid increase in the number of scientists in 
America, the membership of the Association increased several fold during 
the first decade of this century. The programs of the Association became 
correspondingly larger and more important, the growth of the Section on 
Chemistry having been extraordinary. It is impossible within the space 
available in this volume to do more than to give the titles of the addresses 
of the presidents and the vice presidents. 

Special summer meetings were held at Ithaca, X. Y.. June-July. 1906. at 
which 66 papers were presented, and at Hanover, X. H.. June-July, 1908, 
at which 25 papers were presented. 

Presidential Addresses 

R. S. Woodward (mathematics), retiring president at the meeting held 
at Denver, Colorado, in August, 1901, delivered an address on "The Prog- 
ress of Science." (Vol. 50, pp. 219-235.) 

Charles Sedgwick Minot (medicine), retiring president at the meeting 
held at Pittsburg, Pa., in June-July, 1902, delivered an address on "The 
Problem of Consciousness in Its Biological Aspects." ( Vol. 51, pp. 265- 
-'83.) 

Asaph Hall I astronomy ), retiring president at the meeting held at Wash- 



Tin-; Period from 1901 to 1910 39 

ington, 1). C, Dec, 1902 - Jan., 1903, delivered an address on "The Science 
of Astronomy." (Vol. 52, pp. 313-323.) 

Ira Remsen (chemistry), retiring president at the meeting held at St. 
Louis, Mo., Dee., 1903 -Jan., 1904, delivered an address on ''Scientific 
Investigation and Progress." ( Vol. 53. pp. 329-345. ) 

Carroll D. Wright (economics), retiring president at the meeting held at 
Philadelphia, Pa., December, 1904, delivered an address on "Science and 
Economics." 1 Vol. 54. pp. 335^365,) 

W. ( T Farlow (botany), retiring president at the meeting held at New 
Orleans, Louisiana, Dec, [905;- Jan., 1906, delivered an address on "The 
Popular Conception of the Scientific Man at the Present Day." ( Vol. 55, 
pp. 213-234.) 

Calvin M. Woodward (mathematics), retiring president at the meeting 
held in New York, New York, Dec, 1906 - Jan., 1907, delivered an address 
on "The Science of Education." ( Vol. 57, pp. 335-355-) 

William Henry Welch (medicine), retiring president at the meeting held 
at Chicago, 111., Dec, 1907 - Jan., 1908, delivered an address on "The Inter- 
dependence of Medicine and Other Sciences of Nature." Science 27:49-64. 

Edward L. Nichols (physics), retiring president at the meeting held at 
Baltimore, Md.. Dec, 1908 - Jan.. 1909, delivered an address on "Science 
and the Practical Problems of the Future." Science 29:1-10. 

Thomas C. Chamberlin (geology), retiring president at the meeting" held 
at Boston, Mass., Dec, 1909 - Jan., 1910, delivered an address on "A (ieo- 
logie Forecast of the Future Opportunities of Our Race." Science 30:937- 

949- 

Addresses of Vice Presidents 

The Denver Meeting, August, ipoi. Vol. (jo) 
Chemistry. John 11. Long: "Some Points in the Early History and 
Present Condition of the Teaching of Chemistry in the Medical Schools of 
the United States." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. John A. Brashear : "The Car- 
negie Technical School." 

Zoologv. Charles B. Davenport : "Zoology of the Twentieth Century." 
Anthropology. Amos W. I hitler: "A Notable Factor of Social Degen- 
eration." 

Social and Economic Science. Calvin M. Woodward. "The Change of 
Front in Education." 

The Pittsburgh Meeting, June-July, ipo2. ( Vol. 5/) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. James McMahon : "Some Recent Appli- 
cations of Function-Theory to Physical Problems." 



40 The Period from 1901 to 19 10 

Physics. D. B. Brace: "The Group- Velocity and the Wave-Velocity of 
Light." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. Henry S. Jacoby: "Recent Prog- 
ress in American Bridge Construction." 

Geology and Geography. Charles R. Van Hise : "The Training and 
Work of a Geologist." 

Zoology. David Starr Jordan : "The History of Ichthyology." 

Botany. B. T. Galloway : "Applied Botany, Retrospective and Prospec- 
tive." 

Anthropology. J. Walter Fewkes : "Prehistoric Porto Rico." 

Social and Economic Science. John Hyde: "Some Statistical and Eco- 
nomic Aspects of Preventable Disease." 

The Washington Meeting, Dec, 1902- Jan., 1903. (Vol. 52) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. G. W. Hough: "On the Physical Con- 
stitution of the Planet Jupiter." 

Physics. W. S. Franklin: "Popular Science." 
Chemistry. H. A. Weber : "Incomplete Observations." 
Mechanical Science and Engineering. J. J. Flather: "Modern Tend- 
encies in the Utilization of Power." 

Zoology. C. C. Nutting : "The Perplexities of a Systematist." 
Botany. D. H. Campbell : "The Origin of Terrestrial Plants." 
Anthropology. Stewart Culin: "America the Cradle of Asia." 
Social and Economic Science. Carroll D. Wright : "The Psychology of 
the Labor Question." 

Physiology and Experimental Medicine. William H. Welch : "The Origin 
and Aims of the New Section of Physiology and Experimental Medicine." 

The St. Louis Meeting, Dec., 1903- Jan., 1904. (Vol. 53) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. G. B. Halsted : "The Message of Non- 
Euclidian Geometry." 

Chemistry. Charles Baskerville : "The Elements : Verified and Un- 
verified." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. C. A. Waldo: "Mathematics and 
Engineering." 

Geology and Geography. W. M. Davis: "Geography in the United 
States." 

Zoology. C. W. Hargitt : "Some Unsolved Problems of Organic Adapta- 
tion." 

Social and Economic Science. H. T. Newcomb : "Some Recent Phases 
of the Labor Problem." 



The Period from 1901 to 1910 41 

The Philadelphia Meeting, December, 1904. ( Vol. 54) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Otto H. Tittmann: "The Present State 
of Geodosy." 

Physics. Edwin H. Hall : "A Tentative Theory of Thermo-Electric Ac- 
tion." 

Chemistry. Wilder D. Bancroft : "Future Development in Physical 
Chemistry." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. Calvin Milton Woodward : "Lines 
of Progress in Engineering." 

Geology and Geography. Israel C. Russell : "Cooperation among Amer- 
ican Geographical Societies." 

Zoology. E. L. Mark: "The Bermuda Islands and the Bermuda Bio- 
logical Station for Research." 

Botany. Thomas H. Macbride : "The Alamogordo Desert." 

Social and Economic Science. Simeon E. Baldwin : "The Modern 'Droit 
D'Aubaine'." 

The New Orleans Meeting, Dec., 1905 - Jan., 1906. ( Vol. 55) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Alexander Ziwet: "The Relation of Me- 
chanics to Physics." 

Physics. William F. Magie : "The Partition of Energy." 

Chemistry. Leonard P. Kinnicutt : "The Sanitary Value of Water 
x\nalysis." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. D. S. Jacobus: "Investigations 
and Commercial Tests in Connection with the Work of an Engineering 
College." 

Geology and Geography. Eugene A. Smith : "On Some Post-Eocene and 
Other Formations of the Gulf Region of the United States." 

Zoology. C. Hart Merriam : "Is Mutation a Factor in the Evolution of 
the Higher Vertebrates?" 

Botany. B. L. Robinson : "The Generic Concept in the Classification of 
the Flowering Plants." 

Anthropology. Walter Hough : "Pueblo Environment." 

Social and Economic Science. Martin A. Knapp : "Transportation and 
Combination." 

Physiology and Experimental Medicine. William T. Sedgwick : "The 
Experimental Method in Sanitary Science and Sanitary Administration." 

The New York City Meeting, Dec, 1906 - Jan., 1907. (Vol. 57) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. W. S. Eichelberger : "Clocks — Ancient 
and Modern." 

Physics. Henry Crew : "Fact and Theory in Spectroscopy." 



42 The Period from 1901 to 1910 

Chemistry. Charles F. Mabery: "Education of the Professional Chemist." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. F. W. McXair: "Some Problems 
Connected with Deep Mining in the Lake Superior Copper District." 

Geology and Geography. William Xorth Rice : "The Contributions of 
America to Geology." 

Zoology. Henry B. Ward: "The Influence of Parasitism on the Host." 

Anthropology. George Grant MacCurdy: "Some Phases of Prehistoric 
Archaeology." 

Social and Economic Science. Irving Fisher: "Why Has the Doctrine 
of Laissez Faire Been Abandoned?" 

Physiology and Experimental Medicine. William T. Sedgwick: "The 
Expansion of Physiology." 

The Chicago Meeting, Dec, igO/ - Jan., 1908. (Science 2J. igoS) 1 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Edward Kasner : "Geometry and Me- 
chanics." ( Publication not known. ) 

Physics. Wallace C. Sabine: "Melody and the Origin of the Musical 
Scale." 

Chemistry. Clifford Richardson : "A Plea for the Broader Education of 
the Chemical Engineer." 

Geology and Geography. A. C. Lane: "The Early Surroundings of 
Life." Science 26. 

Zoology. Edwin G. Conklin : "The Mechanism of Heredity." 

Botany. D. T. MacDougal : "Heredity and Environic Forces." 

Anthropology and Psychology. A. L. Kroeber : "The Anthropology of 
California." 

Social and Economic Science. Charles A. Conant: "The Influence of 
Friction in Economics." 

Physiology and Experimental Medicine. Simon Flexner : "Tendencies 
in Pathology." 

Education. Elmer Ellsworth Brown : "The Outlook of the Section for 
Education." 

The Baltimore Meeting, Dec, igo8 - Jan., igog. (Science 20. ipop) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Edgar Odell Lovett : "The Problem of 
Several Bodies: Recent Progress in Its Solution." 

Physics. Dayton C. Miller: "The Influence of the Material of Wind In- 
struments on the Tone Quality." 

Chemistry. Henry P. Talbot : "Science Teaching as a Career." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. Olin H. Landreth : "Government 
Control of Public Waters." ( No record of publication. ) 

1 Unless otherwise stated, the addresses listed are printed in the indicated volumes of Science. 



The Period from kjol to 19 10 43 

Geology and Geography. Joseph I'. hidings: "The Study of Igneous 
Rocks." 

Zoology. Edmund I'.. Wilson: "Recent Researches on the Determina- 
tion and Heredity of Sex." 

Botany. Charles Edwin Bessey: "The Phyletic Idea in Taxonomy." 

Anthropology and Psychology. Franz Boas: "Race Problems in Amer- 

ft 
ica. 

Social and Economic Science. John Franklin Crowell : "The Influence 
of Science upon the Progress of Investment." 

Physiology and Experimental Medicine. Ludvig Hektoen : "Opsonins 
and Other Antibodies." 

Education. Elmer Ellsworth Brown; "American Standards in Educa- 
tion and the World-Standard." 

The Boston Meeting, Dee., ipop-'Jaii., iqio. (Seienee 51. ipio) 

Mathematics and Astronomy. Cassius J. Keyset' : 'The Thesis of Mod- 
ern Eogistic." 

Physics. Karl Eugcn Guthe: "Some Reforms Needed in the Teaching 
of Physics." 

Chemistry. Louis Kahle.nberg: "The Past and Future of the Study of 
Solutions." 

Mechanical Science and Engineering. George E. Swain: "The Profes- 
sion of Engineering and Its Relation to the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science." 

Geology and Geography. Bailey Willis: "Principles of Paleogeography." 

Zoology. C. Judson Herrick: "The Evolution of Intelligence and Its 
Organs." 

Botany. Herbert M. Richards: "The Nature of Response to Chemical 
Stimulation." 

Anthropology and Psychology. R. S. Woodworth: "Racial Differences 
in Mental Traits." 

Social and Economic Science. Byron \\ r . Holt: "The Gold Question." 
( Moody's magazine, 1 oj o. ) 

Physiology and Experimental Medicine. William H. Howell: "Chemi- 
cal Regulation in the Animal Body by Means of Activators, Kinases and 
Hormones." 

Education. John Dewey : "Science as a Method of Thinking and as In- 
formation in Education," 



44 The Period from 191 i to 1920 

Statistical Data 



Year 


Meeting Place 


Registration 


Papers Read 


Membership 


1901 


Denver 


3ii 


220 


2703 


1902 


Pittsburgh 


435 


360 


3474 


1902-3 


Washington 


975 


426 


3992 


1903-4 


St. Louis 


385 


264 


4005 


1904-S 


Philadelphia 


890 


224 


4041 


1905-6 


New Orleans 


233 


211 


4321 


1906-7 


New York 


934 


360 


4498 


1907-8 


Chicago 


725 


458 


51 14 


1908-9 


Baltimore 


1088 


459 


6136 


1909-10 


Boston 


1 140 


404 


7950 



VIII. THE PERIOD FROM 191 1 TO 1920 

From the founding of the Association in 1848 until the year 1909 the 
Proceedings of its meetings were published in annual volumes. For many 
years the Proceedings contained all papers in full for which manuscripts 
were supplied to the permanent secretary. As the number of papers in- 
creased it became necessary to reduce reports of them to abstracts, except 
the addresses of retiring presidents. Beginning with 1908 the addresses of 
retiring presidents have been published in Science and have not been in- 
cluded in the Proceedings. Since 19 10 both preliminary announcements and 
reports of the meetings have been published in Science, and copies of the 
issues of Science containing the reports have been sent to every member of 
the Association. 

With the publication in Science of the addresses of the retiring presi- 
dents of the Association and of most of the vice presidents, and also of many 
other papers presented at the meetings, the importance of the Proceedings 
as a medium for the publication of addresses and papers declined. There- 
after the reports of the programs of the meetings were given only in con- 
densed form. For example, the Proceedings for 1885, containing a report 
of the only (Philadelphia) meeting held that year, amounted to 736 pages; 
while the Proceedings for 1908 and 1909, including condensed reports of 
three meetings, namely, a special summer meeting in Hanover, N. H., in 
1908, the annual meeting held in Baltimore, Dec, 1908 - Jan., 1909, and also 
the meeting held in Boston, in December, 1909, totaled only 686 pages. 

As a consequence of these various factors, beginning with 1912 the Pro- 
ceedings have been published only in summarized form, each volume cover- 
ing a period of several years. The second Summarized Proceedings were 
published in 1915, the third in 1921, the fourth in 1925, the fifth in 1929, 
and the sixth in 1934. 

In 191 5 the Pacific Division of the Association was organized and held 
its first annual meeting at San Diego, Calif,, in August. 1916. The South- 
western Division was organized in 1920, 



The Period from 191 i to 1920 45 

Addresses of Retiring Presidents 

1910. David Starr Jordan (zoology) : "The Making of a Darwin." 
Science 32 : 929-942. 

191 1. Albert A. Michelson (physics): "Recent Progress in Spectro- 
scopic Methods." Science 34 : 893-902. 

1912. Charles E. Bessey (botany) : "Some of the Next Steps in Botani- 
cal Science." Science 37: 1-13. 

1913. Edward C. Pickering (astronomy) : "The Study of the Stars." 
Science 39: 1-9. 

1914. Edmund B. Wilson (zoology) : "Some Aspects of Progress in 
Modern Zoology." Science 41 : 1-11. 

1915. Charles W. Eliot (education) : "The Fruits, Prospects and Les- 
sons of Recent Biological Science." Science 42 : 919-930. 

1916. Wallace W. Campbell (astronomy): "The Nebulae." Science 45 : 

513-548. 

1917. Charles R. Van Hise (geology) : "Some Economic Aspects of the 

World War." Science 47 : 1-10. 

19 1 8. Theodore W. Richards (chemistry) : "The Problem of Radio- 
active Lead." Science 49: 1-1 1. 

1919. John M. Coulter (botany) : "The Evolution of Botanical Re- 
search." Science 51 : 1-8. 

1920. Simon Flexner (medicine) : "Twenty-five Years of Bacteriology: 
A Fragment of Medical Research." Science 52 : 615-632. 

Addresses of Retiring Presidents — The Pacific Division 

1919. D. T. MacDougal (botany) : "Growth in Organisms." Science 

49: 599-605. 

1920. John C. Merriam (paleontology) : "The Research Spirit in Every- 
day Life of the Average Man." Science 52 : 473-478. 

Statistical Data 
Year Meeting Place Registration Papers Read Membership 



1911 


Washington 


1306 


860 


8041 


1912 


Cleveland 


720 


813 


8333 


1913 


Atlanta 


394 


443 


8350 


1914 


Philadelphia 




774 


8325 


1915 


San Francisco 


606 


482 




1915 


Columbus 


750 


532 




1916 


New York 


2100 


1252 




1917 


Pittsburgh 


692 


546 




1918 


Baltimore 





467 




1919 


St. Louis 




824 


11,442 


1920 


Chicago 


2413 


ion 


n,547 



46 The Period from 1921 to 1940 

IX. THE PERIOD FROM 1921 TO 1940 

The decade following the World War was one of great expansion in 
science and in the membership of the Association. In 1921 a total of 41 na- 
tional scientific societies and 12 state and local academies of science had be- 
come "affiliated" with the Association and had representation on its Council. 
In addition, there were 40 societies and organizations that had become "asso- 
ciated." societies, without representation on the Council. At the close of the 
fiscal year 1921 there were 11,547 members of the Association ; by 1930 the 
membership had increased to 19,059. Following the industrial depression 
that began in 1930 there was a moderate recession in the activities of many 
scientific societies and in the membership of the Association, which had 
declined to 18,549 at the close of the fiscal year 1933. As of July 1, 1940, 
the membership of the Association was 21,150. 

With the progressive subdivision of science into more specialized fields 
there were corresponding increases in the number of sections of the Asso- 
ciation. A new constitution of the Association, adopted at the annual meet- 
ing for 1919-20, provided for 15 sections, all of which have been contin- 
ously active except the Section on Industrial Science (P). 

In order to present conveniently, in groups, in one volume the titles of all 
the addresses of presidents of the Association from its founding in 1848 to 
1940, and. references to the places where they were published, they will be 
given here for the period from 1921 to 1940, although from 1921 to 1934 
they are included in the Summarized Proceedings published in 192 1, 1925, 
1929, and 1934 ; and for the period 1934 to 1940 they appear in the following 
detailed reports of the activities of the Association for these years. The titles 
of the addresses of vice presidents for the period 192 1 to 1934, having been 
given in earlier Summarized Proceedings, are not repeated here. But com- 
plete lists of the Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, Maiben and John Wesley 
Powell lectures are given. 

At the April, 1925, meeting of the Executive Committee of the Associa- 
tion a contract was entered into between Dr. J. McKeen Cattell, owner and 
editor of Science, and the Association for the transfer, under certain con- 
ditions, of the absolute ownership of Science to the Association. This con- 
tract was superseded when, in December, 1938, Dr. J. McKeen Cattell and 
Josephine Owen Cattell executed an indenture transferring title of both 
Science and The Scientific Monthly to the Association, the terms of the 
transfer being defined by a simultaneous contract entered into between 
J. McKeen Cattell and Josephine Owen Cattell, parties of the first part, and 
the Association. This acquisition of title to Science and The Scientific 
Monthly may well prove to be one of the most important steps taken by the 
Association since its founding. 



The Period from 1921 to 1940 47 

Science was established in 1883 by Alexander Graham Bell and Gardner 
G. Hubbard, following a short-lived weekly journal with the same title- 
started by Thomas A. Edison in 1881. Science attained at the most a paid 
circulation of only about 2000 and continually had a deficit. In 1893 the 
Association voted it a subsidy of $750. In spite of this assistance it sus- 
pended publication with the issue of March 2^,, 1894. At this juncture Dr. 
Cattell purchased Science, resumed its publication on January 4, 1895, and 
tilled all unexpired subscriptions. This was the beginning of the "New 
Series," the issue of June 28, 1940, completing the 91st volume. After the 
first year under the ownership of Dr. Cattell, Science neither received nor 
sought any subsidies or gifts for its support. In 1900 Science became the 
official journal of the Association. Immediately thereafter both the member- 
ship of the Association and the circulation of Science rapidly increased. 

The Scientific Monthly completed its 50th volume with the June, 1940, 
issue. During the entire period of the publication of these 50 volumes Dr. 
Cattell was owner and editor of the journal. 

Addresses of Retiring Presidents 

[921. L. O. Howard (entomology) : "On Some Presidential Addresses; 
The War Against the Insects." Science 54 : 641-65 1 . 

1922. E. H. Moore (mathematics): ''What Is a Number System?" 
(Not published.) 

1923. J. Playfair McMurrich (anatomy): "A Retrospect." Science 58: 

52I-53I- 

1924. Charles D. Walcott (paleontology): "Science and Service." 
Science 61 : 1-5. 

1925. J. McKeen Cattell (psychology) : "Some Psychological Experi- 
ments." Science 63 : 1-8,29-35. 

1926. M. T. Pupin (engineering): "Fifty Years' Progress in Electrical 
Communications." Science 64: 631-638. 

1927. L. H. Bailey ( horticulture). (Retiring president ill and address 
not delivered. ) 

1928. Arthur A. Noyes (chemistry) : "The Story of the Chemical Ele- 
ments." Science 69: 19-27. 1929. 

1929. Henry F. Osborn ( paleontology ) : 'The Discovery of Tertiary 
]\Jan." Science 71 : 1-7. 1930. 

1930. Robert A. Millikan (physics): "Present Status of Theory and 
Experiment as to Atomic Disintegration and Atomic Synthesis." Science 

7i- i-5- 193'- 

193 1. Thomas H. Morgan (zoology). (Retiring president ill and ad- 
dress not delivered.) 



48 The Period from 1921 to 1940 

1932. Franz Boas (anthropology) : "The Aims of Anthropological Re- 
search." Science 76: 605-613. 

I 933- John J. Abel (pharmacology) : "On Poisons and Disease and 
Some Experiments with the Toxin of the Bacillus Tetani." Science 79: 63- 
70, 121-129. 

1934. Henry Norris Russell (astronomy) : "The Atmospheres of the 
Planets." Science 81 : 1-9. 

1935. Edward L. Thorndike (psychology) : "Science and Values." 
Science 83 : 1-8. 

1936. Karl T. Compton (physics) : "The Electron: Its Intellectual and 
Social Significance." Science 85 : 27-37. 

1937. Edwin G. Conklin (zoology) : "Science and Ethics." Science 86: 
595-603. 

1938. George D. Birkhoi! (mathematics) : "Intuition, Reason and Faith 
in Science." Science 88: 601-609. 

1939. Wesley C. Mitchell (economics) : "The Public Relations of 
Science." Science 90 : 599-607. 

Addresses of Retiring Presidents — The Pacific Division 

1916. Wallace W. Campbell (astronomy) : "What We Know About 
Comets." ( No record of publication.) 

19 18. (Record not available.) 

1919. D. T. MacDougal (botany) : "Growth of Organisms." Science 
49: 599-605. 

1920. John C. Merriam (paleontology) : "The Research Spirit in Every- 
day Life of the Average Man." Science 52 : 473-478. 

1921. William E. Ritter (zoology) : "Scientific Idealism." The Scien- 
tific Monthly 13: 328-341. 

1922. Barton W. Everman (biology) : "The Conservation and Proper 
Utilization of Our Natural Resources." The Scientific Monthly 15 : 289-312. 

1923. E. P. Lewis (astronomy) : "The Contributions of Astronomy to 
Civilization." Science 58: 405-412. 

1924. David Starr Jordan (zoology) : "Science and Sciosophy." Science 

59: 563-569- 

1925. C. E. Grunsky (engineering) : "The Climate of the Ice Age." Proc. 
Calif. Acad. Sci. 4th Ser. 16: 53-85. 

1926. Robert G. Aitken (astronomy) : "The Solar System — Some Un- 
solved Problems." Science 64: 191-198. 

1927. Arthur A. Noyes (chemistry) : "The Periodic Relations of the 
Elements." Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 13: 737-743. 

1928. C. A. Kofoid (zoology) : "The Luminescence of the Sea." (No 
record of publication.) 



The Period from 1921 to 1940 49 

1929. Walter S. Adams (astronomy) : "The Astronomer's Measuring 
Rod." Publications of Astronomical Society of the Pacific 41 : 195-21 1. 

1930. Douglas H. Campbell (botany) : "The Origin of Land Plants." 
Science 72: 177-187. 

1931. T. Wayland Vaughan (geology, anthropology). 

1932. A. O. Leuschner (astronomy) : "The Astronomical Romance of 
Pluto." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 44. 

1933. W. F. Durand (engineering) : "The Development of Our Knowl- 
edge of the Laws of Fluid Mechanics." Science 78: 343-351. 

1934. Joel H. Hildebrand (chemistry) : "The Liquid State." Science 
80: 125-133. 

1935. Bailey Willis (geology) : "The Living Globe." Science 82 : 427- 

433- 

1936. Richard C. Tolman (physical chemistry) : "The Present Status 
of Cosmology." The Scientific Monthly 43 : 491-507 ; 44 : 20-40. 

1937. Herbert M. Evans (anatomy) : "The Development of Our Knowl- 
edge of Anterior Pituitary Functions." 

1938. J. S. Plaskett (astronomy) : "Modern Conceptions of the Stellar 
System." Popular Astronomy 48, No. 5. 1939. 

1939. S. J. Holmes (zoology) : "Darwinian Ethics and Its Practical Ap- 
plications." Science 90: 1 17-123. 1939. 

1940. Lewis M. Terman (psychology) : "Psychological Approaches to 
the Biography of Genius." 

Addresses of Retiring Presidents — The Southwestern Division 

1920. Edgar L. Hewett (archaeology) : "The Southwest — Yesterday 
and Tomorrow." Archaeol. Inst, of Am. New Ser. 2 : 1-8. 

1922. A. E. Douglass (astronomy) : "Some Aspects of the Use of the 
Annual Rings of Trees in Climatic Study." The Scientific Monthly 15: 
1-21. 

1923. (Record not available.) 

1924. Byron Cummings (archaeology) : "The Development of Prehis- 
toric Pueblo Culture." 

1925. Elliott C. Prentiss: "The Specific Immunity of the Tissues and 
Its Bearing on Treatment." Science 62 : 91-95. 

1926. T. D. A. Cockerell (zoology) : "The Duty of Biology." Science 

63: 367-37I- 

1927. A. L. Flagg (engineering) : "The Search for Metals." (No rec- 
ord of publication.) 

1929. Forrest Shreve (botany) : "The Desert as a Dwelling Place." 

1930. Francis Ramaley (botany) : "Specialization in Science." Science 
72 : 325-326. 



50 The Period from 1921 to 1940 

[932. John D. Glark (chemistry): "A Responsibility of the Scientist 
Toward Society."' 

1933. Charles T. Yorhies : "Snakes of the Southwest." (Not published.) 

1934. O. C. Lester (physics) : "'Research: The Door to Tomorrow." 

1935. D. S. Robbins (physics) : "Science and Religion." 

1936. Harold S. Colton (archaeology) : "The Rise and hall of the Pre- 
historic Population of Northern Arizona." Science 84 : 337-343. 

1937. None. 

1938. F. E. E. Germann (chemistry) : "The Occurrence of Carbon Di- 
oxide, with Notes on the Origin and Relative Importance of Subterranean 
Carbon Dioxide." Science 87: 513-521. 

1939. Edwin F. Carpenter (astronomy) : "The Revolt Against Thought.*' 

1940. J. R. Ever (biology) : "Responsibility of the Scientist in a Chang- 
ing World ( )rder." 

Statistical Data — Annual Meetings 











Membership 


Year 


Meeting Place 


Registration 


Papers Read 


at Sept. 3$ 


IQ2I 


Toronto 


1832 


813 


11,547 


1022 


Boston 


2339 


iciq 


1 1 ,646 


19-3 


Cincinnati 


_•_' 1 1 


1 140 


11,707 


1024 


Washington 


4206 


1781 


12,887 


1 1 )25 


Kansas City 


1 93 1 


985 


14,263 


1026 


Philadelphia 


3181 


1449 


1 4,366 


1927 


Nashville 


166 j 


1 141 


14,862 


1 928 


New York 


3>H5 


2200 


16,32s 


1929 


Pes Moines 


1880 


1230 


18.462 


1930 


Cleveland 


2635 


1830 


19,059 


1931 


New Orleans 


14-17 


1263 


10.889 


1932 


Atlantic City 


2066 


1500 


18,005 


1933 


Boston 


2351 


1500 


18,549 


'934 


Pittsburgh 


2823 


1550 


i8.553 


' 935 


St. Louis 


2292 


1200 


18,102 


1936 


Atlantic City 


^.]7:-> 


1450 


[8,242 


1937 


Indianapolis 


3094 


1681 


18.776 


1938 


Richmond 


2553 


1706 


19.050 


1939 


Columbus 


2715 


2154 


20, 1 05 




Statistical Data — The 1 


'acific Division 




Year 


Meeting Place 


Registration 


Papers Read 


Membership 


1916 


San Diego 


120 








1917 


No meeting 











1918 


Stanford University 











1919 


Pasadena 











hjjo 


Seattle 











1 92 1 


Berkeley 











1922 


Salt Lake City ' 


400 









Joint meeting of the Pacific Division and the Association. 



The Period from 1921 to 1940 51 



Year 


Meeting Place 


Registration 


Papers Read 


Membership 


1 9-^3 


Los Angeles 


558 


231 


i ^3? 


1924 


Palo Alto 


377 


185 


1342 


[925 


Portland, Ore. 


-'54 


221 


[408 


[926 


Mills College, Calif. 


402 


23^ 


i-\7i 


1 1 )2J 


Reno, Nevada 


[82 


174 


1550 


1928 


Pomona, Calif. 1 


483 


266 


1802 


1929 


Berkeley 


521 


89 


1997 


1930 


Eugene, Ore. 


456 


233 


[997 


1931 


Pasadena 


1 1 93 


580 


201 I 


193-' 


Pullman, Wash. 


519 


222 


1922 


'933 


Salt Lake City 


268 


162 


1 743 


1934 


Berkeley 


1 164 


863 


1856 


1935 


Los Angeles 


779 


38;, 


J 97 1 


1936 


Seattle 


77') 


449 


2004 


1937 


Denver - 


76.3 


575 


2023 


1938 


San Diego 


832 


3'-' 


2096 


"939 


Stanford University 








2157 



J Joint meeting of the Pacific Division and the Southwestern Division. 

- Joint meeting of the Association, the Pacific Division and the Southwestern Division. 



Statistical Data — The South western Division 



) 'car 


Meeting Place 


Registration 


Papers Read 


Membership 


1 1 >20 


El Paso 


7i 


36 





1922 


Tucson 


1 12 





— — 


1922 


Santa Fe 


i22 


3S 





1923 


Los Angeles ' 


558 


-'3i 





1924 


El Paso 


90 





■ 


1925 


Boulder 


i?3 


39 





1926 


Phoenix 


214 


130 





1927 


Santa Fe 


73 


55 


-'53 


1928 


Flagstaff 


7-' 


87 


286 


1929 


Albuquerque 


103 


104 


337 


1930 


Tucson 





121 


331 


1931 


No meeting 





— 


339 


1932 


Denver 


■ — 


98 


3'6 


'933 


Las Cruces 





136 


296 


[934 


Lubbock 





^2 


-'58 


• 935 


Santa Fe 


220 


142 


277 


1936 


Flagstaff 


160 


116 


323 


'937 


Denver - 


763 


?75 


342 


1938 


Albuquerque 


"3 


] 10 


410 


1939 


Alpine-Mt. Locke 3 





1 12 


366 


1940 


Tucson 


165 


153 


366 



1 Joint meeting with Pacific Division. 

- Joint meeting with the Association and the Pacific Division. 

3 Joint meeting with American Astronomical Society at dedication of the McDonald Observatory at 
Mt. Locke, Texas. 



52 The Period from 1921 to 1940 

Annual Sigma Xi Lectures 

Each year since 1922 a lecture has been delivered at the annual meeting of 
the Association under the joint auspices of the Association and the Society 
of the Sigma Xi. The Association sets aside an evening for these lectures 
which are designated as General Sessions. The Society of the Sigma Xi 
selects the lecturer. 

Each of these lectures has been published in the issue of the Sigma Xi 
Quarterly next following the date of its delivery. Since the lectures have 
been delivered late in December, they have been published in the early 
months of the following year. The following is the complete list of the lec- 
turers and the titles of their addresses from 1922 to 1939, inclusive : 

1922. Livingston Farrand : "The Nation and Its Health." 

1923. Willis R. Whitney: "The Vacuum — There's Something in It." 

1924. Frederick F. Russell : "War on Disease, Particularly Yellow 
Fever and Malaria." 

1925. F. D. Farrell : "A Desert Becomes a Garden." 

1926. Herbert C. Hoover : "The Nation and Science." 

1927. Clarence Cook Little : "Opportunities for Research in Mammalian 
Genetics." 

1928. Arthur Compton : "What Is Light ?" 

1929. George Howard Parker: "Some Aspects of Human Biology." 

1930. C. E. K. Mees: "The Science of Photography." 

193 1. C. F. Hirshfeld : "Whose Fault?" 

1932. Harlow Shapley : "Fact and Fancy in Cosmogony." 

1933. Henry E. Sigerist : "The Foundation of Anatomy in the Renais- 
sance." 

1934. Earnest A. Hooton: "Homo Sapiens, Whence and Whither." 

1935. John Bellamy Taylor: "The Human Eye and the Electric Eye." 

1936. Henry G. Knight : "Selenium." 

1937. Irving Langmuir : "The Biological Applications of Surface Chem- 
istry." 

1938. W. F. Durand: "Modern Trends in Air Transport." 

1939. Kirtley F. Mather: "The Future of Man as an Inhabitant of the 
Earth." 

Annual Phi Beta Kappa Lectures 

Each year since 1935, at the annual meeting of the Association, a lecture 
has been delivered under the auspices of the United Chapters of Phi Beta 
Kappa. The lecturers and the titles of their addresses from 1935 to 1939, 
inclusive, are as follows : 

1935. William Allan Neilson : "The American Scholar Today." The 
American Scholar 1936, spring. 



The Period from 1921 to 1940 53 

1936. James Rowland Angell : "The Scholar and the Specialist." The 
American Scholar 1937, summer. 

1937. George Lyman Kittredge: "Shakespeare and the Critics." To ap- 
pear in a book. 

1938. Frank Pierrepont Graves: "Is Education a Science." School and 
Society. 

1939. Marjorie Hope Nicolson : "Science and Literature." 

Annual Maiben Lectures 

The Maiben Lectures were established in 1932 in memory of Hector E. 
Maiben, for most of his life a farmer near Lincoln, Nebraska, who was for 
ten years a sustaining member of the Association and who left his entire 
estate to the Association upon his death. The Maiben lecturers and their 
subjects have been as follows : 

1932. Henry Norris Russell : "The Constitution of the Stars." Science 

77- 65-79- 

1933. William Morris Davis : "The Faith of Reverent Science." The 

Scientific Monthly 38 : 36. 1933. 

1934. L. Dudley Stamp : "Planning the Land of the Future." Science 80: 
507-512. 

1935. Richard P. Strong: "The Importance of Ecology in Tropical Dis- 
eases." Science 82 : 307-317. 

1936. Charles Camsell : "A 4000 Mile Flight over Northwestern Canada 
in August, 1935." (No record of publication.) 

1937. Nevil V. Sidgwick: "Molecules." Science 86: 335-340. 

1938. Robert C. Wallace : "The Changing Values of Science." Science 
88: 265-271. 

1939. Victor G. Heiser : "The Influence of Nutrition on the Diseases of 
Middle and Old Age." The Scientific Monthly 49 : 304-310. 

1940. Edwin P. Hubble: "Problems in Nebular Research." 

The John Wesley Powell Lectures 

In 1929 the Southwestern Division inaugurated the John Wesley Powell 
Memorial Lectures in honor of a distinguished geologist and the leader of 
the first expedition that descended the Colorado River through the Grand 
Canyon. The lecturers and the titles of their addresses have been as follows : 

1929. William Morris Davis, Harvard University. 

1930. Rodney H. True, University of Pennsylvania. 

1932. Max Pinner, Desert Sanatorium of Southern Arizona : "Fifty 
Years of the Tubercle Bacillus." 

1933. Aldo Leopold, University of Wisconsin : "The Conservation Ethic." 



54 



Meeting Places 



1934. Otto Struve, The University of Chicago : "The Galaxy." 
T 935- Edgar L. Hewett, President of the Schools of American Research 
and Director of the Museum of New Mexico : ''The Social Sciences in the 
Program of Education.*' 

I 93 ( J- John C. Merriam, President of the Carnegie Institution of Wash- 
ington : "The Wilderness as a Teacher, Preacher, and Companion. A Study 
of the Contribution made by a Great National Park." 

1937. A. E. Douglass, University of Arizona : "Tree-rings and Chronol- 

ogy." 

1938. E. R. Hedrick, Provost of University of California, Los Angeles : 
"Relations of Science to Economics and to War." 

1939. A. H. Compton, The University of Chicago: "Physics Views the 
Future." 



MEETINGS, 1848-1940 
Meetings of the Association 



ci- 
io. 
I I. 

12. 

13- 

14- 

15- 
16. 

1 "• 
iS. 

19- 
20. 
21 . 
22. 
23- 
24- 
25- 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 



Philadelphia Sept., 

Cambridge Aug., 

Charleston (S. Car.) Mar., 

New Haven Aug., 

Cincinnati May, 

Albany Aug., 

(No meeting in 1852) 

Cleveland July, 

Washington May, 

Providence Aug., 

Albany ^ug., 

Montreal : Aug., 

Baltimore May, 

Springfield (Mass.) Aug., 

Newport Aug., 

(No meetings 1861-1865) 

Buffalo Aug., 

Burlington ( Vt.) Aug., 

Chicago Aug., 

Salem ( Mass.) Aug., 

Troy Aug., 

Indianapolis Aug., 

Dubuque Aug., 

Portland (Maine) Aug., 

Hartford Aug., 

Detroit Aug., 

Buffalo Aug., 

Nashville Aug., 

St. Louis Aug., 

Saratoga Springs Aug., 

Boston Aug., 



1848 


30. 


1849 


31- 


1850 


32. 


1850 


33- 


1851 


34- 


1851 


35- 




36. 


1853 


37- 


1854 


3*. 


18SS 


39- 


1856 


40. 


1857 


41- 


1858 


42. 


1859 


43- 


i860 


44- 




45- 


1866 


46. 


1867 


47- 


1868 


48. 


1869 


49- 


1870 


50. 


1871 


Si- 


1872 


5-2. 


1873 


S3- 


1874 


54- 


187S 


55- 


1876 


56. 


1877 


57- 


1878 


58. 


1879 


59- 


1880 


60. 



Cincinnati Aug. 

Montreal Aug. 

Minneapolis Aug. 

Philadelphia Sept. 

Ann Arbor Aug. 

Buffalo Aug. 

New York Aug. 

Cleveland Aug. 

Toronto Aug. 

Indianapolis Aug. 

Washington Aug. 

Rochester Aug. 

Madison Aug. 

Brooklyn Aug. 

Springfield (Mass.) Aug.-Sept. 

Buffalo Aug. 

Detroit Aug. 

Boston Aug. 

Columbus ^ug. 

New York June 

Denver ^ug. 

Pittsburgh June-July 

Washington . . . .Dec, 1902-Jan. 

St. Louis Dec, 1903-Jan. 

Philadelphia Dec. 

New Orleans . . .Dec, 1905-Jan. 

Ithaca June-July 

New York Dec, 1906-Jan. 

Chicago Dec, 1907-Jan. 

Hanover (.\ T . H.) . . . .June-July 
Baltimore Dec, 1908-Jan. 



1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
189S 
1896 

1897 
1898 

1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1904 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1909 



Mmtinc, Plac 



55 



Meetings of the Association, Continued 



61. Boston . .Dec. 1909-Jan.. ioio 84. 

62. Minneapolis Dec, 1910 85. 

63. Washington Dec, 1911 86. 

64. Cleveland Dec, 1912-Jan., 1913 87. 

65. Atlanta Dec, 1913-Jan., 1914 88. 

f>6. Philadelphia . . . Dec. 1914-Jan., 1915 89. 

67. San Francisco Aug., 1915 00. 

68. Columbus Dec, 1015-Jan., 1916 01. 

69. New York Dec, 1916 02. 

70. Pittsburgh Dec. 1917-Jan., 1918 93. 

71. Baltimore Dec, 1918 94- 

72. St. Louis Dec, 1919-Jan., 1920 05. 

73. Chicago Dec, iQ20-Jan., 1921 qA. 

74. Toronto Dec, 192 1 97. 

75. Salt Lake City June, 1922 98. 

76. Boston Dec, 1922 99. 

77. Los Angeles Sept., 1923 100. 

78. Cincinnati Dec, 1923-Jan., 1924 101. 

79. Washington . . . .Dec, 1924-Jan., 1925 102. 
So. Boulder (Colo.) June, 1925 103 

81. Portland (Oregon) June, 1925 104. 

82. Kansas City .... Dec, 1925-Jan., 1926 105. 

83. Philadelphia ... Dec, 1926-Jan., 1927 106. 



Nashville Dec, 1927 

New York Dec, 1928-Jan.. 1929 

Des Moines .... Dec, 1929-Jan., 1930 

Cleveland Dec, 1930-Jan., 193 1 

Pasadena June, 1931 

New Orleans ... Dec, 1931-Jan., 1932 

Syracuse June, 1932 

Atlantic City Dec, 1932 

Chicago June, 1933 

Boston Dec, 1933-Jan., 1934 

Berkeley June, 1934 

Pittsburgh Dec, 1934-Jan., 1935 

Minneapolis June, 1935 

St. Louis Dec, 1935-Jan., 1936 

Rochester June, 1936 

Atlantic City ... Dec, 1036-Jan., 1937 

Denver June, 1937 

Indianapolis . . .Dec, 1937-Jan., 1938 

Ottawa June. 1938 

Richmond ( Va.) Dec, 1938 

Milwaukee June, 1939 

Columbus Dec, 1939-Jan., 1940 

Seattle June, 1940 



Meetings of the Pacific Division 



1. San Diego Aug., 19 16 

2. Stanford University June, 1918 

3. Pasadena June, 19 19 

4. Seattle June, 1920 

5. Berkeley Aug., 1921 

6. Salt Lake City June, 1922 

7. Los Angeles Sept., 1923 

8. Palo Alto June, 1924 

9. Portland, Oregon June, 1925 

10. Mills College, Calif June, 1926 

11. Reno, Nevada June, 1927 

12. Pomona, Calif June, 1028 



13. Berkeley June, 1929 

14. Eugene. Ore June, 1930 

15. Pasadena June, 193 1 

16. Pullman, Wash June, 1932 

17. Salt Lake City June, 1933 

18. Berkeley June, 1934 

19. Los Angeles June, 1935 

20. Seattle June, 1936 

21. Denver June, 1937 

22. San Diego June, 1938 

23. Stanford University June, 1939 

24. Seattle June. 1940 



Meetings of the Socthwestern Division* 



El Paso Dec, 1920 

Tucson Jan., 1922 

Santa Fe Sept., 1922 

Los Angeles Sept., 1923 

5. El Paso May, 1924 

6. Boulder June, 1925 

7. Phoenix Feb., 1926 

8. Santa Fe April, 1927 

9. Flagstaff April, 1928 

10. Albuquerque April, 1929 



11. Tucson April, 1930 

12. Denver April, 1932 

13. Las Cruces May, 1933 

14. Lubbock April, 1934 

15. Santa Fe April-May, 1935 

16. Flagstaff-Grand Canyon . .April, 1936 

17. Denver June, 1937 

18. Albuquerque April, 1938 

19. Alpine-Mt. Locke May, 1939 

20. Tucson April, 1940 



56 



General Officers 



GENERAL OFFICERS, 1848-1940 



Roll of the Presidents 



*William B. Rogers (geology) (Acting until 
the election of President Rcdfield) 

♦W. C. Redfield (geology) 1848 

*Joseph Henry (physics) 1849 

*A. D. Bache (geography) 1850 

♦Louis Agassiz (zoology) 1851 

(No meeting in 1852) 

♦Benjamin Peirce (physics) 1853 

*James D. Dana (anthropology) 1854 

*John Torrey (botany) 1855 

♦James Hall (geology) 1856 

♦J. W. Bailey (chemistry) 1857 

*Jeffries Wyman (medicine) 1858 

* Stephen Alexander (astronomy) 1859 

♦Isaac Lea (geology) i860 

(No meetings 1861-1865 and no presidents) 

*F. A. P. Barnard (astronomy) 1866 

♦J. S. Newberry (geology) 1867 

*B. A. Gould (astronomy) 1868 

*J. W. Foster (geography) 1869 

*Wm. Chauvenet (mathematics) 1870 

♦Asa Gray (botany) 1871 

*J. Lawrence Smith (chemistry) 1872 

* Joseph Lovering (physics) 1873 

*J. L. LeConte (entomology) 1874 

♦J. E. Hilgard (geography) 1875 

♦William B. Rogers (geology) 1876 

* Simon Newcomb (astronomy) 1877 

*0. C. Marsh (geology) 1878 

♦G. F. Barker (chemistry) 1879 

♦Lewis H. Morgan (anthropology) .... 1880 

*G. J. Brush (geology) 1881 

♦J. W. Dawson (geology) 1882 

*C. A. Young (astronomy) 1883 

*J. P. Lesley (geology) 1884 

*H. A. Newton (mathematics) 1885 

*Edward S. Morse (zoology) 1886 

♦S. P. Langley (physics) 1887 

*J. W. Powell (geology) 1888 

*T. C. Mendenhall (physics) 1889 

♦G. Lincoln Goodale (botany) 1890 

* Albert B. Prescott (chemistry) 1891 

♦Joseph LeConte (geology) 1892 

♦William Harkness (astronomy) 1893 

♦Daniel G. Brinton (anthropology) .... 1894 

♦E. W. Morley (chemistry) 1895 

♦Edward D. Cope (zoology) 1896 

♦Theodore Gill (zoology) (successor to 

Edward D. Cope, deceased.) 



♦Wolcott Gibbs (chemistry) 

*F. W. Putnam (anthropology) 

♦Edward Orton (geology) 

*R. S. Woodward (mathematics) 

*C. S. Minot (medicine) 

♦Asaph Hall (astronomy) 

(first meeting) 

♦Ira Remsen (chemistry) 

(second meeting) 

♦Carroll D. Wright (economics) 

*W. G. Farlow (botany) 

*C. M. Woodward (mathematics) 

♦Wm. H. Welch (medicine) 

♦E. L. Nichols (physics) 

*T. C. Chamberlin (geology) 

♦David S. Jordan (biology) 

♦A. A. Michelson (physics) 

♦Charles E. Bessey (botany) 

♦E. C. Pickering (astronomy) 

♦Edmund B. Wilson (zoology) 

♦Charles W. Eliot (education) 

♦W. W. Campbell (astronomy) 

♦Charles Richard Van Hise (geology) . . 
♦Theodore W. Richards (chemistry) . . . 
♦John Merle Coulter (botany) 

Simon Flexner (medicine) 

L. O. Howard (entomology) 

♦E. H. Moore (mathematics) 

♦J. Playfair McMurrich (anatomy) 
♦Charles D. Walcott (paleontology)... 

J. McKeen Cattell (psychology) 

♦Michael I. Pupin (engineering) 

L. H. Bailey (horticulture) 

♦Arthur A. Noyes (chemistry) 

♦Henry Fairfield Osborn (paleontology) 

Robert A. Millikan (physics) 

Thomas H. Morgan (zoology) 

Franz Boas (anthropology) 

♦John J. Abel (pharmacology) 

Henry N. Russell (astronomy) 

Edward L. Thorndike (psychology) . . . 

Karl T. Compton (physics) 

Edwin G. Conklin (biology) 

George D. Birkhoff (mathematics) . . . 

Wesley C. Mitchell (economics) 

Walter B. Cannon (physiology) 

Albert F. Blakeslee (genetics) 

Asterisk denotes person is deceased. 



( Jeneral Officers 



57 



Permanent Secretaries 

♦Spencer F. Baird 1851-54 

♦Joseph Lovering 1854-68 

*F. W. Putnam i860 

♦Joseph Lovering 1870-73 

*F. W. Putnam 1873-98 

L. O. Howard 1898-1920 

Burton E. Livingston 1920-30 

Charles F. Roos 1931-32 

Henry B. Ward 1033-37 

1". R. Moulton 1937- 

General Secretaries 

♦Edward L. Nichols 1920 

D. T. MacDougal 1921-24 

W. J. Humphreys 1925-28 

Frank R. Lillie 1 929- 30 

Burton E. Livingston 1031-34 

Otis W. Caldwell 1035- 

Director of Press Service 

Austin H. Clark 1926-37 



Assistant Secretaries 

F. S. Hazard 191 -^o 

Sam Woodley 1 1920- 

Treasurers 

*R. S. Woodward 1920-24 

John L. Wirt 1925- 

DlRECTORS OF EXHIBITS 

H. S. Kimberly 1925-30 

F. C. Brown i93i~37 

Owen Cattell 1938-39 

Auditors 

Herbert A. Gill 1 920-2 1 

R. B. Sosman 1922-28 

A. G. McCall 1929-31 

W. J. Humphreys 1932- 

1 Executive Assistant, 11120-1939. 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 
CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

AND THE PRESENT 

ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION 

OF THE 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 

OF THE 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT 

OF SCIENCE 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
In the Year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy-Four 

An Act 

To Incorporate the "American Association for the Advancement of Science" 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General Court assembled, 
and by the authority of the same, as follows : 

Section i. Joseph Henry of Washington, Benjamin Peirce of Cambridge, James D. 
Dana of New Haven, James Hall of Albany, Alexis Caswell of Providence, Stephen 
Alexander of Princeton, Isaac Lea of Philadelphia, F. A. P. Barnard of New York, 
John S. Newberry of Cleveland, B. A. Gould of Cambridge, T. Sterry Hunt of Boston, 
Asa Gray of Cambridge, J. Lawrence Smith of Louisville, Joseph Lovering of Cam- 
bridge, and John LeConte of Philadelphia, their associates, the officers and members of 
the Association known as the "American Association for the Advancement of Science," 
and their successors are hereby made a corporation by the name of the "American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science," for the purpose of receiving, purchasing, hold- 
ing, and conveying real and personal property, which it now is, or hereafter may be 
possessed of, with all the powers and privileges, and subject to the restrictions, duties 
and liabilities set forth in the general laws which now or hereafter may be in force and 
applicable to such corporations. 

Section 2. Said corporation may have and hold by purchase, grant, gift, or otherwise, 
real estate not exceeding two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in value, and personal 
estate in any amount.* 

Section 3. Any two of the corporators above named are hereby authorized to call the 
first meeting of the said corporation in the month of August next ensuing, by notice 
thereof "by mail," to each member of the said Association. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

In Senate, March 17, 1874. House of Representatives, March 10, 1874. 

Passed to be enacted, Passed to be enacted, 

GEO. B. LORING, President, John E. Sanford, Speaker, 

Secretary's Department, March 19, 1874. 

Boston, April 3, 1874. Approved, 

A true copy, Attest: W. B. WASHBURN. 

David Pulsifer, 
Deputy Secretary of the Commonwealth. 



*In accordance with amendment by Special Act of Massachusetts Legislature, Chapter 238, approved 
March 30, 1915. 

60 



Constitution of the Association 6i 

THE CONSTITUTION OF THE ASSOCIATION 

(Adopted at the Third St. Louis Meeting, December 29, 1919, to January 3, 1920 ') 

Article i — Objects 

The objects of the Association are to promote intercourse among those who are cul- 
tivating science in different parts of America, to cooperate with other scientific societies 
and institutions, to give a stronger and more general impulse and more systematic direc- 
tion to scientific research, and to procure for the labors of scientific men increased 
facilities and a wider usefulness. 

Article 2 — Membership 

Persons willing to cooperate in the work of the Association may be elected to be 
members by the Council. Members who are professionally engaged in scientific work or 
who have advanced science by research may be elected to be fellows. The Council shall 
fix the admission fees and dues (Dec. 27, 1934). A member who pays at one time the 
sum of one hundred dollars to the Association becomes a life member and is exempt 
from further dues. A person who gives one thousand dollars to the Association may be 
elected to be a sustaining member and is exempt from further dues. 

Article 3— Officers 

The officers of the Association shall be elected by ballot by the Council, and shall 
consist of a President, a Vice President from each section, a Permanent Secretary, a 
General Secretary, a Treasurer and a Secretary of each Section. The President and the 
Vice Presidents shall be elected for one year, the other officers for four years. The 
officers shall perform the usual duties of these offices, under the direction of the Council. 

Article 4 — Council 

The Council shall consist of the President, the Vice Presidents, the Permanent Secre- 
tary, the General Secretary, the Secretaries of the Sections, and the Treasurer, the 
members of the Executive Committee, ex officio, if they arc not otherwise members of 
the Council (Dec. 27, 1923), of one fellow elected by each division, affiliated state acad- 
emy, and (Dec. 27, 1932) affiliated society, and one additional fellow from each affiliated 
society having more than 100 members who are fellows of the Association, and of eight 
fellows, two elected annually by the Council for a term of four years. There shall be 
an Executive Committee of the Council, consisting of the President, the Permanent 
Secretary, the General Secretary, and eight members elected by the Council, two an- 
nually for a term of four years, who shall be ex officio members of the Council. The 
Council may appoint standing or temporary committees to make reports, to assist in the 
conduct of the work of the Association and to promote its objects. 

Article 5 — Sections 

The Association shall be divided into the following Sections : A, Mathematics ; B, 
Physics ; C, Chemistry ; D, Astronomy ; E, Geology and Geography ; F, Zoological 

1 There have been several minor amendments to the Constitution since iq2o. The parts that have 
been amended are printed, as amended, in italics followed by the dates of the amendments in paren- 
theses. 



62 Constitution of the Association 

Sciences; G, Botanical Sciences; H. Anthropology; I, Psychology; K, Social and Eco- 
nomic Sciences; .L, Historical and Philological Sciences; M, Engineering; N, Medical 
Sciences: O, Agriculture; P, Industrial Science (Dec. jS, 1936); Q, Education. Mem- 
bers of the Association shall be members of that Section or of those Sections under 
which their work or their interests fall. Members of the Section shall nominate to the 
Council a Chairman, who becomes ex officio a Vice President of the Association and 
whose term of office shall be one year, and a Secretary, whose term of office shall be 
four years. These officers, together with four fellows, one elected annually by the 
Section for a term of four years, and the representatives on the Council of affiliated 
societies in the same field shall form a Sectional Committee. This Committee shall 
arrange the scientific programs of the meetings and may form sub-sections or hold joint 
meetings with other sections or other societies. It may appoint committees and shall in 
all ways promote the objects of the Association within its own field. 

Article 6 — Divisions and Branches 

Regional Divisions and Local Branches of the Association may be formed by vote of 
the Council. Such Divisions and Branches may elect officers, hold meetings, appoint 
committees, enter into relations with other societies and promote within their fields the 
objects of the Association. 

Article 7 — Associated and Affiliated Societies 

National and local scientific societies may, by vote of the Council, become associated 
with the Association. Those Associated Societies which the Council shall designate as 
Affiliated Societies shall be represented on the Council and on the Sectional Committees 
as provided in Articles 4 and 5. 

Article 8 — Meetings 

The Association shall hold an annual meeting at such time and place as may be deter- 
mined by the Council. Other meetings of the Association and of the Sections may be 
authorized by the Council. The Divisions and the Branches may hold annual and other 
meetings. 

Article — Proceedings 

The proceedings of the Association and the list of officers and members shall be pub- 
lished in such manner as the Council may direct. 

Article 10 — Funds 

The Permanent Secretary shall collect the annual dues and make expenditures as 
directed by the Council. The Treasurer shall deposit or invest the permanent funds of 
the Association, as provided for trust funds by the laws of the state of Massachusetts or 
the state of New York. Bequests and gifts will be administered in accordance with the 
provisions of the donors. The payments from sustaining and life members form part of 
the permanent fund, and the income (after the death of the member) shall be used for 
research, unless otherwise directed by unanimous vote of the Council or by a majority 
vote at two consecutive annual meetings. 

Article ii — Alteration of the Constitution 

This Constitution may be amended at a general session by unanimous vote or by a 
majority vote at two consecutive annual meetings. 



By-Laws and Rules of Procedure 63 

BY-LAWS AND RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE 

ASSOCIATION 

(Adopted at the Third St. Louis Meeting, December 29, 1919, to January 3, 1920, 

and in force since January 3, 1920 ' ) 

Article I 

The Association is American, its field covering North, Central and South America. 
Inhabitants of any country are eligible to membership. 

Article II 

Sectio)i 1. An incorporated scientific society or institution or a public or incorporated 
library may become a member by vote of the Council. 

Section 2. Associates, on payment of five dollars, may he admitted to the privileges 
of a meeting, except voting. 

Section 3. Foreign associates may be admitted without fee to the privileges of a 
meeting, except voting. 

Section 4. Members who have paid annual dues for fifty years may be excused from 
further payments and still retain all the prizileges of active membership. (April 14, 

1935). 

Section 5. Members may be elected by the Council to be fellows of the Association 
and members so elected shall remain fclloivs only so long as they retain membership. 
If a fellow discontinues his membership and subsequently rejoins the Association he 
shall automatically again become a fclloiv from the time of rejoining, without another 
election. Members are eligible to nomination for fellowship if they have contributed to 
the adzanccment of science cither by the publication of original research or in other 
significant manner. Nominations for election to fellowship may be made by any three 
fellows, by the Permanent Secretary or by any Section Secretary, but before being sub- 
mitted to the Council every nomination shall have been first approved by the section 
committee in whose field the nominees' scientific zvork mainly lies. (Dec. 27, 1929). 

Section 6. The Council may exclude from the Association any one who has made 
improper use of his membership or whose membership is regarded as detrimental to the 
Association. 

Article III 

Section 1. The Permanent Secretary, the General Secretary, the Permanent Chair- 
man of the Finance Committee, the Treasurer of the Association and the Secretaries of 
the Sections shall be elected at the larger convocation week meetings held once in four 
years beginning the last week of the year 1916. Vacancies in these offices shall be filled 
by the Council. 

Section 2. The President of the Association shall give an address at a general session 
of the Association at the annual meeting following that over which he presided. 

Section 3. The Vice-Presidents shall hold seniority in the order of their continuous 
membership in the Association. 

Section 4. The Permanent Secretary shall attend to the business of the Association, 
the arrangements for the meetings and such other matters as the Council may designate. 
He may employ, with the approval of the Council, an Assistant Secretary. The salary 
of the Permanent Secretary shall be determined by the Council. 

1 There have been several minor amendments to the By-Laws since 1920. The parts that have been 
amended are printed, as amended, in italics followed by the dates of the amendments in parentheses. 



64 By-Laws and Rules of Procedure 

Section 5. The General Secretary shall attend to matters connected with the organi- 
zation of the Association, its relations to the affiliated societies and such other matters 
as the Council maj' designate. He shall receive such compensation as may be determined 
by the Council. 

Section 6. The Permanent Secretary, the General Secretary and the Treasurer shall 
present annually to the Council an account of the funds in their charge. These accounts 
shall be audited by an Auditor elected by the Council. There shall be a Finance Com- 
mittee of five, including the Permanent Chairman, the Treasurer and three other mem- 
bers elected one each year for a period of three years. The Finance Committee shall 
give advice in regard to the investment of the funds of the Association. The Treasurer 
shall administer bequests and gifts in accordance with the provisions of the donor; and 
shall sell such securities and properties of the Association and buy such securities and 
properties for the Association zvith the permanent funds of the Association and exchange 
such securities and properties of the Association for such securities and properties as the 
Finance Committee shall direct by formal rote recorded in its minutes (April 21, 1940). 
The Treasurer and the Permanent Secretary and General Secretary shall each present 
a budget to the Council at the annual meeting. 

Article IV 

Section 1. The Executive Committee shall haic full po-ivcr to act for the Council 
when the Council is not in session (Dec, 28, 1923). 

Section 2. There shall be a Committee on Grants, appointed by the President, with 
the advice of the Council, consisting of eight members, two appointed annually for a 
period of four years, which shall award for scientific research such part of the income 
from the permanent and special funds of the Association as may be appropriated for that 
purpose by the Council. 

Section 3. The following standing committees are authorized : Committee of One 
Hundred on Scientific Research ; Committee on the Jane M. Smith Life Membership 
Fund. 

Section 4. A local committee shall be organized by the members resident in the place 
where a meeting of the Association is held. This committee may appoint an executive 
committee and other committees and shall make arrangements for the meeting, in co- 
operation with the Permanent Secretary and the other officers of the Association. 

Article V 

Section 1. The Sectional Committees shall arrange for each annual meeting a pro- 
gram of general scientific interest, occupying usually one or two sessions. The section 
shall not hold sessions for the reading of special papers when the affiliated society in 
the same field meets with the Association. 

Section 2. No member shall take part in the organization or hold office in more than 
one section at any one meeting. Council representatives of affiliated organizations which 
are not specially related to any single section of the Association are members of the 
respective section committees to which their scientific interests are most closely related. 

Article VI 

Section 1. Regional divisions authorized by the Council have full control of their 
meetings, of their affiliations with other scientific organizations, and of all movements 
to promote the advancement and diffusion of science in their territory. 

Section 2. The Pacific Division (organized in 1915) includes members resident in 
Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and 



Hv-Laws and Rules of Procedure 65 

the Hawaiian Islands. The Pacific Division is allowed, for its expenses, the entrance 
fees of new members resident in its region and an additional annual allowance not to 
exceed one dollar for each of its members in good standing. 

Section 3. The Southwestern Division (organized in 1920) includes members resi- 
dent in Arizona, New Mexico. Colorado (Dec. 26, 1922), Sonora, Chihuahua and Texas 
west of the 100th meridian (June 21, 193/). The Southwestern Division is allowed, for 
its expenses, the entrance fees of new members resident in its region and an additional 
annual allowance not to exceed one dollar for each of its members in good standing. 

Section 7. Affiliated academies of science receive, for their expenses, an annual allow- 
ance not to exceed fifty cents for each of their members who is also a member in good 
standing of the American Association. 

Article VII 

Section 1. Affiliated societies having two representatives in the Council and in the 
Sectional Committees are : ( see pages 66-69) • 

Section 2. Affiliated societies having one representative in the Council and in the 
Sectional Committees are: (see pages 66-69). 

Section }. Associated societies are: (see pages 69-70). 

Article VIII 

Section 1. A general session of the Association shall usually be held on the first 
evening of the meeting, and at this session the address of the retiring president shall be 
given. Other general sessions may be arranged by the Council. 

Section 2. The Council shall ordinarily meet on the afternoon of the first day of the 
meeting. It may also meet at such other times as may be decided. 

Section 3. The Sectional Committees shall ordinarily hold meetings on the morning 
of the first day of each annual meeting and may hold such other meetings as they may 
arrange. 

Section j. The Executive Committee shall meet on the day preceding the annual 
meeting and at such other times during the meeting as it may decide. It shall ordinarily 
hold meetings in the spring and in the autumn. 

Article IX 

Section 1. By arrangement with the publishers of Science this journal publishes 
the official notices and proceedings of the Association and is sent to all members in good 
standing, the sum of $3 being paid to the publishers of the journal for each member. 
Members may by request receive The Scientific Monthly in place of Science. This 
arrangement may be cancelled by the Council of the Association or by the publishers 
of the journal, after one year's notice has been given by either party. 

Article X 

Section 1. The official year of the Association shall begin on October 1, and the dues 
of the members are payable on that date. Only members who have paid their dues shall 
enjoy the privileges of the meetings and receive publications of the Association, but 
those not longer than two years in arrears for dues are retained on the membership list. 
Members dropped from membership for non-payment of dues may have their names re- 
instated by payment of arrearages or may be reelected with payment of the entrance fee. 
Payment of the entrance fee is omitted for members of affiliated organizations who join 
the Association before the second annual meeting after the ratification of the affiliation, 
or before the second annual meeting after their admission to the affiliated organization. 



66 



Officially Associated Societies 



Section 2. The Secretaries of the Sections receive, for their expenses incurred in 
attending the annual meetings, a per diem of four dollars for the time spent in tiaiel 
and at meetings and regular railroad fares, including Pullman, to and from the meetings 
(April 24, 193S). Hotel rooms for their use at the annual meetings are provided by the 
Association. 

Section 3. Members of the Executive Committee receive, for their expenses incurred 
in attending the annual meetings, a per diem allozvance of four dollars and the regular 
railroad fares, including Pullman, to and from the meeting (April 24, 1938). Hotel 
rooms for their use at the annual meetings are provided by the Association. Members 
of the Executive Committee attending special meetings of the Committee receive, for 
their expenses, a per diem allowance of six dollars a day and a mileage allowance of 
five cents a mile for the round trip. 

Article XI 
These By-Laws and Rules of Procedure may be amended by vote of the Council. 



OFFICIALLY ASSOCIATED SOCIETIES 

Affiliated Societies 1 
Section on Mathematics 



Mathematical Association of America 

(2) , 2 Dec. 29, 1920. 
American Mathematical Society (2). 

Dec. 29, W20. 
Association for Symbolic Logic (1). Oct. 

So. 1937- 



American Electrochemical Society (2). 

April 27. 1924. 
American Oil Chemists' Society (1). 

April 25, 1926. 



Section on Astronomy 

American Astronomical Society (2). Be- 
fore 1920. 

Astronomical Society of the Pacific (1). 
Dec. 30, 1925. 
Optical Society of America (2). Before The Society for Research on Meteorites 



Section on Physics 



1920. 

American Physical Society (2). Before 
1920. 

American Association of Physics Teach- 
ers (2). Oct. 23, 1931. 

Acoustical Society of America (1). April 
26, 1931. 

American Meteorological Society ( 1 ) . 
Before 1920. 

Society of Rheology (1). April 26, 1931. 

Section on Chemistry 

American Chemical Society (2). Before 
1920. 



1 Dates of affiliation subsequent to 1920 fol- 
low the names of the respective societies; pre- 
vious to 1920 dates of affiliation were not re- 
corded. 

- Numbers in parentheses are the numbers of 
representatives the respective societies have on 
the Council of the Association. 



(1). Associated April 14, 1935,' affili- 
ated Dec. 30, 193S. 

Section on Geology and Geography 

Association of American Geographers 
(2). Before 1920. 

American Geographical Society of New 
York (2). April 24, 1921. 

Geological Society of America (2). Be- 
fore 1920. 

Paleontological Society (2). April 27, 

1924. 
Seismological Society of America (2). 

Before 1920. 
Mineralogical Society of America (1). 

April 27, 1924. 

Section on Zoological Sciences 

American Association of Economic En- 
tomologists (2). Before 1920. 



Officially Associated Societies 



6 7 



Entomological Society of America (2). 
Before 1920. 

Association for Research in Human He- 
redity, Inc. 1 (2). Before 1920. 

American Society of Mammalogists (2). 
Noz: 20, 1921. 

American Society of Parasitologists (2). 
April 26, 1925. 

American Society of Zoologists (2). Be- 
fore 1920. 

Section on Botanical Sciences 

Botanical Society of America (2). Be- 
fore 1920. 

American Phytopathological Society (2). 
Before 1920. 

American Society of Plant Physiologists 
(2). Oct. 12, 1924. 

Torrey Botanical Club (2). April 24, 
1927. 

Mycological Society of America (2). 
June iS, 1934. 

Societies Related to Both Zoological 
and Botanical Sciences 

Ecological Society of America (2). Be- 
fore 1920. 

American Genetic Association (2). Be- 
fore 1920. 

Genetics Society of America (2). April 
?4, 1932. 

American Microscopical Society (2). Be- 
fore 1920. 

American Society of Naturalists (2). Be- 
fore 1920. 

Western Society of Naturalists (2). Oct. 
21, 192S. 

Federation of American Societies for Ex- 
perimental Biology (2). April 19, 1936. 

Limnological Society of America (1). 
Oct. 27, 1935. 

Section on Anthropology 

American Anthropological Association 
(2). Before 1920. 

Section on Psychology 

American Psychological Association (2). 

Before 1920. 
Midwestern Psychological Association 

( 1). June 16, 1931. 

1 Formerly Eugenics Research Association. 



Society for Research in Child Develop- 
ment (0. April 14, 1935. 

The Psychometric Society (1). April 17, 
1937- 

Section on Social and Economic 
Sciences 

Econometric Society (1). Oct. 25, 1931. 

American Sociological Society (1). As- 
sociated before 1920; affiliated April 24, 
1932. 

American Statistical Association (1). As- 
sociated before 1920; affiliated April 25. 

I93i- 

Section on Historical and 
Philological Sciences 

History of Science Society (2). April 26, 

I9?5- 
Linguistic Society of America (1). Oct. 
17, 1926. 

Section on Engineering 

American Society of Civil Engineers (2). 
Before 1920. 

American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers (2). Before 1920. 

Illuminating Engineering Society (2). 
Before 1920. 

American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers (2). Before 1920. 

American Institute of Mining and Metal- 
lurgical Engineers (2). Before 1920. 

Society for the Promotion of Engineer- 
ing Education (2). June 19, 1933- 

The American Ceramic Society (1). As- 
sociated Nov. 20, 1921; affiliated April 
27, 1924. 

The Institute of Radio Engineers (1). 
Oct. 25, 1925. 

American Society for Testing Materials 
(1). April 24, 1921. 

The Institute of Aeronautical Sciences 
(1). April 14, 1935- 

Section on Medical Sciences 

American Association of Anatomists (2). 

Before 1920. 
Society of American Bacteriologists (2). 

Before 1920. 



68 



Officially Associated Societies 



American Medical Association (2). Be- 
fore 1020. 

Society for Experimental Biology and 
Medicine (2). Oct. 17, 1927. 

American Public Health Association (2). 
April 27, 1924. 

American Pharmaceutical Association 
(2). Dec. 30, 1925. 

American Society for Experimental Pa- 
thology (2). Associated before 1920; 
affiliated April 19, 1936. 

American Society of Biological Chemists 
(2). Associated before 1920; affiliated 
April 19, 1936. 

American Physiological Society (2). 
April 19, 1936. 

American Society for Pharmacology and 
Experimental Therapeutics (2). April 
19, 1936. 

American Society of Tropical Medicine 
(2). Dec. 30, 1939- 

American Roentgen Ray Society (1). 
Oct. 20, 1929. 

American Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion (1). April 25, 1926. 

American Academy of Tropical Medicine 
(1). June 24, 1935. 

American Division, International Asso- 
ciation for Dental Research (1). April 

14, 1935- 
American Academy of Ophthalmology 

and Otolaryngology (0- April 19, 

1936. 
American Psychiatric Association (1). 

Oct. 25, 1936. 
National Malaria Committee (1). Dec. 

30, 1939- 

Section on Agriculture 

American Society of Agronomy (2). 
April 24, 192 1. 

American Society for Horticultural 
Science (2). Before 1920. 

Society of American Foresters (2). Be- 
fore 1920. 

Canadian Society of Technical Agricul- 
turists 0). April 23, 1922. 

American Society of Animal Production 
(1). April 27, 1924. 



Section on Education 

National Society of College Teachers of 
Education (2). Before 1920. 

National Education Association (2). 
April 27, 1924. 

National Society for the Study of Edu- 
cation (2). Before 1920. 

American Philosophical Association (1). 
Associated before 1020; affiliated Dec. 
3i, 1936. 

General Societies 

United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa (2). 
Dec. 27, 1928. 

Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi (2). 
April 26, 1923. 

Society of the Sigma Ni (2). Before 
1920. 

American Association of University Pro- 
fessors (2). Nov. 8, 1922. 

Sigma Delta Epsilon Graduate Women's 
Scientific Fraternity (2). Associated 
January 2, 193ft; affiliated April 23, 

1939- 
American Library Association ( 1 ). April 

22, 1928. 

American Nature Study Society (1). 
Oct. 27, 1926. 

Academies of Science 

Alabama Academy of Science ( \) . April 

23, 1926. 

The American Institute of the City of 
New York (1). Dec. 27, 1938. 

British Columbia Academy of Sciences 
(1). June 30, 1938. 

Colorado-Wyoming Academy of Science 
(1). Dec. 26, 1927. 

Florida Academy of Sciences (1). Oct 

25, 1936. 

Georgia Academy of Science (1). April 

26, 1925. 

Illinois State Academy of Science (1). 

April 26, 1925. 
Indiana Academy of Science (1). April 

26, 1925. 
Iowa Academy of Science (1 ) . Before 

1920. 
Kansas Academy of Science ( • Before 

1920. 



Officially Associated Societies 



69 



Kentucky Academy of Science (1). Be- Northwest Scientific Association (1) 



fore 1920. 



April 25, 193 1. 



Louisiana Academy of Science (1). Dec. Ohio Academy of Science (1). Before 



29, J933- 



1920. 



Maryland Academy of Sciences (1). Oklahoma Academy of Science (1). Dec. 



Ipril 24, W21 
Michigan Academy of Science (1). Dec. 

27. 1920. 
Minnesota Academy of Science (1 I. Oct. 

t6, i'933. 
Mississippi Academy of Science (1). 

June 19. 1939. 



27, 1920. 
Pennsylvania Academy of Science (1). 

April 25, 1926. 
Academy of Science of St. Louis (1). 

Sept. 17. 1930. 
South Carolina Academy of Science (t). 

Oct. 17. 1927. 



Missouri Academy of Science (1). .ipril Tennessee Academy of Science (1). Dec 



rj. 1935- 
Nebraska Academy of Science (t). Bl 
fore 1920. 



30. I925- 
Texas Academy of Science (0- April 
7. 1930. 



New Hampshire Academy of Science Virginia Academy of Science (1). April 



( 1 ) . Dec. 30, 1925. 



26, 1923. 



\ - / - • +}~ } ~ 7 — v/ " J — 7 — *J~ 

New Orleans Academy of Science (1). West Virginia Academy of Science (1) 



Before 1920. 
North Carolina Academy of Science (1). 

. Ipril 24. 192 1. 
North Dakota Academy of Science (1). 

April 26, 1925. 



Pee. 30, 1925. 
\\ isconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, 
and Letters (1). Before 1920. 



Associated Societies 



Section ox Physics 
Sigma Pi Sigma. Jan. 2. 1936. 

Section ox Chemistry 

American Institute of Chemical Engi- 
neers. Before 1920. 
Phi Lambda Upsilon. June 21, 1933. 
Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity. Oct. 27. 

'935- 

Section ox Geology and Geography 

National Council of Geography Teachers. 

Before 1920. 
American Alpine Club. Before 1920. 

Sk( tion ox Zoological Sciences 
Wilson Ornithological Club. Before 1920. 

Section on Botanical Sciences 

American Fern Society. Before 1920. 
Sullivant Moss Society. Before 1920. 
American Society of Plant Taxonomists. 
Dec. 30, 1939. 



Societies Related to Both Zoological 

• and Botanical Sciences 

Phi Sigma Society. Oct. 25, 1925. 
National Association of Biology Teach- 
ers. April 23, 1939. 

Section on Anthropology 

Archaeological Institute of America. Be- 
fore 1920. 
American Folk-Lore Society. Before 

1Q20. 

Section ox Psychology 
Southern Society for Philosophy and 
Psychology. Before 1920. 

Sectiox ox Social and Economic 
Sciences 

American Planning and Civic Associa- 
tion. Before 1920. 

American Economic Association. Before 
1920. 

Metric Association. Before 1920. 



7o 



Officially Associated Societies 



Section on Engineering 

American Society of Heating and Venti- 
lating Engineers. Before 1920. 

American Society of Refrigerating Engi- 
neers. Before 1920. 

Western Society of Engineers. Dec. 26, 
193?- 

American Society of Photogrammetry. 
April 19, 1936. 

American Society of Agricultural Engi- 
neers. Dec. 30, 1939. 

Section on Medical Sciences 

American Dental Association. Oct. 15, 
1932. 

American College of Dentists. April 26, 
193 'i, 

American Association of Dental Schools. 
Oct. IS, 1932. 

American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. April 14, 1935. 

American Dietetic Association. June 24, 
1925. 

Alpha Epsilon Delta Premedical Frater- 
nity. Oct. 25, 1936. 

Section on Agriculture 

Potato Association of America. April 22, 
1923. 

American Dairy Science Association. Be- 
fore 1920. 



Association of Official Seed Analysts. Be- 
fore 1920. 

American Pomological Society. Before 
1920. 

Gamma Sigma Delta (Honor Society of 
Agriculture). Before 1920. 

Xi Sigma Pi. Sept. 17, 1930. 

Section on Education 

The Canadian Teachers' Federation. 

April 23, 1939. 
Kappa Delta Pi. Dec. 30, 1929. 
Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity. Nov. 20, 

1921. 
Pi Lamhda Theta. June 21, 1932. 

General Societies 

Bibliographical Society of America. Be- 
fore 1920. 

American College Personnel Association. 
April 26, 193 1. 

Pi Gamma Mu. Dec. 28, 1931. 

Gamma Alpha Graduate Scientific Fra- 
ternity. Oct. 23, 1925. 

Chi Beta Phi Scientific Association. Oct. 
27, 1935. 

American Science Teachers Association. 
Dec. 28, 1936. 

The Wildlife Society. Dec. 30, 1937. 

Research Council on Problems of Alco- 
hol. Dec. 30, 1937. 



History of the Constitution 71 



ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF 
THE ASSOCIATION 

History of the Constitution 

When the Association was organized in 1848 it adopted and began opera- 
tions under "Objects and Rules of the Association," consisting of a state- 
ment of "Objects" and 20 "Rules" that had been drawn up and presented by 
a committee appointed for the purpose the preceding year. The "Objects" 
were almost identical with Article 1 of the present constitution. The supreme 
power of the Association was vested in the Standing Committee, consisting 
of the general officers, the chairmen and secretaries of the sections and six 
other elected members. The annual dues of one dollar per year entitled each 
member to a copy of the Proceedings of the Association. One of the duties 
of the Local Committee in each city in which the Association met was to 
provide funds for paying for publishing the Proceedings of the meeting. 

In 1 85 1 the "Objects and Rules" became a "Constitution" with two 
amendments, one providing for dropping members who were in arrears on 
their dues for two years and the other raising the annual dues to two dollars. 

In 1856 a new draft of the Constitution was adopted. There were no By- 
Laws but certain actions of the Standing Committee were carried under the 
heading, "Resolutions of a Permanent and Prospective Character." 

After discussions extending over two years a completely revised constitu- 
tion of 38 articles was adopted in 1874. The committee reporting on the pro- 
visions of the new constitution said, "The constitutional troubles, which for 
many years have often caused the meetings to assume the temporary char- 
acter of a parliamentary body, have finally been disposed of . . ." The annual 
dues of members were increased from two to three dollars. 

In 1874 the Association was incorporated under the laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. The articles of incorporation gave the Association 
the right of "receiving, purchasing, holding, and conveying real and personal 
property, which it now is, or hereafter may be possessed of, with all powers 
and privileges, and subject to the restrictions, duties and liabilities set forth 
in the general laws which now or hereafter may be in force and applicable 
to such corporations." 

The Constitution of the Association was amended in 1881, 1886 and 18S7. 
In 1887 the Standing Committee was changed to the Council. Occasionally 
minor amendments to the Constitution were adopted, and several were made 
in 1899. 



j 2 Classes of Members 

Important amendments to the Constitution adopted in 1903 increased the 
Council by including in its membership the presidents and vice presidents 
of the two preceding years, the other general officers, 9 fellows elected by the 
Council, three each year for a term of three years and one fellow elected by 
each affiliated society having more than 25 members who were members of 
the Association. The term of office of the Permanent Secretarv, the Treas- 
urer and secretaries of the sections was 5 years. At this time the Constitution 
contained 39 articles. 

There was no thorough revision of the Constitution of the Association 
from 1874 to 1920, a period of 46 years. In this interval the membership of 
the Association had increased from 722 to 11,547. Affiliated and associated 
societies had been provided for in 1899. In 1920 there were 4T affiliated 
societies, 12 affiliated academies of science and 40 associated societies. Under 
these greatly changed conditions a revised and simplified constitution became 
imperative. In 1917 a committee consisting of J. McKeen Cattell, H. L. 
Fairchild and D. T. MacDougal was appointed to make a radical revision of 
the Constitution. The report of the committee was presented and adopted 
in 1920. The Constitution consisted of only 11 articles and of 11 By-Laws 
defining rules of procedure subject to amendment by vote of the Council. 
This Constitution, except for minor amendments indicated by italics as it is 
printed on pages 61 and 62, is in effect at the present time. 

The constitution adopted in 1920 increased the annual dues of members 
from three to five dollars. 

Classics of Members 

There are six classes of members: sustaining members, life members, 
emeritus life members, emeritus annual members, fifty-year members, and 
annual members ; in addition, there are honorary British Association mem- 
bers and honorary junior members. 

Sustaining members are members who have given to the Association one 
thousand dollars ; they are exempt from annual dues. The payments received 
1)}' the Association from sustaining members form part of the permanent 
Kind of the Association, the income of which is used for research. Sustaining 
members have all the privileges of annual members. For the complete list of 
sustaining members see page 203. 

Life members are members who have paid to the Association one hundred 
dollars at one time ; they also are exempt from annual dues. Payments re- 
ceived from life members become ( after their respective deaths) part of the 
permanent fund of the Association, the income from which is used for re- 
search. Life members have all the privileges of annual members. For the 
complete list of life members see page 203. 

Emeritus life members are members whose life membership payment has 



Classes ot Members 73 

been made, by direction of the Council, from income of the Jane M. Smith 
endowment for this purpose. Usually emeritus life members are chosen by 
the Council from the members who have had longest continuous membership 
in the Association. Emeritus life members are exempt from the payment of 
annual dues and have all the privileges of annual members. For the complete 
list of emeritus life members see page 210. 

Emeritus annual members are members, usually chosen from among those 
of longest continuous membership in the Association, whose dues have been 
paid by direction of the Council from the income of the Luella A. Owen 
fund. Emeritus annual members have all the privileges of annual members. 

Fifty-year members are members who have paid annual dues for 50 years 
and have been excused from further payments. For the list of 50-year 
members see page 212. 

. hiiuial members are members who pay annual dues. For the complete list 
of all persons who have been members at any time between June 1, 1934. 
and July 1, 1940, see page 217. 

Fellozvs are members of any class who have been elected to fellowship by 
the Council of the Association in recognition of their having contributed to 
the advancement of science by the publication of original research or in other 
significant manner. Before a member is eligible for election as a fellow he 
must have been nominated by three fellows, the Permanent Secretary or a 
Section Secretary or a Section Committee, and approved by the Section 
Committee in whose field his work mainly lies. 

All of the foregoing members receive with their membership a subscrip- 
tion to either Science or The Scientific Monthly for each calendar year of 
their membership. 

Honorary BritisJi Association members are officers and members of the 
Council of the British Association elected to membership for one year by the 
Council of the Association under the arrangement between the British Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science and the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science for reciprocal British and American Association 
lectures on alternate years. These members pay no dues. They receive the 
general programs, preliminary announcements and reports of the meetings 
of the Association, but they do not receive subscriptions to Science or The 
Scientific Monthly. For a complete list of Honorary British Association 
members see page 213. 

Honorary junior members are boys and girls, nominated by the affiliated 
academies of science, who have been elected by the Council of the Associa- 
tion to honorary junior membership for one year. Each affiliated academy is 
entitled to nominate only one boy and one girl each year from the junior 
academy or junior science clubs of its territory. Honorary junior members 
pay no dues. They receive certificates of membership, general programs. 



74 The Council 

preliminary announcements and reports of the meetings of the Association 
and a subscription to Science News Letter during the year of their member- 
ship. For a complete list of honorary junior members see page 214. 

Annual Dues of Members 

The annual dues of annual members and fellows are $5 per year, payable 
in advance. Of these dues, $3 pays for a subscription to either Science or 
The Scientific Monthly. The fiscal year of the Association is from October 1 
to September 30. The subscription to Science or The Scientific Monthly 
going with each membership is for the calendar year beginning three months 
after the membership year beginning on October 1. New volumes of both 
Science and The Scientific Monthly begin with the calendar year. 

Of the dues paid by each member of the Pacific Division and the South- 
western Division, $1 goes to the respective division for office expenses. 

The Council 

The control of the Association, including the election of officers, the elec- 
tion of members and fellows, the determining of places and dates of meet- 
ings, the establishing of policies and the appropriation of funds, is vested in 
the Council of the Association. 

The Council consists of the President, the Vice Presidents, the Permanent 
Secretary, the General Secretary, the secretaries of the Sections, the Treas- 
urer, the members of the Executive Committee, a representative from each 
of the two divisions of the Association, eight fellows, two of whom are elected 
annually by the Council for a term of four years, two from each affiliated 
society having more than 100 members who are fellows of the Association, 
and one from each of the other affiliated societies and from each affiliated 
academy of science. There are members of the Council representing every 
major field of science and interest of the Association. The great majority of 
the members of the Council are elected by the sections and affiliated societies 
which are entirely independent of the Executive Committee and the general 
officers of the Association. It would be difficult to lodge the power of an 
organization having more than 21,000 members in a more representative and 
democratically elected body than the Council. 

The scientific interests of the general officers, the Executive Committee, 
the eight elected members of the Council, the representatives of the divisions 
of the Association, the representatives of such general organizations as 
American Association of University Professors, and the representatives of 
the affiliated academies of science cannot be given any fixed distribution 
among the sciences because they vary from time to time. There are 66 such 
members of the Council, and there are 174 others whose interests are dis- 
tributed among the major scientific fields as follows: mathematics, 7; 



Election of the President 75 

physics, 11 ; chemistry, 7; astronomy, 6; geology and geography, 13; zool- 
ogy, 14; botany, 12, both zoology and botany, 15 ; anthropology, 4; psychol- 
ogy, 7; social and economic sciences, 5; historical and philological sciences, 
5; engineering, 18; medical sciences, 31 ; agriculture, 10, and education, 9. 
The total number of members of the Council on January 1, 1940 was 240. 
All of the 21,150 members of the Association, except 471, have been 
recorded, at their request, as desiring affiliation with one or more of the 15 
sections. It may be interesting to measure the correspondence between the 
number of members interested in the various scientific fields and their repre- 
sentation on the Council. The numbers of representatives on the Council for 
the various sections for each 1000 members affiliated with the respective 
sections are as follows: Mathematics, 4.3; physics, 3.1; chemistry, 1.3; 
astronomy, 7 ; geology and geography, 6.3 ; zoology, 5.1 ; botany, 5.4 ; anthro- 
pology, 4; psychology, 3.6; social and economic sciences, 6.0; historical and 
philological sciences, 11.5 ; engineering, 6; medical sciences, 5.2 ; agriculture, 
5.1 ; education, 4.5. 

Election of the President 

Perhaps nothing shows better the democratic organization and operation 
of the Association than the election of its presidents. In July the office of the 
Permanent Secretary sends to each member of the Council a preliminary 
nomination ballot. There are on it the names of the past presidents for the 
preceding 20 years and the field in which each of them was distinguished. 
About 15 of the names receiving the greatest number of votes in the pre- 
liminary ballot by the Council are included on the nomination ballot sent 
out to the entire membership of the Association on October 1, and also the 
names of the presidents for the preceding 20 years. The members are advised 
that they may make nominations other than those made by the Council. 

At the election of the president by the Council at the annual meeting in 
December the names of from 10 to 15 persons receiving the greatest number 
of votes on the ballots returned from the entire membership are placed on 
the blackboard in alphabetical order. The president calls for nominations 
from the floor. Then the Council proceeds to the election by ballot of a presi- 
dent of the Association for the following year. 

The Executive Committee 

The Constitution of the Association provides for an Executive Committee 
of the Council for two reasons : ( 1 ) It is sometimes necessary to transact 
business of the Association between meetings of the Council (it meets only 
at meetings of the Association ) , and (2) it is practically necessary to have a 
smaller group than the entire Council of nearly 250 members for intensive 
study of the problems of the Association. For the first of these reasons the 



y6 The Sections 

Executive Committee holds two interim meetings each year, one in April 
and one in October. An example of the problems that the Council refers to 
the Executive Committee with full power of decision is that of determining" 
which of the symposia presented at meetings of the Association and offered 
for publication shall be accepted. In nearly all cases the Executive Com- 
mittee refers to the Council the questions it has studied, with recommenda- 
tions ; in exceptional cases in which prompt decisions are necessary the 
Executive Committee acts and reports its actions to the Council. 

The Sections 

The scientific programs of the meetings of the Association are largely 
organized under 15 sections in cooperation with the affiliated and associated 
societies. Each section has a Chairman, who is a vice president of the Asso- 
ciation for the section, with a term of office of one year, a Secretary, with a 
term of office of four years, and a Section Committee, consisting of four 
fellows, one of whom is elected each year by the section committee for a 
term of four years, and the representatives on the Council from the affiliated 
societies whose chief interests are in the field of the section. 

The vice president for each section delivers a formal vice presidential 
address, usually at the meeting at which his term of office expires, on some 
subject of wide interest in the held of the section. The addresses of the vice 
presidents are generally published in Science and are referred to with titles 
and places of publication in the Summarized Proceedings. 

The secretaries as chief administrative officers of the sections have burden- 
some and important responsibilities, among which are the planning of pro- 
grams at the meetings of the Association, generally in cooperation with the 
officers of several affiliated societies. Many of the programs of sections and 
their cooperating affiliated societies contain more papers than an)- entire 
program of the Association for the first 50 years of its existence. The section 
secretaries also arrange for the voting of the section committees, or the mem- 
bers of the sections, on nominations of vice presidents, nominations of 
section committeemen, nominations of fellows, election of committees and 
other special representatives. In order to provide an easy opportunity for 
interchanges of ideas between secretaries and for conferences respecting the 
problems arising in the operations of the sections, a Secretaries Conference 
is held at each annual meeting of the Association. This conference follows a 
dinner and is attended by the members of the Executive Committee. 

Divisions oe the Association 

It is costly for members of the Association living on the Pacific Slope or 
in the southwestern mountain states to attend meetings of the Association 
held on the Eastern Seaboard or even in the Mississippi Valley. Yet meet- 



Divisions of tiik Association j~ 

ings of the Association must generally be held in the populous regions east 
of the Rocky Mountains. Moreover, the rapid increase in scientific research 
and membership of the Association made it advisable to hold more than one 
meeting each year. These considerations led to the establishment of the 
Pacific Division in 1915 and of the Southwestern Division in 1920. 

Members of the Association on the Pacific: Slope, about 1000 in number, 
had found it advantageous to hold meetings under what was called the 
"Pacific Coast Committee of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science," which was organized in 191 3. At the meeting of the Association 
held in San Francisco in August, 191 5, the Pacific Division was formally 
established by the Council and held its first meeting at San Diego in August, 
1916. (See By-Laws, Article VI, Section 2, for the territory of the Pacific 
Division.) 

On April 26, 1920, the Executive Committee of the Association approved 
the organization of the Southwestern Division that had been tentatively made 
at a meeting of delegates held in Tucson, Arizona, on April to. (See By- 
Laws, Article VI, Section 3, for the territory of the Southwestern Division.) 
The Southwestern Division held its first meeting at FA Paso, Texas, on 
April 30, 1920. 

The divisions of the Association are entirely autonomous, under the pro- 
visions of the Constitution. They elect their own officers, determine the 
places and times of their meetings, arrange their programs, and publish pre- 
liminary announcements and reports of their meetings. Occasionally the two 
divisions hold joint meetings, and at times the Association holds a joint 
meeting with one or both of them. The members of the Pacific and South- 
western Divisions have one member each on the Council of the Association 
and participate in its elections, but the reverse is not true. This close co- 
operation under complete freedom is admirably fulfilling the purpose of the 
Association, the advancement of science. 

The membership records of members resident in the territories of the 
Pacific and Southwestern divisions are kept in the office of the Permanent 
Secretary, the annual dues of these members are collected by the Permanent 
Secretary, their journals are ordered from the office of the Permanent Secre- 
tary, and all communications to them concerning the Association as a whole 
are sent out from the office of the Permanent Secretary. But the offices of the 
divisions have their own expenses which are provided for by an allowance 
of $1 for each of their annual members from the funds of the office of the 
Permanent Secretary. 

Local Branches 

At the meeting held in Atlanta, ( ia., December, 1913 — January, 1914, the 
Council authorized "the establishment of local branches in places where the 



78 Affiliated and Associated Societies 

members are prepared to conduct organizations that will forward the objects 
of the Association." Branches with varying degrees of success have been 
organized at seven places. The following organizations have functioned as 
branches: South Florida Science Association, Lancaster (Pa.) Branch 
(nearly iooo members), Mobile (Ala.) Academy of Science, Phoenix 
(Ariz.) Local Branch, Plattsburg (N. Y.) Branch, Southern Rhode Island 
Branch, and Westchester (N. Y.) Institute of Sciences. 

Affiliated and Associated Societies 

In 1899 the Constitution of the Association first referred to "Affiliated 
Societies," which were defined as scientific societies meeting contemporane- 
ously with the Association and which were recognized by vote of the Council 
as Affiliated Societies. The number of affiliated and associated societies has 
steadily increased to 174 on July 1, 1940. 

Affiliated and associated societies are societies whose purposes, organiza- 
tions and activities have been approved by the Council by admitting them 
into one of these relationships with the Association. Affiliated and associated 
societies pay no entrance fees or dues and are invited to hold their meetings 
simultaneously with, and in cooperation with, the meetings of the Associa- 
tion. When affiliated and associated societies meet with the Association, the 
office of the Permanent Secretary arranges for their headquarters, meeting 
rooms and necessary equipment. The outstanding features of their programs 
are included in the preliminary announcements of the meetings of the Asso- 
ciation and the Permanent Secretary's reports of the meetings that are pub- 
lished in Science. The complete programs of their meetings are included in 
the General Programs of the meetings of the Association. 

The only practical difference between the relationship of an affiliated 
society and an associated society with the Association is that the former has 
representation on the Council and the latter does not. If an affiliated society 
has more than 100 members who are fellows of the Association, it has two 
representatives on the Council ; otherwise it has only one. 

Associated and affiliated societies whose interests are limited to a recog- 
nized field of science cooperate with the corresponding sections of the Asso- 
ciation, and their representatives on the Council are ex officio members of 
their Section Committees. For example, the American Physical Society co- 
operates with the Section on Physics. It is the policy of the Association for 
its sections to cooperate, rather than compete, with their related affiliated and 
associated societies. Some sections hold only one or two sessions of invited 
papers by eminent specialists in their fields, leaving the major part of the 
programs to the affiliated and associated societies. 

There are some affiliated societies, such as the Society of the Sigma Xi, 
whose interests are not limited to special fields. Their representatives on the 



Finances 79 

Council are assigned to the section committees of the sections in whose fields 
the representatives' chief interests lie. 

The steps to be taken by a society to become an affiliated or associated 
society are : First its secretary files with the Permanent Secretary an appli- 
cation for the relationship, a copy of its constitution and by-laws, a list of its 
members and a copy of its publication, if it has any ; then the application and 
accompanying data are presented by the Permanent Secretary to the Execu- 
tive Committee, which makes its recommendation to the Council. 

Finances 

Article 10 of the Constitution separates the finances of the Association 
into two parts, one under the control of the Treasurer and the other under 
the control of the Permanent Secretary. The Treasurer has charge of the 
permanent funds of the Association, such as endowments for support of 
research, general funds and bequests for special purposes, such as the Jane 
M. Smith fund for emeritus life members, fees of sustaining and life mem- 
bers (after their death) and reserves that may be set up by authority of the 
Council. The Treasurer disburses the income from the funds in his charge in 
accordance with previously submitted budgets that have been approved by 
the Council. 

The Permanent Secretary collects dues from members, moneys due the 
Association from the sale of publications, such as summarized proceedings 
and symposia, interest on bank deposits, registration fees at meetings of the 
Association, rentals of booths at the annual science exhibitions, and gifts 
from members for general purposes. The Permanent Secretary also admin- 
isters funds given as grants for the support of specific researches, such as 
science in education on the college level. Nearly all of the receipts of the 
office of the Permanent Secretary are from the dues of annual members. 
Since three dollars of the annual membership dues of five dollars are used to 
pay for the subscription to Science or The Scientific Monthly, by far the 
largest disbursements from the office of the Permanent Secretary are for 
journal subscriptions for members. The next largest item of expenditure by 
the office of the Permanent Secretary is for salaries of the office force and 
operating expenses of the office, including such items as postage, office 
equipment and supplies, and telephone and telegraph. The final large item 
of expense borne by the office of the Permanent Secretary is that of the 
meetings of the Association. The Association assumes all general expenses 
of its meetings, including both those of its own sections and those of the 
affiliated and associated societies that meet with it. All collections and dis- 
bursements of moneys by the Permanent Secretary are in accordance with 
previously submitted budgets that have been approved by the Council. 



8o Finances 



From 


THE TrEASU 


rer's Report 






Interest x 


Research - 


Academies 3 


Journals 1 


Price 5 


$8,530.98 


.$1,870 




$i,536 


$1,000 


8,273-89 


2,950 


$50 


1,506 


T,ooo 


8,195.04 


3,000 


2,500 


1,506 


1,000 


7,736.66 


4,000 


2,765 


i,58l 


1,000 


7,252.60 


2,725 


2,035 


1,686 


1,000 


7,403-27 


2,000 


2,615 


1,668 


1,000 



The following table gives the principal items of receipts and disbursements 
by the Treasurer for the years 1934-1939, inclusive : 



Fiscal year 

1933-4 
1934-5 
1935-6 
1936-7 
1937-8 
1938-9 

1 Interest received only from Endowment for Research and General Funds. 

2 Grants in aid of research recommended by the Grants Committee and approved by the Council. 

3 Grants to the affiliated academies for use in aid of research, the amount available being approxi- 
mately 50 cents per year for each member of an affiliated academy who is a member of the Association. 

4 Amounts paid for subscriptions to Science or The Scientific Monthly for life members and fifty- 
year members. 

3 Annual Thousand Dollar Prize to the person who has been recommended by the Prize Committee 
and approved by the Council as the recipient of the prize for a paper presented at the annual meeting 
of the Association. The funds for the Thousand Dollar Prize are provided by an anonymous friend of 
the Association. 

The following table gives the principal items of income and the principal 
items of expense of the office of the Permanent Secretary for the years 1934- 
1939, inclusive: 

From the Permanent Secretary's Reports 

Circular- Meetings Regis- 
Fiscal year Dues 1 Journals 2 Office 3 iaation 4 Expense 5 tration G Divisions 1 

1933-4 $81,848 $50,116 $19,852 $2923 $9194 $2297 $2133 

1934-5 81,766 50,425 20,051 3650 8492 3188 2210 

t 935-6 84,288 51,776 21,222 3925 9492 2702 2275 

1936-7 84,316 52,083 20,138 3176 9864 3149 2264 

1937-8 88,284 54,6i4 23,971 3096 7790 3926 2358 

1938-9 93,8o4 57,922 25,349 5485 7752 2786 2256 

1 Annual dues of members and entrance fees. 

- Subscriptions to Science and The Scientific Monthly for members. 

3 Salaries, postage, equipment, supplies, telephone, etc. 

4 Expense of circular letters inviting persons to become members of the Association. 

5 Total expense to the Association of the meetings for the respective years. 

6 Money received from registrants, one dollar each, at the meetings; available to apply against ex- 
pense of meetings. 

7 The Pacific Division and the Southwestern Divisions are allowed one dollar per member each year 
for office expenses. 

Meetings of the Association 
With few exceptions the annual meetings of the Association from its 
founding in 1848 to the year 1902 were held in August. Apparently one of 
the reasons for the choice was that university and college men were on vaca- 
tion at that time of the year. But after the opening of The University of 
Chicago in 1893 summer sessions in universities rapidly became common 
and the vacation consideration lost its importance. Moreover, the American 
Society of Naturalists and a related group of scientific societies were holding 
meetings in the Christmas holidays. On the recommendation of a com- 



Meetings of the Association 8i 

mittee, of which Charles S. Minot was chairman, the annual meeting at 
Pittsburgh in June-July. 1902, was followed by a meeting in Washington in 
December, 1902- — January, 1903. Since that year all annual meetings of the 
Association have been held during Convocation Week. 

In 1922 a committee, of which J. McKeen Cattell was chairman, made a 
thorough study of the whole problem of meetings and recommended that a 
twelve-year cycle be adopted. Under this plan major meetings were to be 
held cyclically in four-year intervals in Washington, New York and Chi- 
cago ; in mid-periods in large cities in succession in New England, the 
Central States and the Middle Atlantic States. It was also recommended that 
a summer meeting be held in 1923. 

The recommendations were adopted by the Council and a joint meeting 
with the Pacific Division and the Southwestern Division was held in Los 
Angeles in September, 1923, just before the total eclipse of the sun of that 
year, the track of which passed across Southern California. A summer meet- 
ing was held in 1925, a joint meeting with the Southwestern Division at 
Boulder, Colorado, but no other summer meeting was scheduled until 193 1, 
when a joint meeting with the Pacific Division was held at Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia. Since 1931 the Association has held a summer meeting each year. 
Two summer meetings are scheduled for 194T, one at Durham, N. H., in 
June and one at Chicago in September. 

Various considerations enter into the choosing of places for meetings of 
the Association. Perhaps the primary one is that they should be distributed 
widely over the country. Another is that they should be held in or near large 
centers of scientific interests. They must be held where facilities are adequate 
and reasonably concentrated. This is not a light requirement, for at the 
winter meetings there must be available at one time for the sessions of the 
Association sections and of the affiliated and associated societies at least 60 
meeting rooms with seating capacities ranging from 75 to 500 and equipped 
with projection apparatus. Moreover, there must be suitable headquarters 
for the Association and for from 20 to 50 affiliated and associated societies. 
Finally, it must be possible to serve at least six or eight large luncheons or 
dinners at the same time. One of the most difficult requirements to meet is a 
suitable, conveniently located space of at least 20.000 square feet for the 
annual science exhibition and general registration headquarters and lounge. 
At summer meetings science exhibitions are not held and other requirements 
are about half those for winter meetings. 

The first step in choosing a place for a meeting is usually an invitation 
from local institutions or organizations, supported by members of the Asso- 
ciation living in the city extending the invitation. If the invitation is looked 
on with favor by the Executive Committee, the office of the Permanent 
Secretary makes a survey of the physical and other facilities available in the 



82 Meetings of the Association 

city from which the invitation is received. If the report is favorable, the 
Executive Committee may recommend to the Council that the invitation be 
accepted. If the recommendation is adopted by the Council, the inviting insti- 
tution is notified that the invitation is accepted and arrangements are taken 
up in due course for holding the meeting. Usually invitations are accepted 
several years in advance of the dates when the meetings will be held. 

Article IV, Section 4 of the By-Laws of the Association provides that "A 
local committee shall be organized by the members resident in the place 
where a meeting of the Association is held." This committee has heavy re- 
sponsibilities both in work and in taking care of local expenses. Usually a 
local committee, of from five to twenty-five members is organized, variously 
styled "The Local Committee," "The General Committee," "The General 
Planning Committee," or "The Committee on Arrangements." The chair- 
man of this committee should always be a man of eminence, wide influence, 
high executive ability and thoroughness. The executive secretary should 
have the same qualities. Often an "Advisory Committee" from local educa- 
tional institutions, academies, museums and other cultural organizations is 
set up. Such committees rarely do an appreciable amount of work. There 
are, however, subcommittees of great importance, the chairman of each of 
which should be especially well qualified by experience and ability to carry 
efficiently the responsibilities placed upon his committee. The special com- 
mittees usually are : (1) Finance, (2) Transportation. (3) Excursions, (4) 
Receptions and Social Functions, (5) Meeting Places, (6) Special Dinners, 
(7) Equipment, (8) Printing, (9) Exhibits, and (To) Publicity. These 
committees function in close cooperation with the office of the Permanent 
Secretary which furnishes the chairman of the General Committee a detailed 
list of the arrangements that must be made. For example, the finance com- 
mittee provides the funds necessary to meet the expenses of the various local 
subcommittees. The amount required at annual meetings is usually about 
$5,000, and half as much at the summer meetings. The special committee on 
printing cooperates with the office of the Permanent Secretary in making 
arrangements for printing and assisting in getting through the press the 
General Program of the meeting, a book of about 300 pages for the annual 
meetings and about 120 for the summer meetings. The other special com- 
mittees assume obvious responsibilities. The work of every committee must 
be organized thoroughly and carried out with precision so that its responsi- 
bilities will all be completely fulfilled at predetermined dates and possibly 
hours. 

Publications 

Science and The Scientific Monthly. First on the list of publications in 
which the Association is interested are Science and The Scientific Monthly, 
titles to which were transferred to the Association in December, 1938, by 



Publications 83 

J. McKeen Cattell and Josephine Owen Cattell. Dr. and Mrs. Cattell retain 
full control as editors and publishers of these journals until they voluntarily 
relinquish control of them or until Dr. Cattell's death. When control of them 
passes to the Association, the Association, under the terms of an agreement 
entered into at the time of the transfer of title, will pay J. McKeen Cattell 
and Josephine Owen Cattell each year for a period of ten years one-half of 
the average annual net income of each of these journals for the pre- 
ceding five years. In determining the net income no charge is to be made for 
the services of Dr. Cattell and Mrs. Cattell to these journals as editors and 
publishers. 

Science is a weekly journal now in its ninety-second volume and has been 
the official journal of the Association since 1900. The Scientific Monthly is 
a 96-page illustrated journal now in its fifty-first volume. Each member of 
the Association receives with his membership a subscription to either Science 
or The Scientific MontJily, at his option. To nonmembers the annual sub- 
scription to Science is $6.00 and to The Scientific Monthly, $5.00. 

The Association Symposia. In January, 1934, the Science Press pub- 
lished as a supplement to Science a report on "The Protection by Patents of 
Scientific Discoveries" that had been submitted by the Committee on Patents, 
Copyrights and Trade Marks, consisting of Joseph Rossman, Chairman, 
K. G. Cottrell, A. W. Hull and A. F. Woods. This report was published 
under the general title "Occasional Publications of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science," No. 1, and appeared as a supplement to 
Science, vol. 79. In the same year a symposium on "Physical and Chemical 
Changes in Nerve During Activity" was published as No. 2 of this series. 
The third on "The Scientific Aspects of Flood Control" was published in 
1936. The first two of these publications are out of print. The fourth, a sym- 
posium on "Some Fundamental Aspects of the Cancer Problem," was pub- 
lished in June, 1937. Copies of this 248-page volume are still available. 

Financial responsibility for the publication of the first four of the "Occa- 
sional Publications of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science" was assumed by the Science Press. Since other symposia of high 
merit were being organized for presentation at meetings of the Association, 
it appeared likely that their publication might assume considerable propor- 
tions. After considerable discussion the Council passed the following resolu- 
tion on December 27, 1937: "That the Association assume responsibility for 
the publication of such symposia as shall be passed upon and approved by 
the Executive Committee". At the same meeting, the Council approved the 
recommendation of the Executive Committee "that the Association assume 
full responsibility for the publication of the Acid-fast Bacteria [later called 
Tuberculosis and Leprosy] symposium presented at the Denver meeting, 
June, 1937." The Association has assumed full responsibility for all its later 



84 Grants 

symposia (except one 1 ) that have been published. The list is as follows: 

Tuberculosis and Leprosy (24 contributors) 1938 

Syphilis (33 contributors) 1938 
Recent Advances in Surface Chemistry and Chemical Physics 

(12 contributors) 1939 

The Migration and Conservation of Salmon (9 contributors) 1939 

Mental Health (94 contributors) 1939 

Problems of Lake Biology (9 contributors) 1939 

The Gonococcus and Gonococcal Infection (45 contributors/) 1939 

The Genetics of Pathogenic Organisms (11 contributors) 1940 

Blood, Heart and Circulation (53 contributors) 1940 

The Cell and Protoplasm (17 contributors) 1940 

The Association publishes only those symposia presented at its meetings 
that are systematic, comprehensive and documented discussions by eminent 
specialists of important limited fields of science. It has been said that only 
those symposia are published that the Association cannot afford not to pub- 
lish. However that may be, the ten published in the past three years have 
received hearty approval by specialists in their fields and a gratifying" number 
of copies of them have been sold. The policy has been adopted of selling" the 
symposia and all other publications of the Association at discounts to its 
members. 

77/f Association Science Series. In June, 1939, the Association entered 
into a contract with Doubleday, Doran and Company, Inc., for the publica- 
tion, at the publisher's expense, of nontechnical books on scientific subjects 
of wide general interest. Manuscripts submitted for this series are passed on 
by a committee representing the Association and by the publishers. Only if 
a manuscript is accepted both by the Association and by the publishers does 
it appear as one of the Association Science Series of books. 

The first book in this series is "Multiple Human Births," by H. H. New- 
man, which is scheduled to appear from the press on October 21, 1940. The 
second is "Strange Malady" (allergy), by Warren T. Vaughan, which is 
scheduled to be published in January, 1941. Members of the Association will 
be allowed discounts of 20 per cent from the list prices of these books. 

Grants 

Each year the Council makes an appropriation out of the income from 
the endowment and permanent funds of the Association for grants in aid of 
research. The amounts appropriated may vary from year to year, depending 
upon the income available for the purpose. The amount appropriated in each 
of the past six years is given in the table on page 80. 

The individual grants are made by the Council upon the recommendation 
of the Committee on Grants, which consists of 8 members, two elected each 

1 The exception is "The Cell Theory," presented at the Virginia (Richmond) meeting in Decembei 
1938; published by the Jaques Cattell Press, Lancaster, Pa. 



Prizes 85 

year for a term of 4 years. The members of the Grants Committee are chosen 
from among the various sciences so that every principal field is represented. 
1 11 October of each year a note is published in Science, stating that the Asso- 
ciation gives grants and that instructions and blanks for making applications 
can be obtained from the office of the Permanent Secretary. Early in De- 
cember the Permanent Secretary sends copies of all applications received to 
each member of the Grants Committee. The Grants Committee reports its 
recommendations, through the office of the Permanent Secretary, to the 
Council at the annual meeting of the Association, and the Council formally 
votes the grants. The grants are usually for amounts not exceeding $200, 
and they are often for aid in completing research already well under way or 
for which funds have been provided in part from other sources. Each re- 
cipient of a grant is required to report to the Association on the results 
obtained with its aid. 

Since 1935 the Association each year has made available to each affiliated 
academy for grants in aid of research an amount approximately equal to 
$0.50 for each of its members who is also a member of the Association. The 
funds for the grants are appropriated by the Council. The academies decide 
on the grants they desire to make and notify the office of the Permanent 
Secretary, which transmits to them the amounts made available under the 
appropriation by the Council. 

The Association makes these funds available to the academies because 
experience has shown that they contribute efficiently to the advancement of 
science. Through the affiliated academies the Association is able to extend 
its assistance very widely and to aid many persons who would not otherwise 
be reached. 

Prizes 

The Association awards two prizes each year, "The Thousand Dollar 
Prize" provided by an anonymous friend of the Association for a paper of 
high importance presented before a scientific session at the annual meeting, 
and the "Theobald Smith Award," provided by the Eli Lilly Company, of 
Indianapolis, Ind., for a distinguished contribution to medical science by a 
person under thirty-five years of age. This award is made at summer 
meetings. 

The recipients of the Thousand Dollar Prize, their fields and the subjects 
of their papers for which the prizes have been awarded are as follows : 

1923. Leonard Eugene Dickson (mathematics). "The Theory of Numbers." 

1924. (1) Edwin P. Hubble 1 (astronomy). "The Spiral Nebulae." (2) L. R. Cleve- 
land 1 (biology). "The Physiology of Termites and their Intestinal Protozoa." 

1925. Dayton C. Miller (physics). "The Ether-drift Experiment." 

1926. George D. Birkhoff (mathematics). "Mathematical Criticism of some Physical 
Theories." 

1 Shared equally the prize for 1925. 



86 The Annual Science Exhibition 

1927. H. J. Muller (genetics). "The Influence of X-rays on Genes and Chromosomes."' 

1928. Oliver Kamm (chemistry). "The Hormones of the Pituitary Gland." 

1929. Arthur J. Dempster (physics). "The Reflection of Protons from a Calcite 
Crystal." 

1930. M. A. Tuve, L. R. Hafstad and O. Dahl (physics). "The Production of Beta 
Rays and Gamma Rays by Means of High-Yoltage Vacuum Tubes." 

1931. C. C. Speidel (medicine). "The Study of Living Nerves." 

1932. Henry Eyring (chemistry). "Quantum Mechanics and Chemistry with Particular 
Reference to Reactions Involving Conjugate Double Bonds." 

! 933- Reuben L. Kahn (medicine). "Tissue Reactions in Immunity; the Specific Re- 
acting Capacities of Different Tissues of an Immunized Animal." 
1934. Vera O. Knudsen (physics). "The Absorption of Sound in Gases." 
J 935- P- W. Zimmerman (plant physiology) and A. E. Hitchcock (botany). "Re- 
sponses of Plants to Synthetic Growth Substances (Phyto-hormones)." 

1936. W. M. Stanley (chemistry). "Some Biochemical Investigations on Crystalline 
Tobacco Mosaic Virus Proteins." 

1937. Philip R. White (botany). "Root Pressure — an Unappreciated Force in Sap 
Movement." 

1938. Norman R. F. Maier (psychology). "Experimentally Produced Neurotic Be- 
havior in the Rat." 

1939. I. I. Rabi (physics). "Radio Frequency Spectra of Atoms and Molecules." 

The Theobald Smith Awards in Medical Science have been as follows : 

1937. Robley D. Evans. "A Study of Radium Poisoning." 

1938. Charles F. Code. "Histamine in the Blood." 

1939. Albert B. Sabin. "Constitutional Barriers to Involvement of the Nervous System 
by Certain Viruses." 

The Annual Science Exhibition 

At the meeting held in Kansas City in 1925 the Association had its first 
science exhibition, managed by Major H. S. Kimberly, of Washington, and 
Professor Albert Saeger, of Kansas City. There were 10 exhibits by leading 
manufacturers of scientific instruments, apparatus, biological models, mate- 
rials and supplies, and exhibits by several agencies of the Government, in- 
cluding the Bureau of Standards, the Chemical Warfare Service (com- 
bating boll weevil and other pests), the Bureau of Fisheries, the F'ixed 
Nitrogen Research Laboratory, the Navy and the Smithsonian Institution. 
In addition, there were about 25 exhibits by individual scientists and labora- 
tories. 

At each annual meeting of the Association since 1925 a science exhibition 
has been held. The mere fact that the exhibits have been held for 16 suc- 
cessive years proves that they have been of advantage both to the exhibitors 
and to the Association. Scientists and institutions presenting individual 
exhibits have shown other scientists in the most efficient way what they are 
doing and how they are doing it. And those who visit these exhibits may 
make valuable comments and suggestions to the exhibiting scientists about 



The Annual Science Exhibition 87 

the problems on which they are working. In short, the exhihits by scientists 
and institutions give unsurpassed opportunities for conferences between 
experts on important scientific problems and methods in the atmosphere of 
the laboratory. 

Publishers of scientific books find at the meetings of the Association large 
numbers of prospective purchasers of their publications. The members of the 
Association look over the new books in their fields not only to decide what 
they will themselves purchase but to make recommendations to libraries and 
for adoption for classroom use. 

Once scientists worked in garrets with instruments of their own construc- 
tion. Now the progress of science is essentially dependent on those who make 
the enormous variety of instruments and equipment that scientists use. No 
astronomer could construct a 100-inch telescope ; no biologist could make his 
own compound microscope ; no chemist could produce the delicate scales he 
uses in his work; no medical man could design an electrocardiograph that 
would function. Specialists design and manufacture all such things, often at 
very great cost in time and money. They and the scientists together promote 
the advancement of science. For these reasons the Association welcomes the 
manufacturers of scientific equipment, apparatus and supplies of all kinds in 
their annual science exhibitions. 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS 



For the Period Jan. 1934 - Jan. 1940 



Volumes LXXXVII - XCIII 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION, 1934-1940 

Presidents of the Association. 1034- '940 
(For the calendar years) 

Edward L. Thorndike ( psychology), Columbia University 1934 

Karl T. Compton ( physics), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. . . 1935 

Edward G. Conklin ( zoology), Princeton University 1936 

( ieorge D. Birkhofr (mathematics). Harvard University 1937 

Wesley C. Mitchell (economics), Columbia University 1938 

Walter B Cannon (physiology), Harvard University 1939 

Albert F. Blakeslee (genetics), Department of Genetics of Carnegie 
Institution of Washington, Cold Spring Harbor, X. Y T940 

Presidents of the Pacific Division, 1934-1940 
(To the annual meetings in June ) 

Joel H. Hildebrand (chemistry), University of California 1934 

Bailey Willis (geology), Stanford University 1935 

Richard C. Tolman (physics), California Institute of Technology 1936 

Herbert M. Evans (anatomy), University of California 1937 

J. S. Plaskett (astronomy), Dominion Astrophysieal Observatory, 

Victoria, B. C i93 lS 

S. J. Holmes (zoology), University of California x 939 

Lewis M. Terman (psychology), Stanford University T 94° 

Harald U. Sverdrup (oceanography), Scripps Institution of 

Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif 194 1 

Presidents of the Southwestern Division, 1934-T940 

( To the annual meetings in April) 

Oliver C. Lester (pbysics), Colorado Carnotite Company 1934 

D. S. Robbins (physics), State College, Xew Mexico 1935 

Harold S. Colton (zoology), Museum of Northern Arizona 193O 

Frank E. E. Germann (chemistry), University of Colorado 1937 

Frank E. E. Germann (chemistry), University of Colorado 1938 

E. F. Carpenter (astronomy), University of Arizona 1939 

John R. Eyer ( biology), State College, New Mexico 1940 

Carrol V. Xewson (mathematics), University of Xew Mexico 1941 



91 



9 2 



Section Officers 



SECTION OFFICERS 



Mathematics (A) 

Vice Presidents 

R. D. Carmichael '934 

T. H. Hildebrandt 1935 

G. C. Evans 10.51. 

W. D. Cairns 1937 

J R. Kline 1938 

Marston Morse 1939 

A. B. Coble 1940 

Secretaries 

William H. Roever 1920-24 

R. C. Archibald 1925-27 

Charles N. Moore 1928-32 

Earle R. Hedrick 1933- 

Physics (B) 

Vice Presidents 

Henry G. Gale 1934 

John T. Tate 1935 

George R. Pegrani 1936 

Harvey Fletcher 1937 

H. E. Ives 1938 

E. O. Lawrence 1939 

A. L. Hughes 1940 

Secretaries 

G. W. Stewart 1917—20 

S. R. Williams 1921-24 

A. L. Hughes 1925-32 

H. A. Barton 1933- 

Chemistry (C) 

Vice Presidents 

Joel H. Hildebrand 1934 

Moses Gomberg 1935 

Irving Langmuir 1936 

Farrington Daniels 193" 

H. C. Urey 1938 

Henry C. Gilman 1939 

George Scatchard 1940 

Secretaries 

Charles E. Caspari 1 920 

Gerald L. Wendt 1921 

W. D. Harkins 1922-24 

Gerhard Dietrichson l 1925-28 

*R. R. Renshaw 1929-31 

R. C. Fuson 193.2 

1 Assistant secretary, 1923-24. 



J. H. Simons 1932-36 

Neil E. Gordon 1937- 

ASTRONOMY (D) 

Vice Presidents 

Frederick Slocum 1934 

H. R. Morgan 1 935 

Frederick H. Seares 1936 

Philip Fox 1937 

R. Meldrum Stewart 1938 

Everett I. Yowell 1939 

Robert R. McMath 1940 

Secretaries 

F. R. Moulton 1920-24 

Philip Fox 1925—32 

H. T. Stetson 1933— 

Geology and Geography (E) 

Vice Presidents 

James B. Macelvvane 1934 

Walter E. McCourt 1035 

George R. Mansfield 1 936 

Kirtley F. Mather 1937 

Walter H. Bucher 1938 

Kirk Bryan 1939 

Hugh D. Miser 1940 

Secretaries 

Rollin T. Chamberlin 1920 

Elwood S. Moore 1921—24 

G. R. Mansfield 1925-28 

Kirtley F. Mather 1929-36 

Howard A. Meyerhoff i937~ 

Zoological Sciences (F) 

Vice Presidents 

George L. Streeter 1934 

Oscar Riddle 1935 

Ross G. Harrison 1936 

Ralph S. Lillie 1937 

Francis B. Sumner 1938 

W. R. Coe 1939 

L. J. Cole 1940 

Secretaries 

*Herbert V. Neal 1920 

H. W. Rand 1921-24 

George T. Hargitt 1925-32 

George R. La Rue 1933—36 

George A. Baitsell 1937- 



Section Officers 



93 



Botanical Sciences (G) 
Vice Presidents 

Bernard O. Dodge 1934 

E. W. Sinnott I93S 

J. M. Greenman 1936 

F. E. Denny 1937 

Raymond J. Pool 1938 

Veil E. Stevens 1939 

M . L. Fernald 1940 

Secretaries 

Mel. T. Cook 1920 

R. B. Wylie 1921-24 

Sam F. Trelease 1925-36 

John T. Buchholz I937- 

Anthropology (H) 

Vice Presidents 

Melville J. Herskovits 1934 

N. C. Nelson 1935 

Ralph Linton 1936 

John Swanton 1937 

Diamond Jenness 1938 

Neil Judd 1939 

W. Duncan Strong 1940 

Secretaries 

E. A. Hooton 1920-22 

R. J. Terry 1923-26 

Fay-Cooper Cole 1927 

Charles H. Danforth 1928-31 

Carl E. Guthe 1932 

W. M. Krogman i933~ 

PSYCHOLOGY (I) 
Vice Presidents 

John E. Anderson 1 934 

♦Joseph Peterson . . . .Jan. 1 to Oct. 8, 1935 

R. M. Ogden Oct. 27 to Dec. 30, 1935 

* Edward S. Robinson 1936 

A. T. Poffenberger 1937 

Calvin P. Stone 1938 

J. F. Dashiell 1938 

C. L. Hull 1939 

Karl M. Dallenbach 1940 

Secretaries 

Frank N. Freeman 1920-28 

John E. Anderson 1929-33 

John A. McGeoch 1934-36 

Leonard Carmichael i937 _ 



Social and Economic 

Sciences (K) 

Vice Presidents 

Carl Snyder 1934 

Shelby Harrison 1935 

Harold G. Moulton 1936 

Stuart Rice 1937 

Howard R. Tolley 1938 

Warren S. Thompson 1939 

Holbrook Working 1940 

Secretaries 

♦Seymour C. Loomis 1920 

R. M. Maclver 1921 

Frederick L. Hoffman 1922-26 

(No secretary elected for 1927) 

Charles F. Roos 1928-31 

Harold Hotelling 1931-32 

James Ford 1933-36 

E. P. Hutchinson I937- 

Historical and Philological 

Sciences (L) 
Vice Presidents 

Solon J. Buck 1934 

George Sarton 1935 

E. H. Wilkins 1936 

R. C. Archibald 1937 

Nelson Glenn McCrea 1938 

L. C. Karpinski 1939 

Chauncey D. Leake 1940 

Secretaries 

Frederick E. Brasch 1921-27 

Leonard Bloomfield 1928 

Joseph Mayer, Secretary of Sub- 
section on History of Science. 1929-36 
Leonard Bloomfield, Secretary 

of Subsection on Linguistics. . 1929-36 
Joseph Mayer 1931 - 

Engineering (M) 
Vice Presidents 

C. E. Skinner 1934 

H. N. Davis 1935 

W. E. Wickenden 1936 

J. W. Barker 1937 

A. A. Potter 1938 

Jerome C. Hunsaker 1931 

Robert L. Sackett 1940 



94 



Section Officers 



Secretaries 

Frederic L. Bishop 1920 

L. W. Wallace 1921-23 

Hugh Miller 1924 

N. H. Heck 1925-32 

Vannevar Bush 1933-37 

F. M. Feiker 1937- 

Medical Sciences (Nj 
Vice Presidents 

Cyrus C. Sturgis 1934 

Stanhope Bayne-.Tones 1935 

Joseph T. Wearn 1936 

Esmond R. Long 1937 

T. M. Rivers 1938 

C. J. Wiggers 1939 

Paul R. Cannon 1940 

Secretaries 

A. J. Goldforb 1 920-27 

R. G. Hoskins 1028 

Charles W. M. Poynter 1929-31 

F. A. Moss 193 1 

\Y. W. Cort 1932 

W. M. Simpson 1933 

''Earl B. McKinley 1934 

Vincent du Vigneaud 193S-36 

Malcolm H. Soule 1937- 

SUBSECTION ON DENTISTRY (Nd) 

Chairmen 

Theo B. Beust 193S 

Thomas J. Hill 1936- 

Cotmnitteemen 

Win. J. Gies 1935 

J. L. T. Appleton 1936— 

M. L. Ward 1936-38 

Paul C. Kitchin 1939- 

SUBSECTION ON PHARMACY (Np) 
Chairmen 

John C. Krantz. Jr 1936 



R. A. Lyman 1937 

Wortley F. Rudd 1938 

Glenn L. Jenkins 1939 

Committeemen 

R. A. Lyman 1936 

Wortley F. Rudd 1936-37, 1939— 

Glenn L. Jenkins 1937-38 

Edward Spease 1938- 

Agriculture (O) 

Vice Presidents 

♦Jacob G. Lipman 1934 

H. K. Hayes 1935 

*P. E. Brown 1936 

E. C Auchter 1937 

Robert M. Salter 1938 

Henry Schmitz 1939 

W. H. Chandler 1940 

Secretaries 

* Jacob G. Lipman 1920 

*P. E. Brown 1921-35 

M. Francis Morgan 1936— 

Education (Q) 
Vice Presidents 

Guy Thomas Buswell 1934 

F. B. Knight 1935 

E. S. Evenden 1936 

Ralph W. Tyler 1937 

George D. Stoddard 1038 

M. R. Trabue 1939 

E. J. Ashbaugh 1940 

Secretaries 

*Bird T. Baldwin 1920—21 

A. S. Barr 1922-28 

Willis L. Uhl 1929-32 

William S. Gray 1933—36 

P. M. Symonds 1937—38 

H. H. Remmers i939~ 

Asterisk indicates person is deceased. 



MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL 



95 



MEM HERS OF THE COUNCIL 

For the Years 1934-1939, Inclusive 



K.\ OFFICIO 

The President (see page 91) 

The Permanent Secretary (see page 57) 

The C.eneral Secretary (see page 57) 

The Treasurer (see page 57) 

The Vice Presidents for the Sections 

( see pages 02-04) 
The Secretaries of the Sections (see 

pages 02-04) 

Elected Mem hf.ks 

John C. Mcniani 1921—37 

Frederick G. Cottrell 1931-34 

Austin H. Clark 1 02S-- 

Arthur II. Coinpton 1928- 

W. W. Con 1033-.M 

( ieorge T. Hargitt 1933-36 

Dugald C. Jackson 1933-3' 1 

E. K. Richtmyer i934~37 

William F. Ogburn i93S~3' s 

Louis B. Wilson 1935-3^ 

Vincent du Vigneaud I937~ 



Satti F. T release 1937- 

C. C. Colby 193S- 

E. R. Weidlein 1938- 

1 1 . W. Odum 1939- 

W. T. Vanghan i03«- 

APPOINTED liY THE DIVISIONS 

Pacific Division 

W. F. Durand 1933 

E. (i. Martin 1934 

Roy E. Clausen '935 _ 

SOUTHWESTERN I )l\'ISION 

Oliver C. Lester 1933 

Forrest Shreve 1934 

Harold S. Colton 1935 

Frank E. E. Germann 1936— 

Elected by Affiliated 
Organizations 

(See pages 97-107) 



COMMITTEES OF THE COUNCIL 



Executive Com mittee 



J. McKeen Cattell 

Henry B. Ward 

Burton E. Livingston 

Edwin B. Wilson 

David R. Curtiss 

Karl T. Compton 

Joel H. Hildebrand 

Robert A. Millikan 

Philip Fjox 

Albert F. Woods 

Edward L. Thorndike 

Edwin G. Conklin 

Otis W. Caldwell 

*Earl B. McKinley 

Rollin T. Chamberlin 

I iilbert X. Lewis 

(ieorge D. Birkhoff 

F. R. Moulton 

Wesley C. Mitchell 

Esmond R. Long 

Linus Pauling 



1921 — 
1921- 
1921- 

7928-35 
1929- 
1020-35 
1929—36 

■1933-34 
1 9 3 3-3 f' 

... 11134 

1934- 
1935- 
■ 1935-38 

• 1936-37 
1936-38 
t937- 

• 1037- 

103S 

.1938- 

. 1038-30 



Walter B. Cannon 1939 

A. F. Blakeslee 1940- 

Roy E. Clausen 1040- 

Fi n a n ce Com m itt ee 

John L. Wirt 1923— 

Arthur Keith '933- 

Wilson Compton I933 - 

Arthur L. Day 1924-39 

p Herbert Gill 1023-36 

F. R. Moulton 1937- 

Charles S. Baker '937 - 

Frederick P. H. Siddons 1040- 

COMMITTEE ON GRANTS 

Arthur H. Compton '030-37 

Carl E. Guthe i03i~34 

Samuel C. Lind 1931-34 

William R. Crocker 193-2-35 

Philip Fox 1932-35 

Edward W. Berry i933~34 

Walter R. Miles 1933-36 



Asterisk denotes person is deceased. 



9 6 



Committees of the Council 



C. C. Little 1934-37 

James B. Macelwane 1935-36 

McKeen Cattell 1935-38 

Moses Gomberg 1935-38 

Joel Stebbins 1936-39 

Sam F. Trelease 1936-39 

*J. G. Lipman 1937-39 

A. T. Poffenberger 1937— 

G. H. Parker 1938- 

*F. K. Richtmyer 1938-39 

Vincent du Vigneaud 1939— 

T. R. Hogness 1939- 

A. F. Woods 1939— 

Dayton C. Miller 1939- 

S. A. Mitchell 1940- 

John T. Buchholz 1940- 

committee on the place of 
Science in Education 

Otis W. Caldwell 1934- 

Karl T. Compton 1934-38 

Jerome Isenbarger 1934- 

Burton E. Livingston 1934— 

Morris Meister 1934- 

W. L. Eikenberry 1938- 

Ralph W. Tyler 1938- 

F. R. Moulton 1938- 

committee on source books in 
the History of Science 

Gregory D. Walcott 1927- 

Edwin G. Conklin 1927— 

Harlow Shapley 1927- 

committee on popular science 
Book Lists 

Joseph L. Wheeler 1927- 

Edward W. Berry 1927- 

Paul R. Heyl 1927- 

Burton E. Livingston 1927- 



Trustees of Science Service 
from the Association 

J. McKeen Cattell 1922- 

Raymond Pearl 1929-34 

Burton E. Livingston 1930-36 

Henry B. Ward 1935- 

Edwin G. Conklin 1937- 

Representatives in the Division 

of Foreign Relations of the 

National Research Council 

Burton E. Livingston 1921-31 

William A. Xoyes i93i - 37 

F. R. Moulton 1937- 

Representatives in the Council 

of the Union of American 

Biological Societies 

For the Association as a Whole 

Burton E. Livingston 1923- 

Henry B. Ward 1923- 

For the Section on Zoological Sciences 
Henry Osborn 1923- 

For the Section on Botanical Sciences 
C. O. Appleman 1923- 

For the Section on Medical Sciences 
C. A. Kofoid 1923— 

For the Section on Agriculture 

R. W. Thatcher 1923—33 

Albert F. Woods 1933- 

Representatives on the Board 

of Trustees of Biological 

Abstracts 

Herbert Osborn 1928-38 

Henry B. Ward 193S- 



Section Committees 



97 



SECTION COMMITTEES 

Consisting of (a) Members elected by the Sections and (b) Fellows elected as 
Representatives in the Council by the Affiliated Societies 



Mathematics (A) 
Elected by the Section 

E. B. Stouffer 1931-34 

H. E. Buchanan 1932-35 

Marston Morse i933 - 36 

R. E. Langer 1934-37 

E. B. Stouffer i935~38 

L. M. Graves 1936-39 

M. H. Stone i937~40 

Joseph Miller Thomas 1938-41 

W. M. Whyburn 1939-42 

J. L. Walsh 1940-43 

American Mathematical Society 

Mark H. Ingraham I93i~37 

Charles N. Moore 1934-36 

Gordon T. Whyburn 1937 

R. E. Langer 1938-39 

F. D. Murnaghan 1938-39 

L. L. Dines 1939 

Arnold Dresden 1940- 

J. R. Kline 1940- 

Mathematical Association of America 

W. D. Cairns 1920-36 

C. S. Atchison I934~39 

H. L. Rietz 1937 

W. D. Cairns 1938 

F. D. Murnaghan 1939- 

L. L. Dines 1940- 

Association for Symbolic Logic 

Haskell B. Curry 1937 

Edward V. Huntington 1938- 

United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa 
Dunham Jackson 1935 

Sigma Delta Epsilon Graduate Women's 
Scientific Fraternity 

Mayme I. Logsdon 1939 

Florida Academy 
J. H. Kusner I937~ 



Physics (B) 
Elected by the Section 

Raymond Thayer Birge 1931-34 

Harvey Fletcher 1932-35 

Frederick A. Saunders 1933-36 

Ernest O. Lawrence i934~37 

A. L. Hughes 1935-38 

Karl K. Darrow 1936-39 

J. W. Beams 1937-40 

Lee A. DuBridge 1938-41 

E. U. Condon 1939-42 

George R. Harrison 1940-43 

Elected by Affiliated Societies 
American Physical Society 

Leonard B. Loeb i934~35 

W'illard L. Severinghaus 1 934~ 

*F. K. Richtmyer 1936-38 

John T. Tate 1939 

John Zeleny 1940- 

Optical Society of America 

Herbert E. Ives 1934 

P. I. Wold 1934-37 

W. E. Forsythe 1935-37 

R. C. Gibbs 1938- 

Elmer Hutchison 1938- 

American Association of Physics Teachers 

William E. McElfresh 1934 

Oswald Blackwood I934 - 

C. F. Hagenow I935~ 

American Meteorological Society 
W. J. Humphreys I934 - 

Acoustical Society of America 

Vern O. Knudsen i934~35 

Floyd R. Watson 1936- 

Society of Rheology 
Elmer O. Kraemer I934 - 

Asterisk indicates person is deceased. 



f)8 SkCTIU.N CUMMITTEKS 

American Association oj University Elected by Afeiliated Societies 

Professors American Chemical Society 

Henry Crew 1034- Alexander Silverman 1034 

Joel H. Hildebrand 1034 

Society of Sigma Xi Moses Gomberg 1035 

\V. F. Durand 1936-38 P. A. Shaffer 1035 

Irving Langmuir 1936-3" 

United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa Tohn R Murlin 1936-3; 

Robert A. Millikan 1934 A. F. Benton 1938-39 

George E. M. Jauncey 1935 H. C. Urey 1938-39 

Arthur IT. Comptnn 1936- H. S. Lukens 1940- 

George Scatchard i94 0- 

Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi *£ q Franklin 

R. C. Gibhs 1934- (summer meeting) 1934 

S. C. Lind (summer meeting) 1935 

American Philosophical Association Ne{] Gordon. ... (summer meeting) 1938 

F. S. C. Northrop 1039- H. K. Benson. . .(summer meeting) 1940 

George McP. Smith 
Alabama Academy (summer meeting) 1940 

Paul D. Bales 1937 

J. H. Coulliette 1938- The Electrochemical Society 

Kansas Academy "Charles S. Palmer .934 

„ . „: Joseph Slepian 1934 

Harvey A. Zinszer 1934-38 g c Und ^ 

Maryland Academy c - A - Mann W» 

H. Jermain Creighton 1936- 

S. Karrer 1039- ,„ c- 1 1 u t 

*Herman Schlundt 1936-37 

Missouri Academy Hiram S - ^"kens 193S- 

T , ... n . „ . Wm. C. Bray (summer meeting) 1934 

K. 1. Durtord 1038- ... ... , T 

\\ . \\ . Hanscom 

New Orleans . Icadcmy (summer meeting) 1934 

,, _,. Earl C. Gilbert 

Isaac M. Chne km; 

• ( summer meeting) 1940 

Ohio Academy Paul c - Haeseler 

, v .,,. u ., , (summer meeting) 1940 

\\ illiam H. Alexander J935~ 

Tennessee Academy American Oil Chemists' Society 

A. W. Dicus 1939- * Charles E. Coates 1934- 

CHi:.\! ISTKY ( C) American Pharmaceutical I Association 

Elected by tut. Section j ohn c . Krantz, Jr 1934-37 

Frank C. Whitmore 1031-34 

William Hlum 1932-35 Sigma Xi 

Charles A. Browne 1933-36 Edward Ellery i?34~ 

\rlhur B. Lamb >934~37 

.1. H. Hildebrainl 1935-38 Colorado-Wyoming Academy 

Harrington Daniels 1 1038- ,. v . mk F F Qermann 1934- 

Moses Gomberg 1036-30 

Irving Langmuir 1937-40 Georgia - Icadcmy 

James F. Norris 1938-41 * , r> c Li 

, r t. „ *Leon P. Smith 1034-35 

M. T. Bogert 1939-42 

Ross V Gortner 1040-43 <-. ., ,■ ,■ , , 

^ *' South Carolina .icadcmy 

. „ . . r J. E. Copenhaver 1934 

1 Special member ot Executive Committee uf „ t, t, ,. 

ilit- section. Roe E. Remington 1936-3" 



Section Committees 99 

Tennessee Acadewx George Rogers Manshdd '"-"^ 

Waldemar T. Schaller 1933-3" 

J"'"' T. WcGill '934-3^ kngh ,, mit - ,„,.,_, . 

LpU».It Bircher Edward L. Troxeil 1935-38 

(summ.r meetmg) 1939 Q H Behre . , r ,036-39 

Wisconsin - Icademy Walter H. Bucher > .039 

r Preston £. lames i937~4« 

W- A " Sch " ette I934 ~ 36 W, T. Thun, Jr HWM' 

,-., William W. Rubey 1939-4-^ 

ASTRONOMY (D) (ohn , Ricli 1CJ40 _ 43 

Elected by the Section 

, . . ,. ,,,,,-!, EJECTED BY AFFILIATED' SoCIKTIKS 

\nnie J. Cannon ">3' 34 , . It ,.. 

W H. Wright 1032-35 Gcdlogtcdl Society of . Imcrtca 

C. O. Lampland 1933-40 Charles P. Rerkey I934~ 

Raymond S! Dugan t934~37 [, :H((t Blackwelder '934 

Dinsmore Alter i935~3* \e\ in M. Ferineman '935 

John C. Duncan 1936-3" w c Mendenhall i93 rt 

Charles P.Olivier 1938-4' Charles Palache 1037 

Robert H. Baker 1939-4- j Wavland Vaughan 1038- 

Dean B. McLaughlin 1940-43 

Paleoiitolo'gfial Society 

Elected by Affiliated Societies siemon W. Mullet- '934 

American Astronomical Society Hervey W. Shimer io.u 

„ . . o toL fohn R. Ball i93S~ 

keivin Burns {934 -' 

.. . n„„;<,i Kiu Lourtnev Werner i935-3» 

Zaccheus Daniel "934 - 

r . .. j, IO ,- I. E. Carman 1939- 

h. S. Haynes '935 

W. J. Luyten '935 Association of . [merman GeVgr.apUers 

S L. Boothroyd 1936-37 

W. S. Eichelherger 1036-37 Charles C: Colby 19^ 

S. V Mitchell !938 W. Elmer Ekblaw .9 4 

Herbert R. Morgan 193S « -> "Harold Smith 935-f 

,. .. , , ,K,n. E. N. Transeau i939 _ 

E. S. Manson 1939 

. .. T0 . _ Eugene Van Cleef 1930- 

I . J. N assan 1939 

Harold D. Babcock Seismological Society of .hncrica 
...(summer meeting) 1034 

"r'r" 'ford Nicholas H. Heck i934"37 

' * . .summer meeting) .,34 Harold Edgar McComb i 9 34 

C X "Chant (summer meeting) ,038 W* B. Macelwane 1935-37 

Stephen Taher f93° 

Istronomical Society o'f the Pacific Wm. T. Thorn, Jr 1938- 

Krivin Burns 10.U <" h » P " Dda " e >' V ^ 

Eli Stuart Haynes 1935-3* LI Don Leet (summer meet.ng) 1934 

R. T. Crawford 1939" K ™*' F " Mather 

C. D. Shane (summer meeting) 1934 (summer meeting. « 9 34 

Society for Research on Meteorites American Geographical Society 

of A ew ) ork 

'I ,Tm coin La Paz i939~ 

W. L. G. Joerg 1934-30 

Imcricaii Association of I University j„h n K. Wright 1934- 

Professors O. M. Miller 1040- 

S- v Mitchell J934- M i„cralo<,icaI Society oj .hncrica 

( foOLOGY AND ( iEOORAPHY ( E) Paul F - Kerr ' ° 34 ~ 

Elected by the Section 

1 Special member Executive Committee of the 

Edward W. Berry i93i~34 -ection. 



IOO 



Section Committees 



Maryland Academy 
♦Francis C. Nicholas i934~37 

Nebraska Academy 

N. A. Bengston 1934 

A. L. Lugn 1938- 

Northzvest Scientific Association 
Otis W. Freeman i935~ 

Zoological Sciences (F) 
Elected by the Section 

William B. Herms I93i~34 

Dwight E. Minnich 193-2-35 

Sewall Wright I933~36 

David H. Wenrich i934~37 

Paul S. Welch 1935-38 

A. M. Banta 1936-39 

J. H. Bodine 1937-40 

J. William Buchanan 1938-41 

J. T. Patterson 1939-42 

H. H. Plough 1940-43 

Elected by Affiliated Societies 
American Society of Zoologists 

J. William Buchanan 1934 

♦William H. Longley 1934 

J. H. Bodine 1935 

R. A. Budington 1935 

J. E. Ackert 1936 

H. H. Plough 1936 

Dwight E. Minnich 1937 

B. H. Willier 1937, 1939 

*H. V. Neal 1938 

A. A. Schaeffer. 1938 

C. R. Moore i939~ 

R. K. Burns, Jr 1940- 

Entomological Society of America 

John J. Davis 1934 

P. J. Parrott 1934 

T. J. Headlee 1935-36 

C. L. Metcalf 1935-36 

W. B. Herms 1937 

O. A. Johannsen 1937-38 

John J. Davis 1938-39 

C. T. Brues i939~ 

S. E. Flanders 1940- 

Amcrican Association of Economic 
Entomologists 

G. M. Bentley 1934-36 

C. H. Hadley 1934 

Alvah Peterson i935~38 

Leonard Haseman 1937-38 



J. I. Hambleton i939~ 

L. A. Stearns i939~ 

American Society of Parasitologists 

George R. LaRue 1934-36,1938- 

Elery R. Becker 1937 

William A. Riley 1940- 

American Society of Mammalogists 

Glover M. Allen i934~37 

George B. Wislocki i934~37 

Lee R. Dice 1938- 

Marcus Ward Lyon, Jr 1938- 

Association for Research in 
Human Heredity x 

Harrison Randall Hunt 1934 

H. H. Laughlin 1934- 

Clarence G. Campbell 1935-38 

Laurence H. Snyder i939~ 

American Society of Naturalists 

C. G. Rogers ^34-37 

W. B. Herms 1936-37 

Alfred C. Kinsey 1938 

H. R. Hunt 1939- 

Ecological Society of America 

♦Joseph Grinnell 1934 

E. B. Powers 1935 

Paul S. Welch 1936-37 

R. E. Coker 1938 

Lee R. Dice i939~ 

Wcstern Society of Naturalists 

C. V. Taylor i934~35 

W. B. Herms 1936 

R. C. Miller i937~39 

Harry Beal Torrey i937~39 

James E. Lynch 1940 

American Genetic Association 

Hugh C. McPhee 1934 

Sewall Wright 1935 

C. E. Leighty 1936-37 

W. V. Lambert 1938- 

American Microscopical Society 

James E. Ackert i934~ 

John E. Guberlet 1935 

A. M. Checkering 1936- 

Gcnctics Society of America 
E. B. Babcock 1934 

1 Formerly Eugenics Research Association. 



Section Committees 



ioi 



C. W. Metz 1935 

F. B. Hutt 1936 

Fernandus Payne. 1937-38 

W. P. Spencer 1939 

F. B. Hutt 1940 

Limnological Society of America 

Paul S. Welch 1936 

Tames G. Needham 1937~ 

Federation of American Societies 
for Experimental Biology 

Andrew C. Ivy 1936-38 

D. R. Hooker 1937-38 

Sigma Xi 

George Howard Parker i934~35 

George A. Baitsell i939~ 

Phi Beta Kappa 
Dwight E. Minnich 193.S 

American Nature Study Society 

Edith Patch 1935-36 

Alfred Satterthwait i937~ 

Sigma Delta Epsilon 
Nina E. Gray 1939 

Alabama Academy 
P. H. Yancey 1936 

British Columbia Academy 
C. McLean Fraser 1939 

Georgia Academy 
George H. Boyd 1936- 

Illinois Academy 

Arthur C. Walton 1934 

Lyell J. Thomas 1935-36, i939~ 

Indiana Academy 
Howard E. Enders I934 - 

Kansas Academy 

*George E. Johnson 1934 

Roger C. Smith 1936-37.1939- 

Kentucky Academy 
Austin R. Middleton I934 - 

Louisiana Academy 

Ellinor H. Behre 1935. 1938 

Harry J. Bennett 1939 

William H. Gates 1940 



Michigan Academy 

Peter Okkelberg i934~35 

A. H. Stockard 1936 

A. Franklin Shull i937~ 

Minnesota Academy 
T. B. Magath 1935 

New Hampshire Academy 

Walter C. O'Kane i934~37 

W. W. Ballard 1940- 

Netv Orleans Academy 
Ernest C. Faust 1934 

North Carolina Academy 
Bert Cunningham 1936- 

North Dakota Academy 
George C. Wheeler i934~ 

Northwest Scientific Association 
Thomas Large i934~35 

Ohio Academy 
Herbert Osborn i934~35 

Oklahoma Academy 
A. O. Weese i937~39 

Pennsylvania Academy 

T. L. Guyton I934~35 

V. Earl Light 1936- 

St. Louis Academy 

A. F. Satterthwait i934~35 

Albert Kuntz 1936 

South Carolina Academy 
Franklin Sherman 1936 

Texas Academy 
S. W. Bilsing i934~ 

Botanical Sciences (G) 

Elected by the Section 

Henry Reist Kraybill i93i~34 

Albert F. Blakeslee 193^-35 

B. O. Dodge 1933-36 

A. J. Eames I934~37 

F. E. Denny 1935-38 

E. W. Sinnott 1936-39 

Neil E. Stevens 1937-40 

J. M. Beal 1938-41 

E. N. Transeau 1939-42 

W. J. Robbins 1940-43 



102 



Section Com m itteks 



Electee by Affiliated Societies 

Botanical Society of .hnerica 

G. J. Peirce 1034 

II. L. Shantz ' 9'34 

\. F. Blakeslee 1935 

C. F. Hottes 1035 

J. T. Biichholz i «).?6 

E. X. Transeau 1936 

II. H. Bartlett I937~38 

E. J. Kraus 1937-38 

Ivty l r . Lewis I939 - 

I'aul B. Sears I939~ 

. Iiiicrican Phy to pathological Society 

II. S. Cunningham I934 - 37 

Xeil E. Stevens 1934-36 

\V. U. Valleau 1937-38 

S. A. Wingard 1038- 

L. M. Massey i939~ 

American Society of Plant Physiologists 

D. R. Hoagland 1034 

C. J. Peirce 1 934 

Charles O. Appleman I935~ 39 

Charles Albert Shull '935. 1940- 

VV. H. Horr 1936- 

Torrey Botanical Club 

B. O. Dodge i934 _ 35 

D. T. MacDougal 1934-35 

William Crocker 1936, 1938-30 

( ieorge H. Shull 1036. 1038 

Frederick McAllister 1037 

R. J. Pool 1937 

J. H, Barnhart 1939 - 

C, S. Gager - 1940- 

.1/ ycolo<iical Society o) America 

H. S. Jackson '935 

C. L. Shear 1035 

Carroll VV. Dodge 1936-3(1 

Fred J. Seaver 1936-30 

W. (A Coker 1040- 

B. ( ). Dndjre 1940- 

American Society of Naturalists 

R. F. Cleland 1934-35. ?93&~ 

J. L. Cartledge 1939 

W. R. Taylor 1940 

Ecological Society of America 

*George E. Nichols 1,934 

H. C. Hanson 1935. i939~ 

Geprge D. Fuller 1936-3; 

H. de Forest 103S 



Western Society of Naturalists 

D. R. Hoagland 1934-35 

American Genetic Association 

\. F. Blakeslee 1034 

L. J. Stadler 1035 

Hugh C. Mcl'hee 1936-37 

C. E. Leighty 1938- 

. Imerican Microscopical Society 
1.. II. Tiffany 1034 

Uenetics Society of America 

R. E. Clausen 1934 

C. F. Allen 1935. i937~38 

B. R. Nebel 1936 

F. D. Richey 1939 

I). C. Cooper 1940- 

American Society of Agronomy 

J. G. Dickson 1934 

T. A. Kiesselbach 1935 

T. E. Odland 1936 

L. J. Stadler • 1937 

II. K. Hayes 1938 

R. J. Garber 1930 

S. T. Dexter 1940- 

. Imerican Nature Study Society 

E. Laurence Palmer J934 

I' hi Kappa I'hi 
E. D. Merrill 1034- 

1 II in is . I cad any 
George I). Fuller 1037-38 

Towa . Icademy 
Joseph C. Gihnan 1934— 

Louisiana Academy 
A. (i. Plakidas 1030-37 

Minnesota . Icademy 
Har\ ey Elmer Stork 1 934 

Nebraska . Icademy 

C. J. Shirk 1035 

J. E. Weaver 1936-37 

New Hampshire . Icademy 
George F. Potter 1038-39 

Saint Louis Academy 
Carroll \Y. Dodge 1937- 



Section Committees 



103 



South Carolina Academy 
Velma I). Matthews 1938 

West Virginia . Icademy 
Perry I). Strausbaugh. .1934-36, 1939- 

C. R. Orion 1037-.?* 

1 1 isconsiu Acadehiy 

X . C. Fassett 1 937-3? 

E. M. Gilbert i939~ 

Anthropology (H) 
Elected by the Section 

Adolph H. Schultz ii)3i-3-t 

A. V. Kidder 193-2-35 

X. C. Xelson I933~36 

William Duncan Strong i934~37 

*Truman Michelson i93S~3^ 

Robert Redfield 1936-39 

Carl E. Guthe i937~40 

John M. Cooper 1938-41 

Frank Speck 1939-42 

Frank M. Setzler 1940-43 

Elected by Affiliated Societies 
American Anthropological Association 

E. A. Hooton 1934-35. '939 

Bruno Oetteking 1934 

Ales Hrdlicka I93S 

Melville J. Herskovits 1936 

Robert J. Terry 1936 

♦Truman Michelson 1037 

H. L. Shapiro i<>37 

II. B. Collins, Jr 1038 

Leslie A. White 1938 

Cornelius Osgood T 939~ 

Clyde Kluckhohn 1940- 

Phi Beta Kappa 
Robert H. Louie 1934 

PSYCHOLOGY (I) 

Elected by the Section 

Walter R. Miles I93i~34 

Carl C. Brigham 1932-35 

Karl M. Dallenbach 1933-36 

Clark L. Hull 1934-37 

J. F. Uashiell i935~38 

John P. Xafe 1936-39 

Edward C. Tolman 1937-40 

F. L. Wells 1938-41 

E. A. Culler 1939-42 

Samuel W. Fernberger 1940-43 



Elected by Affiliated Societies 
American Psychological Association 

Donald G. Paterson 1934 

*Joseph Peterson 1934 

Walter R. Miles 1035- 

Christian A. Ruckmick I935-3« S 

John A. McGeOch i939~ 

Midwestern Psychological Association 

John A. McGeoch 1934 

Florence Goodenough 1935 

A. G. Bills 1936 

C. M. Louttit 1937- 

Society for Research in Child 
Development 

Robert J. Terry 1936- 

Psychometric Society 
Henry E. Garrett 1938- 

Western Society of Naturalists 
Calvin P. Stone 1 936 

Social and Economic 

Sciences (K) 
Elected by the Section 

*Henry Schultz i93 T ~34 

Holbrook Working J93^~35. 1936-39 

Harold Hotelling 1933-36 

Griffith C. Evans 1934-37 

Carl Snyder 1935-38, I939~42 

H. G. Moulton 1937-40 

Stuart A. Rice 1938-41 

Stanley Dodge i940~43 

Elfxted by Affiliated Societies 
Econometric Society 

W. A. Shewhart >934 

Charles F. Roos i935~ 

American Sociological Society 

F. Stuart Chapin i934~3 7 

George A. Lundberg 1938- 

American Statistical Association 

William F. Ogburn 1934-38 

Stuart A. Rice I939~ 

American Library Association 
Joseph L. Wheeler I934~ 



io4 



Section Committees 



Historical and Philological 

Sciences (L) 

Elected by the Section 

George M. Boiling 1931-34 

Kemp Malone 1932-35 

W. B. Munro 1933-36 

Melville J. Herskovits 1934— 37 

John W. Oliver 1935-38 

George Sarton 1936-39 

Max Farrand 1937-40 

Alexander Pogo 1938-41 

Henry E. Sigerist 1939-42 

Tenney L. Davis 1940-43 

Elected by Affiliated Societies 
History of Science Society 

F. B. Dains 1934- 

Joseph Mayer 1934- 

Eingnistics Society of America 

*Edward Sapir 1934-38 

George Herzog 1940- 

Engineering (M) 

Elected by the Section 

William E. Wickenden 1931-34 

Arthur E. Morgan 1932-35 

*Calvin W. Rice 1933-36 

A. A. Potter i934~37 

C. J. Tilden 1935-38 

N. H. Heck 1936-39 

F. L. Bishop 1937-40 

J. W. Barker 1938-41 

Elected by Affiliated Societies 

American Society of Mechanical 

Engineers 

Ralph Earle 1934 

W. S. Monroe 1934 

John R. DuPriest 1935 

A. S. Langsdorf 1935 

George F. Bateman 1936 

Crosby Field 1936 

William A. Hanley 1937 

G. W. Munro 1937 

R. F. Gagg 1938- 

R. L. Sackett 1938- 

Amcrican Institute of Mining and 
Metallurgical Engineers 

W. B. Plank 1934 

♦Albert Sauveur 1934 

Paul D. Foote 1935 

F. N. Speller 1935 



Harold L. Ailing 1936 

Q. D. Singewald 1936 

Gustav Egloff 1937 

J. R. Van Pelt 1937,1940- 

W. M. Corse 1938 

Frank E. Lathe 1930 

Oscar E. Harder 1939- 

John L. Rich 1939 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers 

C. A. Adams 1934 

Charles Edward Skinner 1934 

J. M. Bryant 1935 

A. S. Langsdorf 1935 

V. Karapetoff 1936 

J. B. Whitehead 1936 

C. C. Knipmeyer 1937 

R. E. Nyswander 1937 

Vannevar Bush 1938- 

H. S. Osborne 1938-39 

J. W. Barker 1940 

American Society of Civil Engineers 

Charles T. Main 1934 

Charles P. Price 1934 

F. S. Merrill 1935 

Harold A. Thomas 1935 

F. W. Green 1936 

Hermann Von Schrenk 1936 

Ivan E. Houk 1937- 

Arthur O. Ridgway 1937- 

Illuminating Engineering Society 

E. C. Crittenden 1934- 

*A. E. Kennelly 1934-36 

J. W. Barker '937 

American Society for Testing Materials 

R. E. Davis 1934 

Hermann Von Schrenk 1935-36 

C. L. Warwick 1937- 

American Ceramic Society 

Gordon Scott Fulcher 1934-36 

W. J. McCaughey 1937 

Ross C. Purdy 1938- 

Institute of Radio Engineers 
J. C. Jensen 1934 

Society for the Promotion of 
Engineering Education 

F. L. Bishop 1934-35 

H. B. Langille i934~35 

A. S. Langsdorf 1936 

O. M. Leland 1936 



Section Committees 



105 



Karl T. Compton I937 - 

R. L. Sackctt i937~ 

Institutc of Aeronautical Sciences 
Jerome C. Hunsaker 1936- 

American Institute of the City 

of New York 

Robert T. Pollock i939~ 

Missouri Academy of Science 
A. S. Langsdorf 1936-37 

Medical Sciences (N) 
Elected by the Section 

Anton J. Carlson 1931-34 

Victor C. Myers 193-^-35 

*George H. Bigelow I933~36 

Willard C. Rappleye i934~37 

Walter B. Cannon 1935-38 

Arno B. Luckhardt 1936-39 

Paul R. Cannon 1937-40 

C. A. Doan 1938-41 

E. W. Goodpasture 1939-42 

L. R. Dragstedt 1940-43 

Elected by Affiliated Societies 
American Medical Association 

*William H. Park 1934-38 

George M. Piersol i934 - 

Edwin P. Jordan i939~ 

American Association of Anatomists 

C. H. Danforth i934~35 

Davenport Hooker i934 _ 35 

George W. Corner 1936 

J. Parsons Schaeffer 1936,1940- 

Burton D. Myers 1937 

Ivan E. Wallin 1937 

H. E. Jordan 1938-39 

C. C. Macklin 1938 

Eben J. Carey 1939 

Olof Larsell 1940- 

Society of American Bacteriologists 

W. H. Manwaring 1934 

Karl F. Meyer 1934 

R. L. Kahn 1935-37 

S. A. Waksman 1 935~36 

M. J. Rosenau 1 938-39 

Randle C. Rosenberger 1940- 

Amcrican Public Health Association 

Kendall Emerson 1934-36 

William H. Park 1934-36 



Clair E. Turner i937~ 

Abel Wolman i937~ 

Socicty for Experimental Biology 
and Medicine 

Karl F. Meyer 1934 

T. H. Morgan 1934 

E. A. Doisy 1935 

Oscar Riddle 1936 

McKeen Cattell 1936 

G. H. A. Clowes 1937 

Ivan E. Wallin 1937 

J. B. Collip 193S- 

H. E. Jordan 1938- 

Amcrican Veterinary Medical Association 
Ward Giltner i934~ 

American Roentgen Ray Society 

Robert R. Newell 1934 

G. W. Grier 1935 

Leo G. Rigler 1936 

Raymond C. Beeler 1937 

Howard Pirie 1938 

Robert G. Allison i939~ 

American Academy of Tropical Medicine 
Malcolm H. Soule 1036 

American Division, International 
Association for Dental Research 

Thomas J. Hill 1936-38 

Paul C. Kitchin i939~ 

American Pharmaceutical Association 

John C. Krantz, Jr i934~37 

E. F. Kelly 1938- 

Wortley F. Rudd 1938 

Glenn L. Jenkins i939~ 

Amcrican Society for Experimental 
Pathology 

E. B. Krumbhaar 1936- 

Shields Warren 1936- 

Amcrican Society of Biological Chemists 

Vincent du Vigneaud I937 - 

P. A. Shaffer i937~ 

Amcrican Physiological Society 

Philip Bard i937~38 

Henry C. Bazett 1937-38 

Frank A. Hartman I939 - 

Walter J. Meek i939~ 



to6 



Section Committees 



American Society of Pharmacology 
ami Experimental Therapeutics 

Charles C. Johnson iy.?7 

Harvey B. Haag 1938 

R. L. Stehle 1938 

1). E. Jackson 1930 

M. H. Seevers 1939 

Charles M. Gruber 1940- 

A. E. Livingston 1940- 

.Imerican Academy of Ophthalmology 

and Otolaryngology 
Harry S. Gradle 1936- 

American Psychiatric Association 

Franklin G. Ebaugh 1937-38 

John C. Whitehorn 1939- 

Pederation of American- Societies for 
Experimental Biology 

G. Philip Grabfield 1.938- 

C. Glen King 1938- 

American Society of Parasitologists 

Elery R. Becker 1934-36 

E. C. Faust 1937-30 

National Malaria Committee 
Mark F. Boyd 1040- 

. II aba ma Academy 
Emmett B. Carmichael 1934-35 

New Orleans Academy 
E. C. Faust 1936- 

l "xrginia Academy 
Edgar C. L. Miller 1934- 

Agriculture (O) 
Elected by the Section 

Joseph H. Gourley 1931— 34 

E. C. Auchter 1932-35 

Walter P. Keller 1933—36 

F. J. Sievers i934~37 

Emil Truog i935~38 

R. M. Salter 1936-30 

R. J. Garber 1937-40 

Richard Bradfield 1938-41 

I f . C. Thompson 1939-4J 

\V. A. Albrecht 1040-43 

Elected by Affiliated Societies 

American Society of Agronomy 

R. M. Salter 1034. 1040- 



\Y. A. Albrecht 1035 

H. P. Cooper 1936 

G. W. Conrey 1937 

Emil Truog 1938 

F. B. Smith 1030 

American Society for Horticultural 
Science 

VV. H. Alderman I934~37 

J. K. Shaw 1934-37 

C. H. Connors 1938 

E. H. MacDaniels 1938 

V. R. Gardner 1939 

A. J. Heinicke I939 - 

Y. R. Boswell 1940- 

Society of American Foresters 

Harris Collingwood 1934 

Henry I. Baldwin 1935- 

C. F. Korstian 1037- 

Canadian Society of Technical 

Agriculturists 

H. Barton I934~ 

. Imerican Society of Animal Production 

Paul E. Howe 1934-3 7 

Klmer Roberts 1938- 

Society of American Bacteriologists 

S. A. YVaksman 1034—37, 1940- 

R. E. Buchanan 1938-30 

Minnesota Academy 
H. K. Wilson 1036- 

North Carolina Academy 
C. F. Korstian i934 - 35 

Oklahoma Academy 
Horace James Harper 1934-36 

South Carolina Academy 

G. H. Collings 1939 

Education (O) 
Elected by the Section 

Truman Lee Kelley i93 I- 34 

Walter S. Monroe 1932-35 

M. R. Trabue 1933-36 

Stuart A. Courtis 1934-37 

A. I. Gates I935~38 

Ernest Horn 1 936-30 

E. J. Ashbaugh 1937-40 

F. B. Knight 1038-41 



Section Com m lttees 



107 



Edward S. Evenden 1939-4- 

S. R. Powers 1940-4.? 

Elected by Affiliated Societies 
National Education Association 

Otis \V. Caldwell i934~ 

J. W. Studebaker 1934-36 

Florence E. Bamberger I937~ 

National Society of College Teachers 
of Education 

Stuart A. Courtis 1934- 

F. C. Ensign 1034- 

National Society for the Study of 
Education 

M. K. Trabue 1934-36, 1938- 

Guy M. Whipple 1934-35 

W. S. Gray 1936 

Frank N. Freeman 1937 

Ralph W. Tyler 1937- 

f'hi Beta Kappa 
William A, Shimer 1936- 



Appointed by Affiliated 
Organizations 1 

Section on Mathematics p. 97 

Section on Physics pp. 97-98 

Section on Chemistry pp. 98-90 

Section on Astronomy p. 99 

Section on Geology ami 

Geography pp. 99-100 

Section on Zoological Sciences, .pp. 100-ini 
Section on Botanical Sciences, .pp. 101-103 

Section on Anthropology p. 103 

Section on Psychology p. 103 

Section on Social and Economic 

Sciences p. 103 

Section on Historical and 

Philological Sciences p. 104 

Section on Engineering pp. 104-105 

Section on Medical Sciences. . .pp. 105-106 

Section on Agriculture p. 106 

Section on Education pp. 106-107 

1 Members of the Council elected or appointed 
by the Affiliated Societies, under the provision 
of Article 5 of the Constitution (page 61), are 
ex officio members of the Section Committees of 
the respective sections in whose fields their prin- 
cipal scientific interests lie. 



108 Resolutions Passed by the Council 

RESOLUTIONS PASSED BY THE COUNCIL, 

1 934- 1 940 

Resolution for Continuance of Scientific Work in the 

Government Bureaus 

Adopted by the Council, April 15, 1934 

Whereas, The American Association for the Advancement of Science, comprising 
with affiliated American scientific societies a membership of a quarter of a million, ex- 
ists because its members are convinced of the importance to America of the advance- 
ment of science and its useful applications in this country ; 

Whereas, The Bureau of Standards plays an essential and unique role in supplying 
American scientists with technical data and methods concerned with materials, measure- 
ments and standards which are essential to the progress of science and not otherwise 
available ; 

Whereas, This and other scientific bureaus of the Federal Government represent a 
great capital investment of money, work and scientifically trained men, as well as a 
prolific source of those elements essential to the national prosperity and welfare of the 
future ; 

Whereas, The permanent importance to this country of the continued work of the 
scientific bureaus maintained by the Federal Government is relatively far greater than 
the half of one per cent of the Federal budget allotted to these scientific bureaus would 
imply : 

Whereas, The recent cuts in appropriation to these bureaus have crippled their work 
and disorganized their staffs so seriously as to impair their service and in large measure 
destroy that capital investment of money, work and men on which the future technical 
progress of the country depends ; and 

Whereas, A large, part of the budgetary savings effected by these curtailments are 
false economies in that ( 1 ) the investment in some earlier work is lost, (2) some essen- 
tial work is continued in a less efficient manner, (3) many former members of staffs 
of these bureaus are now maintained at government expense on emergency Federal 
projects of far less value and with far lower efficiency than that of the work from 
which they were dropped in the economy program and (4) the technical effectiveness 
of the country is receiving a blow from which it will take years at best to recover ; 
therefore be it 

Resolved, That the attention of those responsible for the administration of the fed- 
eral affairs be called to these unfortunate aspects of the present situation in the scien- 
tific bureaus of the Government, and that they be requested to provide adequately for 
the continuation of such scientific work as is, in the opinion of qualified scientists and 
technical experts, essential to the national prosperity and not capable of or appropriate 
for efficient continuation by non-governmental agencies ; and be it further 

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be sent to the President of the United States, 
to the members of his Cabinet, to the Director of the Budget and to the Members of 
Congress, and that it be published in the official organ of this Association. 



Resolutions Passkd by the Council 109 

Resolution Reaffirming the Relation of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science to Human Welfare 

Adopted by the Council, December 29, 1934 

Whereas, The objective of science is knowledge of man and of the world in which 
he lives ; and 

Whereas, Upon this knowledge is based man's opportunity to live more intelli- 
gently, to work more effectively and to experience greater comfort and satisfaction ; and 

Whereas, The justification of the work and purposes of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science is found in the contributions of this work to human 
welfare ; and 

Whereas, The American Association for the Advancement of Science, founded in 
i8-<8 and incorporated in 1874, with its 18,000 members and 141 associated societies 
covering the entire field of pure and applied science including sociology, economics and 
education, and with its administrative offices in the Smithsonian Institution of Washing- 
ton has been and is well and permanently organized to administer funds for the ad- 
vancement of science ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the American Association for the Advancement of Science is prepared 
to accept and administer additional funds for the advancement of science and the pro- 
motion of national welfare. 



Resolution for Governmental Support of Scientific Work 

Adopted by the Council, December 29, 1934 

Whereas, Development and application of science have been basic to the economic 
and social progress of nations, making possible such movements as universal education, 
abolition of child labor and slavery, emancipation of women, insurance and pensions, 
moderate hours of labor and great improvement in the standards of health, comfort and 
satisfaction in living; and 

Whereas, Scientific developments have not only conferred general social benefits, 
but in particular have been largely effective in leading to recovery from previous de- 
pressions, — as the railroad industry following the depression of 1870, the electric in- 
dustry following that of 1896 and the automobile industry following that of 1907; and 

Whereas, Scientific research is a productive investment proven by experience to 
yield a high rate of return, as illustrated by the saving of $2,000,000,000 per year from 
the Bessemer Steel process and of over $1,000,000 per day from the modern incan- 
descent lamp, and as illustrated also by the entire chemical, electrical, communication, 
transportation and metallurgical industries and by the enormous employment in such 
industries ; and 

Whereas, Progressive foreign nations have recognized the importance of maintain- 
ing their scientific strength at a high productive level and have provided for this main- 
tenance by allocation of funds to support scientific work on a national scale ; and 

Whereas, There now exists in America a situation demanding as never before an in- 
telligent use of our national resources ; and 

Whereas, There are manifold problems in health, safety, agriculture, better use of 
resources, development of new products and processes whose social value and urgent 
need are unquestioned but whose solution is being seriously hampered by lack of funds 
for research, which have been greatly curtailed at this time when properly directed 
scientific work is more than ever needed; and 



i io Resolutions Passed j:v the Council 

Whereas, The great national planning program, which is now under consideration 
for the use of our physical resources of soil, minerals and crops, will he seriously de- 
ficient unless it includes provisions for utilizing the scientific resources of the country 
for creative work ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That aggressive governmental support of scientific work is essential to 
any sound program of building for the future national welfare, and is essential if this 
country is to do its full part in the further advance of civilization and if it is to enjoy 
its proper share in the benefits of this advance ; and be it further 

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be sent to the President of the United 
States, to the members of his Cabinet and to the members of the Congress. 



Resolutjon of Approval of An Adequate United States 

IjOTanical Garden 

Adopted by the Council, December 31 , 1934 

Resolved, By the Council of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, that the efforts now being made to establish at Washington, D, C, an adequate 
United States Botanical Garden under effective scientific control be heartily approved. 



Resolution Recommending the Adoption of Legislation Adequate 
to Control Pollution of Public Waters 

Adopted by the Council, December 31, 1934 

Whereas, The degree of control of pollution of coastal and inland waters by domestic 
and industrial wastes which is essential for public health and national welfare has not 
yet been achieved and cannot be without further development and coordination of fed- 
eral, state and local authority ; 

Therefore, Be it resolved that the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, meeting at Pittsburgh, urgently recommend the enactment of legislation ade- 
quate to control pollution of public waters. 



Resolution for a Careful and Sane Revision of the 
Pure Food and Drug Act 

. idopted by the Council, December 31, 1931 

Resolved, That the American Association for the Advancement of Science with more 
than 18,000 members and 141 associated societies and academies representing a total 
membership of more than 725,000 feels that there is a real need for a careful and sane 
revision of the Pure Food and Drug Act, which has served so effectively over a long 
period of time. 

It seems reasonable and desirable that cosmetics should be included in any new bill 
which is presented, and that in order to safeguard adequately public health and public 
welfare, manufacturers, their salesmen or other agents, should be allowed to use in 
their advertising, printed, broadcasted or otherwise, only such statements as are not 
misleading and are essentially in accordance with fact. 



Resolutions Passed by the Council j i i 

Resolution on the Use of Dogs for Medical Experimentation 
in the District of Columbia 

Adopted by the Council, December 31, 1930; Reaffirmed December 3:, 1934 

The American Association for the Advancement of Science, which has repeatedly 
recorded its protest against the enactment of legislation prohihiting animal experimen- 
tation for scientific and medical purposes, herehy protests against the passage of House 
Bill 7884 in the present Congress prohibiting the use of dogs for medical experiments 
in the District of Columbia. 

The circumstances under which this bill was favorably reported, as set forth in the 
minority report, make abundantly clear that this bill should be recommitted to the 
Committee on the District of Columbia for full and proper consideration by the mem- 
bers and for adequate presentation of objections by opponents of the bill. 

This Association is in accord with the practically unanimous and often expressed 
authoritative voice of science and medicine that animal experimentation has conferred 
inestimable benefits upon mankind, as well as upon animals themselves, and is essential 
to the progress of the biological and medical sciences. 

The history of medical discovery affords countless examples of the necessity for the 
use of dogs in certain kinds of experiments, as may be illustrated by the experiments 
leading to' the recent discoveries of insulin in the treatment of diabetes and of liver ex- 
tract in the treatment of pernicious anaemia. 

The conditions under which animal experimentation is conducted in the government 
and medical laboratories in the District of Columbia afford every safeguard against the 
infliction of unnecessary suffering upon the animals. 

No legislation of the character proposed in this bill has ever been enacted in spite of 
the efforts of antivivisectionists in this country and abroad for many years. 

This Association with a membership of over nineteen thousand, and representative of 
all the sciences of nature and of man, is confident that if the members of Congress be- 
come fully informed of the injury which would be inflicted upon the progress of cura- 
tive and preventive medicine by such legislation, H. R. Bill 7884 will not receive their 
favorable consideration. 



Resolution for the Continuance in the Department of 
Agriculture of the Land Utilization Agencies 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, December 31, 193-I 

Resolved, By the American Association for the Advancement of Science, that any 
reorganization of the United States Government agencies should provide for the con- 
tinuance in the Department of Agriculture of the land utilization agencies now there, 
including the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, Forest Service, Biological Survey, and 
the addition of such other agencies as have to do with the agricultural, forest, or range 
use of the public domain or the protection thereof from erosion. 



Resolution on the United States Forest Service as a Part of the 
United States Department of Agriculture 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, December 31, 193 / 



ii2 Resolutions Passed by the Council 

Resolved, By the American Association for the Advancement of Science, that any 
governmental reorganization planned should provide that the United States Forest 
Service remain, as at present a part of the United States Department of Agriculture. 



Resolution on the Science Advisory Board Appointed by the 
President of the United States 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, December 31, 1934 

Resolved, That the Council of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, with more than 18,000 members and 141 associated societies and academies rep- 
resenting a total membership of more than 725,000, appreciates the judgment of the 
President of the United States in appointing a Science Advisory Board and hopes that 
all problems of the Government involving scientific problems be referred to this Board 
for its recommendation before action is taken. 



Resolution Approving and Endorsing the Program of the 
quetico-superior council 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, June 28, 1935 

Resolved, That the Council of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, meeting in Minneapolis, June 24 to 29, 1935, reaffirms its previous action in 
approving and endorsing the program of the Quetico-Superior Council. 

The project of an international park, sponsored by that organization, if carried 
through, will preserve for all time the scientihe, recreational, and inspirational values of 
a unique wilderness area and will, at the same time, constitute a close link between two 
friendly nations. 



Resolution on Calendar Reform 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, December 30, 1935 

Whereas, This association is already on record as approving a simplification of the 
calendar ; and 

Whereas, The League of Nations in 1931 proposed two plans for serious considera- 
tion : one, the 13-month plan; the other, the 1 2-month equal-quarters plan known as 
the World Calendar; and 

Whereas, The 12-month equal-quarter plan has the advantages of a minimum of 
disturbance of the present system and greater flexibility in subdivision of the year; be 
it therefore 

Resolved, That the American Association for the Advancement of Science hereby 
approves the 1 2-month equal quarters plan for the simplification of the calendar. 



A Resolution on Simplification of Patent Procedure 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, December 31, 1935 
Whereas, The progress of science has greatly elevated the standard of living of the 



Resolutions Passed by the Council 113 

American people, and given useful employment to millions ; and 

Whereas, For greatest benefit the applications of science in industry should In- 
facilitated and encouraged ; and 

Whereas, The founders of this Republic instituted a patent system to encourage 
progress in science and useful arts, which has been a powerful aid in this respect, and 
which should be strengthened and maintained ; and 

Whereas, The increasing complexity of science and its applications places a great 
burden upon the patent office and the courts in their administration of the patent sys- 
tem ; and 

Whereas, The Science Advisory Board has recommended alterations in the patent 
system to enable it to operate more effectively for the benefit of the American inventor 
and the American public, which recommendations contemplate simplification of the 
process of litigation, scientific and technical advice to courts in the consideration of 
patent matters, and steps to raise the standard of invention, 

Now, Therefore, Be it resolved, that this Council expresses the readiness of the 
scientific men of this country to aid in worthy moves to render the Patent System of 
greatest benefit to the American Public ; and 

That this Council endorses the recommendation of the Science Advisory Board that 
the processes of patent litigation be simplified, in order that expense and delay may be 
reduced, by prompt, enlightened decision of patent cases by a single Court of Patent 
Appeals ; and 

That this Council endorses also the recommendation that adequate scientific and 
technical advice, on a high plane, be made available to this court and to all courts deal- 
ing with the intricate technical problems involved in modern patent cases ; and 

That this Council endorses the principle that the standard of invention should be 
raised, and recommends careful attention to this problem on the part of those charged 
with the administration of the Patent Office. 



A Resolution on International Biological Abstracts 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, December 30, 1935 

Whereas, The American Association for the Advancement of Science has cooperated 
with the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council in the or- 
ganization and development of International Biological Abstracts through the Union 
of Biological Societies ; and 

Whereas, Great progress has been made in the development of international coopera- 
tion among biologists in support of this project; and 

Whereas, The Rockefeller Foundation has generously aided this project since its 
beginning ten years ago and has expressed its hearty satisfaction and approval of the 
work thus far accomplished ; 

Whereas, The results of a decade of intensive and largely gratuitous work by many 
biologists represented by the ten volumes of abstracts now nearing completion consti- 
tute one of the most noteworthy achievements of the Foundation ; 

Therefore, The Council of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, with its 152 associated societies representing more than one-half a million men 
and women of science, both in this country and abroad, urges that every possible effort 
be made to continue this highly important and significant undertaking and hopes that 
the Rockefeller Foundation will find it possible to provide for permanent continuation 
of International Biological Abstracts. 



ii4 Resolutions Passed by the Council 

A Resolution Concerning Unauthorized Use of the Name of 

the American Association for the Advancement of Science 

and Concerning Scientific Ethics and Good Taste 

. Id,) pied by the lixecutire Committee by . hithority of the Council. December 30, 1935 

Resolved, That the American Association for the Advancement of Science does not 
allow the unauthorized use of its name hy any individual in connection with any type of 
promotional enterprise or advertising- Furthermore, this Association deplores certain 
tendencies of some individuals and organizations to exploit science for the purposes of 
gain through the public press, radio, and other forms of publicity in a manner not con- 
sistent with fundamental scientific ethics and good taste. 



A Resolution on Save-Kfntucky's-Primeval-Forest-Ueague 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council. January 1. 1936 

The Council of the American Association for the Advancement of Science approves 
the formation of unofficial councils of representative citizens, such as "Save-Kentucky's- 
Primeval-Forest-League" with the objective of securing local, state, or federal action 
in the preservation of important examples of America's diverse types of vegetation with 
their accompanying fauna. These areas should be carefully selected with competent 
scientific advice and preserved either through local, state, or national agencies. 



A Resolution on the Dutch Elm Disfasf 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, January _', 1936 

Resolved, That the Council of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science strongly endorses the efforts of Federal and State agencies to prevent the in- 
troduction of plant diseases and injurious insects from other countries and to combat 
most vigorously such diseases and injurious insects as have already entered the United 
States, especially at this time, the Dutch Elm Disease. 



A Resolution on the Problems of Plant Quarantines 

. Idopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council. January 2, 1936 

Resolved, That the American Association for the Advancement of Science endorses 
the resolution of the Sixth International Botanical Conference held at Amsterdam, Hol- 
land, as follows : 

That an effective and unceasing campaign against destructive plant diseases and insect 
pests can be successfully prosecuted only by international action and mutual coopera- 
tion ; 

That close and frequent international discussion of the problems of plan quarantines 
should take place to bring about improvement of the health conditions of plants and 
plant products offered for export ; 

That it unanimously recognizes that such action will greatly facilitate international 
trade in the commodities concerned ; and 

That, finally, this resolution be brought to the attention of the League of Nations, em- 



Resolutions Passed i:y the Council 115 

phatically endorsing the League's proposal to give this matter urgent and careful con- 
sideration with a view to facilitating and expediting the purpose and aims of this reso- 
lution. 



A Resolution on the Pan-American Institute of 

( i EOG RAPH Y A N D H I STORY 

. Idopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, June 16, 1936 

Inasmuch as the Pan-American Institute of Geography and History has undertaken 
to study and promote the protection of those natural areas in the Americas which rep- 
resent unique present and future scientific, economic, intellectual, or spiritual values; 
and 

Inasmuch as a committee has heen appointed by the Pan-American Institute to estab- 
lish and maintain contacts with the various governments in the Americas which through 
their representatives have approved the resolution ; 

Be It Rksolvkd. That the American Association for the Advancement of Science 
hereby records its approval of this plan and pledges its support in all feasible ways to 
the achievement of its purpose. 



A Resolution on the Maintenance of the Highest Standards in 
the System of National Parks of the United States 

Adopted by the Council. December 28j 1927" reaffirmed June 2$, i<>37 

Resolved, That the American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Approves the creation of those national parks only which meet the highest standards 
of the System, namely, which are wholly or almost wholly areas of original, unmodified 
natural conditions, each a unique example of its landscape or geologic type in the coun- 
try ; and 

Declares that, as the only reservational system for preservation of the primitive and 
majestic in nature, the protection inviolate of the system of national parks demands 
extraordinary watchfulness and care; and 

Recognizes that, by reason of its peculiar limitations and conditions, the system of 
national parks possesses facilities for popular education in nature and for inspiration, 
which have incalculable value to individuals and the nation. 



Resolution for the Continuance in the Department of 
Agriculture of the Land Utilization Agencies 

Adopted by the Council, December 29, 1937 

Resolved, That the American Association for the Advancement of Science reaffirm 
its position on the status of federal land utilization agencies as expressed in the resolu- 
tion adopted at its Pittsburgh meeting in December, 1934.. namely : 

That any reorganization of United States Government agencies should provide for 
the continuance in the Department of Agriculture of the land utilization agencies now 
there, including the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, 
Soil Conservation Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Biological Survey, and the addi- 



1 16 Resolutions Passed by the Council 

tion of other agencies concerned with renewable resources, such as the agricultural, for- 
est, or range use of the public domain or the protection thereof from erosion. 

Be it further resolved that all positions in these Bureaus should be retained under the 
existing Classified Civil Service without exception, because of their policy-determining 
nature. 



A Resolution on the Preservation of Yellowstone 

National Park 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, December 31, 1937 

Whereas, A proposal has been laid before the National Resources Committee of the 
United States Government that plans be prepared for the commercial utilization of the 
waters of Yellowstone Lake, situated in Yellowstone National Park ; 

Whereas, Operations incident to such utilization would inevitably result in destroy- 
ing or irreparably damaging many of the most unique and significant primeval, scenic 
and recreational features of the Park ; 

Whereas, Yellowstone National Park was established by act of Congress "for the 
benefit and enjoyment of the people"; and 

Whereas, That act specifically pledged the Nation to protect from injury or spolia- 
tion all timber, mineral deposits, natural curiosities and wonders within the Park and 
to provide for their retention in natural condition ; now 

Therefore, The American Association for the Advancement of Science hereby 
places on record its unqualified disapproval and unalterable opposition to each and 
every project that might threaten to injure Yellowstone National Park in any way 
whatsoever ; 

The American Association for the Advancement of Science also appeals to the Na- 
tional Resources Committee, as well as to all other government agencies and officers 
concerned in the control of Yellowstone National Park, and urges the prompt re- 
jection of all such projects, to the end that the nation's pledge shall be kept and this 
magnificent primeval area with its many unique features shall be preserved inviolate for 
coming generations. 



Resolution on the Importance of Animal Experimentation 

in the Study of Diseases 

Adopted by the Council, December 30, 193/ 

The American Association for the Advancement of Science, recognizing the impor- 
tant role of animal experimentation in the study of diseases, especially those of child- 
hood, and in the perfecting of those procedures and treatments to which no small part 
nf our community owes its life and continued presence among us, regards with appre- 
hension the activities of certain groups which are attempting to prevent the use of un- 
claimed animals for study in qualified institutions of medicine and research and which 
are endeavoring by direct and indirect means to cut off the supply of animals needed 
in the production of antitoxins and other biologic products. 

This Association is in accord with the practically unanimous and often expressed 
authoritative voice of science and medicine that animal experimentation has conferred 
inestimable benefits upon mankind, as well as upon animals themselves, and is essential 
to the progress of the biological and medical sciences. 



Resolutions Passed i:v the Council 117 

This Association, with a membership of over eighteen thousand and representative of 
all the sciences of nature and of man, is confident that a fully informed public will not 
support legislation which would seriously interfere with the progress of preventive and 
curative medicine. 



Resolution on Science and Society 

. Idopted by the Council, December so, 1937 

Whereas, Science and its applications are not only transforming the physical and 
mental environment of men but are adding greatly to the complexities of their social, 
economic and political relations ; and 

Whereas, Science is wholly independent of national boundaries and races and creeds 
and can flourish permanently only where there is peace and intellectual freedom; now 

Therefore, Be it resolved by the Council on this 30th day of December, 1937, that 
the American Association for the Advancement of Science makes as one of its objec- 
tives an examination of the profound effects of science upon society ; and that the Asso- 
ciation extends to its prototype, the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, and to all other scientific organizations with similar aims throughout the 
world, an invitation to cooperate not only in advancing the interests of science but also 
in promoting peace among nations and intellectual freedom in order that science may 
continue to advance and to spread more abundantly its benefits to all mankind. 



Resolution on the Cooperation of Industries and Industrial 
Laboratories with Other Laboratories and Research 

Organizations 

Adopted by the Executive Committee by Authority of the Council, June 27, 103S 

Resolved, That, in order to bring industries and industrial laboratories into closer 
relations with other laboratories and research organizations for the purpose of ad- 
vancing the interests of science, the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science now formulates and adopts the following plan : 

The Association, upon recommendation of its Executive Committee and approval by 
its Council, will accept and administer funds given in support of specific researches in 
designated laboratories or research organizations, under the condition that, if the in- 
vestigations supported by the funds shall lead to patentable inventions or discoveries, 
the investigators shall take out and assign to the Association patents on the inventions 
or discoveries at the expense of the respective donors of the funds ; and the Association 
will either assign the patent subject to usual and reasonable royalties, to the donor of 
the funds (or grant the donor of the funds an exclusive license under the patent or 
patents), subject to usual and reasonable royalties, (such exclusive license to be in no 
case for a period of less than three years from date on which the patent is granted or 
the product is marketed, whichever is the later date.) The Association will use any 
royalties so received in the support of such research as it may determine, and it reserves 
the right to waive the royalties whenever it deems such action to be in the public interest 
in the use of the products or processes covered by the patents which it assigns. 



i iK Resolutions Passed by the Council 



Resolution on Honorary Junior Membership 

Adopted by the Council. June 28, 1938 

Resolved, That the officers of the Association be authorized and instructed to offer 
to each of the affiliated Academies of Science the privilege of nominating for annual 
Honorary Junior Membership in the Association one hoy and one girl from its junior 
academy or, if it has no junior academy, from junior science clubs within its territory; 
and that the Association in thus providing for Honorary Junior Memberships shall ar- 
range that during the period of honorary membership the honorary junior member shall 
pay no entrance fee or dues, shall receive a suitable certificate of membership, the four 
copies of Science containing the preliminary announcements and reports of the meet- 
ings, the programs of the meetings ; and also Science News Letter provided through the 
courtesy of Science Service. 



Resolution Supporting the Holding of International Congresses 

Adopted by the Council, June 27, 1938 

Whereas, The American Association for the Advancement of Science, realizing the 
fact that the holding of International Congresses or meetings for the purpose of dis- 
cussing science and human welfare serves fundamentally to advance understanding 
among the nations, hereby approves in principle lending its influence and support to 
further the plans of such congresses or meetings when arranged or sponsored by any 
of its affiliated societies or other organizations of corresponding standing. 



Resolution in Memorial to Earl Baldwin McKinley 

Approved by the Council, December 27, 1938 

in the death of Earl Baldwin McKinley science in America suffered an irreparable 
loss. When on July 29 the Hawaiian Clipper disappeared in the China Sea, it brought 
to a tragic and untimely end the life of this able and devoted worker who had rendered 
signal services in his own country and in distant lands to the advancement of science 
and to the conquest of disease. 

Trained in arts and medicine at the University of Michigan by distinguished teachers 
and investigators, McKinley was drafted into the faculty of the university even before 
he had received the medical degree. Rapidly new opportunities offered themselves to 
him. Research in the tropics of Orient and Occident made him familiar at first hand 
with the great plagues of man. A keen observer and able interpreter, he promptly won 
recognition and support for his research projects. With breadth of vision granted only 
to the few, he sensed intuitively the significant lines of attack on great problems in 
bacteriology, tropical medicine and public health. 

While he gave distinguished services to several universities in this country, he spent 
a large part of a short but eventful life in the tropics ; and only a year ago returned 
from a sabbatical year devoted to experimental work on leprosy. His last great venture 
sought to determine the influence of upper air currents in the transportation and dis- 
persal of disease germs. Suddenly with the epoch making flight westward nearly com- 
pleted, and in the company with another distinguished scientist and member of the 
American Association, Fred C. Meier, some unknown disaster closed the record. In 



Resolutions Passed r.v the uhwcil ng 

sight of success he went down to glorious defeat in the great struggle of the human 
race for freedom from the hondage of disease. 

A loyal friend, a genial and vigorous fighter for high ideals, never turned from his 
purpose by narrow criticism, animated by the constant desire to make the world he 
knew a hetter place to live in, McKihley left his mark on many undertakings in science, 
education and social advancement. The Executive Committee of the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, to the work of which he had unselfishly and 
generously devoted much time and energy} wishes through this tribute to bear testi- 
mony to his services for the cause of science and for the welfare of man. All his fellow 
workers wish to join also in expressing to his family heartfelt sympathy and condolence. 



Resolution on the Cooperation of the Smithsonian Institution 

Adopted by the Council, December 2g, 1038, 

The American Association for the Advancement of Science at its annual meeting in 
Richmond places on record its appreciation of the cooperation of the Smithsonian In- 
stitution and of its distinguished secretaries, the late Charles D. Walcott and the pres- 
ent secretary, Dr. C. G. Abbot. The Smithsonian Institution has since 1907 provided 
rooms in its building for the headquarters of the Association, free of all charge for 
rent or incidental expenses, and in Decemher, 1928, increased the space to meet the 
growing needs of the Association. 

The Association may look forward to a building of its own which might provide 
headquarters also for the national scientific societies affiliated with it; but this will re- 
quire large funds. In the meanwhile the Association is most fortunate in its present 
location and address. The Smithsonian Institution is a national and international 
foundation, unique in its origin, its control and its history. On its seal its objects are 
stated in the classic words: "For the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men."' 
The objects of the American Association for the Advancement of Science are the 
same; these great organizations can to advantage work together for their attainment. 



Resolution on the Menace of Stream Pollution 

Adopted by the Council. December so, 1030 

The menace of stream pollution has already heen given careful consideration and the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science has expressed its views that any 
legislation should include provision for reasonable control by constituted authority. At 
present the Mundt bill as amended is the only measure yet proposed which conforms 
to that consideration. 



Resolution of Appreciation to the National Association of 

Science Writers 

Adopted by the Council, December 30, 193Q 

The Council of the American Association for the Advancement of Science expresses 
its ohligation and appreciation to The National Association of Science Writers. By 
the efforts of its members to disseminate through the newspapers accurate news of 



120 Resolutions Passed by the Council 

progress in all fields of science this organization has become a most important agency 
in changing the picture of science in the public mind, and is performing a distinctive 
service to science and the public. 

The services of this specially trained group of men and women are unique in the 
history of journalism and of popular education. Their efforts in bringing before the 
attention of the world the proceedings of the annual summer and winter meetings of 
the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as of the proceed- 
ings of other scientific bodies, have proved not only of great value to the public but 
also to the scientists themselves individually and collectively. 

The National Association of Science Writers is keenly aware of the importance of 
Science as the greatest potential force for the betterment of man, and has worked un- 
tiringly to make the scientists themselves aware of their social responsibility as the 
builders of man's future. By keeping the world at large constantly informed of the 
important developments in pure and applied science they accomplish a three-fold pur- 
pose — spread knowledge to the millions, materially reduce the lag between discovery 
and application, and give greater impetus to research. 






SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS 



For the Calendar Year 1934 



Volume LXXXVII 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS For 1 934 I 23 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS SQM 1934 

The Association held tWo meetings in the calendar year 1934, a joint 
meeting with the Pacific Division at Berkeley, Calif., June 17-20, and the 
annual meeting at Pittsburgh, Pa., Dec. 27, 1934 -Jan. 2, 1935. The Pa- 
cific Division had previous!}- met in Berkeley twice, in 192 r and in 1929. 
The Association had held two earlier meetings in Pittsburgh, the first in 
1902 and the second in 1918. The Southwestern Division held a joint meet- 
ing with the Texas Academy of Science at Lubbock, Texas, April 30 - May 

3. 1934- 

At the Berkeley meeting the registration was 1 104 and 863 addresses and 
papers were on the programs ; at Pittsburgh 2823 persons were registered 
and 1550 addresses and papers were delivered or read. At the close of the 
fiscal year 1934 (Sept. 30) the membership of the Association was 18,553; 
of the Pacific Division, 1856; and of the Southwestern Division, 258. 

Officers of the Association for 1934 

President. Edward L. Thorndike (psychology), Columbia University. 

Retiring President. Henry Norn's Russell (astronomy), Princeton Uni- 
versity. 

Permanent Secretary. Henry B. Ward, University of Illinois. 

General Secretary. Burton E. Livingston, Johns Hopkins University. 

Treasurer. John L. Wirt, Washington, D. C. 

Secretary of the Council. Charles A. Shull, University of Chicago. 

Executive Assistant. Sam Woodley, Washington, D. C. 

Auditor. W. J. Humphreys, U. S. Weather Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

Director of Press Service. Austin H. Clark, National Museum, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Director of the Annual Science Exhibition. F. C. Brown, Washington, D. C. 

Members of the Executive Committee (page 95 ) 

Members of the Finance Committee (page 95) 

Members of the Committee on Grants (page 95) 

Members of the Council (pages 95 and 92-94) 

Section Officers (pages 92-94) 

Officers of the Pacific Division 
(For the fiscal year June, hj^j - J uiu\ lyjp 

President. Joel H. Hildebrand (chemistry), University of ( California. 
Secretary. J. Murray Luck, Stanford University, Calif. 



124 The Berkeley Meeting 

Council Representative. E. G. Martin, Stanford University, Calif. 

Officers of the Southwestern Division 

(For the fiscal year April, iyjj - April, 1934) 

President. Oliver C. Lester (physics), Colorado Carnotite Company. 

Secretary. E. F. Carpenter, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. 

Council Representative. Forrest Shreve, Desert Laboratory, Tucson, Ariz. 

The Berkeley Meeting, June 18-23, 1934 

( The 9 .jth meeting of the Association and the iSth meeting of the 

Pacific Division) 

Officers of the Local Committee 
R. E. Clausen, chairman; A. R. Davis, secretary; L. A. Nichols, treasurer 

Participating Societies 

Affiliated with Section on Mathematics 
American Mathematical Society ( 14 -)- 4 papers 1 ) 

Affiliated with Section on Physics 

American Physical Society (53 + 5 papers) 
American Meteorological Society (37 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Chemistry 
American Chemical Society, Pacific Intersectional Division (53 papers) 
Phi Lambda Upsilon 

Affiliated with Section on Astronomy 

Astronomical Society of the Pacific (40 -f- 5 papers) 
Society for Research on Meteorites ( 1 1 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Geology and Geography 
Committee on the Oceanography of the Pacific 

Affiliated with Section on Zoological Sciences 

Western Society of Naturalists (39 -\- 14 papers) 

American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpatologists, Western Di- 
vision (15 papers) 

American Association of Economic Entomologists, Pacific Coast Branch 
(4i -f 13 papers) 

1 The first number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; 
the second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



The Berkeley Meeting 125 

Entomological Society of America (5 papers) 
American Society of Parasitologists (8 + 6 papers) 
Pacific Coast Entomological Society (o -(- 5 papers) 
Lorqnin Entomological Club (o -f- 5 papers) 
Committee on the Oceanography of the Pacific 
San Francisco Aquarium Society (5 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Botanical Sciences 

Botanical Society of America (16 -J- 46 papers) 

American Phytopathological Society, Pacific Division (40 papers) 

American Society of Plant Physiologists (o -(- 32 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

Genetics Society of America ( 14 -f~ 5 papers) 
Ecological Society of America (13 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Anthropology 
American Anthropological Association, Pacific Division (36 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Psychology 
Western Psychological Association (68 + 3 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Social and Economic Sciences 

Econometric Society (o -f- 18 papers) 
American Statistical Association (o -f- 8 papers) 
Western Farm Economic Association (17 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Historical and Philological Sciences 

History of Science Society (o -j- 10 papers ) 
Linguistic Society of America ( o -(- 10 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Engineering 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers (42 papers) 

American Geophysical Union, Hydrology Section, and 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Pacific Coast Section (13 

papers) 
Western Inter-State Snow Survey Conference (7 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Medical Sciences 

Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, Pacific Coast Branch 

(23 papers) 
California State Veterinary Medical Association (11 -(- 8 papers) 



126 The Berkeley Meeting 

Affiliated with Section on Agriculture 

Western Society of Soil Science (31 papers) 

American Society of Agronomy, Western Branch (17 + 7 papers) 

General Sessions 

Joel H. Hildebrand, University of California. "The Liquid State." (Ad- 
dress as president of the Pacific Division.) 

L. Dudley Stamp, London School of Economics. "Planning the Land of 
the Future." (Third Hector Maiben Memorial lecture.) Science 80: 507- 

5 12 - 1934- 

J. C. Merriam, president of Carnegie Institution of Washington. "Re- 
sponsibility of Science with Relation to Government Problems." Science 
80: 597-601. 1934. 

Edwin B. Wilson, Harvard School of Public Health. "Are There Pe- 
riods in American Business Activity ?" Science 80 : 193-199. 1934. 

Karl T. Compton, president of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
"Science and Prosperity." Science 80: 387-394. 1934. 

Symposia 

"Nuclear Structure" (6 papers). American Physical Society. 

"Fundamental Physical Constants" (6 papers). American Physical So- 
ciety. 

"The Protozoan Life Cycle" (4 papers). The Western Society of Nat- 
uralists. 

"The Origin and Development of North Pacific Floras" (7 papers). Sec- 
tion on Botanical Sciences. 

"A Survey and Evaluation of the Present Status of Endocrine Investi- 
gations" (3 papers). Section on Medical Sciences. 

"Can Personality Be Measured?" (9 papers). Western Psychological 
Association and Section on Education. 

"Weed Control" (7 papers). Section on Agriculture and American So- 
ciety of Agronomy. 

"Phosphate" (7 papers). Western Society of Soil Science. 

"Investigations Bearing on Reading" (4 papers) ; "Investigations in 
Subjects Other Than Reading" (4 papers) ; "Investigations Bearing on 
Maturation" (3 papers) ; "Investigations Bearing on Leadership and Re- 
sponsibility in Schools" (4 papers) ; "Investigations Bearing on Guidance" 
(3 papers). Section on Education. 

Announcement and Report of Meeting 
Preliminary Announcements and Xotices. Science 79: 396-402, 406, 499- 
5CO, 519, 536. 1934- 



The Pittsburgh Meeting 127 

Permanent Secretary's general report, including reports of secretaries of 
the sections and of the participating societies. Science 80: 43-62. 1934. 

Willis Ray Gregg. "Progress in Development of the United States 
Weather Bureau Service in Line with the Recommendations of the Science 
Advisory Board. " Science 80: 349-351. 1934. 



The Pittsburgh Meeting, Dec. 27, 1934- Jan. 2, 1935 
(The 95th meeting of the Association and its 3d meeting at Pittsburgh) 

Officers of the Local Committee 
Thomas S. Baker, chairman; Davenport Hooker, vice chairman 
E. K. Collins, secretary; C. B. Fergus, treasurer 

Participating Societies 
Affiliated with Section on Mathematics 

American Mathematical Society (75 -\- 10 papers 1 ) 
Mathematical Association of America (6 + 9 papers) 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (7 -\- 3 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Physics 

American Physical Society (77 -\- 17 papers) 
American Association of Physics Teachers ( 12 -|- 6 papers) 
Acoustical Society of America ( 12 -f- 3 papers) 
American Meteorological Society (28 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Chemistry 

American Chemical Society, Pittsburgh Section (o -f- 21 papers) 
Phi Lambda Upsilon, Xi Chapter (no papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Zoological Sciences 

American Society of Zoologists (90 -\- 11 papers and demonstrations) 
Entomological Society of America (41 -j- 12 papers) 
American Association of Economic Entomologists (124 papers) 
American Society of Parasitologists (47 -}- 7 papers) 
Wilson Ornithological Club (38 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Botanical Sciences 

Botanical Society of America (75 -f- 11 papers) 
American Phytopathological Society (105 + 15 papers) 

1 The first number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; 
the second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



128 The PittsiBUiRQ.h Meeting 

Mycological Society of America (22 -\- 15 papers) 
American Fern Society (4 papers) 
Sullivant Moss Society (7 papers) 

Affiliated with Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

American Society of Naturalists 15 papers) 
Ecological Society of America ( 10 -f- 27 papers) 
Genetics Society of America (45 + 3 papers) 
American Microscopical Society (no papers) 

Committee on Hydrobiology and Agriculture, National Research Coun- 
cil (15 papers) 

Affiliated wifh Section on Anthropology 

American Anthropological Association (55 papers) 

American Folk-Lore Society (Section and societies jointly, 55 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Social and Economic Sciences 

Econometric Society (6 -f- 7 papers) 

Metric Association (papers not listed in general program) 

Affiliated with Section on Medical Sciences 
American College of Dentists (12 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Agriculture 

American Society of Agronomy, Northeastern Section (4 + 6 papers) 

American Society for Horticultural Science (173 -f- 14 papers) 

Potato Association of America (22 -|- 17 papers) 

Society of American Foresters (o -\- 7 papers) 

Crop Protection Institute (papers not listed in general program) 

Affiliated with Section on Education 

Pi Lambda Theta, National Education Fraternity for Women 
Kappa Delta Pi, Honor Society in Education 
Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity 

Science in General 

Society of the Sigma Xi 

American Nature Study Society 

Gamma Alpha Graduate Scientific Fraternity 

Pi Gamma Mu, National Social Science Honor Society 

Sigma Delta Epsilon, Women's Graduate Scientific Fraternity 



The Pittsburgh Meeting 129 

( rEN'ERAL SESSIONS 

Henry Xorris Russell, Princeton University. 'The Atmospheres 6f the 
Planets." 1 Address of retiring president.) Science Si : 1-9. 1935- 

William Alanson White, Superintendent, St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Wash- 
ington, 1). C. "Man. the Great Integrator." Science 81: 237-243. T935. 

Earnest Albert Hooton, Harvard University. "Homo Sapiens. Whence 
and Whither." (Thirteenth annual Sigma Xi lecture.) Sigma Xi Quarterly 
23, No. 1. [935. 

Arthur B. Lamb, Harvard University. "Crvstallogenic Adsorbents." 
( Address of retiring vice president for the Section on Chemistry.) 

Charles F. Kettering, president of General Motors Research Corpora- 
tion. "Some Future Problems of Science and Engineering." (Address of 
retiring vice president for the Section on Engineering.) 

Cyrus C. Sturgis, University of Michigan. "Review of Some of the More 
Recent Advances in the Study of Blood Diseases." (Address of retiring 
vice president for the Section on Medical Sciences.) Science 81 : 368-371. 

1935- 

Albert Einstein. Institute for Advanced Stud}', Princeton, N. J. "An 
Elementary Proof of the Theorem Concerning the Equivalence of Mass and 
Energy." (Eleventh Josiah Willard ( iibbs lecture. ) 

Addresses of Vice Presidents 

Section on Mathematics. C. X. Moore, University of Cincinnati. "Math- 
ematics and Science." Science 81 : 2y-T,2. 1935. 

Section on Physics. C. J. Davisson. Technical Staff of Bell Telephone 
Laboratories. "Electron Optics." 

Section on Chemistry. Arthur B. Lamb, Harvard University. "Crystal- 
logenic Adsorbents." 

Section on Astronomy. V. M. Slipher, Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, 
Arizona. "The Atmospheres of the Planets as Inferred from their Spectra." 

Section on Geology and Geography. Rollin T. Chamberlin, The Univer- 
sity of Chicago. "Certain Aspects of Geologic Classifications and Correla- 
tions." Science 81 : 183-191,216-218. 1935. 

Section on Zoological Sciences. George L. Streeter, Carnegie Institution, 
Baltimore. "The Education of an Anatomist." 

Section on Botanical Sciences. K. M. Wiegand, Cornell Lniversity. "A 
Taxonomist's Experience with Hybrids in the Wild." Science 81 : 161- 
166. 1935. 

Section on Anthropology. T. Wingate Todd, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity. "Anthropology and Growth." Science 81 : 259-263. 1935. 

Section on Psychology. Walter R. Miles, Yale University. "Training, 
Practise and Mental Longevity." Science 81 : 79-87. 1935. 



130 The Pittsburgh Meeting 

Section on Social and Economic Sciences. Wesley C. Mitchell, Columbia 
University. "The Social Sciences and National Planning." Science 81 : 56- 
62. 1935. 

Section on Engineering. Charles F. Kettering, General Motors Corpora- 
tion. "Some Future Problems of Science and Engineering." 

Section on Medical Sciences. Cyrus C. Sturgis, University of Michigan. 
"Some of the Recent Advances in the Study of Blood Diseases." Science 

81: 368-371- 1935- 

Section on Agriculture. A. R. Mann, Cornell University. "Agricultural 
Planning as an Aspect of State and National Planning." Science 81 : 32-35. 

1935- 

Section on Education. Walter F. Dearborn, Harvard University. "The 

Mental and Physical Growth of Public School Children." 

Symposia 

"Group Theory and Quantum Mechanics" (4 papers). American Math- 
ematical Society and American Physical Society. 

"Heavy Hydrogen and Its Compounds" (4 papers). Sections on Physics 
and Chemistry. 

"Noise Measurement" (4 papers). Acoustical Society of America. 

"The Role of Chemistry in Education" (5 papers). Sections on Chemis- 
try and Education and Division of Chemical Education of American Chemi- 
cal Society. 

"Mitosis" (4 papers). American Society of Zoologists. 

"Improved Technique in the Study of Insects" (16 papers). Entomolog- 
ical Society of America. 

"The Status of Systematic Botany in American Colleges and Univer- 
sities" (5 papers). Botanical Society of America. 

"Plant Hormones" (4 papers). Physiological Section of Botanical So- 
ciety of America and American Society of Plant Physiologists. 

"Cytogenetic Evolutionary Processes and Their Bearing on Evolution 
Theory" (3 papers). American Society of Naturalists, American Society of 
Zoologists, Botanical Society of America and Genetics Society of America. 

"The Chemistry and Metabolism of Sulfur-Containing Compounds of 
the Body" (5 papers ). Section on Medical Sciences. 

"Agricultural Planning" (10 papers). Section on Agriculture and Amer- 
ican Society of Agronomy. 

"The Use and Application of Rapid Soil Tests" (4 papers). Section on 
Agriculture. 

"Psychological Theories of Learning" (4 papers). Sections on Psychol- 
ogy and Education. 



The Pittsburgh Meeting 131 

"Newer Knowledge of Interest to Science Teachers." Special Confer- 
ence of the Committee on the Place of Science in Education. 

"A National Organization of Science Teachers." Special Conference of 
the Committee on the Place of Science in Education. 

Preliminary Announcements and Report of Meeting 

Preliminary Announcements and Notices. Science 80: 423, 424, 426, 
485-494, 581-582, 612. Supplement to Science 80: 4-7, 18-25. 1934. The 
Scientific Monthly, Jan., 1935. 

Permanent Secretary's general report, including financial statements, 
reports of secretaries of sections and of participating societies. Henry B. 
Ward. Science 81 : 103-136. 1935. 

Miscellaneous Articles, Notes and Reports 

Edwin B. Wilson. "What Is a Proof?" Science 81 : 2>7~Z7Z- J 935- 
Frederick P. Gay. "The Unsolved Problems of Leprosy." Science 81 : 
283-285. 

H. H. Bennett. "Facing the Erosion Problem." Science 81 : 321-326. 

1935- 

Council Meetings. June 18 and 21, 1934, at Berkeley. Science 80: 45-47. 

1934- 

Meeting of the Executive Committee, April 15, 1934, at New York. 
Science 79: 481-484. 1934. 

Treasurer's financial report for the fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 1934. 
Science 81 : 108-109. 1935. 

Permanent Secretary's financial report for the fiscal year 1933-34. 
Science 81 : 109. 

Grants in aid of research for 1934. Science 79: 483. 1934. Science 81 : 

136. 1935- 

Membership. A statement concerning membership for the fiscal year. 
Science 81 : 109. 1935. 

The Eleventh Prize Award of the Association. Science 79: 89-90. 1934. 

The Science Exhibition at the Pittsburgh meeting of the Association. 
Science 80: 284-285. 1934. 

Symposium : "Physical and Chemical Changes in Nerve During Activity." 
Science : Science Supplement, Apr. 27, 1934. Occasional Publications of the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science. No. 2. (Out of print.) 



132 The Luhp.ock. Texas, Meeting 



The Lup.bock, Texas, Meeting of the Southwestern 
Division, April 30- May 3, 1934 

( The T./th meeting of the Southwestern Section, held in association with 

the Texas Academy of Science) 

R. A. Studhalter, Chairman of Local Committee 

General Sessions 

Bradford Knapp. president of Texas Technological College, and Ross 
Edwards, Mayor of Lubbock, addresses of welcome ; B. C. Thorpe, presi- 
dent of the Texas Academy of Science, and O. C. Lester, president of the 
Southwestern Division, responses. 

O. C. Lester, Lniversity of Colorado. "Research, the Door to Tomor- 
row." (Address of retiring president of Southwestern Division.) 

Otto Struve, Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, Wisconsin. "The Ga- 
laxy." (Fifth John Wesley Powell lecture.) 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS 



For the Calendar Year 1935 



Volume LXXXVIU 



Summarized Proceedings for 1935 135 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS FOR 1935 

Two meetings of the Association were held in the calendar year 1935, the 
summer meeting at Minneapolis, Minn., June 24 to June 29, and the annual 
meeting at St. Louis, Mo., December 30, 1935 to January 4, 1936. The Asso- 
ciation had held two earlier meetings in Minneapolis, the first in August, 
1883, and the second in December, 1910. Three earlier meetings had been 
held in St. Louis, the first in August, 1878, the second in December, 1903, 
and the third in December, 19 19. 

The Pacific Division held its annual meeting in Los Angeles in June, a 
previous meeting of the division having been held in Los Angeles in 1923. 
The Southwestern Division held its meeting in Santa Fe, N. M., having 
previously held a meeting in that city in both 1922 and 1927. 

At the Minneapolis meeting the registration was 417 and 340 papers were 
on the programs ; at the St. Louis meeting 2,292 persons were registered 
and 1575 papers were on the programs ; at the Los Angeles meeting of the 
Pacific Division the registration was 779 and 383 papers were on the pro- 
grams ; and at the Santa Fe meeting of the Southwestern Division the regis- 
tration was 220 and 142 papers were on the programs. The total registration 
at meetings of the Association and its divisions during 1935 was 3708 and 
the total number of addresses and papers on the programs was 2440. At the 
close of the fiscal year 1935 (September 30) the membership of the Asso- 
ciation was 17,937; the membership of the Pacific Division was 1971 ; and 
the membership of the Southwestern Division was 277. 

Officers of the Association for 1935 

President. Karl T. Compton (physics), Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. 

Retiring President. Edward L. Thorndike (psychology), Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Permanent Secretary. Henry B. Ward, Smithsonian Institution Bldg., 
Washington, D. C. 

General Secretary. Otis W. Caldwell, Columbia University. 

Treasurer. John L. Wirt, Washington, D. C. 

Secretary of the Council. Charles A. Shull, The University of Chicago. 

Executive Assistant. Sam Woodley, Washington, D. C. 

Auditor. W. J. Humphreys, U. S. Weather Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

Director of the Press Service. Austin H. Clark, Washington, D. C. 

Director of the Annual Science Exhibition. F. C. Brown, Washington, D. C. 



136 The Third Minneapolis Meeting 

Members oj the Executive Committee (page 95 I 
Members oj the Finance Committee I page 95 ) 
Members of the Committee on Grants (page 95 ) 
Members oj the Council ( pages 95. 92-94) 
Section Officers (pages 92-94) 

Officers of the Pacific Division 

(For the fiscal year June. 1934 - June, 1935) 

/'resident. I .'ailey Willis, Stanford University, Calif. 

Secretary. J. Murray Luck, Stanford University, Calif. 

Council Representative. E. G. Martin, Stanford University, Calif. 

Officers of the Southwestern Division 

( Fpr the fiscal year April. 1934 - . Ifril. 1035 ) 

President. Harold S. Colton. Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, 

Arizona. 
Secretary. V. C. Kiech, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N. M. 
Council Representative. Harold S. Colton, Museum of Northern Arizona, 

Flagstaff. Arizona. 

The T.h 1 rd M i nneapolis Meetin.g, J.u ne 24 to 29, 1935 
(The $6th meeting of the Association ) 

Officers Of the Local Committee 
I). F. Minnich, chairman; 1). G. Patersoii, secretary 

1 'ART I C I PAT I XG SOCIET I ES 

Affiliated with Section on Physics 
American Meteorological Society (35 papers) 

. / /filiated with Section on . Istronomy 
Society for Research on Meteorites (11 papers) 

Affiliated ivilh Section on Zoological Sciences 
American Society of Parasitologists (5-7-6 papers 1 ) 

Affiliated with Section on Botanical Sciences 

Botanical Society of America ( -f- 4 papers ) 
American Phytopathological Society ( -J- 3 papers) 
American Society of Plant Physiologists ( 19 + 3 papers) 

1 The first number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; 
the second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



The Third Minneapolis Meeting 137 

Affiliated with Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

Ecological Society of America ( -f- 4 papers ) 
< lenetics Society of America 1 6 - 1 - 3 papers ) 

Affiliated with Section on Medical Sciences 

Society of American Bacteriologists 
Minnesota State Medical Association 

Affiliated with Section on Agriculture 

American Society of Agronomy. Corn Kelt Section (o -j- 3 papers) 
American Society for Horticultural Science. Great Plains Section (o -[- 

3 papers) 
American Dairy Science Association io -j- 99 papers) 
Association of Official Seed Analysts of North America (o -j- 27 papers) 

( iEneral Session's 

\\\ P. MurpHy, Boston, Mass. "Diseases of the Klood." 

Richard P. Strong. Harvard University Medical School. "The Importance 
of Ecology in Tropical Disease." ( Fourth Hector Maihen lecture.) Science 
82: 307-317- '935- 

Isaiah Bowman, president of Johns Hopkins University. "The Land of 
Your Possession." Science 82 : 285-293. 1935. 

William F. G. Swanri, Director, Bartol Research Foundation. "The 
Nature of Cosmic Rays." 

Philip Fox, Director, Adler Planetarium and Astronomical Museum, 
Chicago, HI. "The Scale of the Universe." 

Symposia 

"Conservation" (4 papers). General session sponsored by the Association 
and the University of Minnesota. Third paper: "Conservation of Minerals." 
C. K. Leith. Science 82 : 109-1 17. 1935. 

''Hormone Activity" (4 papers). Section on Zoological Sciences. 

"Dormancy, After-Ripening, and Germination of Seeds" (7 papers). 
American Society of Plant Physiologists. 

"Improving the Germ Plasm of Domestic Plants and Animals" (3 
papers). Section on Agriculture, American Phytopathological Society. 
American Society of Plant Physiologists, Corn Kelt Section of American 
Society of Agronomy, Great Plains Section of American Society of Horti- 
cultural Science and American Dairy Science Association. 

"Past, Present and Future of Phytopathology in North America." Amer- 
ican Phytopathological Society. 

"Attitude Measurement" ( 2 papers ). Section on Psychology. 



138 The Fourth St. Louis Meeting 

"Diseases of the Blood" (3 papers). Section on Medical Sciences and 
Minnesota State Medical Association. 

"Higher Education" (5 papers). Section on Education. 
"Improvement in Learning" (4 papers). Section on Education. 
"Childhood Studies" (4 papers). Section on Education. 

Announcements and Reports 

The Coming Minneapolis Meeting. Henry B. Ward. Science 81 : 266- 
267. 1935. 

Preliminary Announcement of the Minneapolis Meeting. Henry B. Ward. 
Science 81 : 495"5°4- J 935- 

Grants in Aid of Research for 1936. Henry B. Ward. Science 81 : 610. 

1935- 

The Lancaster Branch of the Association. F. A. Coventry. Science 81 : 
286-287. I935- 

Permanent Secretary's general report of the Minneapolis Meeting, in- 
cluding reports of the secretaries of the sections and of the participating 
societies. Henry B. Ward. Science 82 : 71-88. 1935. 

The Fourth St. Louis Meeting, Dec. 30, 1935 -Jan. 4, 1936 

(The Q/th meeting of the Association) 

Officers of the Local Committee 

George T. Moore, chairman; James B. Macelwane, vice chairman 

W. D. Shipton, secretary 

Participating Societies 

Affiliated zvith Section on Mathematics 

American Mathematical Society (68 + 3 papers 1 ) 
Mathematical Association of America (6 + 2 papers) 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (10 + 2 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Physics 

American Physical Society (67 -j- 7 papers) 

American Association of Physics Teachers (28 + 6 papers) 

American Meteorological Society ( 10 -\- 15 papers) 

Affiliated with the Section on Geology and Geography 
Association of American Geographers ( 56 -f- n papers) 

1 The first number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; 
the second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



The Fourth St. Louis Meeting 139 

National Council of Geography Teachers (26 papers) 
Seismological Society of America ( 14 + 6 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Zoological Sciences 

Entomological Society of America (43 papers) 

American Association of Economic Entomologists ( 12 + 43 papers) 

American Society of Parasitologists (58 + 5 papers) 

Wilson Ornithological Club (31 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Botanical Sciences 

Botanical Society of America (62 -j- 24 papers) 
American Phytopathological Society (99 + 2 8 papers) 
American Society of Plant Physiologists (41 + 15 papers) 
Mycological Society of America (13 -f- 14 papers) 
American Fern Society (4 -j- 3 papers) 
Sullivant Moss Society (7 papers) 

Affiliated with Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

American Society of Naturalists (o -f- 10 papers) 
Ecological Society of America (33 + 21 papers) 
Genetics Society of America (2,2, + 16 papers) 
American Microscopical Society 
Phi Sigma Society (90 papers) 
Limnological Society of America (18 papers) 
Beta Beta Beta Honor Biological Fraternity 

Affiliated with Scctio)i on Social and Economic Sciences 
Econometric Society (1 + 5 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Historical and Philological Sciences 
History of Science Society 

Affiliated with Section on Agriculture 

American Society of Agronomy (0 + 4 papers) 

American Society for Horticultural Science ( 109 + 19 papers) 

Potato Association of America (36 + 20 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Education 

Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity 

Pi Lambda Theta, National Education Fraternity for Women 

Kappa Delta Pi, Honor Society in Education 



140 The Fourth St. Louis Meeting 

Science in General 

Society of the Sigma Xi 

United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa 

American Nature Study Society (19 papers) 

( iamma Alpha Graduate Scientific Fraternity 

Pi (iamma Mu, National Social Science Honor Fraternity 

Sigma Delta Epsilon, Women's Graduate Scientific Fraternity 

American Science Teachers Association (.8 papers) 

Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi 

American Association of University Professors 

Academy of Science of Saint Louis 

( jKnekal Sessions 

Edward L. Thorndike, Columbia University. ''Science and Values." 
(Address of retiring president.) Science 83:1-8. 1936. 

John Bellamy Taylor, General Electric Company. "The Electric Eye and 
the Human Eye." (Fourteenth annual Sigma Xi lecture.) Sigma Xi Quar- 
terly 24, X T o. 1. 1936. 

William Allan Neilson, president of Smith College. "The American 
Scholar Today." (First annual Phi Beta Kappa lecture.) The American 
Scholar. 1936. 

Harold G. Moulton, president of the Brookings Institution, Washington, 
D. C. "Scientific Method in the Investigation of Economic Problems." The 
Scientific Monthly 17: 214-221. 

B. A. Houssay, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. "The Pituitary 
( rland and the Metabolism of the Body." 

Edwin H. Barbour, University of Nebraska. "The Proboscidea of the 
Plains." • 

Frederick Slocum, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn. "The 
Changing Picture of the Universe." 

Vern O. Knudsen, University of California at Los Angeles. "The Ad- 
sorption of Sound in Gases." 

Carl Snyder. Federal Reserve Bank, New York. "The Role of Capitalism 
in Civilization." 

V. K. Zworykin, Radio Corporation of America. "Electron Optical 
Systems and their Applications." 

Vannevar Bush. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "Mechanical 
Analysis." (Twelfth annual Josiah Willard Gibbs lecture.) 

Addresses of Vice Presidents 

Section on Mathematics. R. D. Carmichacl, University of Illinois. "Linear 
Differential Equations of Infinite Order." 



The Fourth St. Louis Meeting i-|[ 

Section en Physics. Henry G. Gale, The University of Chicago. The 
Diffraction Grating." 

Section on Chemistry. Joel II. Hildebrand, University of California. 
"Dipole Attraction and Hydrogen Bond Formation in their Relation to 
Solubility." Science 83: 21-24. [ 93^. 

Section on Astronomy. Frederick Slocum, Wesleyan Unive Tsity. Middle- 
town, Conn. "The Changing Picture of the Universe." 

Section on Geology and Geography. J. B. Macelwane, St. Louis Uni- 
versity. "Problems and Progress on the ( ieologico-Seismological Frontier." 
Science 83: 193-198. 1936. 

Section on Zoological Sciences. ( )scar Riddle, Station for Experimental 
Evolution of Carnegie Institution. 'The Confusion of Tongues." Science 
83: 41-45. 69-74. 1936. 

Section on Botanical Sciences. Bernard O. Dodge, New York Botanical 
Garden. "Reproduction and Inheritance in Asconwcetes." Science 8^: 

r69-l7S- I93 6 - 

Section on Anthropology. M. J. Herskovits, Northwestern L'niversity. 

"Applied Anthropology and the American Anthropologists." Science 83 : 
215-222. 1936. 

Section on Psychology. John E. Anderson, L'niversity of Minnesota. 
''Child Development and the Interpretation of Behavior/' Science 83: 245- 
252. 1936. 

Section on Social and Economic Sciences. Carl Snyder, Federal Reserve 
Bank, New York. "The Role of Capitalism in Civilization." 

Section on Historical and Philological Sciences. Solon J. Buck. National 
Archives, Washington, D. C. "The National Archives and the Advance- 
ment of Science." Science 83 : 379-385. 1936. 

Section on Medical Sciences. Stanhope Bayne-Jones, Yale University. 
"Bacterial Poisons and their Antidotes." 

Section on Agriculture. Jacob G. Lipman, Rutgers University. "The 
Conservation of our Land Resources." Science 8^ : 65-69. 1936. 

Section on Education. Guy Thomas Buswell, The University of Chicago. 
"Some Contributions of the Study of Eye Movements to the Psychology °f 
Perception." 

Symposia 

"The Teaching of Geometry" (3 papers). National Council of Teachers 
of Mathematics. 

"Photoelectricity" (3 papers). American Physical Society and American 
Association of Physics Teachers. 

"Land Utilization" (5 papers). Association of American Geographers. 

"Species from a Genetic Standpoint" (3 papers). Section on Zoological 



142 The Fourth St. Louis Meeting 

Sciences, Genetics Society of America, Systematic Section of the Botanical 
Society of America and the American Society of Naturalists. 

"Early Man in America with Particular Reference to the Southwestern 
United States" (6 papers). Section on Zoological Sciences, American 
Society of Naturalists, Botanical Society of America and Genetics Society 
of America. 

"Orchard Sanitation" (3 papers). American Association of Economic 
Entomologists. 

''Contemporary Investigation of Taxonomic Concepts" (4 papers). 
Botanical Society of America and Genetics Society of America. 

"Light Relations of Plants" (4 papers). Botanical Society of America 
and American Society of Plant Physiologists. 

"The Plant Geography of the Mississippi Valley" (3 papers). Section on 
Zoological Sciences, General Section of Botanical Society of America, Amer- 
ican Society of Naturalists and Genetics Society of America. 

"Antibiosis : the Antagonism toward Plant Pathogens by other Micro- 
organisms" (3 papers). American Phytopathological Society. 

"Ecological Aspects of some recent Government Activities" (8 papers). 
Ecological Society of America. 

"Study and Teaching of the History of Science" (4 papers). Section on 
Historical and Philological Sciences and History of Science Society. 

"Early Science in the St. Louis Area" (8 papers). Section on Historical 
and Philological Sciences, History of Science Society and Academy of 
Science of St. Louis. 

"Sex Hormones" (11 papers). Section on Medical Sciences. 

"The Conservation of the Land" (4 papers). Section on Agriculture and 
American Society of Agronomy. First paper : "The Conservation of our 
Land Resources.-" Jacob G. Lipman. Science 83 : 65-69. 1936. 

"Maturation and Learning" (4 papers). Section on Education and Sec- 
tion on Psychology. 

Announcement and Report of Meeting 

Preliminary Announcement of the Fourth St. Louis Meeting. Henry B. 
Ward. Science 82: 499-510. 1935. 

Permanent Secretary's general report, including reports of secretaries of 
sections and of participating societies. Henry B. Ward. Science 83: 111- 
146. 1936. 



The Second Los Angeles Meeting 143 

The Second Los Angeles Meeting of the Pacific 
Division, June 25-29, 1935 

(The ipth annual meeting of the Pacific Division) 

Participating Societies 

American Association of Economic Entomologists, Pacific Slope Branch 

American Meteorological Society 

American Physical Society 

American Phytopathological Society, Pacific Division 

American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, Western Division 

Astronomical Society of the Pacific 

Botanical Society of America, Pacific Section 

Ecological Society of America 

Pacific Coast Entomological Society 

Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, Pacific Coast Branch 

Western Psychological Association 

Western Society of Naturalists 

Western Society of Soil Science 

General Sessions 

Bailey Willis, Stanford University. 'The Living Globe." (Address of 
retiring president of the Pacific Division.) Science 82 :427-433. 

Fred E. Wright, Carnegie Institution of Washington. "The Surface of 
the Moon." 

Special Research Reviews 

V. O. Knudsen, University of California at Los Angeles. "Recent De- 
velopments in Acoustics." 

Th. Dobzhansky, California Institute of Technology. "The Mechanism 
of Heredity." 

B. M. Allen, University of California at Los Angeles. "Recent Develop- 
ments in the Field of Hormones." 

Symposia 

"Seismologic Research" (6 papers): (i) "Earthquakes of Northern 
California," Perry Byerly ; (2) "Research on Near and Far Earthquakes," 
B. Gutenberg; (3) "Vibration Research for Earthquake Resistant Build- 
ings," L. Jacobsen ; (4) "Development of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic 
Seismological Program in California," T. J. Maher; (5) "Mechanics of 
Earthquake Activity," Bailey Willis; and (6) "Present Status of the Rela- 
tion of the State of California to Earthquake Resistant Public School Build- 
ing Design and Construction," Geo. B. McDougall. 



144 The Third Santa Fe Meeting 

"The Virus Diseases of Plants and Animals." American Phytopatho- 
logical Society, Pacific Division, Botanical Society of America, Pacific Di- 
vision, Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine and the Western 
Society of Naturalists. 

Preliminary Announcement and Report of Meeting 

"The Los Angeles Meeting of the Pacific Division." J. Murray Luck. 
Science 81 : 333"334- *935- 

Secretary's general report of the Los Angeles meeting of the Pacific Di- 
vision, including reports of the secretaries of participating societies. J. 
Murray Luck. Science 82 : 357-368. 1935. 



The Third Santa Fe Meeting oe the Southwestern 
Division, April 29 - May 2, 1935 

(The 15th meeting of the Southwestern Division) 

Participating Societies 

Ecological Society of America 

New Mexico Association for the Advancement of Science 

New Mexico Game Protective Association 

New Mexico Public Health Association 

Society of American Foresters, Southwestern Section 

Southwestern Conservation League 

Second Annual Tree-Ring Conference 

General Sessions 

D. S. Robbins, State College, N. M. "Science and Religion." (Address 
of retiring president of the Southwestern Division.) 

Edgar L. Hewitt, Director of the Museum of New Mexico. "The Social 
Sciences in the Program of Education." (The sixth John Wesley Powell 
lecture.) 

A. E. Douglass, University of Arizona. "Trees: Recorders of History 
and Climate." 

Symposia 

"Atomic Nuclei." Papers by W. B. Pietenpol, University of Colorado, 
and J. C. Stearns, University of Denver. 

"Trees: Recorders of History and Climate." Papers by A. E. Douglass, 
University of Arizona, E. W. Haury, Assistant Director, Gila Pueblo, 
Globe, Arizona, and G. A. Pearson, Southwest Forest and Range Experi- 
ment Station, Tucson, Ariz. 

Report of Santa Fe meeting. E. F. Carpenter. Science 82: 41-42. 1935. 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS 



For the Calendar Year 1936 



Volume LXXXIX 



Summarized Proceedings for 1936 147 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS FOR 1936 

The Association held two meetings in the calendar year 1936, a meeting 
at Rochester-Ithaca, N. Y., June 16-20, and the annual meeting at Atlantic 
City, N. J., Dec. 28, 1936 - Jan. 2, 1937. The Association had previously 
held one meeting at Rochester, in August, 1892, one meeting at Ithaca, in 
June-July, 1906, and one meeting in Atlantic City, in December, 1932. A 
large portion of the Rochester-Ithaca program was presented at Rochester 
on June 16-18, after which the Association joined with the Society of the 
Sigma Xi at Ithaca in celebration of the semi-centennial of its founding. 
The Pacific Division held a meeting at Seattle, Washington, June 15-20, 
and the Southwestern Division held a meeting at Flagstaff, Arizona, April 
27-30. 

At the Rochester-Ithaca meeting 514 persons were registered and 230 ad- 
dresses and papers were on the programs ; at the Atlantic City meeting 2375 
persons were registered and 1450 addresses and papers were delivered or 
read ; at the Seattle meeting of the Pacific Division 779 persons were regis- 
tered and 449 addresses and papers were delivered or read ; and at the 
Flagstaff meeting of the Southwestern Division 116 addresses and papers 
w r ere delivered or read. At the close of the fiscal year 1936 (Sept. 30) the 
membership of the Association was 18,242 ; the membership of the Pacific 
Division was 2004 ; and the membership of the Southwestern Division was 

323- 

Officers of the Association for 1936 

President. Edwin G. Conklin (zoology), Princeton University. 

Retiring President. Karl T. Compton (physics), Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 

Permanent Secretary. Henry B. Ward, Washington, D. C. 

General Secretary. Otis W. Caldwell. Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant 
Research. 

Treasurer. John L. Wirt, Washington, D. C. 

Secretary oj the Council. Charles A. Shull, University of Chicago. 

Executive Assistant. Sam Woodley. Washington, D. C. 

Auditor. W. J. Humphreys, U. S. Weather Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

Director oj Press Service. Austin H. Clark, National Museum, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Director oj the Annual Science Exhibition. F. C. Brown, Washington, D. C. 

Members oj the Executive Committee (page 95) 

Members oj the Finance Committee (page 95) 



148 The Rochester (N. Y.) - Ithaca Meeting 

Members of the Committee on Grants (page 95) 
Members of the Council (pages 95, 92-94) 
Section Officers (pages 92-94) 

Officers of the Pacific Division 
(For the fiscal year June, 1935 - June, 1936) 

President. Richard C. Tolman, California Institute of Technology 

Secretary. J. Murray Luck, Stanford University. 

Council Representative. Roy E. Clausen. University of California. 

Officers of the Southwestern Division 
(For the fiscal year April, 1935 - April, 1936) 

President. Frank E. E. Germann, University of Colorado. 

Secretary. Y. C. Kiech, University of New Mexico. 

Council Rchrescntati-t-c. Frank E. E. Germann, University of Colorado. 



The Rochester (N. Y.) - Ithaca Meeting, June 16-20, 1936 

( The 98th meeting of the association, its second meeting in Rochester and 

its second meeting at Ithaca) 

Officers of the Local Committee 

H. L. Fairchild, honorary chairman; f. E. Hoffmeister, chairman 

\Y R. Line, secretary 

Participating Societies 

Affiliated with Section on Physics 
American Meteorological Society (6 papers) 

. I ffilialcd with Section on botanical Sciences 

American Society of Plant Physiologists (o -|- 9" papers' 3 ) 
Physiological Section, Botanical Society of America (o -f- 9 papers ) 

. Iffiliated with Section on Engineering 

Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences (7 papers) 
.American Society of Photogrammetry 

1 The first number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; 
the second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



The Rochester < X. Y.) -Ithaca Meeting 149 

Affiliated with Section on Medical Sciences 

Society of American Bacteriologists. Central New York State P. ranch 

(26 -f- 10 papers) 
Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine, Western New York 

Branch (20 papers) 

Affiliated ivith Section on Agriculture 

American Society for Horticultural Science (0 + 9 papers) 
Association of Official Seed Analysts (26 papers) 

General Sessions 

C. E. K. Mees, Eastman Kodak Company. '"Color Photograph)-." 

Charles Camsell, Deputy Minister of Mines of the Dominion of Canada. 
"A 4000 Mile Flight Over Northwestern Canada in August, 1935." (Fifth 
Hector Maiben lecture.) 

Carl Snyder, Federal Reserve Bank of New York. "The Role of Capi- 
talism in Civilization." 

Society of the Sigma Xi Semi-Centennial General Session. ( 1 ) Liv- 
ingston Farrand, president of Cornell University: "Greetings"; (2) Edwin 
G. Conklin, president of the Association : "The American Association for 
the Advancement of Science and the Society of the Sigma Xi"; (3) W. F. 
Durand, president of the Society of the Sigma Xi: "Response"; (4) Ed- 
ward Ellery, Union College : "A Brief History of the Sigma Xi" ; 
(5) Frank Van Vleck, Washington, D. C. (one of the founders of the 
Sigma Xi) : "Reminiscences"; (6) Karl T. Compton, president of Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology: "The Service of Sigma Xi in the Uni- 
versities of the Future." Sigma Xi Quarterly 24 : No. 2. 

Symposia 

"Problems of Current Interest to Physics and Geology" (6 papers). Sec- 
tion on Physics and Section on Geology and Geography. 

"Recent Developments in Weather Forecasting" (4 papers and demon- 
stration of release of two high altitude balloons). Section on Physics and 
American Meteorological Society. 

"Biological Effects of Radiation" (3 papers). Section on Physics. 

"Physiology of Reproduction in Higher Plants" (5 papers). American 
Society of Plant Physiologists, Physiological Section of Botanical Society 
of America and American Society for Horticultural Science. 

"Scientific Aspects of Flood Control" (3 papers). Ecological Society 
of America. Occasional Publications of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, No. 3. Supplement to Science, vol. 84. 



150 The Atlantic City Meeting 

"Social Security" (3 papers). Section on Social and Economic Sciences. 
"Dental Caries" ( 10 papers). Subsection on Dentistry. 

Announcements and Reports of Meeting 

The Summer Meeting of the American Association. Henry B. Ward. 
Science 83 : 365-366. 1936. 

Preliminary Announcements of the Rochester-Ithaca meeting. Henry B. 
Ward. Science 83 : 447-456. 1936. 

Permanent Secretary's general report, including reports of the secre- 
taries of the sections and of the participating societies. Science 84: 93-113. 
1936. 

Miscellaneous Articles, Notes and Reports 

Simon Henry Gage. "Theobald Smith; Investigator and Man." (Ad- 
dress at Theobald Smith Memorial Session.) Science 84: 1 17-122. 1936. 

M. H. Eisenhart. Address on presentation of the 250,000th Bausch and 
Lomb microscope to Professor Frederick G. Novy. Science 84: 122. 1936; 
response by Edwin G. Conklin, pp. 122, 123. 1936. 

Max Mason. "Science and the Rational Animal." Science 84: 71-76. 
1936. 

W. R. Whitney. "Accomplishments and Future of the Physical Sciences." 
Science 84: 21 1-2 17. 1936. 

The Atlantic City Meeting, Dec. 28, 1936 - Jan. 2, 1937 

(The ppth meeting of the Association and its 2d meeting at Atlantic City) 

There being no university at Atlantic City, arrangements for the meet- 
ing were made by -the office of the Permanent Secretary and Mr. A. H. 
Skean, Director of the Convention Bureau. 

Participating Societies 

Affiliated with the Section on Physics 

American Physical Society (68 -j- 2 papers 1 ) 
American Association of Physics Teachers (39 -f- 2 papers) 
American Meteorological Society (21 -\- 7 papers) 
Sigma Pi Sigma 

Affiliated with the Section on Chemistry 

Division of Chemical Education, American Chemical Society (o -f- 2 
papers) 

1 The first number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; 
the second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



The Atlantic City Meeting 151 

Affiliated with the Section on Zoological Sciences 

American Society of Zoologists ( 107 -f- 46 papers) 
Entomological Society of America (48 -(- 5 papers) 
American Association of Economic Entomologists (108+5 papers) 
American Society of Parasitologists (63 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Botanical Sciences 

Botanical Society of America (92 + 19 papers) 
American Phytopathological Society (97 + 26 papers) 
American Society of Plant Physiologists (45 + 15 papers) 
Mycological Society of America (35 +12 papers) 
American Fern Society (5 papers) 
Snllivant Moss Society (9 + 3 papers) 

Affiliated with Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

American Society of Naturalists ( 1 + 10 papers) 
Ecological Society of America (17 + 25 papers) 
Genetics Society of America (33 + 12 papers) 
Limnological Society of America (20 papers) 
American Microscopical Society 

Affiliated with Section on Agriculture 

American Society of Agronomy (0 + 8 papers) 

American Society for Horticultural Science (121 + 16 papers) 

Potato Association of America (32 + 21 papers) 

Science in General 

Society of the Sigma Xi 

United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa 

American Nature Study Society 

Gamma Alpha Graduate Scientific Fraternity 

Sigma Delta Epsilon Graduate Women's Scientific Fraternity 

American Science Teachers' Association 

General Sessions 

Karl T. Compton, president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy. "The Electron: Its Intellectual and Social Significance." (Address of 
retiring president.) Science 85 : 27-37. 1937. 

Henry G. Knight, Chief of U. S. Bureau of Chemistry and Soils. "Sele- 
nium and Its Relation to Soil, Plants, Animals, and Public Health." (Fif- 
teenth annual Sigma Xi lecture.) Sigma Xi Quarterly 25, No. 1. 1937. 



152 The Atlantic City Meeting 

James R. Angell, president of Yale University. "The Scholar and the 
Specialist." (Second Phi Beta Kappa lecture.) The American Scholar. 

1937- 

Special Sessions 

E. O. Hulburt, Naval Research Laboratory. "The Optics of the Surface 
of the Sea." 

David Dietz, Science Editor, Scripps-Howard Newspapers. "Science 
and the American Press." Science 85 : 107-1 12. 1937. 

P. W. Zimmerman, Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research. "Re- 
sponse of Plants to Hormone-like Growth Substances." 

C. C. Little, Roscoe B. Jackson Memorial Laboratory. "The Social Sig- 
nificance of Cancer." 

Walter Schiller, University of Vienna. "Changes and Modifications in 
the Conception of Carcinoma." 

Addresses of Vice Presidents 

Section on Mathematics. T. H. Hildebrandt, University of Michigan. 
"Recent Developments in the Theory of Integration." 

Section on Physics. John T, Tate, University of Minnesota. "Electron 
Impacts in Gases." 

Section on Chemistry. Moses Gomberg, University of Michigan. "Free 
Radicals." 

Section on Astronomy. H. R. Morgan, U. S. Naval Observatory. "Some 
Problems in Fundamental Astronomy." Science 85 : 1-9. 1937. 

Section on Zoological Sciences. Ross G. Harrison, Yale University. "Em- 
bryology and Its Relations." Science 85 : 369-374. 1937. 

Section on Botanical Sciences. E. W. Sinnott, Columbia University. 
"Morphology as a Dynamic Science." Science 85 : 61-65. 1937. 

Section on Anthropology. N. C. Nelson, American Museum of Natural 
History. "Prehistoric Archaeology, Past, Present and Future." Science 
85:81-89. 1937. 

Section on Psychology. Robert M. Ogden, Cornell University. "The 
Psychology of Art : Naive Geometry." 

Section on Social and Economic Sciences. Shelby Harrison, Russell Sage 
Foundation. "Winning Social Advance Through Process of Accretion." 

Section on Historical and Philological Sciences. George Sarton, Harvard 
University. "The Study of the History of 20th Century Science." 

Section on Agriculture. H. K. Hayes, University of Minnesota. "Agri- 
cultural Research in China." Science 85 : 321-325 ; 347-350. 1937. 

Section on Education. F. B. Knight, University of Iowa. "Data Related 
to Classroom Learning." 



The Atlantic City Meeting 153 

Symposia 

'"Some Problems in Radiological Physics" (5 papers). American Phys- 
ical Society. 

"Radio-Meteorographs and Other Apparatus" (8 papers). American 
Meteorological Society. 

"Weather Variations and Long Range Forecasting" (/ papers). Amer- 
ican Meteorological Society and Section on Astronomy. 

"The Preparation of Teachers of Chemistry" (2 papers). Section on 
Chemistry, Section on Education and Division of Chemical Education of 
the American Chemical Society. 

"Experimental Populations" (4 papers). American Society of Zoolo- 
gists and Ecological Society of America. 

"Genetics and Development" (5 papers). American Society of Zoolo- 
gists, Genetics Society of America and American Society of Naturalists. 

"Properties of Protoplasmic Surfaces" (5 papers). American Society of 
Zoologists and Society of Cell Physiologists. 

"Insects Affecting Man" ( 5 papers). Entomological Society of America 
and American Association of Economic Entomologists. 

"Recent Developments in Plant Sciences" (3 papers). Section on Botany, 
Botanical Society of America, American Phytopathological Society, Ameri- 
can Society of Plant Physiologists, Mycological Society of America, Ameri- 
can Fern Society, and Sullivant Moss Society. 

"Mineral Nutrition of Plants" (4 papers). Botanical Society of America, 
Physiological Section, American Society of Plant Physiologists and Ameri- 
can Society of Horticultural Science. 

"Carbondioxide Assimilation" (6 papers). American Society of Plant 
Physiologists. 

"New Jersey Ferns" (5 papers). American Fern Society. 

"Supra-Specific Variation in Nature and in Classification" (4 papers). 
American Society of Naturalists, American Society' of Zoologists, Botanical 
Society of America, Genetics Society of America, American Phytopatho- 
logical Society and Ecological Society of America. 

"Experimental Populations" (4 papers). Ecological Society of America 
and American Society of Zoologists. 

"Technique" (8 papers). Ecological Society of America and American 
Society of Plant Physiologists. 

"The Cortex and Behavior" (4 papers). Section on Psychology. 

"The Cancer Problem" (32 papers). Section on Medicine. Published in 
volume : The Cancer Problem. The Science Press. 1937. 

"Pasture and Forage Crops in the Northeastern States" (8 papers). Sec- 
tion on Agriculture and American Society of Agronomy. 



154 The Seattle Meeting 

Announcements and Reports of Meeting 

Preliminary announcement of the Atlantic City meeting. Henry B. 
Ward. Science 84 : 465-475. 1936. 

Changes in program of last day of Atlantic City meeting. Science 84: 
547-548. 1936. 

Annual science exhibition. Science 84 : 269. 1936. 

Cancer symposium, Section on Medical Sciences. Science 84: 439-440. 

Invitation from American Philosophical Society for a one-day meeting 
in Philadelphia after the Atlantic City meeting. Science 84 : 454. 1936. 

Program of the Sessions in Atlantic City. Science 84 : 548. 1936. 

Permanent Secretary's general report. Henry B. Ward. Science 85 : 129- 
164. 1936. 

Miscellaneous Articles, Notes and Reports 

Meeting of the Executive Committee, Oct. 24-25. Science 84: 460-461. 
1936. 

Broadcasts at the Atlantic City meeting. Science 84 : 570. 1936. 
Officers elected at Atlantic City meeting. Science 85 : 40-41. 1937. 
Financial reports for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 1936. Science 85 : 

i34-r3 6 - J 937- 

The Association Prize Award. Science 85 : 132-133. 1937. 

Report of Committee on Grants. Science 85 : 164. 1937. 



The Seattle Meeting of the Pacific Division, 

June 16-20, 1936 

(The 20th annual meeting oj the Pacific Division) 

A. F. Carpenter, Chairman of Local Committee 

General Sessions 

Richard C. Tolman. California Institute of Technology. "The Present 
Status of Cosmology." (Address of retiring president of the Pacific Di- 
vision.) The Scientific Monthly: 43: 491-507; 44: 20-40. 1936, 1937. 

F. K. Kirsten, University of Washington. "Lux Sit" (low voltage illu- 
mination with rare gases and metallic vapors) . 

C. McLean Fraser, University of British Columhia. "Marine Biology." 

E. G. Moherg, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif. 
"Chemical Oceanography." 



The Flagstaff Meeting 155 

W. F. Thompson, Internationa] Fisheries Commission, Seattle, Wash. 
"Fisheries." 

O. W. Swainson, U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Seattle, Wash. "Hy- 
drographic Survey." 

Special Research Reviews 

"Stellar Spectroscopy." W. E. Harper, Dominion Astrophysical Ob- 
servatory, Victoria, B. C. 

"Plant Nutrition." D. R. Hoagland, University of California, Berkeley, 
Calif. 

"The Chemistry of Growth Promoting" Principles." Roger J. Williams, 
Oregon State College, Corvallis, Oregon. 

"Paleontology." E. L. Packard, Oregon State College, Corvallis, Ore. 

Report of Meeting 

Secretary's general report of the Seattle meeting. J. Murray Luck. 
Science 84: 143-149, 169-174. 1936. 



The Flagstaff Meeting of the Southwkstern Division, 

April 27-30, 1936 

(The 16th annual meeting of the Southwestern Division) 
T. J. Tormey, Chairman of Local Committee 

General Sessions 

T. J. Tormey, president of Arizona State Teachers College, Address of 
Welcome ; Harold S. Colton, Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, Re- 
sponse. 

Harold S. Colton, president of the Southwestern Division. "The Rise 
and Fall of the Prehistoric Population of Northern Arizona." (Address of 
retiring president of the Southwestern Division.) Science 84: 337-343. 
1936. 

John C. Merriam, President of the Carnegie Institution of Washington : 
"The Wilderness as a Teacher, Preacher, and Companion. A Study of the 
Contrihution made by a Great National Park." 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS 



For the Calendar Year 1937 



Volume XC 



Summarized Proceedings for 1937 [59 

SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS FOR 1937 

The Association held two meetings in the calendar year 1.937. a joint 
meeting with the Pacific Division and the Southwestern Division at Denver, 
Colorado, June 21 to June 26, inclusive, and a meeting at Indianapolis, Ind., 
Dec. 27, 10,37 - Jan. 2, 1938, inclusive. The only previous meeting of the 
Association in Denver was held in [901. 

At the Denver meeting the registration was from 50 states, territorial 
possessions and foreign countries, and 575 addresses and papers were on 
the programs. At the meeting in Indianapolis the registration was 3,094 
and 168 1 addresses and papers were on the programs. At the end of the 
fiscal year 1937 (Sept. 30), the membership of the Association was 18,776, 
that of the Pacific Division was 2023, and that of the Southwestern Division 
was 258. 

Officers of the Association for 1937 

President. George D B. Birkhoff (mathematics), Harvard University. 

Retiring President. Edwin G. Conklin ( zoology), Princeton University. 

Permanent Secretary. F. R. Moulton, Washington, D. C. 

General Secretary. Otis W. Caldwell, Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant 
Research. 

Treasurer. John L. Wirt, Washington, D. C. 

Secretary of the Council. Charles A. Shull, University of Chicago. 

Executive Assistant. Sam Woodley, Washington, D. C. 

Auditor. W. J. Humphreys, U. S. Weather Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

Counsel. Charles S. Baker, Munsey Building, Washington, D. C. 

Director of Press Service. Austin H. Clark, National Museum, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Director of the Annual Science Exhibition. F. C. Brown, Washington, D. C. 

Members of Executive Committee (page 95) 

Members of Finance Committee (page 95) 

Members of Committee on Grants (page 95) 

Members of Council (pages 95, 92-94 ) 

Section Officers (pages 92-94) 

Officers of Pacific Division 

(For the fiscal year June, 1936-June, 1937) 

President. Herbert M. Evans (anatomy), University of California, Berke- 
ley, Calif. 

Secretary. J. Murray Luck, Stanford University, Calif. 

Council Representative. Roy E. Clausen, University of California, 
Berkeley, Calif. 



160 The Denver Meeting 

Officers of Southwestern Division 

(For the fiscal year April, 1936 - April, 1937) 

President. Frank E. E. Germann (physics). University of Colorado, 

Boulder, Colo. 
Secretary. V. C. Kiech, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N. M. 
Council Representative. Frank E. E. Germann, Boulder, Colo. 

The Denver Meeting, June 21-26, 1937 

{The 100th meeting of the Association, the 21st meeting of the Pacific 
Division and the i/th meeting of the Southwestern Division) 

Officers of the Local Committee 

J. J. Waring, chairman; T. P. Campbell, executive vice chairman 
A. C. Nelson, treasurer; J. C. Stearns, secretary 

Participating Societies 

Affiliated with Section on Physics 

American Physical Society, Pacific Coast Branch (26 -f- 4 papers 1 ) 
American Meteorological Society, Pacific Coast Branch ( 10 -f- o papers) 
Hydrology Section, American Geophysical Union (30 -\- 9 papers) 
American Association of Physics Teachers ( 18 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Astronomy 

Astronomical Society of the Pacific (22 + 4 papers ) 
Society for Research on Meteorites ( 15 -\- 8 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Geology and Geography 

Oceanographic Society of the Pacific (20 papers) 
Association of Pacific Coast Geographers (21 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Zoological Sciences 

American Association of Economic Entomologists, Pacific Slope Branch 

(2 papers) 
American Society of Parasitologists ( 18 papers) 
American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, Western 

Division (10 papers) 

1 The first number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone: 
the second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



The Denver Meeting 161 

Affiliated with Section on Botanical Sciences 

American Phytopathological Society, Pacific Division (o -f- 12 papers) 
American Society of Plant Physiologists, Western Division (31 -(- 10 

papers) 
American Fern Society 
Botanical Society of America, Pacific Section (8 + 5 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

Ecological Society of America (25 + 3 papers) 
Western Society of Naturalists (7 + 5 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Social and Economic Sciences 

Econometric Society (3+15 papers) 
American Statistical Association (3 + 13 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Engineering 
The Institute of Aeronautical Sciences (7 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Medical Sciences 

Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, Pacific Coast Branch 
and Southern California Branch (o -|- 11 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Agriculture 

Western Society of Soil Science (21+4 papers) 

Society of American Foresters, Denver Section ( o -f- 16 papers) 

General Sessions 

Herbert M. Evans, Director of Institute of Experimental Biology, Uni- 
versity of California. "The Development of Our Knowledge of Anterior 
Pituitary Function." (Address of president of the Pacific Division.) 

Nevil V. Sidgwick, Lincoln College, Oxford, England. "Molecules." 
(Sixth Hector Maiben lecture.) Science 86: 335-340. 

A. E. Douglass, University of Arizona. "Tree-rings and Chronology." 
(Eighth John Wesley Powell lecture.) 

Symposia 

"Astrophysical Problems of the Ionosphere" (4 papers). American 
Physical Society, Section on Astronomy and Astronomical Society of the 
Pacific. 

"Rocky Mountain Geomorphology" (8 papers). Section on Geology and 
Geography. 



162 The Indianapolis Meeting 

"Interrelations of the Sciences Which Compose Oceanography" (3 
papers). Oceanographic Society of the Pacific. 

"Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever'' (4 papers). American Society of 
Parasitologists. 

"Chlorosis and Some of the Minor Elements" (5 papers). American So- 
ciety of Plant Physiologists and Western Society of Soil Science. 

"Plant Hormones" (4 papers). American Society of Plant Physiolo- 
gists. 

"Drought Resistance in Plants" (6 papers). American Society of Plant 
Physiologists. 

"Genetics and the Species Problem" (2 papers). Botanical Society of 
America. 

"Conservation Management of Wildlife" (5 papers). Ecological Society 
of America. 

"The Scientific Aspects of the Control of Drifting Soils" (3 papers). 
Ecological Society of America. Published in The Scientific Monthly 47 : 
22-33, 193-210, 381-399- 1938- 

"Tuberculosis and Leprosy — The Mycobacterial Diseases" (21 papers). 
Publication No. 5 of the Association. 1938. 

Announcements and Reports of Meeting 

List of principal addresses to be delivered. Henry B. Ward. Science 85 : 
421. 1937. 

Travel to Denver. Henry B. Ward. Science 85 : 446. 1937. 

Preliminary announcement of the meeting. Henry B. Ward. Science 85 : 
461-469. 1937. 

Symposia at the Denver meeting. Science 85 : 491-492. 1937. 

Minutes of the Executive Committee. Science 85 : 499-500. 1937. 

Symposium on Control of Drifting Soils. Science 85 : 514. 1937. 

Permanent Secretary's general report, including reports of secretaries 
of the sections and of the participating societies. Science 86 : 131 -149. 1937. 



The Indianapolis Meeting, Dec. 27, 1937- Jan. i, 1938 
(The 101st meeting of the Association and its 3d meeting at Indianapolis) 

Officers of the Local Committee 

Stanley Coulter, chairman; Ray C. Friesner, secretary 
Henry T. Davis, executive secretary 






The Indianapolis Meeting 163 

Participating Societies 
Affiliated with Section on Mathematics 

American Mathematical Society (78 -f- 15 papers 1 ) 
Mathematical Association of America (5+1 papers ) 
Institute of Mathematical Statistics (8 -f- 7 papers) 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (9 papers) 
Association of Symbolic Logic ( o -j- 7 papers) 

Affiliated with the Section on Physics 

American Physical Society t 64 + 3 papers) 
American Association of Physics Teachers (23 + 3 papers) 
American Meteorological Society (13 + 6 papers) 
Sigma Pi Sigma Physics Honor Society 

Affiliated with Section on Zoological Sciences 

American Society of Zoologists (147 -+- 19 papers) 

American Association of Economic Entomologists ( 108 -+- 7 papers ) 

Entomological Society of America (48 -f- 7 papers) 

American Society of Parasitologists (68 papers) 

Wilson Ornithological Club (37 papers ) 

Affiliated with Section on Botanical Sciences 

Botanical Society of America ( 1 1 7 -(- 27 papers) 

American Phytopathological Society ( 84 -f- 46 papers) 

American Society of Plant Physiologists (49 -)- ! J papers) 

Mycological Society of America (19 4- 16 papers) 

American Fern Society 

Sullivant Moss Society (10 -|- 4 papers) 

American Society of Plant Taxonomists 

Affiliated with Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

American Society of Naturalists (3+1 papers) 

Ecological Society of America (31 -f 28 papers) 

Genetics Society of America (55 + 5 papers) 

American Microscopical Society 

1 .imnological Society of America (29 + 6 papers ) 

Phi Sigma Society (34 papers) 

Beta Beta Beta Honorary Biological Fraternity 

1 The first number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; 
the second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



164 The Indianapolis Meeting 

Affiliated with Section on Social and Economic Sciences 
Econometric Society (o -f- 1 paper) 
Metric Association (4 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Historical and Philological Sciences 
History of Science Society (0+12 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Engineering 

Institute of Aeronautical Sciences (8 papers) 
Institute of Radio Engineers (5 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Agriculture 

Potato Association of America (25 -)- 22 papers) 
Society of American Foresters (o -f- 10 papers) 

Science in General 

Society of the Sigma Xi (o + : paper) 

United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa (o -j- 1 paper) 

American Nature Study Society (21 papers) 

Gamma Alpha Graduate Scientific Fraternity 

Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi 

Sigma Delta Epsilon Graduate Women's Fraternity 

American Association of University Professors (2 papers) 

American Science Teachers' Association (9 papers) 

Union of American Biological Societies 

Catholic Round Table of Science 

General Sessions 

Edwin G. Conkliii, Princeton University. "Science and Ethics." (Ad- 
dress of retiring president.) Science 86 : 595-603. 1937. 

Irving Langmuir, General Electric Company. "Biological Applications 
of Surface Chemistry." (Sixteenth annual Sigma Xi lecture.) Sigma Xi 
Quarterly 26, Xo. 1. 1938. 

George Lyman Kittredge, Harvard University. "Shakespeare and the 
Critics." (Third annual Phi Beta Kappa lecture.) 

Thomas Parran, Surgeon-General, U. S. Public Health Service. "Syphilis 
as a Public Health Problem." Science 87: 147-152. 1938. Also Publication 
No. 6 (Syphilis) of the Association. 1938. 

Special Sessions 

Charles A. Kraus, Brown University. "The Present Status of the Theory 
of Electrolytes." (Fourteenth Josiah Willard Gibbs lecture.) 

Esmond R. Long, Henry Phipps Institute. "Tuberculosis, Leprosy and 



The Indianapolis Meeting 165 

Allied Mycobacterial Infections." Science 87: 23-31. 1938. Publication 
No. 5 (Tuberculosis and Leprosy) of the Association. 1938. 

Harold G. Moulton, Brookings Institution. "Science and Society." 
Science 87: 173-179. 1938. 

Addresses of Vice Presidents 

Section on Mathematics. G. C. Evans, University of California. "Mathe- 
matical Progress in Theoretical Economics." 

Section on Physics. George B. Pegram, Columbia University. 

Section on Chemistry. Irving Langmuir, General Electric Company. 
"Overturning and Anchoring of Monolayers." Science 87 : 493-500. 1938. 
Publication No. 7 (Applications of Surface Chemistry in Biology, pp. 9-18) 
of the Association. 1939. 

Section on Astronomy. Frederick H. Seares, Mt. Wilson Observatory. 
"Magnitudes Again." Science 87: 1-8. 1938. 

Section on Geology. George R. Mansfield, U. S. Geological Survey. "Ge- 
ology in National and Everyday Life." Science 87 : 49-57. I93& 

Section on Zoological Sciences. Ralph S. Lillie, University of Chicago. 
"The Nature of Organizing Action." 

Section on Botanical Sciences. J. M. Greenman, Missouri Botanical Gar- 
dens, St. Louis. "Taxonomy as a Field for Research." Science 87: 265- 
266. 1938. 

Section on Anthropology. Ralph Linton, University of Wisconsin. "The 
Present Status of Anthropology." Science 87: 241-248. 1938. 

Section on Psychology. A. T. Poffenberger, Columbia University. "Some 
Unsolved Problems in Human Adjustment." Science 87: 124-129. 1938. 

Section on Social and Economic Sciences. Harold G. Moulton, Brook- 
ings Institution. "Controlled Factors in Economic Development." Science 

87: 173-179- 1938. 

Section on Engineering. William E. Wickenden, Case School of Applied 
Science. "The Social Sciences and Engineering Education." Science 87: 
152-158. 1938. 

Section on Medical Sciences. Esmond R. Long, Phipps Institute. "Tu- 
berculosis, Leprosy and Allied Mycobacterial Infections." Science 87: 23- 
31. Publication No. 5 (Tuberculosis and Leprosy, pp. 123-133) of the As- 
sociation. 1938. 

Section on Education. E. S. Evenden, Columbia University. "Factors 
Affecting the Salaries of College and University Teachers." 

Symposia 

"College Physics in Its Relations to Pre-College Education" (2 papers). 
American Association of Physics Teachers. 



i66 The Indianapolis Meeting 

"The Applications of Surface Chemistry in Biology" (6 papers). Sec- 
tion on Chemistry. Publication Xo. 7 of the Association. 1939. 

"Recent Advances in Chemical Physics" (9 papers). Section on Chemis- 
try. Publication No. 7 of the Association. 1939. 

"Oil in the Pennsylvanian of the Eastern Interior Basin" (10 papers). 
Section on ( ieology. 

"Sex Differentiation" (4 papers). American Society of Zoologists and 
Genetics Society of America. 

"Hydrobiology" (6 papers). American Society of Zoologists and Limno- 
logical Society of America. 

"The Relation Between Insects and Plant Diseases" (5 papers). Ameri- 
can Association of Economic Entomologists. Entomological Society of 
America and American Phytopathological Society. 

"Agencies for Extending Entomological Information" (7 papers). Amer- 
ican Association of Economic Entomologists. 

"The Concept of the ( ienus" ( 5 papers ) . Botanical Society of America. 

"Growth and Development of Meristems with Special Reference to Re- 
production" (6 papers). Botanical Society of America, American Society 
of Plant Physiologists and American Society for Horticultural Science. 

"The Origin and Distribution of the Flora of the Middle West ( 6 papers). 
Botanical Society of America. 

"Methods of Teaching Plant Physiology" (4 papers). American Society 
of Plant Physiologists. 

"The Nature of Protoplasm" (3 papers). American Society of Zoolo- 
gists. Botanical Society of America and Genetics Society of America. 

"Breeding to Meet Economic Needs" (4 papers). Genetics Society of 
America. 

"Science and Society" (9 papers). Section on Social and Economic 
Sciences. 

"The Endocrines and Behavior" (4 papers). Section on Psychology. 

"Social Implications of Modern Science (5 papers). Section on His- 
torical and Philological Sciences and History of Science Society. 

"Maya Civilization" (3 papers). Section on Historical and Philological 
Sciences. 

"Syphilis" ( 2<> papers). Section on Medical Sciences. Publication No. 6 
of the Association. 1938. 

'The Role of Minor Element Fertilization in Economic Plant Produc- 
tion" (8 papers). Section on Agriculture, American Society for Horticul- 
tural Science, Potato Association of America and American Society of 
Agronomy. 

"Need for a Twelve Year Science Program for American Public 
Schools" (5 papers). American Science Teachers Association. 



The Indianapolis Meeting 167 

Announcement and Report of Meeting 

Preliminary Announcement of the Indianapolis Meeting. F. R. Moulton. 
Science 86: 503-510. 1937. 

Permanent Secretary's general report of meeting (including reports of 
the secretaries of the sections and of the participating societies). Science 
87:95-117. 1938. 

Miscellaneous Articles, Notes and Reports 

George David Birkhoff, president-elect of the Association for 1937. 
Science 85 : 131. 1937. 

Report of Committee on Grants for 1937. Science 85 : 164. 1937. 

Joint meeting of the Lancaster, Pa., Branch. Science 85 : 283. 

Principal Addresses at the Denver Meeting. F. R. Moulton. Science 85 : 
421. 1937. 

Minutes of the April meeting of the Executive Committee. Henry B. 
Ward. Science 85 : 499-500. 1937. 

"Science." F. R. Moulton. Science 85 : 571-575. 1937. 

Activities of the Phoenix Branch of the Association. A. L. Flagg. Science 
86 : 58. 1937. 

"Science and Society." F. R. Moulton. Science 86: 387-391. 1937. 

Symposia Organized by the Section on Medical Sciences of the Associa- 
tion. Earl B. McKinley. Science 86: 414. 1937. 

"Science and Democracy." J. McKeen Cattell. Science 86: 443. 1937. 

October meeting of the Executive Committee of the Association. F. R. 
Moulton. Science 86 : 495-496. 1937. 

"New Societies and Shifting Interests." Henry B. Ward. Science 86: 
579-580. 1937. 

"Resolutions on Intellectual Freedom." Science 87 : 10. 1938. 

"Tuberculosis, Leprosy and Other Diseases Caused by Acid-Fast Bac- 
teria." Wm Charles White. Science 87: 14-15. 1938. 

"Science's Magna Charta." The Xevv York Times. Science 8y. 16-17. 

1938. 

"Science for Humanity's Sake." The Washington Post. Science 87: 
118. 1938. 

"Pandemic Botany." C. Stuart Gager. Science 87: 285-292. 1938. 

"Functions of an Ecological Society." R. E. Coker. Science 87: 310- 

3L> 1938. 

"Progress in Horticultural Science." Arthur J. Heinicke. Science 87: 

333S37- ^938- 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS 



For the Calendar Year 1938 



Volume LXI 



Summarized Proceedings for 1938 171 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS FOR 1938 

The Association hold two meetings in the calendar year 1938, one at 
Ottawa, Canada, from June 27 to July 2, inclusive, and the other in Rich- 
mond. Virginia, from December 2j to 31, inclusive. The Ottawa meeting 
was the fifth meeting of the Association in Canada, but the first in Ottawa; 
the Richmond meeting was the first meeting of the Association in Virginia. 
The Pacific Division held a meeting in San Diego, California, from June 20 
to 25, inclusive, and the Southwestern Division held a meeting at Albu- 
querque, New Mexico, from April 25 to 28, inclusive. 

At the Ottawa meeting the registration was 1104 and 466 addresses and 
papers were listed on the programs ; at the Richmond meeting the registra- 
tion was 2553 and 1706 addresses and papers were listed on the programs; 
at the San Diego meeting of the Pacific Division ^2 persons were regis- 
tered and the programs contained the titles of 312 addresses and papers; 
and at the Albuquerque meeting 113 persons were registered and no ad- 
dresses and papers were delivered or read. At the close of the fiscal year 
1938 (Sept. 30) the membership of the Association was 19,059, and the 
memberships of the Pacific and Southwestern Divisions were 2096 and 
410, respectively. 

Officers of the Association for 1938 

President. Wesley C. Mitchell (economics), Columbia University. 

Retiring President. George D. Birkhoff (mathematics), Harvard Univer- 
sity. 

Permanent Secretary. F. R. Moulton, Washington, D. C. 

General Secretary. Otis W. Caldwell, Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant 
Research. 

Treasurer. John L. Wirt, Washington, D. C. 

Secretary of the Council. Charles A. Shull, University of Chicago. 

Executive Assistant. Sam Woodley, Washington, D. C. 

Auditor. W. J. Humphreys, U. S. Weather Bureau, Washington, D. C 

Counsel. Charles S. Baker, Washington, D. C. 

Members of the Executive Committee (page 95) 

Members of the Finance Committee (page 95) 

Members of the Committee on Grants (page 95 ) 

Members of the Council (pages 95, 92-94) 

Section Officers (pages 92-94) 



172 The Ottawa, Canada, Meeting 

Officers of the Pacific Division 

(For the fiscal year June, 1937 - June, 1938) 

President. J. S. Plaskett, Victoria, B. C, Canada. 

Secretary. J. Murray Luck, Stanford University, Calif. 

Council Representative. Roy E. Clausen, University of California. 

Officers of the Southwestern Division 

(For the fiscal year April, 193/ - April, 1938) 

President. Frank E. E. Germann, University of Colorado. 

Secretary. Veon C. Kiech, University of New Mexico. 

Council Representative. Frank E. E. Germann, University of Colorado. 



The Ottawa, Canada, Meeting, June 27 to July 2, 1938 

(The I02d meeting of the Association and the $th meeting in Canada) 

Officers of the Local Committee 

His Excellency, Lord Tweedsmuir, patron 

Senator Raoul Dandurand, honorary chairman 

C. Camsell, chairman 

Participating Societies 

Affiliated with Section on Astronomy 
Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (o -(- 30 papers 1 ) 

Affiliated with Section on Geology and Geography 
Geological Society of America ( o -f- 41 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Zoological Sciences 

American Association of Economic Entomologists and Entomological 
Society of America and Entomological Society of Ontario in joint ses- 
sions (o -f- 28 papers ) 

Affiliated with Section on Botanical Sciences 

Canadian Phytopathological Society (0 + 6 papers) 
American Phytopathological Society (o -f- 26 papers) 
American Society of Plant Physiologists (6 + 20 papers) 
Botanical Society of America (o -f- 5 papers) 
American Society of Plant Taxonomists (o -f- 5 papers) 

1 First number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; the 
second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



The Ottawa, Canada, Meeting 173 

Affiliated with Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

Ecological Society of America (0 + 8 papers ) 
< ienetics Society of America ( 14 -(- 22 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Social and Economic Sciences 

American Statistical Association (9 +3 papers) 

Canadian Agricultural Economics Society (20 + 3 papers ) 

Affiliated with Section on Engineering 
Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences (9 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Agriculture 

Society of American Foresters and Association of Forest Engineers of 
Quebec and Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, Woodlands Sec- 
tion, and Canadian Society of Forest Engineers (14 -f- 11 papers) 

Canadian Society of Technical Agriculturists and Canadian Society of 
Animal Production and Canadian Agricultural Economics Society in 
joint sessions (0 + 55 papers) 

American Society of Agronomy ( 7 papers ) 

General Sessions 

Robert C. Wallace, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. "The Chang- 
ing Values of Science." (Seventh Hector Maiben lecture.) Science 88: 
265-272. 1938. 

Stuart A. Rice. U. S. Central Statistical Bureau, Washington. "World 
Standards of Living." (First address on Science and Society program.) 
Science 90: 167-172. 1939. 

F. E. Lathe, Division of Research Information, National Research Coun- 
cil of Canada. "World Natural Resources." (Second address on Science 
and Society program.) Science 88 : 337-344. 1938. 

William Crocker. Director, Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Re- 
search. "The Botanical Sciences and the Future." (Third address on 
Science and Society program.) Science 88: 387-394. 1938. 

Frank R. Lillie, The University of Chicago. "Zoological Sciences in the 
Future." (Fourth address on Science and Society program.) Science 88: 
65-72. 

Arthur H. Compton, University of Chicago. "Physics and the Future." 
(Fifth address on Science and Society program.) Science 88: 11 5- 121. 

Harold C. Urey, Columbia University. "Chemistry and the Future." 
(Sixth address on Science and Society program.) Science 88: 133-139. 

M. W. Smith, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company. "The 



174 The Ottawa, Canada, Meeting 

Application of Science to the Electrical Industry." (Seventh address on 
Science and Society program.) 

John Johnston, Director of Research, U. S. Steel Corporation. "The 
Application of Science to the Metallurgical Field." (Eighth address on 
Science and Society program.) The Scientific Monthly 48: 493-503. 1939. 

Symposia 

"Medical Biochemistry" (6 papers). Section on Chemistry and Section 
on Medical Sciences. 

"The Nutrition Problem in North America" (8 papers). Section on 
Chemistry. 

"The Application of Isotopes to Biochemical Properties" (4 papers). 
Section on Chemistry and Section on Zoological Sciences. 

"Atmospheric Ozone and Measurement of Ultraviolet Light in Solar 
Radiation" (4 papers). Section on Astronomy and Royal Astronomical 
Society of Canada. 

"The Migration and Conservation of Salmon" (6 papers). Section on 
Zoological Sciences. Publication No. 8 of the Association. 1939. 

"The Relation of Insects to Forest Conservation" (5 papers). American 
Association of Economic Entomologists, Entomological Society of America, 
Entomological Society of Ontario, Society of American Foresters, Canadian 
Society of Forest Engineers and Association of Forest Engineers of Quebec. 

"The Genetics of Pathogenic Organisms" (11 papers). Section on 
Botanical Sciences, Section on Medical Sciences, Section on Agriculture 
and Genetics Society of America. Publication No. 12 of the Association. 
1940. 

"Phytogeographical Problems of Northeastern Canada" (5 papers). Sec- 
tion on Botanical Sciences, Botanical Society of America and American So- 
ciety of Plant Taxonomists. 

"Root Rots and Seed Borne Diseases" (6 papers). Canadian Phyto- 
pathological Society and American Phytopathological Society. 

"Micro-Elements and Deficiency Diseases" (9 papers). American Phy- 
topathological Society and American Society of Plant Physiologists. 

"Drought Relations" (11 papers). American Society of Plant Physiolo- 
gists and Genetics Society of America. 

"The Influence of Fire on Forests, Wild Life and Public Welfare" (3 
papers). Ecological Society of America, Society of American Foresters 
and Canadian Society of Forest Engineers. 

"History of Science in Canada" (9 papers). Section on Historical and 
Philological Sciences. 

"Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (B.C.G.)" (5 papers). Section on Medical 
Sciences. 



The Virginia (Richmond) Meeting 175 

"Progress of Swine Improvement in Canada" (7 papers). Canadian Ag- 
ricultural Economics Society. 

Announcements and Reports of Meeting 

Preliminary Announcement for the Ottawa Meeting. Science 87: 445- 

45i- 1938. 

American and Canadian Scientists Meet in Ottawa. F. R. Moulton. The 
Scientific Monthly 47: 87-89. 1938. 

Permanent Secretary's general report of the meeting, including reports 
of the secretaries of the sections and of the participating societies. F. R. 
Moulton. Science 88: 87-101. 1938. 

Report of the Ottawa Meeting. F. R. Moulton. The Scientific Monthly 
47: 183-184. 1938. 



The Virginia (Richmond) Meeting, Dec. 27-31, 1938 
( The 103d meeting of the Association and its 1st meeting in Virginia) 

Officers of Local Committee 

Lloyd C. Bird, chairman ; W. Catesby Jones, co-chairman 
L. W. Himmler, secretary 

Participating Societies 

Affiliated with Section on Mathematics 

American Mathematical Society (o -f 2 papers 1 ) 
Mathematical Association of America (o -f- 2 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Physics 
American Meterological Society (14 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Astronomy 
Society for Research on Meteorites ( 14 -j- 9 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Geology and Geography 

Geological Society of America (o -|- 59 papers) 
American Geophysical Union (o -(- 9 papers) 
Carolina Geological Society (o -j- 29 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Zoological Sciences 
American Society of Zoologists (156 + 7 papers) 

1 The first number is the number of papers on the program of the society alone; the second is the 
number presented before a joint session of the society and another society. 



176 The Virginia (Richmond) Meeting 

American Association of Economic Entomologists (98 -f- 12 papers) 
Entomological Society of America (33 + 6 papers) 
American Society of Parasitologists (j$ papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Botanical Sciences 

Botanical Society of America (82 + 80 papers) 
American Phytopathological Society (95 + 49 papers) 
American Society of Plant Physiologists (42 + 46 papers) 
Mycological Society of America (30 -|- 16 papers) 
Sullivant Moss Society 1 12 papers) 
American Fern Society ( 1 paper) 
American Society of Plant Taxonomists 

Affiliated with Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

American Society of Naturalists (1+3 papers ) 
Ecological Society of America (36 + 21 papers) 
Genetics Society of America (58 + 7 papers) 
American Microscopical Society 
Limnological Society of America (29 + papers) 
National Association of Biology Teachers (9 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Medical Sciences 
American Psychiatric Association, Council 

Affiliated with' Section on Agriculture 

American Society of Agronomy (0 + 4 papers) 
American Society for Horticultural Sciences 
Potato Association of America (34 + 25 papers) 
Society of American Foresters (0 + 4 papers) 

Science in General 

Society of the Sigma Ni 

United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa 

American Nature Study Society (22 papers) 

American Science Teachers Association (8 papers) 

Gamma Alpha Graduate Scientific Fraternity 

Sigma Delta Epsilon Graduate Women's Fraternity 

Pi Gamma Mu 

Union of American Biological Societies 

Catholic Round Table of Science 



The Virginia (Richmond) Meeting 177 

General Sessions 

George D. Birkhoff, Harvard University. "Intuition, Reason and Faith 
in Science." (Address of retiring president of the Association.) Science 
88: 601-609. 1938. 

\V. F. Durand, Stanford University. "Modern Trends in Air Trans- 
port." (Seventeenth annual Sigma Xi address.) Sigma Xi Quarterly 27, 
Xo. 1. 1939. 

Frank Pierrepont Graves, president of the University of the State of 
Xevv York. "Is Education a Science?" I Fourth annual Phi P>eta Kappa 
lecture.) The American Scholar. 1939. 

David SarnofT, Radio Corporation of America. "Science and Freedom." 
Radio Corporation of America. 1938. 

Sir Richard Gregory, editor of Xature. London, England. "Religion in 
Science." The Scientific Monthly 48: 99-108. 1939. 

C. McFie Campbell, Director, Boston Psychopathic Hospital. "Human 
Xeeds and Social Resources." The Scientific Monthly 48: 293-307. 1939. 
Publication No. 9 of the Association (Mental Health), pp. 457-470. 1939. 

Harvey Fletcher, Bell Telephone Laboratories, New York. "Auditory 
Patterns." (Address of retiring vice president for the Section on Physics.) 

Special Sessions 

Cranston Williams, Southern Xevvspaper Publishers Association. "Dr. 
Charles Herty's Methods for Meeting the Problems of the South." 

Win. T. Sanger, president of the Medical College of Virginia. "Virginia 
Homes and Gardens." (Illustrated by colored slides.) 

Wm. M. Mann, director of the Xational Zoological Park, Washington, 
D. C. "Motion Pictures of Wild Animals in Sumatra." 

Addresses oe Vice Presidents 

Section on Mathematics. W. D. Cairns, Oberlin College. "Seismology 
from a Mathematical Viewpoint." Science 89: 113-118. 1939. 

Section on Physics. Harvey B. Fletcher, Bell Telephone Laboratories. 
"Auditory Patterns." (With demonstrations.) 

Section on Chemistry. Farrington Daniels, University of Wisconsin. 
"Reaction Rates." 

Section on Astronomy. Philip Fox, Museum of Science and Industry, 
Chicago. "Astronomers and Their Tools." 

Section on Geology and Geography. Kirtley F. Mather, Harvard Uni- 
versity. "Earth Structure and Earth Origin." Science 89 : 65-70. 1939. 

Section on Zoological Sciences. F. B. Sumner, Scripps Institute of 
Oceanography. "Human Psychology and Some Things That Fishes Do." 
The Scientific Monthly 49: 245-255. 1939. 



178 The Virginia (Richmond) Meeting 

Section on Botanical Sciences. F. E. Denny, Boyce Thompson Institute 
for Plant Research. "Production of Ethylene by Plants." 

Section on Anthropology. John Swanton, U. S. Bureau of American 
Ethnology. "Some Thoughts on the Problem of Progress and Decline." 
Science 89: 253-258. 1939. 

Section on Psychology. Calvin P. Stone, Stanford University. "Indi- 
vidual Differences as Points of Departure for Research in Animal Psy- 
chology." 

Section on Historical and Philological Sciences. R. C. Archibald, Brown 
University. "Mathematics, and Poetry and Drama." Science 89: 19-26, 
46-50. 1939. 

Section on Social and Economic Sciences. Stuart A. Rice. "Standards 
of Living as Functions of Science and of Social Organization." Science 90: 
167-172. 1939. 

Section on Engineering. Joseph W. Barker, Columbia University. "En- 
gineering Planning vs. Planned Economy." 

Section on Medical Sciences. Thomas M. Rivers, Rockefeller Institute 
for Medical Research, New York. "The Nature of Viruses." 

Section on Agriculture. E. C. Auchter, U. S. Bureau of Plant Industry, 
Washington, D. C. 'The Inter-relations of Soils and Plant, Animal and 
Human Nutrition." Science 89: 421-427. 1939. 

Section on Education. Ralph W. Tyler, The University of Chicago. 
Basic Considerations in the Improvement of Educational Tests." 



"r> 



Symposia 

"Reaction Rates in Organic Chemistry" (5 papers). Section on Chemis- 
try. 

"Natural Resins" (4 papers). Section on Chemistry. 

"Phenanthrene and Related Compounds" (6 papers). Section on Chem- 
istry. 

"The Importance of Geophysics to the Study of Continental Borders" 
(9 papers). Section on Geology and Geography, American Geophysical 
Union, Geological Society of America and Section on Astronomy. 

"Geology of the Coastal Plain and Continental Shelf" (12 papers). Sec- 
tion on Geology and Geography and Geological Society of America. 

"Chromosome Structure" (4 papers). American Society of Zoologists 
and Genetics Society of America. 

"Color Changes in Animals, Their Significance and Activation" (6 pa- 
pers). American Society of Zoologists. 

"Mating Types and Their Interactions in Ciliate Infusoria; Determina- 
tion, Inheritance and Relation to .Sexuality" (6 papers). American Society 
of Zoologists. 



The Virginia (Richmond) Meeting 179 

"Insect Populations*' (5 papers). American Association of Economic 
Entomologists, Entomological Society of America and Ecological Society 
of America. 

"The Effects of Water-Soluble * Irowth- Promoting Substances on Plants" 
(3 papers). Botanical Society of America. 

"Influence of Low Temperature on Plants" (5 papers). Botanical So- 
ciety of America. 

"The Structure of Chloroplasts" (3 papers). Botanical Society of 
America. 

"The Physiology and Diseases of Cotton'' (9 papers). American Society 
of Plant Physiologists, American Phytopathological Society and Botanical 
Society of America, Physiological Section. 

"The Teaching of Plant Physiology" (5 papers). American Society of 
Plant Physiologists. 

"Contributions of the Higher Animals to an Understanding of Human 
Biology" (3 papers). American Society of Naturalists, American Society 
of Zoologists, Botanical Society of America, Genetics Society of America 
and Section on Anthropology. 

"Some Leading Problems of Limnology with Special Reference to Lakes" 
(9 papers). Limnological Society of America. Publication No. 10 of the 
Association entitled "Problems of Lake Biology." 1939. 

"Research in Audition: The Next Steps" (5 papers). Section on Psy- 
chology. 

"Significance of the Pareto Distribution" (3 papers). Section on Social 
and Economic Sciences. 

"Centenary of the Cell Theory" (7 papers). Section on Historical and 
Philological Sciences, Section on Zoological Sciences and Section on Botan- 
ical Sciences. Reprinted from the American Naturalist by the Jaques Cattell 
Press. 1940. 

"Mental Health" (94 papers). Section on Medical Sciences. Publication 
Xo. 9 of the Association. 1939. 

"Dental Caries : Diet and Nutrition ; Bacterial ; Heredity ; Distribution ; 
Chemical; Tooth Structure; Blood and Saliva" (22 papers). Subsection 
on Dentistry. 

"Glycols" (5 papers). Subsection on Pharmacy. 

"Land Use" (3 papers). Section on Agriculture and Section on Social 
and Economic Sciences. 

"Economic Effects on Education" (4 papers). Section on Education. 

"Problems of Interpretation of Educational Research" (7 papers). Sec- 
tion on Education. 

"Problems in Reading" (4 papers). Section on Education. 

"New Developments in Education" (5 papers). Section on Education. 

"Ferns of Virginia and Neighboring States." American Fern Society. 



r8o The San Diego, Calif., Meeting 

Announcements and Reports of Meeting 

Preliminary Announcement of the Virginia meeting. F. R. Moulton. 
Science 88: 509-517. 1938. 

The Virginia (Richmond) meeting of the Association. F. R. Moulton. 
The Scientific Monthly 47 : 561-563. 1938. 

Permanent Secretary's general report, including reports of the secretaries 
of the sections and of the participating societies. Science 89: 89-112. 1939. 

Miscellaneous Articles, Notes and Reports 

A Special Research Conference on Chemistry organized by the Section 
on Chemistry. F. R. Moulton. Science 88 : 8-9. 1938. 

Cooperation Between the British and American Associations. F. R. 
Moulton. Science 88 : 258-259. 1938. 

The Scientific Monthly and the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. J. McKeen Cattell. Science 88 : 428-429. 1938. 

Symposium on Mental Health. Malcolm H. Soule. Science 88: 302-305. 

The Cell and the Problem of Organization. Edmund W. Sinnott. Science 
89: 41-46. 1939. 

Walter B. Cannon, President-Elect of the Association. Esmond R. Long. 
Science 89: 92-93. 1939. 

Financial Reports of the Treasurer and the Permanent Secretary. F. R. 
Moulton. Science 89: 201-202. 1939. 

Grants in Aid of Research for 1939. Science 89: 405. 1939. 



The San Diego, Calif., Meeting, June 20-25, 1938 

(The 22d annual meeting oj the Pacific Division) 

Local Organizations Sponsoring the Meeting 

San Diego Society of Natural History 
Scripps Institution of Oceanography 
San Diego Museum Association 
Zoological Society of San Diego 
San Diego State College 
San Diego County Medical College 

Pa rt 1 C II' at 1 n g So c 1 et 1 ES 

American Association of Physics Teachers (5 papers) 
American Meteorological Society (12 papers) 
American Physical Society (9 papers) 
American Chemical Society (42 papers) 
Astronomical Society of the Pacific (31 papers) 



The Sax Diego, Calif., Meeting t8] 

Association of Pacific Coast Geographers ( 14 papers ) 

( )ceanographic Society of the Pacific (8 papers) 

American Association of Economic Entomologists, Pacific Slope Branch 
( 15 papers) 

American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, Western Division 

Pacific Coast Entomological Society 

Western Society of Naturalists (9 papers) 

American Phytopathological Society, Pacific Division (24 papers) 

American Society of Plant Physiologists, Western Section (35 papers ) 

Botanical Society of America, Pacific Section (25 papers) 

Ecological Society of America ( 14 papers ) 

American Anthropological Association, Pacific Division ( 17 papers) 

Society of American P>acteriologists, Southern California Section 
( 10 papers) 

Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, Pacific Coast Branch 
and Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, Southern Cali- 
fornia Branch (8 papers) 

Western Society of Soil Science (20 papers) 

General Sessions 

J. S. Plaskett, Director, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria. 
B. C. "Modern Conceptions of the Stellar System." (Address of retiring 
president of the Pacific Division.) 

B. O. Raulston, University of California, Los Angeles ; A. J. Carlson, 
University of Chicago ; and Harry Beal Torrey, Stanford" University, were 
the speakers on a general session symposium on "Animal Experimentation." 
Science 88 : 245-250. 1938. 

John B. Leighly, University of California, Berkeley ; Ernst Antevs, Globe, 
Arizona, Merrill K. Bennett, Stanford University, and C. M. Reynolds, 
Stanford University, were the participants in a general session symposium 
on "Climate and Man." 

C. Skottsberg, Botanical Garden, Gothenburg, Sweden. "The Distribu- 
tion of Flowering Plants Over the Pacific Ocean and Its Significance." 

Special Reports on Scientific Progress 

J. A. Anderson, Mount Wilson Observatory. "Recent Instrumental De- 
velopments in Astronomy." 

H. U. Sverdrup, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. "Recent Advances 
in Our Knowledge of the Oceans." 

C. H. Danforth, Stanford University. "The Sex Hormones." 

Richard Goldschmidt, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. "Ge- 
netics." 



182 The Albuquerque, New Mexico, Meeting 

Symposia 

"Nuclear Transformations and Their Astrophysical Significance" (3 
papers). American Physical Society and Astronomical Society of the Pa- 
cific. 

"Physical Problems of the Ocean" (6 papers). American Physical So- 
ciety. 

"Salt Tolerance of Plants and Related Problems" (4 papers). American 
Society of Plant Physiologists, Western Section, and Western Society of 
Soil Science. 

"Plant Invasion on the Pacific Coast" (4 papers). American Society of 
Plant Physiologists, Western Section, and Botanical Society of America, 
Pacific Section. 

"Cell Wall Structure" (5 papers). American Society of Plant Physiolo- 
gists, Western Section, and Botanical Society of America, Pacific Section. 

"A Resume of Progress in Plant Science" (4 papers). American Society 
of Plant Physiologists, Western Section, and Botanical Society of America, 
Pacific Section. 

"History and Relationships of the Southwestern Flora" (3 papers). 
Botanical Society of America, Pacific Section. 

"The Problem of Culture Sequence on the West Coast" (5 papers). 
American Anthropological Association, Pacific Division. 

Preliminary Announcement and Report of Meeting 

Preliminary Announcement of the San Diego meeting of the Pacific Di- 
vision. Science 87: 317-318. 1938. 

Secretary's general report of the meeting. J. Murray Luck. Science 88 : 
195-204. 1938. 

The Albuquerque, New Mexico, Meeting, 
April 25-28, 1938 

(The 18th meeting of the Southwestern Division and its 2d meeting 

in Albuquerque) 

Participating Societies 
Mathematical Association of America, Southwestern Section 
Society of American Foresters, Southwestern Section 
American Association of University Professors, Rocky Mountain Region 
American Society of Civil Engineers, New Mexico Section 

General Sessions 

Frank E. E. Germann, University of Colorado. "The Occurrence of 
Carbon Dioxide with Notes on the Origin and Relative Importance of Sub- 



The Albuquerquk, New Mexico, Meeting 183 

terranean Carbon Dioxide." (Address of retiring president.) Science 87: 
513-521. 1938. 

E. R. Hedrick, Provost of University of California, Los Angeles. "Re- 
lations of Science to Economics and to War." (Ninth John Wesley Powell 
lecture.) 

Herbert C. Stewart, Head of Section of Erosion Control Practices, Rio 
Grande District, Soil Conservation Service, and Thomas Maddock, Section 
of Watershed and Hydrologic Studies, Soil Conservation Service, were the 
speakers at a general-session symposium on "The Results of Soil Conserva- 
tion," at which John D. Clark presided. 

E. R. Hedrick, Provost of University of California, Los Angeles, and 
Harold Benjamin, Dean of College of Education, University of Colorado, 
delivered addresses at a dinner of the American Association of University 
Professors, the former on "Place and Function of Faculties in University 
Government" and the latter on "University Administration in the Amer- 



* 99 

icas. 



Symposia 

"Social Diseases" (4 papers). Biological Sciences Section. 

"Meteorology" (4 papers). Physical Sciences Section. 

"Teaching Problems in Mathematics" (5 papers). Mathematics Section. 

Preliminary Announcement and Report of Meeting 

Preliminary Announcement of the Albuquerque Meeting of the South- 
western Division. Veon C. Kiech. Science 87: 134. 1938. 

Secretary's general report of the meeting. Veon C. Kiech. Science 87 : 
508-510. 1938. 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS 



For the Calendar Year 1939 



Volume LXll 



Summarized Proceedings for 1939 187 



SUMMARIZED PROCEEDINGS FOR 1939 

The Association held two meetings in the calendar year 1939, a summer 
meeting at Milwaukee, Wis., June 19-24, and the annual meeting at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, Dec. 27, 1939 -Jan. 2, 1940. The only previous meeting held in 
Wisconsin was at Madison in August, 1893. The Association first met in 
Columbus in August, 1899, and held a second meeting there in Dec, 191 5- 
Jan., 1916. The Pacific Division held its annual meeting at Stanford Uni- 
versity, June 26 - July 1, 1939. The Southwestern Division held its annual 
meeting in connection with the dedication of the McDonald Observatory at 
Alpine, Texas, May 2-5, 1939. 

At the Milwaukee meeting the registration was 331 and there were 264 
papers listed on the programs. At the annual meeting in Columbus 2715 
persons were registered and 2154 addresses and papers were delivered or 
read. At the Pacific Division meeting at Stanford University the registra- 
tion was 882, with 440 papers on the program. The registration was not 
reported for the meeting of the Southwestern Division at Alpine ; there were 
112 papers on the program. 

Officers of the Association for 1939 

President. Walter B. Cannon, Harvard University. 

Retiring President. Wesley C. Mitchell, Columbia University. 

Permanent Secretary. F. R. Moulton, Washington, D. C. 

General Secretary. Otis W. Caldwell, Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant 

Research. 
Treasurer. John L. Wirt, Washington, D. C. 
Assistant Secretary. Sam Woodley, Washington, D. C. 
Auditor. W. J. Humphreys, U. S. Weather Bureau, Washington, D. C. 
Counsel. Charles S. Baker, Washington, D. C. 
Members oj the Executive Committee (page 95 ) 
Members oj the Finance Committee (page 95) 
Members oj the Committee on Grants (page 95) 
Members oj the Council (pages 95, 92-94) 
Section Officers (pages 92-94) 

Officers of the Pacific Division 
(For the fiscal year June, 1938 - June, 1939) 

President. S. J. Holmes, University of California. 
Secretary. J. Murray Luck, Stanford University. 
Council Representative. Roy E. Clausen, University of California. 



i88 The Milwaukee Meeting 

Officers of the Southwestern Division 
(For the fiscal year April, 193S - April, 1939) 

/'resident. E. F. Carpenter, University of Arizona. 

Secretary. Emil Haury, University of Arizona. 

Council Representative. Frank R. E. Germann, University of Colorado. 

Tin-: Milwaukee Meeting, Jink 19-^4, 1939 
( The 104th meeting of the Association ) 

Officers of the Local Committee 

S. A. Barrett, general chairman 

Governor Julius P. Heil, honorary co-chairman 

Mayor Daniel W. Hoan, honorary co-chairman 

Dr. Clarence Dykstra, honorary co-chairman 

Rev. R. C. McCarthy, S. J., honorary co-chairman 

Participating Societies 

Affiliated with Section on Physics 
American Meteorological Society ( 22 papers ) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Botanical Sciences 
American Society of Plant Physiologists ( 3 -f- 3 papers' ) 
American Phytopathological Society (o -)- 3 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 
Ecological Society of America (4-4-12 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Social and Economic Sciences 
Population Association of America (o -\- 20 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Engineering 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers (o + 14 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Medical Sciences 
American Neisserian Medical Society (o -)- 33 papers) 

Affiliated zvith Section on Agriculture 
Society of American Foresters ( 17 -)- 4 papers) 

( General Sessions 
Victor G, Heiser, Metropolitan Tower, New York. "The Influence of 

1 First number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; the 
second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



The Milwaukee Meeting 189 

Nutrition on the Diseases of Middle and Old Age." The Scientific Monthly 
49: 304-3IO. 1939. 

Heber D. Curtis, University of Michigan. "Solar Storms." (Illustrated 
with motion pictures taken at the McMath-Hulbert Observatory of the 
University of Michigan.) 

Special Sessions 

The third conference on "Science and Society" consisted of four Special 
Sessions at each of which two papers were presented. They were as follows : 

George W. Edwards, College of the City of Xew York. '"The Capitalistic- 
System and How It Evolved." 

Rufus S. Tucker, General Motors Corporation. "Free Enterprise and 
Scientific Development." 

Charles F. Roos, Institute of Applied Econometrics. "The Application 
of Natural Science Methodology to Economic Studies." 

Harold G. Moulton, The Brookings Institution. "Economics and Its 
Dynamic Aspects." 

Leverett S. Lyon, The Brookings Institution. "The Role of Government 
in the Economic System." 

James W. Bell, Northwestern University. "Government Finance and 
Economic Stability." 

Charles H. Judd, National Resources Committee. "Present Relations of 
Government to Science." 

William F. Ogburn, University of Chicago. "Should the Government 
Finance Non-governmental Research Activities ?" 

Symposia 

"Kinetics of Homogeneous Gas Reactions" ( 19 papers). The Section 
on Chemistry and American Chemical Society, Division of Physical and In- 
organic Chemistry. (Presented at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, 
Wis., June 20-22.) 

"Soil Conservation and Land Utilization in the Great Lakes Region" ( 14 
papers). The Section on Geology and Geography, American Society of 
Agricultural Engineers, the Section on Engineering, Association of Ameri- 
can Geographers and Geological Society of America. 

"The Relation of Genetics to Geographical Distribution and Speciation" 
( 5 papers ) . Section on Zoological Sciences. 

"Regeneration" ( 5 papers). Section on Zoological Sciences. 

"Socio-Economic Approach to Land Use" (4 papers). Section on Bo- 
tanical Sciences, Ecological Society of America, Society of American For- 
esters and Section on Agriculture. 

"Photoperiodism" (3 papers). American Society of Plant Physiologists, 



190 The Milwaukee Meeting 

Section on Botanical Sciences and American Phytopathological Society. 

"Measuring Attitudes." Section on Psychology. 

"Psychological Bases of Mental Hygiene." Section on Psychology. 

"Neuromuscular Tension." Section on Psychology. 

"Population Problems and Programs in the Northern Lake States" (17 
papers). The Section on Social and Economic Sciences, Population Asso- 
ciation of America, Ecological Society of America and Section on Agricul- 
ture. 

"Gonococcus and Gonococcal Infection" (33 papers). The Section on 
Medical Sciences and the American Neisserian Medical Society. Publica- 
tion No. 1 1 of the Association. 1939. 

"Vitamins with Particular Reference to Their Standardization" (6 
papers ) . Subsection on Pharmacy. 

"Forest Rehabilitation in the Lake States" (8 papers). Society of Amer- 
ican Foresters. 

"The Education of the Emotions" (17 papers). The Section on Educa- 
tion. 

Announcements and Reports of Meeting 

Preliminary Announcement of the Milwaukee Meeting. F. R. Moulton. 
Science 89 : 469-474. 1939. 

"Milwaukee a Mecca for Scientists in June." F. R. Moulton. The Scien- 
tific Monthly 48: 575-576. 1939. 

Permanent Secretary's general report of the meeting, including reports 
of the secretaries of the sections and of the participating societies. F. R. 
Moulton. Science 90: 45-55. 1939. 

"Reflections on the Milwaukee Meeting." F. R. Moulton. The Scien- 
tific Monthly 49: 86-88. 1939. 

Miscellaneous Articles, Notes and Reports 

"The American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Na- 
tional Education Association." Science 89: 147. 1939. 

Financial reports of the Treasurer and the Permanent Secretary for the 
fiscal year ended September 30, 1938. Science 89 : 201-202. 1939. 

'The Society of the Sigma Xi." Edward Ellery. Science 89: 201. 1939. 

Joint Symposium of the American Chemical Society, the University of 
Wisconsin and the A.A.A.S. Harold C. Urey. Science 89 : 463-464. 1939. 

"Science and Social Pioneering." Isaiah Bowman, president of The Johns 
Hopkins University. (The first British and American Association exchange 
lecture. The Dundee, Scotland, meeting of the British Association, Sep- 
tember, 1939.) Science 90: 309-319. 1939. 



The Columbus, Ohio, Meeting 191 

The Columbus, Ohio, Meeting, Dec. 27, 1939- Jan. 2, 1940 

( The 105th meeting of the Association and its 3d meeting at Columbus) 

Officers of the Local Committee 

Alpheus W. Smith, chairman 

Howard L. Hamilton, executive secretary 

Participating Societies 

Affiliated with Section on Mathematics 

American Mathematical Society (64 -j- 4 papers 1 ) 
Mathematical Association of America (6 -f- 6 papers) 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics ( 16 -f- 5 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Physics 

American Physical Society (75 -(- 2 papers) 

American Association of Physics Teachers (25 -f- 2 papers) 

American Meteorological Society (9 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Astronomy 

American Astronomical Society (39 + ll papers) 
Society for Research on Meteorites (9 -)- 14 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Geology and Geography 

Geological Society of America (o -f- 55 papers) 

Ohio Academy of Science, Section of Geology (0+31 papers) 

American Geophysical Union (o-f-6 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Zoological Sciences 

American Society of Zoologists ( 187 + 8 papers) 

American Association of Economic Entomologists ( 105 -f- 9 papers) 

Entomological Society of America (49 -f- 15 papers) 

American Society of Parasitologists (84 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Botanical Sciences 

Section on Botanical Sciences 
Botanical Society of America ( 1 1 1 + 55 papers) 
American Phytopathological Society (101 -f- 53 papers) 
American Society of Plant Physiologists (37 + 16 papers) 
Mycological Society of America (22 -j- 17 papers) 
Sullivant Moss Society (14 papers) 
American Fern Society (2 -f- 4 papers) 
American Society of Plant Taxonomists 

1 First number is the number of papers presented at sessions at which the society met alone; the 
second is the number presented at one or more joint sessions of the society. 



ic)2 The Columbus, Ohio, Meeting 

Affiliated with Sections on Zoological and Botanical Sciences 

American Society of Naturalists ( i + 3 papers) 

Ecological Society of America (43 -f- 29 papers) 

Genetics Society of America ( 58 -f- X papers ) 

American Microscopical Society 

Limnological Society of America (32 -f- 8 papers ) 

Phi Sigma Society (24 papers) 

National Association of Biology Teachers ( 12 papers) 

Union of American Biological Societies 

Affiliated with Section on Social and Economic Sciences 
Metric Association (7 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Historical and Philological Sciences 
History of Science Society ( 5 + 1 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Agriculture 
Society of American Foresters (15 -f- 14 papers) 
American Society for Horticultural Sciences ( 178 -f- ,V papers) 
Potato Association of America (18 -\- 22 papers) 

Affiliated with Section on Education 
American Federation of Teachers 

Science in General 

Society of the Sigma Xi 

United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa 

American Nature Study Society (22 papers) 

American Science Teachers Association (8 papers) 

Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi ( 1 paper) 

Gamma Alpha Graduate Scientific Fraternity 

Sigma Delta Epsilon Graduate Women's Fraternity ( 1 paper) 

Pi Gamma Mu, National Social Science Honor Society (2 papers) 

American Association of Scientific Workers (3 papers) 

The Catholic Round Tahle of Science 

General Sessions 

Wesley C. Mitchell, Columbia University. "'The Public Relations of 
Science." (Address of retiring president of the Association.) Science 90: 
599-607. 1939. 

Isaiah Bowman, president of the Johns Hopkins University. "Who Is 
Responsible for Peace?" (Address under auspices of Honor Society of 
Phi Kappa Phi.) 



The Columbus, Ohio, Meeting i<)3 

Kirtley F. Mather, Harvard University. "The Future of Man as an In- 
habitant of the Earth." (Eighteenth annual Sigma Xi lecture.) Sigma Xi 
Quarterly 28, X<>. 1. 1940; The Scientific Monthly 50: 193-203. 1940. 

Julian Huxley, London, England. "'Science. War and Reconstruction." 
( Second British and American Association exchange lecture.) Science 91 : 
151-158. 1940. 

Marjorie Hope Nicolson, Smith College. "Science and Literature." (Fifth 
annua! Phi Beta Kappa lecture. ) 

Addresses of Vice Presidents 

Section on Mathematics. J. R. Kline, University of Pennsylvania. "The 
Jordan Curve Theorem." 

Section on Physics. Herbert E. Ives, Bell Telephone Laboratories. "The 
Measurement of Velocity with Atomic Clocks." Science 91 : 79-84. 1940. 

Section on Chemistry. Harold C. Urey, Columbia University. "The De- 
pendence of Physical and Chemical Properties on Mass, and the Separation 
of Isotopes." 

Section on Astronomy. R. Meldrum Stewart. Dominion Observatory, 
Ottawa, Canada. "Some Remarks on Gravity Clock Escapements." 

Section on Geology and Geography. Walter H. Bucher. University of 
Cincinnati. "Problems of the Atlantic Ocean." 

Section on Zoological Sciences. Wesley R. Coe, Yale University. ''Di- 
vergent Pathways in Sexual Development." Science 91 : 175-182. 1940. 

Section on Botanical Sciences. Raymond J. Pool, University of Ne- 
braska. "White Man Versus the Prairie." Science 91 : 53-58. 1940. 

Section on Anthropology. Diamond Jenness, National Museum of Can- 
ada, Ottawa, Canada. "Canada's Indian Problems." 

Section on Psychology. J. F. Dashiell, University of North Carolina. "A 
Xeglected Fourth Dimension to Psychological Research." 

Section on Historical and Philological Sciences. Nelson Glenn McCrea, 
Columbia University. "Literature as an Ally of the Social Sciences." 

Section on Engineering. A. A. Potter, Purdue University. "Research 
and Invention in Engineering Colleges." Science 91 : 1-7. 1940. 

Section on Medical Sciences. C. J. Wiggers, Western Reserve University 
School of Medicine. "Pathways of Medical Progress." Science 91: 25-31. 
1940. Publication No. [3 ( Blood, Heart and Circulation) of the Associa- 
tion, pp. 1-9. 1940. 

Section on Agriculture. Robert M. Salter, Ohio Agricultural Experiment 
Station, Wooster, Ohio. "Some Soil Factors Affecting Tree Growth." 
Science 91 : 391-398. 1940. 

Section on Education. George D. Stoddard. University of Iowa. "Re- 
flections upon the I. Q." 



194 The Columbus, Ohio, Meeting 

Symposia 

"Relational Thinking in Secondary Mathematics" (12 papers). National 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 

"Isotopes" (13 papers). Section on Chemistry. 

"Photosynthesis" (14 papers at regular sessions and a round-table discus- 
sion after dinner). Section on Chemistry. 

"Glacial and Geomorphic Development of the Ohio Basin" (12 papers). 
Section on Geology and Geography, Geological Society of America and 
Ohio Academy of Science (Section on Geology). 

"Industrial Minerals" (9 papers). Section on Geology and Geography 
and Geological Society of America. 

"Paleozoic Stratigraphy of the Ohio Basin" (13 papers). Section on 
Geology and Geography, Geological Society of America and Ohio Academy 
of Science (Section on Geology). 

"Meteorite Falls and Meteorite Accretion" (5 papers). Section on Ge- 
ology and Society for Research on Meteorites. 

"Applications of Mathematics to the Earth Sciences" (5 papers). Sec- 
tion on Geology and Geography, Section on Mathematics, American Mathe- 
matical Society, Mathematical Association of America and Geological 
Society of America. 

"Hydrologic Problems in the Ohio and Michigan Basins" (6 papers). 
Section on Geology and Geography, Geological Society of America (Sec- 
tion on Hydrology), American Geophysical Union and Ohio Academy of 
Sciences (Section on Geology). 

"Speciation" (5 papers). American Society of Zoologists and Genetics 
Society of America. 

"Experimental Study of Cellular Organization" (5 papers). American 
Society of Zoologists. 

"Fifty Years of Entomological Progress" (5 papers). American Asso- 
ciation of Economic Entomologists and Entomological Society of America. 

"Viruses and Plant Quarantines" (4 papers). American Association of 
Economic Entomologists and American Phytopathological Society. 

"Training for the Various Fields of Entomology" (5 papers). American 
Association of Economic Entomologists. 

"Physiological Processes of Plants in Relation to Temperature" (5 
papers). Botanical Society of America (Physiological Section), American 
Society for Horticultural Science and American Society of Plant Physiolo- 
gists. 

"Defense Mechanisms in Plants and Animals" (3 papers). Botanical 
Society of America, American Society of Naturalists, American Society of 
Zoologists, Genetics Society of America and Section on Medical Sciences. 



The Columbus, Ohio, Meeting 195 

"The Teaching of Plant Physiology" (3 papers). American Society for 
Plant Physiology. 

"Relation of Ecology to Human Welfare — The Human Situation" (5 
papers). Ecological Society of America. 

"The Internal Environment and Behavior." Section on Psychology. 

"Effects of Science upon Human Beings" (4 papers). Fourth Science 
and Society Conferences of Section on Social and Economic Sciences. 

"Blood, Heart and Circulation" (39 papers). Section on Medical 
Sciences. Publication No. 13 of the Association. 1940. 

"Definite Oral Manifestations of Systemic Disease" (9 papers). Sub- 
section on Dentistry. 

Preliminary Announcements and Reports 

Preliminary Announcement of the Columbus Meeting. F. R. Moulton. 
Science 90: 499-507. 1939. 

"Scientists Assemble at Richmond." F. R. Moulton. The Scientific 

Monthly 49: 573S7^ J 939- 

Permanent Secretary's general report, including reports of secretaries of 
sections and participating societies. F. R. Moulton. Science 91 : 101-124. 
1940. 

"American Association in Action." F. R. Moulton. The Scientific 
Monthly 50: 85-91. 1940. 

Miscellaneous Articles, Notes and Reports 

"Constitutional Barriers to Involvement of the Nervous System by Cer- 
tain Viruses." Albert B. Sabin. (Address upon receipt of the Theobald 
Smith Award of the Association.) Science 91 : 84-87. 1940. 

"The Nation and Petroleum Geology Today." Hugh D. Miser. Science 
91: 251-255. 1940. 

Report of Committee on Grants for 1940. Science 91 : 124. 1940. 

Financial Reports of Treasurer and Permanent Secretary for the fiscal 
year ended September 30, 1939. F. R. Moulton. Science 91 : 195-196. 1940. 

Membership of the Association. F. R. Moulton. Science 91 : 219-220. 
1940. 

Newly Elected President of the American Association ( Albert F. Blakes- 
lee). Burton E. Livingston. The Scientific Monthly L: 182-185. 1940. 

Award of the American Association Prize. (I. I. Rabi, recipient.) Karl 
K. Darrow. The Scientific Monthly L: 185-187. 1940. 

The Scientific Exhibition in Columbus. Owen Cattell. The Scientific 
Monthly L: 189-191. 1940. 

The Washington Dinner in Honor of Julian S. Huxley. (Dinner spon- 



196 The Stanford University Meeting 

sored by the Association, the Smithsonian Institution and The Scientific 
Monthly.) The Scientific Monthly 50 : 191-192. 1940. 

"Symposium on Blood, Heart and Circulation." Malcolm H. Soule. The 
Scientific Monthly 50: 187-189. 1940. 



The Stanford University Meeting, June 26 - July i, 1939 
( The 23d annual meeting of the Pacific Division) 

Pa rt 1 c r pat j x g Soci et i es 

American Association of Physics Teachers ( 4 invited papers) 

American Meteorological Society (30 papers) 

American Physical Society (13 papers) 

American Chemical Society, Pacific Intersectional Division ( 32 papers) 

Astronomical Society of the Pacific (25 papers) 

Association of Pacific Coast Geographers ( 15 papers) 

American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, Western Division 

( 1 5 papers ) 
The Western Society of Naturalists ( 10 papers) 
American Association of Economic Entomologists, Pacific Slope Branch 

(59 papers) 
Ecological Society of America, Western Section ( 12 papers) 
Pacific Coast Entomological Society (all joint sessions) 
American Phytopathological Society, Pacific Division (28 papers) 
American Society of Plant Physiologists, Western Section (28 papers) 
Botanical Society of America, Pacific Section (45 papers) 
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, Pacific Coast Branch 

and Southern California Branch ( 17 papers) 
American Society for Horticultural Science, Western Section 

(24 papers) 
Western Society of Soil Science (33 papers) 

General Sessions 

S. J. Holmes, University of California, Berkeley. "Darwinian Ethics and 
Its Practical Applications." ( Address of retiring president of the Division. ) 
Science 90: 117-123. 1940. 

V. Gordon Childe, University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh, Scotland. "The 
Neolithic Economy in Northwestern Europe." 

1.1). Bernal, University of London, London, England. "The Structure 
of Protein Molecules." 



Thk Stanford University Meeting 197 

Special Reports on Scientific Progress 

J. \Y. McBain, Stanford University. "Recent Advances in Colloid Chem- 
istry." 

A. R. Davis, University of California, Berkeley. "Mineral Metabolism in 
Plants." 

Henry Borsook, California Institute of Technology. "Biological Oxida- 
tions and Reductions." 

J. W. Macfarlane, University of California, Berkeley. "Research on Per- 
sonality Development." 

Symposium on "Radiation and Life" 

W. V. Houston, California Institute of Technology. "Radiation." 

John H. Lawrence, University of California, Berkeley. "Radioactive 
Elements as Tracers in Metabolic Studies." 

M. Delbruck, California Institute of Technology. "Radiation and the 
Hereditary Mechanism." 

Robert R. Newell, Stanford University Hospitals, San Francisco, Calif. 
"Medical Applications." 

Symposia 

"Some Xew Ultra-High-Frequency Radio Apparatus ( 4 papers with 
demonstrations). American Physical Society. 

"Methods and Results of X-ray Structure Determination" (5 papers). 
American Physical Society. 

"Dams and the Problem of Migratory Fishes" (5 papers). American 
Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, Western Division, and The 
Western Society of Naturalists. 

"Recent Contributions of Botany and Ecology to Society" (4 papers). 
Ecological Society of America, Western Section, and Botanical Society of 
America, Pacific Section. 

"Availability of Nutrients in Soils to Plants" (6 papers). American So- 
ciety of Plant Physiologists, Western Section, and Western Society of Soil 
Science. 

"Translocation of Solutes in Plants" ((> papers). American Society of 
Plant Physiologists. Western Section, and Botanical Society of America, 
Pacific Section. 

"Growth" (8 papers). American Society of Plant Physiologists, Western 
Division. 

"Native Plants of Western North America Offering Exceptional Mate- 
rial for Botanical Research" ( 5 papers). Botanical Society of America, Pa- 
cific Section. 



198 The Alpine, Texas, Meeting 

"The Cell and Protoplasm" (17 papers). This symposium in commem- 
oration of the centenary of the Cell Theory, held at Stanford University, 
July 1-5, was participated in by J. D. Bernal, of England, Szent-Gyorgyi, of 
Hungary, and Hugo Theorell, of Sweden. Publication No. 14 of the Asso- 
ciation. 1940. 

"National Colloid Symposium." The Colloid Symposium Committee of 
the Division of Colloid Chemistry, American Chemical Society and the 
Committee on Colloid Science, National Research Council. This symposium, 
the sixteenth national colloid symposium, was held at Stanford University, 
July 6-8. 

Preliminary Announcement and Report 

Preliminary Announcement of the Stanford meeting, J. Murray Luck. 
Science 89 1504. 1939. 

Secretary's general report of the Stanford meeting, including reports of 
the secretaries of the participating societies. J. Murray Luck. Science 90: 
123-131. 1939. 



The Alpine, Texas, Meeting of the Southwestern 
Division, May 2-5, 1939 

( The igth meeting of the Southwestern Division) 
Victor J. Smith, Chairman of General Committee 

Participating Societies 

Mathematical Association of America, Southwestern Section 

Society of American Foresters, Southwestern Section 

Texas Archaeological and Paleontological Society 

West Texas Museum Association 

Panhandle Plains Historical Society 

Southwest Texas Archaeological Society 

Clearing House for Southwestern Museums 

Texas Folk Lore Society 

Texas Academy of Science 

West Texas Historical and Scientific Society 

Central Texas Archaeological Society 

Texas Nature Federation 

West Texas Chamber of Commerce Resource and Museum Institute 

Sociedad Chihuahuense de Estudios Historicos 



The Alpine, Texas, Meeting i99 

General Sessions 

E. F. Carpenter, University of Arizona. "The Revolt Against Thought." 
(Address of retiring president of Southwestern Division.) 

A. H. Compton, University of Chicago. "Physics Views the Future." 
(Tenth John Wesley Powell lecture.) 

Dedication of the McDonald Observatory, Mt. Locke: "Tender of Com- 
pleted Observatory," P. E. Bliss, Warner & Swasey Company; "Accept- 
ance of Completed Observatory," Otto Struve, the Yerkes Observatory; 
"The Cooperative Enterprise," Robert Maynard Hutchins, president of 
The University of Chicago; "Acceptance for the University of Texas," 
member of Board of Regents; "Some Features of the New Mirror," J. S. 
Plaskett, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Ottawa, Canada; 'The 
First of the Sciences," Arthur H. Compton, The University of Chicago; 
and "Dedication of the Observatory," J. W. Calhoun, president of the Uni- 
versity of Texas. 

Section Programs 

Biological Sciences Section (15 papers). W. H. Bell, chairman. 

Mathematics Section (13 papers). R. S. Underwood, chairman. Pro- 
gram of the Section included a symposium on "Topology" (2 papers). 

Physical Science Section (23 papers). E. J. Workman, chairman. 

Social Science Section (27 papers). Victor J. Smith, chairman. Pro- 
gram of the Section included a symposium on "Methods of Cultural Classi- 
fication and Description: Conference on Texas Archaeological Methods" 
(10 papers). 

Program in Connection with the Dedication of the McDonald Observa- 
tory (27 addresses and papers). The program included a symposium on 
"Galactic Structure" (2 papers) and a symposium on "Galactic and Ex- 
tragalactic Structure" (2 papers). 

Texas Junior Academy of Sciences presented a program of 9 reports of 
projects and activities. 

Preliminary Announcement and Report of Meeting 

Preliminary Report of the Annual Meeting of the Southwestern Division. 
Veon C. Kiech. Science 89:73. 1939. 

Secretary's general report of the Alpine, Texas, meeting of the South- 
western Division. Veon C. Kiech. Science 90 : 38. 1939. 



200 Special Research Conferences 

SPECIAL RESEARCH CONFERENCES UNDER THE 
AUSPICES OF THE SECTION ON CHEMISTRY 

Each of these special conferences consisted of two sessions each day for a 
period of five days. Usually only one paper was presented at each session, 
the remainder of the time being reserved for discussions. The conferences 
during each five-day period were devoted to an important limited field of 
chemistry and were participated in only by specialists in the field. 

First Research Conferences ox Chemistry 

(Gibson Island, Maryland, August 15-16, WjS) 

These two conferences were organized by Neil E. Cordon, Secretary of 
the Section on Chemistry. The subject of the first one was, "Relation of 
Structure to Physiological Action," Harold C. Urey, chairman. Five formal 
papers were presented at this conference. The second one was on "Cellular 
Metabolism and Tissue Respiration," by Kurt G. Stern, chairman. Nine 
formal papers were presented at this conference. Science 88: 8-9. 1938. 

Second Research, Conferences ox Chemistry 

(Gibson Island, Maryland, July 10-28, WjQ) 

The .subjects of the three conferences held in 1939 were, "Resinous 
Polymers," "Vitamins" and "Relation of Structure to Physiological Action." 
The respective chairmen were Howard L. Bender, C G. King, and Walter 
H. Hartung. Ten papers were presented at the first conference, eight at the 
second and eight at the third. Science 89 : 559-561 . 1939. 

A third series of five five-day research conferences was held in July- 
August, 1940. 



SUSTAINING MEMBERS 

LIFE MEMBERS 

EMERITUS LIFE MEMBERS 

EMERITUS ANNUAL MEMBERS 

FIFTY-YEAR MEMBERS 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

AND 

ANNUAL MEMBERS 



Complete Lists of the First Six Classses from the Establishment 
of these Classes of Members to July i, 1940 



Sustaining Members 203 



SUSTAINING MEMBERS 

Article 2 of the Constitution of the Association contains the provision : "A person 
who gives one thousand dollars to the Association may be elected to be a sustaining 
member and is exempt from further dues." 

Article 10 of the Constitution contains the provision: "The payments from sustaining 
and life members form part of the permanent fund, and the income (after the death of 
the member) shall be used for research, unless otherwise directed by unanimous vote of 
the Council or by a majority vote at two consecutive annual meetings." 

An asterisk preceding the name of a member indicates that he is deceased. 

The symbols following the name give the complete membership record of the member. 
For example, the symbols following the first name below indicate that Edward Dean 
Adams became a member (M) in 1890, a fellow (F) in 191 3, a sustaining member (S) 
in 1916 and died (D) in 1931. A dash following the letter D means that the year of 
the death of the person is not known by the Association. 

*Adams, Edward Dean. M90F13S16D31. *Maiben, Hector. S21D31. 

^Hermann, Mrs. Esther. S70D11. *Thompson, Mrs. Elizabeth. S73D99. 

*Lilly, William. S79D93. -'Walters, Henry. S29D31. 
*McMillin, Emerson. S88F09D22. 



LIFE MEMBERS 

Article 2 of the Constitution of the Association contains the provision : "A member 
who pays at one time the sum of one hundred dollars [fifty dollars until Jan. 1, 1920] to 
the Association becomes a life member and is exempt from further dues." 

The provision of Article 10 of the Constitution, quoted under Sustaining Members 
above, applies also to Life Members. 

The names of Life Members who were living on June 1, 1934, are included, with 
additional information, in the complete directory of members for the period June 1, 
1 934- July 1, 1940, which begins on page 217. The names of Life Members who were 
deceased on June 1, 1934, are contained in some earlier volume of the Summarized Pro- 
ceedings. Therefore the complete membership record of every person who has been a 
member of the Association since the present system of records was established in 1920 
is contained in some volume of the Summarized Proceedings. 

The symbols following the name give the complete membership record of the member. 
For example, the symbols following the second name below indicate that E. Stanley 
Abbot became a member (M) in 1904, a life member (L) in 1909, and a fellow (F) in 
1928. In case a member is deceased the letter D precedes the digits that indicate the 
year of his death ; a dash following the letter D means that the year of the death of the 
person is not known by the Association. 

New York State Library. Lio. *Argollo, Miguel T. M08L14D16. 

Abbot, E. Stanley. M04L09F28. Armstrong, Clairette P. L29F33. 

Achilles, Edith Mulhall. M22L25F28. Armstrong, Donald. M10L11. 

Ackerman, Mrs. Ethel Serviss. L25. Armstrong, Francis T. Ln. 

Adams, Edwin L. M18L26. Armstrong, S. Howard. L39. 

Allen, A. H. M24L25. Armstrong, Samuel T. M06L07F33. 

Allis, Edward Phelps. M02F05L14. Armstrong, Warren Putnam. L34. 

Allis, William Phelps. M24L31F33. *Arnett, Eugene. L24D38. 

Alvord, John W. M07F11L31. Arnold, John W. M24L29F31. 



204 



Life Members 



Arnold, Weld. L22F31. 

Arutunoff, Armais. M37L39. 

Austin, James Harold. M12L13F15. 
:|: Avery, Samuel P. L87D04. 

Bacon, Clara L. M24L33F33. 

Baekeland, L. H. M06F08L24. 

Baggaley, Ralph. Loi. 

Bailey. John Wendell. M17F33L38. 
;:: Balch, Edwin Swift. Moi F03L03D27. 
•'Baldwin, S. Prentiss. L98F00D38. 
"Baldwin, Simeon E. L01F01D27. 

Ballard, Mrs. Foster K. L38. (Formerly 
Ruth G. Mason) 
*Baltzell, William Hewson. M08L09D28. 
:: Baltzell, Mrs. Wm. Hewson. L29D38. 
*Bangs, Lemuel Bolton. L87D14. 

Banker, Howard J. M02F05L23. 

Bannister, Ruth D. M24L2Q. 

Barber, M. A. L34F34. 

Barbour, Thomas. M02F07L2S. 
*Barge, B. F. M84L88D02. 
-Barker, George F. MsoF7sL8oDio. 
-Barnard, Edward E. M77F83L08D23. 
*Barnes, Cora F. M06L07D11. 

Barnes, Howard T. M06F09L25. 

Barnhart, John H. M60F03L11. 
*Barth, Carl G. M08L25F28D39. 
*Barton, Donald Clinton. M11F21L37D39. 

Bascom, Florence. M02F97L10. 

Bates, B. L. M. L17. 
:i: Bates, Oric. L16D18. 

Bausch, Carl L. M31F32L37. 

Beckwith, Mrs. Daniel. L29. 

Beckwith, Edward P. M11L13. 

Beinecke, Frederick W. M28L31. 

Belknap, Mrs. William. 
*Bell, Alexander Graham. 
-Bell, C. M. LS7D— . 

Bell, Dennistoun M. .\L_ 
:i; Bell, John Everett. M03F06L25D31. 

Belmont, Perry. M06L07. 
^Benjamin, Marcus. M78F87L9 1 D32. 

Berry, Samuel Stillman. M09F15L18. 
:|: Biddle, Thomas. M13L15D15. 

Bierbaum, Christopher H. M03F25L25. 

Bird, Charles Sumner, Jr. M08L09. 
-Bird, John B. L17D25." 
■ |: Birnie, Rogers. M.10L1 1F1 1D39. 
: Bishop, Heber R. L87D02. 

Bitting, Arvill W. M16L17F33. 
-Bitting, Katherine Golden. M93F97L17- 

D36. 
;|: Bixby, Wm. H. L85F92D28. 
*Blackmore, Henry Spencer. M00L09D21. 

Blair, Mary C. L22. 
-Blanchard, George W. M24L31D — . 

Blanchard, Roland. M25L31. 
)! Br.sh, W. G. L84D— . 

Bliss, Cornelius N. L29F40. 

Bliss, Gilbert Ames. M05L06F07. 

Bliss, Robert Woods. L29F40. 
-Bliss. Mrs. William H. L07D35. 

Blossom, Mrs. D. S. L32. 
*Blount, Henry F. M83L98D13. 

Blumenthal, Hugo. L16. 

Blunt, Katharine. M07F10L37. 

Boettger, Robert. L16. 

Bogen, Emil. M29L32F33. 

Bole, Mrs. B. P. M24L30. 
*Bolton, H. Carrington. M68F7SL79D03. 
-Bond, Benjamin D. M17L25D — . 



L29. 

M 7 7F79^ '-•!>- 

1 2 L< 



Boswell. Foster P. M10L2SF28. 

Bower, E. C. L27F27. 

Boyd, James E. M97F99L37. 

Boyden, James R. L18. 
-Brackenridge, George W. L92D20. 
-Bradley, Arthur C. L94D11. 
-Bradley, M. J. L94D11. 
-Bradley, Milton. Los D 10. 
-Bradley, Stephen R. M01L02D10. 

Branch, Hazel Elisabeth. M24L31F33. 
-Brashear, John A. M84F85L02D18. 

Bray, Charles W. M3oF33L37- 
-Breitenbach, M. J. L17D20. 
*Brice, Albert G. M83L07D12. 
-Bridge, Norman. M02F06L23D25. 
:: Britton, Wiley. MQ1L05D — . 

Brodie. R. K. M17F33L37. 
-Brooks, Peter C. M08L09D2S. 
-Brown, Joseph Stanford. L01F06D23. 
-Brown, William Henry. M08F15L20D39. 
-Browning, J. Hull. M06L07D14. 
-Brunton, David William. L01F11D27. 
-Brush, George J. M50F74L81D12. 
-Bryant, Henry Grier. M02F05L10D32. 

Bryant, Owen. M04F06L10. 
-Buck. Fred. M20L37D— . 
-Buckley, Ernest R. M02L03D13. 

Buehler, Henry Andrew. L11F13. 
-Bullard, William N. M17L18D31. 
-Burbank, Luther. M01F01L08D26. 
-Burgess, Horace T. M11F15L20D39. 

Burnett, J. Clawson. L29. 

Burr, Charles W. L22F33. 

Burr, I. Tucker. M08L09. 

Burwash, E. M. L22F25. 

Busch, Henry Paul. L21. 

Caldwell, Otis W. M00F02L23. 

Callender, Walter R. L28. 
-Campbell, William W. Moi Foi L03 D38. 

Cantley, Thomas. M08L23. 

Caplan, Herman. M22L24. 

Capp, Seth Bunker. M14L15. 

Carpenter, Arthur. M28L31F33. 

Carpenter, Leonard. M06L31. 
-Carter, James C. L87D08. 

Case, Theodore W. L17F25. 

Cattell, J. McKeen. MqsF96L98. 

Cattell, Mrs. J. McKeen. M22L30. 
-Cattell, Owen. L16D40. 

Chamberlin, Rollin T. M00F0QL20. 

Chapman, Conrad. M22L23. 
-Chisholm, George E. MoiLi8D38. 

Churchill, Anna Quincy. M23L24F33. 
-Cilley, Frank H. M00F01L01D05. 

Clapp, Grace L. M18F21L37. 
-Clarke, Hopewell. M10L11D — . 

Cleveland, Newcomb. L23. 

Clyde. William Hill. L 3 .i. 
-Coe, Henrv Waldo. M83L8SD27. 
-Colburn, Richard T. M82L87F9AD13. 

Cole, Howard Irving. M29L31F33. 
-Colman, L. C. L22D25. 

Coltcn, Harold Sellers. AI04L09F13. 
:!i Comstock, Theo. B. M75F87L00D15. 
-Converse, John H. M04F06L06D10. 

Cook, Howard H. M10L11. 

Cook, Jonathan. L37. 

Cooke, C. Montague, Jr. M07L23F33. 
-Coolidge, Mrs. J. Randolph. MoSLooDji. 

Cornelius, David W. M24L25F25. 
*Corning, E. L. L18D24. 



Life Members 



20: 



Corning, H. K. L27. 

Cortes, Jose Maria. L35. 
*Costantini, Count D. A. M2QL30D — . 
*Coster, Edward L. Mi 1 1,131)34. 

Council, Francis E. M22L23. 
-Coxe, Eckley B., Jr. M 02 I ..ml)— . 

Crain, Jason. M23L24. 
*Cram, Roys Jones. L02F06D28. 

Crampton, G. C. M 10F] 1 L26. 

Crane, Alfred J. M17L27. 
"Crocker, Sarah H. M08L10D17. 

Crocker, Mrs. Wm. H. L29. 
♦Crowell, A. F. L82D20. 

Crunden, Allan B., Jr. M3SL40. 
-Cullinan, J. S. L22D38. 
-Curie, Charles. L06D10. 

Currie, Thomas R. M08L31. 

Dalai, Rustom D. L32F38. 

d'Autremont, Louis Paul. L27. 
"Davis, Andrew McFarland. M86L0N Fo6- 
Oj 1 . 

Davis, Bradley Moore. M96F97L25. 

Davis, Charles Henry. M07F15L24. 

Davis, Helen I. M23F33L37. 

Davis, William T. M06L07F11. 

Davy, J. Burtt. M02F03L03. 

Dawson, Bernhard H. M21F22L24. 

Day, Katharine Seymour. M25L26. 

Day, William Scofield. LooF"ot. 
-Deagan, John C. M22L26D37. 
"Deering, Charles. L17D27. 

de Forest, Alfred Victor. L17F31. 
'Deghuee, Joseph A. Moi F00L31D31. 
*Delafield, Maturin L. M94F-13L15D29. 

de Landero, Carlos F. M87L91. 
: DeLoubat, LeDuc. M97F97L98D27. 

DeSilver, Mrs. Margaret. L29. 

Desloge, Joseph. M24L31. 
"Dey, Anthony. M06L07D12. 

Deyoe, H. L. M32L37. 

Dickerman, William C. L17F32. 

Dickinson, C. G. M29L31. 

Dobbin, Frank. M12L13. 

Dodd, Gertrude. L2Q. 
-Dodge, Cleveland H. L17D26. 

Drake, Noah Fields. M06L07F0Q. 
*Draper, Daniel. M80F81L87D31. 
''Droppers, Garrett. M01F01L08D27. 
*Du Bois, Aug. J. L81F82D1S. 
*Dudley, Wm. L. M79F81L88D14. 

Dufrenoy, Jean. M28F31L36. 

Duncan, John Charles. M10F11L31. 

Duncanson, Henry B. M01L08. 
"Dunham, Carroll. M06L07D22. 

Dunn, Gano. M01F16L19. 

Dunn, Henry E. M18L31. 

Dunscombe, George E. M06L07. 

Durand, William F. M88F90L31. 
*Dutton, Charles E. L15D26. 
"Eddy, N. A. L17D18. 

Edison, Theodore M. M24L31F32. 
"Edwards, J. Warner. M07L10D21. 

Elder, Clayburn C. M28L37'. 

Elliott, A. W. L38. 

Elliott, William Swan. L33. 

Ellis, Ralph. L28. 
"Ellsworth, James William. L17D25. 

Embury, Emma C. L29. 
:l! Emerson, Charles F. M73F74L98D23. 

Emerson, Mrs. Raymond. M12L13. 

Emmons, Mrs. Arthur B. L29. 



W. M08L09D— . 
Edwin. M17L26. 
Li 7D19. 
H. L35F35. 
Frederick. M80L82- 



-Emmons, S. F. M74F79L87D11. 
*Eno, A. F. L10D— . 

Eshner, Augustus A. M05F09L28. 
:|: Estes, Dana. M80L84D09. 

Ettinger, Amos A. L37. 

Evans, Alice C. M24L31F31. 

Evans, Florence L. M37F38L38. 
:: Fabbri, Alessandro. Li 7D22. 

Farwell, Francis C. L21. 

Field, Wm. B. Osgood. M06L07. 
"Fielde, Adele M. M06L09D16. 

Fish, Stuyvesant. L17. 

Fiske, Thomas Scott. M01F01L06. 

FitzPatrick, Florence K. L38. 
-Fletcher, Andrew. L01D08. 

Floyd, Willis W. L35F35. 

Follin, Maynard D. L22. 

Forbes, Alexander. M08L09F21. 

Forbes, Henry S. M23F25L31. 

Forbes, William T. M. M09L11F14. 

Fortmann, Henry Frederick. M04L06. 

Foxworthy, Fred W. Mo2FiiL23. 

Frazer, John. M07F09L09. 
"Frazer, Persifor. M75F79L84D09. 

Freedman, William H. M01F01L26. 
:|: French, Caroline L 

Freudenthal, Louis 
*Frick, Henry Clay. 

Friedman, Maurice 
:: Frothingham, Mrs. 
D13. 

Fuhr, Clara. M24L30. 
"'Fuller, Frank. M06L07D20. 

Fuller, Myron L. L01F05. 

Fuller, Richard E. M29F31L31. 

Fulton, John F. M27L31F31. 

Gafafer, Wm. M24F33L36. 
:: Gaff, Thomas T. M02L19D23. 

Gaines, Walter Lee. M13L14F31. 
"Gallatin, Albert R. L17F38D39. 

Gamble, Clarence James. L28. 
"Garrett, Mrs. T. H. M08L0QD20. 
-Gates. M. F. L23D25. 

Gates, Reginald Ruggles. M07F09L19. 
*Genth, Fred A. M83L85F00D10. 

Gerdau, Mrs. Otto. L29. 
"Gilbert, G. K. M69F74L00D18. 
"Glenny, William H. M76L83D29. 

Goddard, Verz R. M28L31F33. 

Goebel, Gordon W. L17. 

Goldman, Marcus I. M07F15L28. 

Goldsborough, John Byron. M06L0;. 
"Goldschmidt, S. A. M75F80L15D33. 

Goldsmith, Alfred N. M22F25L30. 

Goldsmith, Edward. M80F92L12. 
"Goodwin, Harold. M13L31D35. 
*Gorman, M. W. L21D26. 
-Gotshall, William C. M28L31F31D35. 
*Gouldy, Jennie A. M01L31D — . 
"Greene, Wm. H. M04L06D18. 

Greenway, James C. M03L27. 
-Gregg, Donald. M23F25L31D39. 
-Gregory, Henry E. L29D — . 

Gregory, Herbert E. M01F02L12. 
!,: Gribbel, Mrs. John. M04L18D34. 
*Guggenheim, Daniel. L29D30. 

Guggenheim, William. M06L07. 

Gunder, Jeane D. M28L31. 
*Guthrie, William Alvis. L24D34. 

Haack, Karl F. O. L29. 

Hague, Eleanor. M18L37. 



206 



Life Members 



*Hague, William. M06L07D18. 
*Haldeman, Cyrus B. M17L20D37. 
*Hale, George Ellery. M88F91L17D38. 
*Hall, Harvey Monroe. M12F15L24D32. 
*Hamerschlag, Arthur A. M06L07F12D27. 
*Hammer, Alfred E. M17L20D35. 
*Hammond, Mrs. John Hays. M01L05D31. 
*Hanaman, C. E. M70F83L83D— . 
*Harkness, Wm. M77F78L78D03. 
*Harper, D. Roberts, 3d. M18L20F21D35. 
*Harris, J. Campbell. L01D — . 

Harris, James Edward. L23. 

Haskins, C. P. M33L37F30. 
• !: Hastings, Charles S. M76F78L87D32. 

Hazeltine, L. Alan. M22L25F33. 
*Hazen, George H. L17D34. 

Hebard, Morgan. M11L13F32. 

Hektoen, Ludvig. M02F06L24. 

Henderson, Judson Pulford. M18L20F31. 

Henstock, Herbert. M23L29F30. 

Herbert, Albert. L18. 

Herbert, Jennie. M16L18. 
*Herrick, Henry A. L17D17. 

Herrick, Joseph C. L30F33. 
*Hexamer, C. J. M82L84D21. 

Heye, George G. L17F31. 

Hicks, Lawrence E. M31L37. 

Higginson, Mrs. James J. L29. 

Hille, Hermann. L11F33. 

Hills, Thomas McD. M00L10F16. 
*Hitchcock, Charles H. M57F74L87D19. 

Hitchcock, Fanny R. M. M86F06L16. 

Hodge, Edwin T. M25F25L26. 

Hoe, Mrs. R., Jr. L87. 

Hoffman, Samuel V. M02F06L11. 

Hoffmann, Bernhard. M18L27. 
^Hoffmann, Friedrich. M78F81L99D04. 

Holden, Mrs. L. E. L86. 

Holmes, Harriet F. M10L25F25. 

Hooker, Davenport. M25F11L37. 

Hooton, E. A. M21F21L31. 

Hopkins, Louis J. M07F13L18. 

Horn, Clarence A. M27F33L36. 

Houghton, Clement S. M08L31. 

Houghton, John D. L39. 
*Hovey, Edmund Otis. M87F95L20D24. 

Howard, L. O. M88FS9L07. 
*Howe, Elmer Parker. M08L09D18. 

Howells, John N. M. M29L31. 

Hoyt, Olive Sawyer. M02L23. 

Hrdlicka, Ales. M97F97L16. 

Hubbard, Bela. M23L24F31. 

Hudson, Alfred. L35. 

Hughes, Rupert. M30L32. 

Hunt, Samuel P. M25L30. 

Hunter, Roland Jackson. L27. 

Huntington, Archer M. M06L07. 

Hurwitz, W. A. M11F13L26. 

Hutchinson, Frank J. L29. 

Hutchison, Charles F. L39. 

Iddings, Arthur. M19L23F31. 

lies, George. M82L93F98. 

Jackson, Mary L. M19L25. 

Jacobs, Merkel H. M10F13L25. 
*Jenkins, George C. M08L09D — . 

Jillson, Willard Rouse. M18F21L25. 

Johnson, H. Herbert. L29F30. 

Johnson, Josef J. M23L25F38. 

Johnson, Myrtle E. M11F21L25. 

Johnston, E. M. L20. 

Johnston, Frederick Atkins. M08L18. 



*Johnston, J. Herbert. L18D31. 

Jones, L. Goodrich. M29F31L33. 

Jones, Walter C. M08F26L27. 

Judd, George E. L35. 

Judd, Horace. M06F25L37. 

Karapetoff, Vladimir. M08F11L26. 

Karpman, Benjamin. M30L31. 

Kaufmann, Herbert M. M18L31F33. 

Kendeigh, S. Charles. M28L29F33. 

Kennan, Mrs. George. L29. 

Kennedy, Harris. M91L92. 
*Kennelly, Arthur E. M01F01L23D39. 

Ketcham, Henry H. M17L30F32. 

Keyes, Edward L. M24L33F33. 
*Kidder, Nathaniel T. M08L09D38. 
*Kinney, Francis S. L07D08. 
*Kinsey, Oliver P. M07L08D31. 

Kirkham, Stanton Davis. M09L10. 

Kissam, William Adams. L17. 
*Kohlsaat, John E. C. M07L31D34. 

Kovarik, Alois F. M07F11L18. 
*Kraemer, Henry. M98F01L02D24. 

Kress, Samuel H. L17. 

Krumbhaar, Edward Bell. M12L19F21. 

Kuschke, Carl G. P. M34F34L35. 

Kwang, Kwong Yung. M12L13. 

Lackenbach, Fred I. L25. 

Ladd, William Sargent. L17F33. 

Laine, Carl David. L29. 

Lamson, Genieve. M24F31L37. 

Lane, Alfred Church. M01F02L02. 
*Lang, James Sherburne. M12L13D29. 

Lang, W. B. M21L28F31. 
*Langdon, Palmer H. M19L26D — . 

Langner, Helen P. M33L34F38. 
*Larkin, Edgar L. L02F03D24. 
* Lawrence, G. Alfred. M06L21D28. 

Leach, Henry Goddard. L33. 

LeClercq, Robert R. M25L31. 
*Lehman, Meyer H. M06L07D — . 

Lemon, Courtenay. M20L21. 
*Leverett, George Vasmer. M08L09D17. 

Levy, Howard S. M20L25. 

Lewis, C. McKenzie, Jr. L37. 

Lewis, Charles H. L28. 

Lewis, Clarence. L98. 
*Lewis, John Frederick. M13L14D32. 

Lewis, Joseph. M31L33. 

Lichtenstein, Alfred F. L16. 
*Linhart, Samuel Black. M06L09D36. 

Litten, Arthur S. M33L37. 

Livingston, Burton E. M03F06L20. 
:|: Loeb, Morris. M87F89L1 1D12. 
*Logan, Walter S. M87L00D06. 

Logan, William N. M13L14F16. 
*Lomb, Adolph. M92L23F31D32. 
*Loomis, Henry B. L22D39. 

Louderback, Geo. D. M01F06L08. 

Lovejoy, Frank Woods. L15. 

Loveland, Horace Hall. L02. 
*Low, A. A. L94D12. 

Lowie, Robert H. M08F10L33. 

Lundberg, A. J. M26L37. 

Lundberg, George A. M32F33L37. 
*Lyman, Benj. S. M66L74F05D20. 

Lyman, Theodore. M05L06F07. 
*Macbride, Thomas H. M89F90L28D34. 
*McCormick, Cyrus H. L22D36. 
■McCormick, Samuel Black. M04L06D28. 

McCracken, Elizabeth. M35L40. 

McCrea, Nelson G. M13L24F31. 



Life Members 



207 



MacDonald, W. E. M24L26. 

McDowell, Louise S. M11F15L20. 

Macllvaine, Francis S. L18. 

Mackay, A. D. L18. 

McKee, Mrs. Arabella Ogden. M27L31. 

McKenney, Randolph E. B. M02F03L09. 
♦Mackenzie, Kenneth K. M06F1 1L23D34. 
♦McMillan, Smith B. M88L99D11. 

Mac Neal, Ward J. M08F13L20. 

Mallinckrodt, Edward, Jr. M03L04F09. 
*Mann, B. Pickman. M73F74L82D26. 

Manry, James C. M19L22F24. 
♦Marble, Manton. L87D17. 
♦Markoe, Francis H. M06L07D08. 
-Marling, Alfred E. M06L07D— . 

Marmor, J. D. M02L04. 
♦Marsh, Millard C. M04F15L31D36. 
•""Marshall, Louis. M06L07D — . 
♦Marshall, Robert. M27L31F33D39. 
♦Marshall, Waldo H. L17D23. 

Marston, George W. M18L31. 

Martin, Earl A. M17L25F33. 

Martin, Mrs. Walton. L17. 

Mason, Ruth G. L38. (See Mrs. Foster K. 
Ballard) 

Matthews, Albert. M02F13L25. 
♦Mears, J. Ewing. L06F11D25. 
♦Mecham, John B. M10L11D30. 

Medlar, E. M. M35F35L37. 

Melcher, Arthur Clarke. M07F11L11. 
♦Merrill, Fred J. H. M86F87L98D16. 

Merrill, Mrs. Winifred Edgerton. M86- 
L98. 

Merritt, Arthur H. M32F39L40. 

Merritt, George E. L27F31. 

Mershon, Ralph D. M01F06L31. 
♦Mertzanoff, A. L29D — . 
♦Metcalf, Frank Hamilton. L16D — . 
♦Metcalf, Orlando. M86L87D09. 

Meyer, Charles F. M17L31F31. 

Meyerding, Henry W. L19F33. 
♦Miller, Edgar G. M80L88D10. 
♦Miller, Emerson R. M02L11D29. 

Miller, George J. M11F16L28. 
♦Miller, George Norton. M04L13D35. 

Miller, W. Lash. M08F10L24. 
*Milne, David. M02L0SD29. 

Miloslavich, Edward L. L25F31. 
♦Minns, Susan. M83L14F32D38. 
♦Minot, Charles S. M79F80L01D14. 

Mitchell, Allan C. G. L25F31. 
♦Mitchell, Arthur M. M06L08D29. 
♦Mitchell, John, Jr. M13L14D — . 

Mitchell, Samuel Alfred. M02F06L23. 
♦Mitchell, Walter S. M24L25D30. 

Mixter, George. M08L12. 

Moffatt, William Sayer. M07L08. 
*Molera, E. J. L01F15D32. 

Monroe, William S. M17F33L37. 

Moore, Mrs. A. O. L15. 

Moore, Elinor. M31F38L40. 

Moore, Elwood S. M08F11L25. 

Moore, J. Percy. M04F06L20. 

Moore, Stanley B. L17. 

Morgan, Caroline L. L29. 

Morgenstern, Edward M. M36L37. 
♦Moriondi, Carlo. L29D31. 
*Morris, Effingham B. L22D37. 

Morris, Frederick K. L26F27. 
♦Morris, Newbold. M00L10D28. 

Morss, Noel. M29F32L33. 



Muncy, Victor Emanuel. M17F24L24. 
*Munn, John Pixley. M06L07D31. 
♦Munroe, Charles Edward. M 73 F74L99- 
D38. 

Murnaghan, Francis D. M24F25L26. 

Myers, William Shields. M94F98L17. 

Nelson, Nels C. L16F25. 

Newcomb, William W. M07L13. 
*Newerf, N. C. L17D— . 

Newkirk, Mrs. Alice M. Field. M18L24. 

Newman, Clarence W. L24. 

Newton, Mrs. Douglass E. M29L30. 

Nichols, John Treadwell. M10L11F15. 
♦Nickerson, William E. M25L26D30. 

Nollen, Henry S. M29L31F32. 

Norton, Thomas Herbert. M86F87L87. 
♦Noyes, Winthrop Gilman. M26L31D31. 

Obenchain, Jeannette B. M21L26F33. 
♦O'Gara, P. J. M09F13L17D27. 

Olivenbaum, J. E. M29L30. 

Olyphant, Robert M. M06L07. 

Osborn, Chase S. M08L09F32. 
♦Osborn, Henry Fairfield. M81F83L17D35. 
♦Osterhout, George E. M08F11L30D37. 

Owen, Juliette A. M01F06L06. 
♦Owen, Luella Agnes. M98F1 1L1 1D32. 
♦Owen, Mary Alicia. M01L11D35. 
♦Page, Clarence V. L02D — . 

Page, Dudley L. M84L95. 
♦Page, Mrs. Nellie K. M84L95D33. 

Palache, Charles. M95F96L10. 

Palmer, Mrs. Elizabeth P. M14L15. 

Palmer, Frederic, Jr. M13F16L37. 

Palmer, L. J. L25F31. 
♦Palmer, T. Chalkley. L17F33D34. 

Panganiban, Elias H. M25L33F33. 
♦Parish, Henry. M00L01D — . 
♦Parker, Gordon. M14L18F31D37. 

Parker, Herschel C. M94F00L09. 
♦Parkhurst, Henry M. M73F74L85D08. 
♦Parsons, Francis H. M02L11F11D25. 
♦Parsons, John E. L87D14. 

Patten, John. MQ4L02. 

Paxson, Owen Shoemaker. M17L25. 

Pemberton, Cyril Eugene. M22F26L31. 

Penfield, Mrs. Paul L. L22. 

Penniman, Josiah H. M13L14F31. 
♦Penrose, R. A. F., Jr. M89F90L94D31. 

Pentecost, E. H. M08L10. 
♦Pentecost, Mrs. E. H. M08L10D22. 
♦Perkins, Arthur. L82D — . 

Perkins, William H. M06L07. 

Perrine, Charles Dillon. L02F03. 

Pfeiffer, Curt G. L29. 

Phelps, John J. L29. 
♦Phillips, Francis Clifford. M87F89L03- 

D20. 
♦Phillips, John C. M02L09F13D38. 

Phipps, Lawrence Cowle. L02F32. 
♦Pierce, Newton Barris. L00F01D16. 
♦Pierrepont, Henry E. L94D11. 

Pitman, Earle C. M17L28F38. 

Pomeroy, Katherine. L29R40. 

Pope, George A. M13L14. 

Pope, Willard. L30F32. 

Porter, Mrs. Albert Brown. M12L32. 
♦Porter, James F. M07F14L23D39. 

Potter, Alden A. L11F15. 
♦Potter, Blanch. M06L07D— . 

Potts, Charles E. L17. 

Preisler, Paul W. M3SF35L37. 



208 



Life Members 



Pruitt, Clarence M. M29L30F31. 
*Pruyn, John V. L. M80L87D04. 
::: Pupin, Michael I. M95F96L05D35. 

Putnam, Helen C. M08L17. 

Putnam, William Lowell. M08L09. 
*Quinan, William Russell. L06D10. 

Rabinowitz, L. M. L29. 
*Raht, Charles. M06L07D18. 
*Ray, Benjamin H. M11L13D25. 

Read, Bernard E. L35F35. 

Rehn, Henry J. L37. 

Rejall, Alfred E. M11L27F33. 

Renouard, Charles Auguste. L32. 
*Rhodes, James Ford. L01F04D26. 

Rice, A. Hamilton. L2QF31. 
*Rice, Edwin Wilbur, Jr. M01F16L16D35. 

Rich, Gilbert J. M19F28L30. 
*Richards, Edgar. M82F86L99D24. 

Rightor, Fred Elmer. M08L31. 

Riley, Wm. G. M29L37. 

Roads, Katie M. M17L23. 
*Robert, Samuel. M06L07D3S. 

Roberts, Dorothea K. M19F25L26. 

Roberts, Helen H. M25F31L35. 
*Robertson, Thomas D. M56L74D02. 
*Robinson, Lucien M. M14L15F32D — 

Robison, Sanford H. M30L33. 

Rockie, W. A. M36F36L37. 

Roebling, John A. L17. 

Roeser, Frederick. M17L37. 

Rohlffs, Walter V. L25. 
* Roosevelt, Marion T. M82L84D— . 
*Rosengarten, George D. M07F1 1L17D36. 
::; Rosenwald, Julius. L21D32. 

Rowell, Dorothy C. L29. 

Roy, Arthur J. M01F08L09. 

Ruediger, E. Henry. L18F33. 
*Ryerson, Martin A. M07L08D32. 

Sanders, Joseph. M27L31. 
*Sargent, Mrs. Helen W. L23D25. 

Sargent, Homer Earle. M07F13L20. 

Saunders, T. Skewes. L16. 

Sawyer, C. B. L29F33. 
*Sayer, William S. M07L09D09. 
*Schaeberle, John Martin. M85F86L90D21. 
*Schaffer, Charles. M80L82D03. 

Scharnberg, Herman J. B. L27. 
*Schermerhorn, F. Aug. L87D19. 
*Schermerhorn, Wm. C. L87D — . 
*Schott, Charles M., Jr. L17D19. 

Schubring, Selma L. MioLii. 
*Schulte, H. von W. M08F1 1 L28D32. 

Schwarz, Herman. M17L37. 

Scott, A. H. M20L21F22. 
*Scovell, M. A. M86L02D12. 
*Scudder, Samuel H. M59F74L80D11. 

Seneker, Seehorn. L28. 

Sevin, Gertrude K. M11L23. 

Sharp, Charles Cutler. M01L18. 

Sharp, George C. M29L32. 
*Shattuck, Frederick C. L01F01D29. 

Shaw, Henry S. M25L31F32. 

Shaw, Robert S. M29L35. 

Sheafer, Arthur Whitcomb. L79. 

Sheldon, Mrs. Frank M. L30. 
*Sheldon, Mrs. J. M. Arms. M95F33L34- 
D38. 

Shepard, Finley J. L29. 
"Shepherd, Elizabeth. M90L00D20. 

Shrigley, Edward White. M31L33. 
-Shryock, Wm. K. M04L06D10. 



Shull, Charles Albert. M07F15L24. 

Silsbee, Francis B. M17F21L37. 

Simes, Mrs. William. M08L31. 

Singewald, Quentin D. M27L31F31. 

Slemons, J. Morris. M08F14L31. 

Slocum, H. Jermain, Jr. L29. 

Smith, A. D. Buchanan. M28L29F31. 

Smith, Burnett. M04F11L1S. 

Smith, Clara E. M08F11L14. 
"Smith, Elizabeth H. L29F31D33. 

Smith, Harrison Willard. L25F25. 
:; Smith, Jane M. L01D11. 

Smith, L. W. M27F31L36. 
:;: Smith, Matilda H. L01D09. 
'"Smith, Quintius Cincinnatus. M77L79- 

F81D11. 
-Smith, Uselma C. M84L86D02. 

Smith, W. S. Tangier. M01F06L11. 
*Smith, Wm. A. M06L07D11. 
*Spenzer, John George. M88L90F95D32. 

Speranza, Mrs. Gino. L29. 
::: Spragg, Frank A. M13F18L24D24. 
-Sprague, C. H. M80L82D0Q. 
"Springer, Frank. M06L07F14D27. 
"Stanfield, Theodore. L16D38. 
-Stanton, Frank McMillan. M01L02D16. 

Stauffer, Clinton R. M06F11L20. 

Stearn, Noel Hudson. M24L29F31. 
-Steers, James R. M06L07D — . 

Stefansson, Vilhialmur. M19L21F25. 

Stenstrom, K. Wilhelm. M24F27L37. 
-Stephens, W. Hudson. M69F74L75D17. 
-Stetson, Francis L. M06L17D20. 

Stevens. Neil Everett. M11F13L19. 
-Sticht, Robert C. M08L10D22. 

Stifler, William W. M11F15L27. 

Stockton, Robert S. M17F31L33. 
-Stoeckel, Carl. M02L04D2S. 
-Stoekle, Erwin R. M28F31L37D38. 

Stokey, Alma Gracey. M11F15L20. 

Stoll, Norman R. M20F25L30. 

Strang, Ruth. M30F32L37. 

Straub, Geo. F. L24. 

Straus, Mrs. Michael W. L26. 

Sturgeon, Myron T. M38L40. 
-Swan, Mrs. J. Andrews. L29D38. 

Swift, Harold H. L21. 

Taber, Edmund Rhett. Lif». 
-Taft, Elihu Barber. M87L91D31. 

Taliaferro, W. T. L. M14F32L33. 
*Talmage, James Edward. L01F06D33. 
*Tanner, John Henry. L98F99D40. 
-Tarr, Ralph Stockman. M00F01L08D12. 
-Thaw, Benjamin. M01 L09F13D33. 
-Thaw, Stephen D. L09F13D23. 
-Thayer, John Eliot. M10L11D33. 

Thomas, Llewellvn Hilleth. L31F33. 
"Thompson, Caroline B. M<)9Fi3Li8D25. 
-Thompson, Frederick F. L87D99. 
-Thompson, H. D. M06L07F09D27. 
-Thorne, Mrs. Phoebe A. L01D11. 
-Thorne, Mrs. W. V. S. L20D37. 

Tolman, Richard C. M11F15L32. 

Tomlinson, C. W. M17F21L31. 

Trelease, Sam F. M10F21L25. 

Trelease, William. M90F91L08. 
*Troescher, A. F. L17D — . 

True, Mrs. Edward C. L33. 
-True, Rodney Howard. M97F99I-33D40. 
:|; Tubbs, Frank Dean. M08F15L17D39. 
-Tuckerman, Alfred. M80L90F91D2S. 



Life Memp.ers 



2<X) 



Turner, Clair Elsmere. M17F21L31. 

Turner, M. L. \I24L2s. 

Uehling, F. F. M11L20. 
*Vaile, Joel F. M01L13D16. 

van Beuren, Frederick T., Jr. L87F25. 
*Van Horn, Frank R. M06L07F09D3.?. 

van Kampen, E. R. M34F34L40. 

Van Orstrand, Charles E. M07F11L13. 

Varela, Edmund Albert. L16. 

Vaughan, F. E. M25F31L32. 
*Vaux, George, Jr. M84L85 F06D27. 
-Veatch, Arthur C. M02F07L19D38. 

Vedder, Edward B. M06F11L12. 
*Wadsworth, Frank L. O. M02L03F04D36. 

Wadsworth, Mrs. W. Austin. L29. 

Wahl, Manfred. M2SL38. 

Waite. J. Herbert. L39. 
-Walcott, Charles D. M76F22L25D27. 

Walcott, Mrs. Chas. D. L25F31. 
-Walker. R. M. M02L04D20. 

Waller, Adolph E. M17L20F21. 
-Waller, E. M74F74L79D19. 

Walls, John A. L34. 
■ : Walsh, Thomas F. L00D10. 

Walsh. Thos. J. L29. 

Walters, Frank. M06L07. 
*Wanamaker, Rodman. L17D28. 
-Warburg, Felix M. L17D37. 
*Ward, Charles W. M06L07D— 

Ward, Henry Baldwin. M99F99L20. 
:i: Ward, Robert DeC. M07F10L18D31. 
■ i: Ware, Lewis Sharpe. M04F10L1 1 DiS. 
*Warington, Robert. L91F99D07. 
-Warner, James D. M69F74L74U1 1 . 

Warren, Mrs. Mary Schaffer. L89. 
*Warrington, James N. M85L31D33. 
-Watson, Thomas A. Mi7L2^F^i D?4. 
-Watson, Wm. M50F84L84D 1 5. 

Wayland, Charles A. M07L08. 

Webster, Mrs. A. G. M08L23. 

Webster, Hutton. M10F13L22. 

Wedderburn, J. H. M. M11F21L37. 



Weeks, John R. M24F31L33. 
-Weitling, William W. M13L25D29. 
♦Welsh, Francis Ralston. L02D38. 

Wernecke, Livingston. M18L31. 

West, Augustus P. L23F25. 
^Westervelt, William Drake. M14L17D39. 

Westervelt, William Young. M08F16L16. 

Westfeldt, Mrs. Martha Gasquet. M25- 

F32L33. 
-Westgate, John Minton. M11F18L25D38. 
-Westinghouse, George. L01F02D14. 
-Wheelock, William E. M06L07D27. 
-Whelpley, Henry Milton. M02L06F13D26. 

White, Amelia Elizabeth. M24L37. 
-White, Israel C. M76F82L90D27. 
-Whiting, Donald F. M25F27L31D31 

Whiting, Phineas. M13L15F20. 
-Wigglesworth, George. M08L10D30. 

Wilcox. Alice Wilson. M12L25F33. 
-Wilcox. William W. L01D03. 

Williamson, Warren. M17L20. 
*Wilmarth, Mrs. Henry D. L91D16. 
-Wilson, J. Howard. M06L07F13D36. 

Wilson, Louis B. M10L11F13. 

Wilson, Margaret B. M06L11F33. 

Winchester, George. M11L13F15. 

Winsor, Henry. M27L31. 

Winter, Floyd L. M23F31L38. 

Wirt, John Loughborough. L16. 

Wirtner, M. M07L08. 

Wolcott, George N. M13L26F26. 

Wolfle, Dael L. M32F37L38. 

Wood, Francis Carter. M06F08L10. 
-Wood, Walter. L84D34. 

Woodley, Sam. M21L30. 
'Woodward, Robert S. M84F85L09D24. 

Worley, Leonard G. M29L30. 

Worthington, James H. M12L13F15. 

Wulfing, John Max, Jr. L24. 

Wunderlich, Frederick W. M94L98. 

Yamanouchi, Shigeo. M06F09L23. 



2IO 



Emeritus Life Members 



EMERITUS LIFE MEMBERS 

In 191 1, Jane M. Smith, of Pittsburgh, Penn., bequeathed $5000 to the Association 
with the stipulation that the income from the fund should be used for establishing 
Emeritus Life Memberships (Council minutes, Dec. 27, 1911). As income received from 
the Fund amounts to $100, or a multiple thereof, it is used to pay life membership dues 
for one or more life members elected by the Council from among the members of longest 
continuous standing. Upon the death of an emeritus life member the $100 set aside for 
his life membership dues reverts to the credit of income from the Fund and may be 
used for the payment of life-membership dues of another member elected to life member- 
ship by the Council. Two or more emeritus life members have been elected each year 
since 1914. 

The names of emeritus life members who were living on June 1, 1934, are included, 
with additional information, in the complete directory of members for the period June I, 
1934-July 1, 1940, beginning on page 217. The names of emeritus life members who 
were deceased on June 1, 1934, are contained in some earlier volume of the Summarized 
Proceedings. Therefore the complete membership record of every emeritus life member 
is contained in some volume of the Summarized Proceedings. In the case of an emeritus 
life member the figures that immediately follow the letter E give the year of his election 
to emeritus life membership. 

An asterisk preceding the name of a member indicates that he is deceased. 

The symbols following the name give the complete membership record of the member. 
For example, the symbols following the fourth name below indicate that Wm. James 
Beal became a member (M) in 1868, a fellow (F) in 1880, an emeritus life member (E) 
in 191 7 and died (D) in 1924. The letter D followed by a dash indicates that the year 
of the member's death is not known to the Association. 



Arthur, J. C. M72F83E24. 
^Baldwin, Herbert B. M94E39D39. 

Bausch, Edward. M77F83E31. 
*Beal, Wm. James. M68F80E17D24. 

Bedell, Frederick. M92F94E39. 
*Bethune, Charles J. S. M69F75E20D32. 

Biddle, James G. M90E39. 
*Blackham, George E. M76F83E27D28. 

Bolley, Henry L. M90F92E39. 
*Brackett, Richard N. M88F91E37D37. 

Bramwell, George W. M94E39. 

Bray, William L. M00F01E38. 
*Britton, Nathaniel L. M80F82E33D34. 
*Burgess, Thomas J. W. M89F99E18D26. 
*Butler, Amos W. M81F85E36D37. 
*Calkins, Marshall. M80E18D24. 

Carver, Gail Luke. M91F95E39. 

Chadbourn, Erlon R. M80E34. 
*Chamberlin, Thomas C. M72F77E23D28. 
*Chandler, Charles F. M70F75E19D25. 
*Clark, John E. M68F75E21D21. 
*Clarke, Frank W. M69F74E17D31. 
*Cloud, John W. M79F86E32D36. 

Cook, Orator F. M91F92E39. 

Crawford, Morris B. M81F89E36. 
*Dall, William H. M69F74E17D27. 
*Dana, Edward Salisbury. M74F75E25D35. 

Davenport, Eugene. M90F09E39. 

Dewey, Lyster H. M91F99E39. 
*Dimmock, George. M73F74E24D30. 



Dunnington, F. P. M31F80E37. 

Eichelberger, W. S. M92F96I139. 
*Emerson, Benjamin K. M70F77E22D32. 

Fairchild, Herman L. M78F83E30. 

Felt, Ephraim P. M95F99E39. 
:!: Fernald, Charles H. M06F13E18D21. 

Focke, Theodore M. M95F03E39. 

Frankforter, George B. M94F01E39. 

Fries, Harold H. M91F98E39. 

Gage, Simon Henry. M79F81E31. 

Ganong, William F. M00F00E38. 
*Gooch, Frank A. M76F80E28D29. 
*Grinnell, George Bird. M76F85E29D38. 

Gruener, Hippolyte. M95F98E39. 

Hagar, Stansbury. M94F99E39. 
*Hall, Edwin Herbert. M80F81E34D38. 
*Hervey, Alpheus B. M73F79E24D31. 
*Hilgard, Eugene W. M57F84E16D16. 

Hobbs, William Herbert. M91F93E39. 

Hopkins, A. D. M93F99E39. 
*Hopkins, Arthur John. M95F00E39D39. 

Hopkins, Grant S. M92F00E39. 

Hume, Alfred. M90F09E39. 

Jones, Lewis Ralph. M92F94E39. 

Kellogg, John Harvey. M75E31F32. 

Kingsbury, Albert. M93F98E39. 

Knight, Charles M. M80F04E34. 
*Langenbeck, Karl. M80F96E35D38. 
*Leach, Mary F. M95F96E39D39. 

Lefavour, Henry. M93F94E39. 



Emeritus Annual Members 



211 



Leverett, Frank. M88F91E37. 
*Linn, Alvin Frank. M01F01E38D— . 
*Lyle, David Alexander. M7SF80E32D37. 

McDonnell, Henry B. M91F93E39. 

MacDougal, Daniel T. M95F97E40. 

Macfarlane, John M. M92F99E39. 

Marian, Charles L. M91F95E39. 

Marvin, Charles F. M90F92E39. 
*Matlack, Charles. M78E33D33. 
*Mees, Carl Leo. M75F76E26D32. 
*Mendenhall, Thomas C. M71F74E15D24. 
*Michelson, Albert A. M77F79E29D31. 

Miller, Dayton C. M95F9SE39. 
*Miller, William Snow. M93F94E39D39. 

Morgan, William Fellowes. M78F32E33. 
:i: Morley, Edward Williams. M69F76E19- 

D23. 
*Morse, Edward S. M69F74E15D25. 
*Moser, Jefferson F. M79FS9E32D34. 

Needham, James George. M96F98E40. 
*Nichols, Edward L. M79F81E30D37. 
:!: Paine, Cyrus Fay. M58F74E17D21. 
*Peck, Charles Horton. M02F06E15D17. 

Peirce, George James. M95F97E39. 
*Perkins, George Henry. M69F82E20D33. 

Ramaley, Francis. M96F99E40. 
*Remsen, Ira. M73F75E25D27. 

Rice, Edward L. M94F05E39. 
-Rice, William North. M69F74E19D28. 

Richards, Robert H. M73F75E18. 

Ries, Heinrich. M92F98E39. 

Rolfs, Peter Henry. M92F99E39. 



Simonds, Frederic W. M76F88E29. 

Smith, Arthur Whitmore. M95F06E39. 
*Smith, Eugene Allen. M71F77E22D27. 
*Smith, Harlan I. M92F96E40D40. 

Smith, Herbert S. S. M80F15E36. 
*Smock, John Conover. M74F79E26D26. 
*Snyder, Monroe B. M75F82E27D32. 

Springer, Alfred. M75F80E28. 

Stebbins. Fannie A. M95F38E39. 

Steiger, George. M91F01E39. 

Stejneger, Leonhard. M91F92E39. 

Stewart, Fred Carlton. M95F01E39. 
*Stockwell, John N. M69F75E21 D20. 
*Stone, Ormond. M75F76E27D33. 

Sturgis, William Codman. M91F92E39. 

Swingle, Walter T. M91F92E39. 

Tainter, Charles Sumner. M80F81E35. 

Thompson, Joseph O. M92F93E39. 
*Todd, David. M78F81E30D39. 
*Tuttle, Albert Henry. M68F74E19D27. 
*Upham, Warren. M76F80E28D34. 

Welin, John Eric. M01F11E37. 
*Wilbur, Albert B. M74F74E26D26. 
*Wiley, Harvey W. M72F74E23D30. 
*Williams, Edward H., Jr. M76F94E29D33. 
*Williams, Francis H. M80F90E35D37. 

Willoughby, Charles C. M96F97E40. 

Woods, Albert F. M93F97E39- 

Wright, John S. M93F99E39- 
*Wurtele, Louis C. M57F75E16D19. 
*Yarrow, H. C. M74F74E25D29. 



EMERITUS ANNUAL MEMBERS 

In 1932 Luella A. Owen bequeathed the Association $500 without specifying the 
purpose to which income from it should be used. On December 29, 1932, the Council 
voted "that the gift of the Owen estate be used as a nucleus of a fund the income from 
which shall be used for emeritus annual memberships." 

The letter C in the symbols following the name of an emeritus annual member pre- 
cedes the year of his election as an emeritus annual member. 



*Galloway, Beverly T. M88F90C34D38. 
Gillette, Clarence P. M01F01C34. 
Graham, James Chandler. M01F11C38. 
Lindsay, Samuel McCune. M04F06C40. 



Van Ornum, John Lane. M01F04C34. 

(Discontinued Oct. 1, 1936.) 
Wooton, Elmer O. M06F11C40. 
Wulling, Frederick J. M07F10C37. 



J I 2 



Fifty-Year A I km bers 



FIFTY-YEAR MEMBERS 

On April 14, 1935, the Executive Committee passed the following by-law: "Members 
who have paid annual dues for 50 years may be excused from further payments of dues 
and still retain all the privileges of active membership." In practise all members who 
have paid membership dues continuously for 50 years are elected fifty-year members. 

The names of fifty-year members who were living on June 1, 1934, are included, with 
additional information, in the complete directory of members for the period June t, 
1934-July 1, 1940, which begins on page 217. 

In the case of a fifty-year member the figures that immediately follow the letter A" 
give the last two digits of the year he became a fifty-year member. 



Boas, Franz. M87F88V37. 

Campbell, Douglas H. M85F88V37. 

Comstock, Charles W. M88F01V38. 
*Coville, Frederick V. M86F90V37D37. 

Darton, Nelson H. M88F93V38. 
■'Davis, John Jefferson. M82FQ9V37D37. 

French, Thomas, Jr. M81F83V36. 
*Galloway, Beverly T. M88F90V38D3S. 
*Howe, Charles Sumner. M85F91V36D39. 

Howe, James Lewis. M87F88V37. 

Jack, John George. M82F90V37. 

Jackson, Robert Tracy. M88F90V38. 

Jacobus, David Schenck. M87F89V37. 

Jastrow, Joseph. M86F87V37. 
*Logan, Frank G. M83F32V36D37. 

MacCurdy, George Grant. M9QF00V39. 

McGill, John Thomas. M86F88V37. 

Magie, William Francis. M86FS7V37. 

Martin, Lillien J. M83F86V37. 



Merritt, Ernest. M84F90V37. 

Miller, John Anthony. M82F06V37. 

Moody, Robert Orton. M86F92V37. 
*Moorehead, Warren King. M89F90V39- 
D39. 

Moseley, Edwin L. M85F02V37. 

Novy, Frederick G. M87F89V37. 

Noyes. William Albert. M83F85V37. 

Osborn, Herbert. M83F84V37. 

Patterson, Harry Jacob. M87F90V37. 

Reid, Harry Fielding. M87F93V37. 
*Shimer, Porter William. M89F09V39D38. 
*Thomson, Elihu. M83F98V37D37. 

Thruston, R. C. Ballard. M87F96V37. 
*Wanner, Atreus. M87F90V37D38. 

Weed, Clarence Moores. M89F90V39. 

Willis, Bailey. M87F90V37. 
:|: Willson, Frederick N. M83F87V36D39. 

Wolff, John Eliot. M87F04V37. 



Honorary Members from British Association 



213 



HONORARY MEMBERS FROM THE BRITISH 
ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT 

OF SCIENCE 

For the Year 1939 

Under the reciprocal arrangement (1938) between the British Association and the 
American Association for "British and American Association Lectures," to be delivered 
in each country on alternate years, the principal executive officers of each Association 
are elected honorary members of the other Association. Science 88 1276. 1938. 



Seward, Sir Albert, President 
Boswell, P. G. H., General Treasurer 
Brooks, F. T., General Secretary 
Ferguson, A., General Secretary 
Allen, R. W., Member of Council 
Aston, F. W., Member of Council 
Aveling, F., Member of Council 
Balfour-Browne, F., Member of Council 
Beare, Sir T. Hudson, Member of Council 
Bledisloe, Rt. Hon. Viscount, Member of 

Council 
Caiman, W. T., Member of Council 
Debenham, F., Member of Council 
Fay, C. R., Member of Council 
Fearnsides, W. G., Member of Council 



Fleure, H. J., Member of Council 
Fritsch, F. E., Member of Council 
Gregory, Sir Richard, Member of Council 
Hill, A. V., Member of Council 
Hill, T. G., Member of Council 
Moore, T. S., Member of Council 
Philip, J. C, Member of Council 
Smith, J. G., Member of Council 
Smith, W. Campbell, Member of Council 
Spearman, C, Member of Council 
Tierney, C, Member of Council 



Tierney 

Ve 

Walk 

V\^hipplc, JX. O., 1V1C111UC1 Ul LUUli 

Wilson, J. S., Member of Counci 



enn, J. A., Member of Council 

r alker, Sir Gilbert, Member of Council 

'hippie, R. S., Member of Council 



l ; or the Year iq /o 



Gregory, Sir Richard, President 
Boswell, P. G. H., General Treasurer 
Brooks, F. T„ General Secretary 
Ferguson, A., General Secretary 
Allen, R. W., Member of Council 
Aston, F. W., Member of Council 
Beare, Sir T. Hudson, Member of Council 
Bledisloe, Rt. Hon. Viscount, Member of 

Council 
Caiman, W. T., Member of Council 
Debenham, F., Member of Council 
Fearnsides, W. G., Member of Council 
Fleming, A. P. M., Member of Council 
Fleure, H. J., Member of Council 
Fritsch, F. E., Member of Council 
Harrod, R. F., Member of Council 



Hill, T. G., Member of Council 
Hutton, J. H., Member of Council 
Kerr, Sir John Graham, Member of 

G inncil 
Livingstone, Sir Richard, Member of 

Council 
Moore, T. S., Member of Council 
Philip, J. C, Member of Council 
Raper, H. S., Member of Council 
Smith, J. G., Member of Council 
Smith, W. Campbell, Member of Council 
Spearman, C, Member of Council 
Tierney, C, Member of Council 
Walker, Sir Gilbert, Member of Council 
Whipple, R. S., Member of Council 
Wilson, J. S., Member of Council 



214 



Honorary Junior Members 



HONORARY JUNIOR MEMBERS 

On June 28, 1938, the Council passed a resolution to offer to each affiliated Academy 
of Science the privilege of nominating each year one boy and one girl from its junior 
academy or from junior science clubs within its territory for a one-year Honorary 
Junior Membership in the Association, without the payment of entrance fees and dues ; 
and to give each honorary junior member a suitable certificate of membership, the pro- 
grams of the meetings of the Association and preliminary announcements and reports of 
its meetings. Science Service gives each honorary junior member a subscription to 
Science News Letter for the term of his or her membership. 



Nominated by Alabama Academy 

Elizabeth Bush, Seale 1939 

Wade Moss, Troy 1939 

Nominated by British Columbia 

Academy 

Dorothy U. Dale, Vancouver 1939 

Charles H. Davenport, Vancouver. .. 1939 

A. E. Covington, Vancouver 1940 

Odetta Hicks, Vancouver 1940 

Nominated by Illinois Academy 

Delbert Rainey, Chester 1940 

Nadine Whitesides, Vienna 1940 

Nominated by Indiana Academy 

Robert Bennett, Mishawaka 1940 

Ruth Downey, Indianapolis 1940 

Nominated by Iozva Academy 

Don Morgan, Spencer 1939 

Mary Jo Rosenberg, Iowa Falls 1939 

Nominated by Kansas Academy 

Harold Green, Pittsburg 1939 

Joanna Wagstaff, Laurence 1939 

Bob Hull, Wichita 1 940 

Jane Miller, Wichita 1940 

Nominated by Kentucky Academy 

Jean Adams, Louisville 1939 

Roy Kirchoff, Bellevue 1939 

J. Virl Chestnut, Somerset 1940 

Alice B. Kinnard, Lancaster 1940 

Nominated by Louisiana Academy 

Frances Hunt, Monroe 1939 

Howard Mayfield, Baton Rouge 1939 

Nominated by Michigan Academy 

Lyle Burdy, Ionia 1939 

Nancy Rohde, East Lansing 1939 

Charles Geisler, Jackson 1940 

Bette C. Willamin, Ann Arbor 1940 

Nominated by Minnesota Academy 

Robert Higgins, Rochester 1939 

Althea Ryden, Stillwater 1939 



Alice Burns, Albert Lea 1940 

James W. Shean, Albert Lea 1940 

Nominated by Missouri Academy 

Raymond Hahn 1940 

Mary F. McAdams, Springfield 1940 

Nominated by New Orleans 
Academy 

Joseph Kyame, New Orleans 1939 

Lester Reed, New Orleans 1939 

Nominated by North Carolina 
Academy 

Eugenia Cox, Winston-Salem 1939 

Ralph Kiser, Charlotte 1939 

Clyde Vaughn, Charlotte 1940 

Nominated by Oklahoma Academy 

L. D. Alley, Enid 1939 

Oneta Carroll, Newkirk 1939 

Katherine Craft, Henryetta 1940 

Dean Steffey, Enid 1940 

Nominated by Pennsylvania 
Academy 

Estelle Bowers, Altoona 1939 

Howard S. McCord, Jr., Upper Darby 1939 

Caroline Emerson, Erie 1940 

Richard Jones, Johnstown 1940 

Nominated by St. Louis Academy 

Robert Leland, Webster Grove 1939 

Doris von Wehrden, Normandy 1939 

Zelda Balch, St. Louis 1940 

David Lawrence, St. Louis 1940 

Nominated by Texas Academy 

John Sinclair, Galveston 1939 

Carol Ruth McElroy, Austin 1940 

Delbert G. Tarter, Commerce 1940 

Nominated by West Virginia 
Academy 

Austin Henning, Elkins 1939 

Ruth Mayhall, Shinnston 1939 

Cary Lou Edgar, Charleston 1940 

Marlin Higgins, St. Albans 1940 



ALPHABETICAL DIRECTORY OF MEMBERS 

Fob the Period Junk i, 1934, to July i, 1940 

Individual and Institution Members. In addition to individual members, 
there are a few hundred institution members. The institutions are univer- 
sities, colleges, libraries, societies and corporations. For convenience the 
institution members are listed separately by states and countries immediately 
following the directory of individual members. 

Names included in the Directory. This alphabetical directory includes 
not only the names of all members at July 1, 1940, its official date, but also 
the names of all members whose memberships terminated by death or other- 
wise since June 1, 1934, which was the date of the corresponding alphabetical 
director)- in the last preceding Summarized Proceedings published in 1934- 
The year in which each membership terminated and the reason therefor are 
given following the name of the member. 

Sources of Information. On December 15, 1939, a special form contain- 
ing blanks to be filled in with information required for the alphabetical 
directory was sent to every member of the Association. Return envelopes 
were enclosed for the convenience of members in making their replies. 
About two-thirds of the members provided the desired information. In 
March, 1940, a second request was sent to those who did not reply to the 
first call. Although many members heeded the second request, a consider- 
able number did not reply at all. In the case of those who did not reply it 
was necessary to use the information contained on their membership ap- 
plication cards and in other records of the office of the Permanent Secre- 
tary. This information was often supplemented by data contained in 
biographical directories. The name of every person who was a member of 
the Association on July 1, 1940, is included whether or not he filled out and 
returned the special information card sent to him. 

Scope of the information given. The information following each name is 
of two kinds, ( 1 ) that which pertains to the member independent of his 
membership, such as his residence, for example, and (2) his membership 
record. 

(1) The personal information is as follows: (a) The surname of the 
member; (b) the title, such as Prof., Dr., Mr., Miss; (c) the given name 
or names with the parts placed in parentheses that are usually omitted in 
correspondence (Smith, Dr. C(larence) James, for example) ; (d) the 
higher scholastic degrees received by the member, each followed by the 
name of the institution that conferred the degree and the last two digits of 
the year it was conferred (Ph.D., Vale, 31, for example) ; (e) the official 
title or position of the member (assoc. prof, chemistry or dir. research lab., 

215 



2l6 



Directory of Members 



for example) ; (f) the name and address of the institution (Northwestern 
Univ., Evanston, 111., or General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y., for 
example) ; and (g) mail address in parentheses, if different from the in- 
stitution address (212 E. Main St., Lansing, Mich., for example). 

(2) The membership record is as follows: (a) Capital letters represent- 
ing various kinds of membership (M, member; F, fellow; S, sustaining 
member ; L, life member ; E, emeritus life member ; V, 50-year member ; 
C, emeritus annual member ; D, deceased ; and R, resigned) indicate the suc- 
cessive changes in membership status of the member, and the numbers im- 
mediately following each of the various letters are the last two digits of the 
year the status was acquired. For example, M21L26F28D37 means that 
the person named was elected a member in 1921, a life member in 1926, a 
fellow in 1928 and died in 1937. If the membership has not been continuous, 
the record for each continuous period is enclosed in parentheses, (b) The 
offices held by a member are given in italics, and the years the offices were 
held, (c) The sections in which a member is interested are indicated by the 
letters attached to the various sections, as shown below. When there is more 
than one letter, the letters are arranged in the order of decreasing interest 
of the member in the corresponding sections. 



Mathematics A 

Physics B 

Chemistry C 

Astronomy D 

Geology and Geography E 

Zoological Sciences F 

Botanical Sciences G 

Anthropology H 

Psychology I 



Social and Economic Sciences K 

Historical and Philological Sciences.... L 

Engineering M 

Medical Sciences N 

Subsection on Dentistry Nd 

Subsection on Pharmacy Np 

Agriculture O 

Industrial Science P 

Education Q 



Abbreviations. The 


following 


abbreviations 


are used in the directory 


Acad. 


Academy 




Hosp. 


Hospital 


Agric. 


Agricultural 




Ins. 


Insurance 


Amer. 


America or American 


Inst. 


Institute or Institution 


Assn. 


Association 




Instr. 


Instructor 


Asst. 


Assistant 




Lalx 


Laboratory 


Assoc. 


Associate 




Med. 


Medical or Medicine 


Biol. 


Biological 




Mfg. 


Manufacturing 


Bur. 


Bureau 




Mgr. 


Manager 


Chem. 


Chemical 




Mus. 


Museum 


Col. 


College 




Nat. 


National 


Dept. 


Department 




Res. 


Research 


Dir. 


Director 




Sec. 


Secretary 


Div. 


Division 




Soc. 


Society 


Engng. 


Engineering 




Sta. 


Station 


Exp. 


Experiment 




Supt. 


Superintendent 


Gen. 


General 




Tech. 


Technology 


Geol. 


Geological 




Treas. 


Treasurer 



Individual Members 



217 



FELLOWS AND OTHER INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS 

A 



Aamodt, Dr. O(laf) S(verre). Ph.D., Min- 
nesota, 27. Principal agronomist, Div. 
Forage Crops and Diseases, U. S. Bur. 
Plant Industry, Washington, D. C. M22- 
F25. OG. 

Aaron, Dr. A. H. M.D., Buffalo, 12. Prof, 
clinical medicine, Univ. Buffalo School 
Med.; attending physician, Buffalo Gen. 
Hosp.. Buffalo, N. Y. (6* Tudor Place) 
M36. N. 

Aaron, Isador (Morris). M.S., Pennsyl- 
vania State; Allegheny Flood Control 
Survey, Kittaning, Pa. (Brady St., Route 
2, Butler. Pa.) M40. G. 

Aase, Dr. Hannah Caroline. Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 14. Assoc, prof, botany, State Col. 
Washington, Pullman, Wash. M18F21. G. 

Abbe, Dr. Ernst C(leveland). M.S., Cor- 
nell. 30; M.A., Harvard, 31; Ph.D., 33. 
Asst. prof., Univ. Minnesota Dept. Bot- 
any. Minneapolis, Minn. M29F38. G. 

Abbitt, Dr. W(illiam) H(enry). Ph.D.. 
Chicago, 26. Prof, physics, Texas Tech. 
Col., Lubbock, Tex. M31F38. AM. 

Abbot, Dr. Charles G(reeley). M.Sc, 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 95; D.Sc, Mel- 
bourne, 14, Case, 30, George Washington, 
37: LL.D., Toronto, 33. Sec, Smithsonian 
Inst.. Washington, ID. C. M00F02. DB. 

Abbot, Dr. E(dward) Stanley. M.D., Har- 
vard, 93. 29 Gloucester St., Boston, Mass. 
M04L09F28. IN. 

Abbott, Dr. Charles H(arlan). A.M., 
Brown, 14; Ph.D., 18. Prof, zoology, Univ. 
Redlands, Redlands, Calif. M14F31. FE. 

Abbott, Donald Putnam. Student, Univ. 
Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii. M37. F. 

Abbott, Dr. Donald Putnam, Sr. M30D36. N. 

Abbott, Dr. E(rnest) V(ictor). M.S., Iowa 
State, 23; Ph.D., 25. Assoc, pathologist, 
U. S. Dept. Agric, Houma, La. M25F31. 
OG. 

Abbott, Dr. Howard C(linton). 212 Ruin- 
sey Ave., Lansing, Mich. M25F25R32. G. 

Abbott, Miss Julia E(lizabeth). M.A., Cor- 
nell, 27 ; M.S., Massachusetts State, 33. 
Instr. science, National Park Col., Forest 
Glen, Md. (413 S. Market St.. Frederick, 
Md.) M39. QC. 

Abbott.Lynn (DeForrest), Jr. M.S., Wayne, 
37; Ph.D., Michigan, 40. Asst. biochemis- 
try, Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
(1014 Cornwell Place) M40. CX. 

Abbott, Dr. Maude Edizabeth Seymour). 
900 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Que.. 
Canada. M35F25R36. NL. 

Abbott, Prof. Raymond B(arrington). 
M.S., California, 12; Ph.D., 19. 339 Sylvia 
St., West Lafayette, Ind. M24F31. B. 



Abbott, Dr. Theodore J(acob). M.D., Co- 
lumbia, 00. Phvsician, 160 E. 81st St., New 
York, N. Y. M20. N. 

Abbott, W. L. 3500 Sheridan Road, Chi- 
cago, 111. M29F29. M. 

Abbott, Walter S(idney). Beltsville, Md. 
M24F25R37. F. 

Abbott, W(illiam) G(eorge), Jr. Treas., 
Hillsborough Mills, Wilton, N. H. M16- 
F31. M. 

Abbott, Dr. William L. M25D36. FH. 

Abegg, Dr. Fred A(nton). M.S., Syracuse, 
22; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 28. Assoc, genetic- 
ist sugar plant investigations, U. S. Bur. 
Plant Industry, Washington, D. C. M29- 
F30. GO. 

Abel. F. A. E. 4604 Kahala Ave., Hono- 
lulu, Hawaii. M33R33. CO. 

Abel, Dr. James F(rederick). A.M., Stan- 
ford. 18; Ph.D., George Washington, 30. 
Chief Div. Comparative Education, U. S. 
Office Education, Washington, D. C. 
(2025 H St. NW.) M27. IQ. 

Abel, Dr. John J(acob). M02F02D38. N. 
President, 1032. 

Abel, Dr. Theodora M(ead). M.A., Colum- 
bia, 24; Ph.D., 25. Dir. research, Man- 
hattan High School Women's Garment 
Trades; psvchological consultant, Chapin 
School, New York, N. Y. (11 W. nth St.) 
M28F31. I. 

Abell, Prof. E(dward) L(aRue). P.O. Box 
642, Terre Haute. Ind. M29R34. Q. 

Abell, Richard G(urley). Dept. Anatomy, 
Univ. Pennsvlvania School Med., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. M33R33. NFC. 

Abello, Prof. Tomas P. M.A., Harvard, 26; 
Ph.D., Chicago, 26. Dept. Physics, Univ. 
Philippines, Manila, P. I. M34F34. B. 

Abeloff, Dr. Abram Joseph, n 14 Madison 
Ave., New York, N. Y. M36R36. N. 

Abercrombie, Dr. Ronald T(aylor). M.D.. 
Johns Hopkins, 05. Dir. Dept. Physical 
Education and Athletics, Johns Hopkins 
Univ.. Baltimore, Md. (10 Whitfield Road) 
M08. KN. 

Abercrombie, Dr. W(arren) Fulton. M.Sc, 
New York, 33; Ph.D., 35. Asst. prof, biol- 
ogy, Howard Col., Birmingham, Ala. 
(8216 2nd Ave. S.) M35. FN. 

Aberle, Dr. Sophie B(ledsoe) D. A.M., 
Stanford. 25; Ph.D., 27: M.D., Yale, 30. 
Supt., U. S. Pueblo Indian Agency; res. 
assoc. Carnegie Inst. Washington, Albu- 
querque, N. Mex. M26F32. HNF. 

Abernathy, Dr. E(dward) R(obert). M.A.. 
Ohio State, 28; Ph.D., 38. Supt., State 
School Deaf, Columbus, Ohio. M40. QI. 



2l8 



L)J RECTORY OF MEMBERS 



Abernathy, Prof. Lewis G. A.M., Missouri. 
jo. Prof, phvsics, Central Col., Fayette, 
Mo. M36F40. B. 

Abernethy, Dr. (Andrew) David, Jr. 220 

Menzies Bldg.. Hickory. X. Car. M36R36. 
MQ. 

Abernethy, Dr. John Leo. M.S.. North- 
western, 38; Ph.D., 40. Asst. chemistry, 
Northwestern Univ.. Evanston, 111. M40. C. 

Ablan. Guillermo L. Div. Fisheries, Bur. 
Science. Manila. P. 1. M 3 3R33- FGB. 

Ableiter, J(ames) Kenneth. M.S., Wiscon- 
sin. 3J. Senior soil technologist, U. S. 
Bur. Plant Industry. Washington. D. C. 
M36F39. OEG. 
Abrahams, Dr. Robert. M29D35. X. 

Abrahamson, Dr. Emanuel M. M.A.. Co- 
lumbia, 20; Ph.D., 22: M.D., 26. Adjunct 
attending physician, Jewish Hosp.: asst. 
attending physician. Greenpoint Hosp.. 
Brooklyn. X. V. (201 Eastern Parkway) 
M25F33. XCB. 

Abram, Prof. Robert Cranston, no X. 
Glenwood Ave., Columbia, Mo. M ?6R36. 

1Q- 

Abrams, Dr. Allen. M.S.. Washington and 
Jefferson. (5; D.Sc, 37. Technical dir., 
Marathon Paper Mills Co.. Rothschild. 
Wis. (8m 10th St.. Wausau, Wis.) M3g. 
CM. 

Abrams, Duff Andrew. C.E.. Illinois, 00. 
Consulting engineer, ir W. 42nd St.. New 
York. X. Y. M08F15. A.M. 

Abrams, Dr. LeRoy. A.M.. Stanford, 02; 
Ph.D.. Columbia, in. Prof, botany and dir. 
Natural History Mus., Stanford Univer- 
sity, Calif. (653 Cabrillo Ave.) M04F09. G: 

Abramson, Dr. David I. M.D.. Long 
Island Col. Med. Assoc, charge cardio- 
vascular research. May Inst. Med. Res., 
Jewish Hosp., Cincinnati, Ohio. M40. X. 

Abramson, Prof. Harold A(lexander). 
M.D., Columbia, 25. Asst. prof., Columbia 
Univ., Xew York. X. Y. ( M2SF33R3.O- 
M35F33. X. 

Abreu, Dr. Benedict Ernest. M.S., Cali- 
fornia. 37 ; Ph.D.. 30. [nstr.. Dept. Phar- 
macology, Univ. Oklahoma School Med.. 
Oklahoma City. Okla. M40. NpFC. 

Acconci, Prof. Themistocles F. D. M.S.. 
Manhattan. 31; M.A.. Columbia, 37- Asst. 
prof, biology, Manhattan Col.. Xew York, 
X. Y. M38. GFQ. 

Achilles, Dr. Edith Mulhall. M.A., Colum- 
bia, 15; Ph.D., 18. Private consultant, 530 
E. 86th St.. Xew York. X. Y. M22L25F2S. 

IQ. 

Achilles, Dr. Paul Strong. M.A., Colum- 
bia, 16; Ph.D., 2S. First vice pres. and 
gen. mgr., Psychological Corp.; lecturer, 
Columbia Univ.. Xew York, X. Y. M27- 
F28. IKQ. 



Achinstein, Dr. Asher. M.A., Columbia, 

2?; Ph.D., 27. 46 W. 83rd St., Xew York. 

X. Y. M35F35. AK. 

Ackerman, A(dolph) J(ohn). Tennessee 

Valley Authority, Knoxville, Tenn. M36- 

R36. M. 

Ackerman, Mrs. Ethel Serviss. A.B., Vas- 

sar, oS. Durie Ave., Closter, X. J. L25. 

ADB. 

Ackerman. Dr. Lloyd. M.S., Michigan, 24: 

Ph.D., 25. Asst. prof, biology, Western 

Reserve Univ.. Cleveland, Ohio. (3012 

Glenwood Road. Cleveland Heights) M25- 

V^. FX. 

Ackerson, Dr. C(lifton) W(alter). M.Sc, 
Minnesota. 22; Ph.D., Nebraska. 26. Act- 
ing charge, Dept. Agric. Chemistry, Univ. 
Xebraska Agric. Exp. Sta., Lincoln, 
Xebr. (3928 Dudley St.) M30F33. CO. 

Ackerson, Dr. Luton. Inst. Juvenile Res., 
Chicago, 111. M27F31R35. 1. 

Ackert, Dr. J(ames) E(dward). A.M.. Illi- 
nois. 11; Ph.D.. 13. Dean Div. Graduate 

Study, prof, zoology, and parasitologist at 
Exp. Sta.. Kansas State Col.. Manhattan. 
Kans. (1023 Leavenworth St. I M11F15. F. 

Ackley, Dr. Alma B(ernice). M.S.. Michi- 
gan, J-t : Ph.D.. Ohio State, 30. Asst. prof.. 
Wayne Univ., Detroit. Mich. (630 Mer- 
rick St.) (M31R3.UM40. G. 

Acquarone, Dr. Paul. Ph.D.. Johns Hop- 
kins, 20. Assoc, prof, biology, Unix. 
\kron. Akron. Ohio. (1558 Alton Drive) 
M35F35. G. 

Acree, Ellen Gray (Mrs. Harmon Monroe 
Radley). M.A.. George Washington, 39. 
Res. assoc, George Washington Univ. 
School Med.. Washington. D. C. (1600 
31M St. XW.) M36F38. X. 

Acree. Mrs. Ruby J. Asst. pathologist, 
U. S. Bur. Plant Industry, Washington, 
D. C. ( 1841 Summit Place XW.) M34F34. 
GO. 

Acuna, Julian B. Ingeniero agronomo, 
Habana, 30. Jefe dpto., Botany and Ge- 
netica, Est. Exp. Agronomical prof, de 
suelos. Escuala Forestal, Cienaga. Habana, 
Cuba. M311F40. G( ). 

Adair, Dr. C(harles) Roy. M.S.. Michigan 
State. .^2; Ph.D.. Wisconsin, 30. Asst. 
agronomist. Rice Branch Exp. Sta.. U. S. 

Bur. Plant Industry, Stuttgart. Ark. M38- 

F40. OG. 

Adair. Dr. Frank E(arl). M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 15; D.Sc. Marietta. 34- Attend- 
ing surgeon and executive officer. Memo- 
rial Hosp.; assoc. prof, clinical surgery, 
Cornell Univ. Med. Col., Xew York, X. Y. 
(75 E. 71st St.) M37F38. NQ. 

Adamo, Martin Eugene. Hotel Statler, 
Boston, Mass. M35R35. XCG. 

Adams, Prof. A(my) Elizabeth. M.A., 
Columbia, 18; Ph.D., Yale, 23. Prof, zool- 
ogy. Mt. Holyoke Col., South Hadley, 
Mass. M19F21. FX'. 



Individual Mem bers 



210 



Adams, Arthur H(erman). M33F32D38. 
MBK. 

Adams, Prof. Arthur S(tanton). M.A., 
California. 26; Sc.D., Colorado School 
Mines, 27. Prof, mechanics, Colorado 
School Mines. Golden, Colo. (121s [6th 
St. 1 M34F34. M. 

Adams, Prof. Bristow. 202 Fall Creek 
Drive. Ithaca, N.Y. M28R32. O. 

Adams, C. Robert. 62 Farragut Ave., Pied- 
mont, Calif. M36R36. 

Adams, Dr. Charles C(hristopher). M.S., 
Harvard, 99; Ph.D., Chicago, 08; Sc.D., 
Illinois Wesleyan, 20. Dir., New York 
State Mus., Albany, N.Y. M01F03. FK. 

Adams, Dr. Charles Frederick. M.D., 

Kansas, 02; A.M., 03. Dir. Labs., State 

Board Health, lefferson Citv, Mo. M04- 
F31. FN. 

Adams, Charles H. Sec, Merchants Ex- 
change, Inc., San Francisco, Calif. (120 
24th Ave.) (M26F32R35)M3/F32. D. 

Adams, Dr. Comfort A(very). D.E., Case. 
25 ; Lehigh. Consulting engineer, Edward 
G. Budd Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa., Bab- 
cock and Wilcox Co., New York, N. Y., 
Okonite Co., Passaic, N. J., and Okonite 
Calendar Co., Patterson, N. J. (436 W. 
Stafford St., Germantown, Philadelphia, 
Pa.) M98F10. BMQ. 

Adams, E. W. 100 Montclair Ave., Mont- 
clair, N. J. M25. 

Adams, Edwin Learned. B.S., California. 
08. Vice pres., Gen. Petroleum Corp. Cali- 
fornia. Los Angeles. Calif. (1712 Milan 
Ave., South Pasadena, Calif.) M18L26. 
MFG. 

Adams, Prof. E(dwin) P(limpton). S.M.. 
Harvard, 01; Ph.D., 04; Sc.D., Beloit, 31. 
Prof, physics, Princeton Univ., Princeton, 
N. J. ( Edgerstoune) M07F10. B. 

Adams, Dr. Elliot Q(uincy). Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia, 14. Physical chemist, Lamp Dept.. 
(ien. Electric Co., Nela Park, Cleveland, 
Ohio. (3535 Edison Road, Cleveland 
Heights) M25F27. CBI. 

Adams, Miss Esther (Flora). M.A., Mis- 
souri, 27. Instr. biological sciences, Mn- 
berlv Junior Col., Moberlv, Mo. (700 Gil- 
man St.) M28. GF. 

Adams, Prof. Frank. A.M.. Nebraska, 06. 
Prof, irrigation investigations and prac- 
tice, L^niv. California; irrigation econo- 
mist, Univ. California Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Berkelev, Calif. (18^1 San [nan Ave.) 
M24F31. EOK. 

Adams, Dr. Frank D(awson). Ph.D., 
Heidelberg, 92; D.Sc, McGill, 02; LL.D.. 
Toronto, 16, Queen's, 19. Emeritus vice 
principal, McGill Univ., Montreal, Que,, 
Canada. (1173 Mountain St.) M08F10. E. 

Adams, Frederick C(arhart). M01D39. CQ. 



Adams, Dr. F(rederick) J(oseph). M.A., 
California, 22; Ed.D., 27. Assoc, prof, ed- 
ucational psychology, Univ. Texas, Aus- 
tin, Tex. M31F34. QUI. 

Adams, G(eorge) E(dward). M.Agr.. 
Rhode Island State, 16. Dean emeritus, 
Rhode Island State Col. School Agric, 
Kingston, R. I. M14F25. O. 

Adams, Miss Georgian. M.A., Nebraska. 
19; D.Sc, Johns Hopkins, 28. Assoc 
home economist, U. S. Dept. Agric. Of- 
fice Exp. Stas., Washington, D. C. (2713 
Chelsea Terrace, Windsor Hills, Balti- 
more, Md.) M30F38. C. 

Adams, Prof. Henry F(oster). Ph.D.. 
Chicago, 10. Prof, psychology, Univ. 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. (2000 Day 
St.) M25F28. I. 

Adams, Dr. J(ames) Alfred. M.S., Iowa 
State, 3^\ Ph.D., 35. Instr. zoology. Grin- 
nell Col., Grinnell, Iowa. M38. F. 

Adams, Dr. J(ames) F(owler). M.Sc. 
Pennsylvania State, 14; Ph.D., Columbia, 
16. Mgr. agric. chems., Gen. Chem. Co., 
New York. N. Y. M13F16. FG. 

Adams, James Richardson. B.S., Pennsyl- 
vania. Supt. Special Products Dept., The 
Midvale Co., Philadelphia, Pa. (Hatboro. 
Pa.) M36. MBA. 

Adams, Prof. John Mead. A.M., Harvard. 
05; Ph.D., 07. Assoc prof, physics, Univ. 
California, Los Angeles, Calif. M18F25. 
BQ- 

Adams, Dr. John Q(uincy). A.M., Mis- 
souri, 25; Ph.D.. 30. Assoc prof, geogra- 
phy, Univ. Missouri, Columbia, Mo. M36- 
F36. EKQ. 

Adams, John W(agstaff). P.O. Box 21. 
(■olden. Colo. (?) M38R39. E. 

Adams, L(eason) H. B.S., Illinois, 06. 
Dir.. Geophysical Lab., Carnegie Inst. 
Washington, Washington, D. C. (Bradley 
Blvd. and Burdette Road, Bethesda, Md.) 
M40. C. 

Adams, Leland D. 310 Sansome St., San 
Francisco, Calif. M36R36. BCE. 

Adams, Dr. L(everett) A(llen). A.M.. 
Kansas. 06: Ph.D., Columbia, 15. Prof, 
/.oology and curator Mus. Natural His- 
tory. Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 111. (401 
Vermont St.) M14F21. FG. 

Adams, Miss Marian. Albion Col., Albion. 

Mich. M39- 

Adams, Dr. Maxwell. M06F09D39. QLC. 

Adams, Dr. Numa P(ompilius) G(arfield). 
A.M., Columbia. 12; M.D., Rush. 24. Dean 
and prof, medicine. Howard Univ. Col. 
Med., Washington, D. C. M37F38. NC. 

Adams, Dr. Oscar S(herman). A.M., Ken- 
yon, 15; Sc.D., 22. Senior mathema- 
tician, U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Washington, D. C. (727 Massachusetts 
Ave. NE.) M24F27. ABF. 



220 



Directory of Members 



Adams, Dr. Philip D(elmar). M.S., Penn- 
sylvania State, 30; Ph.D., Cincinnati, 35. 
Dir. research, Andrew Jergens Co., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. M38. CN. 

Adams, Dr. Porter H. M.S., Norwich, 33. 
Pres., Norwich Univ., Northfield, Vt. M30. 
NMC. 

Adams, Prof. Richard L. M.S., California, 
10. Prof, farm management and agric. 
economist, Agric. Exp. Sta. and Giannini 
Foundation, Univ. California Col. Agric, 
Berkeley, Calif. M35F3S. O. 

Adams, Robert Winthrop. E.E., Worces- 
ter Polytechnic Inst., 08. District mgr.. 
Central Sta. Dept., Gen. Electric Co., Bos- 
ton, Mass. M39. M. 

Adams, Dr. Roger. A.M., Harvard, 10; 
Ph.D., u; D.Sc, Brooklyn Polytechnic 
Inst., 35. Head Chemistry Dept., Univ. 
Illinois, Urbana, 111. (603 Michigan Ave.) 
M17F22. C. Vice president for Section on 
Chemistry (C), 1927. 

Adams, Dr. Roy H. M.A., George Pea- 
body; Ph.D. Assoc, prof, biology, State 
Teachers Col., Nacogdoches, Tex. M36. 
FG. 

Adams, Dr. Sidney. M.S., Washington, 30; 
Ph.D., California, 33. Res. asst., Person- 
nel Dept., Tennessee Valley Authority, 
Knoxville, Term. (3705 Sutherland Ave.) 
M39. I. 

Adams, Theodore (Giffin). M.A., Colum- 
bia. 199 8th Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. M39- F, 

Adams, Mrs. Thomas. 30 E. 60th St., 
New York, N. Y. M29. 

Adams, Dr. Thomas Caldwell. Ph.D., Cor- 
nell, 27. 242 S. 12th East St., Salt Lake 
City, Utah. M35F40. MBO. 

Adams, Dr. Walter S(ydney). M.A., Chi- 
cago, 00: Sc.D., Dartmouth, 13, Colum- 
bia, 26;'LL.D., Pomona, 26. Dir., Mt. 
Wilson Observatory, Carnegie Inst. Wash- 
ington, Pasadena, Calif. M17F18. DBA. 
Vice president for Section on Astronomy 
(D), 1927. President of Pacific Division, 
1929. 

Adams, William A. 2235 N. 75th Ave., 
Elmwood Park, 111. M25. H. 

Adams, William B. 432 S. Walnut St., 
Bloomington, Ind. M38R38. G. 

Adams, William E(ugenius). M.S., North 
Carolina State, 36. Asst. agronomist, U. S. 
Soil Conservation Service, Franklinton, 
N. Car. (115 Cheatham St.) M38. OGE. 

Adams, Dr. W(illiam) Lloyd. M.A., Ph.D., 
Western Reserve. Instr. Physiology and 
pharmacology, Albany Med. Col., Albany, 
N. Y. (357 Morris St.) M40. Np. 

Adams, Prof. W(illiam) R(itchie). M.S., 
Vermont, 28; Ph.D., Yale, 35. Assoc, prof, 
botany and forestry, Univ. Vermont; for- 
ester. Vermont Agric. Exp. Sta., Burling- 
ton, Vt. (36 Overlake Park) M29F33. GO. 



Adamson, George H(eesen), Mgr., Time 
Lab., Tecumseh, Mich. M40. DBA. 

Adamson, William Henry. P.O. Box 461, 
Huntsville, Tex. M33R35. BA. 

Adamstone, Dr. Frank Bolton. Univ. Illi- 
nois, Urbana, 111. M27F33R36. F. 

Adanalian, Miss Alice. 87 S. Broadwav. 
Yonkers, N. Y. M31R33. HIK. 

Addicks, J(ohn) E(dward). Powhatan 
Hotel, Washington, D. C. (?) M37R37- 
MHE. 

Addicott, Dr. F(rederick) T(aylor). Ph.D., 

California Inst. Tech., 39. Instr., Santa 
Barbara State Col.. Santa Barbara. Calif. 
M37. GFN. 

Addie, Dr. Charles Barton. Central Med. 
Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. M33R33. NHQ. 

Addinall, Dr. C(arl) R(upert). M.A., Har- 
vard, 26; Ph.D., 30. Dir. Library Services 
Bur., Merck and Co., Inc., Rahwav, N. J. 
M38. CNB. 

Addington, Prof. L(awrence) H(amilton). 
M.S., Michigan State. New Mexico A. and 
M. Col., State College, N. Mex. M38F40. 
OFC. 

Addison, Herbert. 1445 Detroit St., Den- 
ver. Colo. M19R36. EGM. 

Addison, Prof. William H(enry) Fitz- 
gerald). M.D., Toronto, 17. Prof, normal 
histology and embryology, Univ. Pennsyl- 
vania School Med., Philadelphia, Pa. 
M08F13. FN. 

Addleman, (Addison) Perry. 105 S. La- 
Salle St., Chicago, 111. (?) M36R37. ABD. 

Addoms, Dr. Ruth M(argery). M.A., 
Wellesley, 21; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 26. Asst. 
prof, botany, Duke Univ., Durham, N. 
Car. M26F27. GO. 

Ade, Lester K(elly). 2 Howe St., New 
Haven, Conn. M30R33. QK1. 

Adelson, Dr. David E. M.S., Ph.D., Flor- 
ida. 2535 Le Conte Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 
M38. CB. 

Adkins, Dr. Homer (Burton). M.A., Ohio 
State, 16; Ph.D., 18. Prof, chemistry, 
Univ. Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. (2103 
Rowley Ave.) M29F32. C. 

Adkisson, Prof. C(harles) N. 11 12 Bell 
Ave., Denton, Tex. M34F34R36. B. 

Adkisson, Dr. Virgil W(illiam). 523 
StorerSt.,Fayetteville,Ark. M27F33R39. A. 

Adler, Dr. Charles. 97? Fox St., New 
York, N. Y. M21R33. N. 

Adler, Dr. Cyrus. M04F06D40. L. 

Adler, Dr. Herman M(orris). M08F15D35. 
CIN. 

Adler, Dr. Joseph L(eopold). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 30. Pres., Independent Prospecting 
Co.. Houston, Tex. M32F33. EB. 



Individual Members 



221 



Adler, Dr. Leon Nathaniel. A.M., Ph.D., 
Heidelberg, 83. Proprietor (retired), Ad- 
ler Color and Chem. Works, New York, 
N. Y. (325 West End Ave.) M06F09. C. 

Adolph, Dr. Edward F(rederick). Ph.D., 
Harvard, 20. Assoc, prof, physiology, 
Univ. Rochester School Med. and Den- 
tistry, Rochester, N. Y. M27F30. NF. 

Adolph, Dr. William H(enry). Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania, 15. Prof. biochemistry, 
Yenching Univ., Peiping, China. M35F33. 
CN. 

Adriance, Dr. Guy W(ebb). Ph.D., Mich- 
igan State, 29. Head, Dept. Horticulture, 
Texas A. and M. Col., College Station, 
Tex. M39. O. 

Adriano, Prof. F(elipe) T. 660 Echague 
St., Quiapo, Manila, P. I. M34F34R34. C. 

Adsit, Charles G. M08D — . M. 

Affel, Herman Andrew. B.S., Massachu- 
setts Inst. Tech., 14. Asst. dir. transmis- 
sion development, Bell Telephone Labs., 
Inc., New York, N. Y. (827 Morningside 
Road, Ridgewood, N. J.) M34F34. M. 

Africano, Alfred. M.E., Stevens Inst. 
Tech., 29. Asst. engineer, Interborough 
Rapid Transit Co., New York, N. Y. (43 
Bennett Ave., Yonkers, N. Y.) M36. 
MBD. 

Agar, Dr. William M(acdonough). M.A., 
Princeton, 20; Ph.D., 22. Headmaster, 
Newman School, Lakewood, N. J. M38. E. 

Agard, Prof. H(arry) L(eslie). M.A., 
Yale, 08; Ph.D., 11. Prof, mathematics, 
Williams Col., Williamstown, Mass. M18- 
F33- A. 

Agatha, Sister Mary (See Sister Mary 
Agatha Stratman). 

Agee, H(amilton) P(ope). Castle and 
Cooke, Honolulu, Hawaii. M32F33. O. 

Agersborg, Dr. H(elmer) P. K. M.S., 
Washington, 16; A.M., Columbia, 20; 
Ph.D., Illinois, 23. Centralia, 111. M19F2S. 
FGN. 

Agharkar, Prof. S(hankar) P(urushat- 
tam). M.A., Bombay, 09; Ph.D., Berlin, 
19. Prof, botany, Calcutta Univ., Calcutta, 
India. (35 Ballvganj Circular Road) M38. 
GOE. 

Aginsky, Dr. Bernard W(illard). M.A., 
New York, 32; Ph.D., Columbia, 34. Dir. 
Field Lab. and instr., Washington Square 
Col., New York Univ., New York, N. Y. 
(8 W. 13th St.) (M 3 3R36)M 3 9- HKI. 

Agnes, Sister M. (See Sister M. Agnes 
Arvin). 

Agnes, Sister Rose (See Sister Rose 
Agnes Keyes). 

Agnew, Dr. Donald C. M.A., Duke, 32; 
Ph.D., 36. Acting head Dept. Education, 
Psychology and Philosophy; registrar, 
and acting dean, Coker Col., Hartsville. 
S. Car. M39. IQ. 



Agnew, J(ames) Carson. E.M., Columbia. 
Vice pres., Winston Bros. Co., Minneapo- 
lis, Minn. (612 Landor Lane, Pasadena, 
Calif.) M17F32. M. 

Agnew, Dr. Paul Gough. M.A., Michigan, 
02; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 11. Sec, Amer. 
Standards Assoc, New York, N. Y. (325 
E. 72nd St.) M04F10. BM. 

Agnew, Prof. Ralph P. M.S., Iowa, 25; 
Ph.D., Cornell, 30. Prof, mathematics, 
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. M35F35. A. 

Agnew, Dr. R(obert) Gordon. D.D.S., 

Toronto, 21; M.Sc, 34; L.D.S., Royal Col. 
Dental Surgery, 21. Head Dept. Oral 
Biological Sciences, Col. Med. and 
Dentistry; chairman Section Parodont- 
ology, Dental Clinic, Col. Med. and 
Dentistry; prof, pathology, West China 
Union Univ., Chengtu, Szechwan, West 
China. M39. Nd. 

Agnita, Sister Mary (See Sister Mary Ag- 
nita Reuter). 

Agostinho, Lt. Col. J(ose). Caixa Postal 
17, Angra do Herosimo, Azores Islands. 
M30. EBF. 

Agramonte, Alberto. Simbron 3191, Bue- 
nos Aires, Argentina, S. A. M17R33. M. 

Agrelius, Frank U(lysses) G(rant). 1501 
Rural St., Emporia, Kans. M36F31R39. 
FG. 

Agruss, Dr. Meyer S. Ph.D., Chicago, 35. 
Res. chemist, Pure Oil Co., Chicago, 111. 
(6423 N. Oakley St.) M38F38. CB. 

Agthe, Fred(erick) Thomas. E.M., Le- 
high, 09. Engineer cement plant design, 
Allis Chalmers Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
(Knickerbocker Hotel) M36. M. 

Aguerrevere, Santiago E(migdio). Sur 3, 
No. 94, Caracas, Venezuela, S. A. M31. 
ECM. 

Aguilar, Prof. Felix. Ing. geog., La Plata, 
10. Dir. Observatorio Astronomico, La 
Plata, Argentina, S. A. M38. DE. 

Aguilar, Ponciano. M17D — . ME. 

Ahearn, Dr. Arthur J(ohn). Ph.D., Min- 
nesota, 31. Member tech. staff, Bell Tele- 
phone Labs., Inc., New York, N. Y. M36- 
F38. B. 

Ahearn, John M(aurice). M.S., Oregon, 
32. In charge West Div. Photogrammetric 
Lab., U. S. Agric Adjustment Adminis- 
tration, Salt Lake City, Utah. M38. BM. 

Ahern, Col. George P. 2227 20th St. NW., 
Washington, D. C. M24F31R37. O. 

Ahern, Rev. Michael J(oseph). Weston 
Col., Weston, Mass. M06F15R36. E. 

Ahrens, Dr. Theodor G. 69 Rue des Eausc 
Vires, Geneva, Switzerland. M22R37. EFG. 

Aicher, L. C. Kansas Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Hays, Kans. M31R32. OE. 



222 



Dl RECTORY OF MEMBERS 



Aiguier, Dr. James E(dward). D.D.S.. 
Pennsylvania, 17. Asst. prof, oral hygiene, 
dir. courses oral hygiene and lecturer ma- 
teria medica, Univ. Pennsylvania School 
Dentistry, Philadelphia, Pa. M40. Nd. 

Aiken, Charles W. M17D36. MPC. 

Aikins, Prof. H(erbert) Austin. Ph.D.. 
Yale, 91. Prof, emeritus philosophy. West- 
ern Reserve Univ., Cleveland, Ohio. (2611 
Edgehill Road) M07F10. IQH. 

Aikman, Dr. J(ohn) M(ulvaney). A.M., 
Nebraska Wesleyan, 21 ; Ph.D., Nebraska, 
28. Assoc, prof, botany, Iowa State Col.; 
project supervisor, U. S. Soil Conserva- 
tion Service, Ames, Iowa. M26F31. GOC. 

Ainslie, Charles N(icolas). M08F14D39. F. 

Aird, Dr. John William. M.D., California. 
(13. 112 E. Center St., Provo, Utah. (M18- 
R 3 6)M38. N. 

Aitken, Dr. Robert G(rant). M.A., Wil- 
liams, 92; Sc.D., Williams, 17, Pacific, 03, 
Arizona, 23; LL.D., California, 35. Dir. 
and astronomer emeritus, Lick Observa- 
tory, Univ. California, Mt. Hamilton, 
Calif. (1109 Spruce St., Berkeley, Calif.) 
M03F06. DA. Vice president for Section on 
Astronomy (D), 1926. President of Pacific 
Division, 1926. 

Aitken, Robert T(homas). M.A., Hawaii, 
23. Chartered life underwriter, Home Ins. 
Co. Hawaii, Ltd., Honolulu. Hawaii. M 18. H. 

Aitken, Thomas H(enry) G(ardiner). 
B.S., California, 35. Teaching asst. en- 
tomology, Univ. California, Berkeley, 
Calif. (615 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto, 
Calif.) M38. FN. 

Akeley, Prof. Lewis E(llsworth). 124 N. 
University St., Vermillion, S. Dak. M22- 
F31R36. BKM. 

Akeley, Dr. Mary L. Jobe (Mrs. Carl). 
Amer. Mus. Natural History. New York. 
X. Y. M29R39- FH. 

Akerman, Prof. Clement. Reed Col., Port- 
land, Oreg. M31R36. K. 

Akeroyd, Joseph H(enry). M.S., Ohio 
State, 37. Res. chemist and hematologist, 
Dept. Med., Ohio State Univ., Columbus. 
Ohio. M40. NC. 

Akers, Fred Haffly. S.B., Michigan, 14- 
Instr., Austin High School. Chicago. 111. 
(5830 Fulton St.) M25. DE. 

Akin, Dr. Charles V(ivian). U. S. Quar- 
antine Sta., Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 
M32R35. N- 

Albaum, Harry G. Brooklyn Col., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. M34R34. FGC. 

Albers, Bert (Fred). 5435 Woodward Ave., 
Detroit, Mich. M34. M. 

Albers, Dr. C(arl) C(larence). Ph.D., 
Wisconsin, 36. Assoc, prof, pharmacy. 
Univ. Texas. Austin, Tex. M37F38. GCNp. 



Albert, Dr. A(braham) Adrian. Unix. Chi- 
cago, Chicago, 111. M34F34R34. A. 

Albert, Prof. A(rthur) R(obert). B.S.. 

Wisconsin, 15. Asst. prof, soils, Univ. 
Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. (Hancock, 
Wis.) M34F34- O. 

Albert, Major Edward J(ohn). Gen. mgr.. 
Thwing-Albert Instrument Co.. Philadel- 
phia, Pa. ( 1008 E. Rittenhouse St.) M40. M . 

Albert, Dr. Kurt. Humboldstr 29, Wies- 
baden, Germany. M38R38. CBM. 

Albert, Prof. O(rrin) W(ilson). A.M.. Co- 
lumbia, 11; Ph.D., Washington, 31. Prof, 
mathematics, Univ. Redlands, Redlands. 
Calif. (620 Buena Vista St.) M28F33. A. 

Albert, Dr. W(illard) B(enjamin). M.S., 

Wisconsin, 24; Ph.D., 26. Assoc, plant 

physiologist, South Carolina Exp. Sta.. 
Clemson, S. Car. M28F28. GO. 

Alberts, Dr. H(ugo) W(illiam). M.S.. 
Wisconsin, 20; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 26, Illi- 
nois, 26, Harvard. 26. Agronomist charge 
res. sta., \J. S. Soil Conservation Service. 
Rio Piedras, P. R. M27F31. OG. 

Albertson, Dr. F(red) W(illiam). A.M.. 
Missouri. 30; Ph.D., Nebraska, 37- Prof, 
botany and chairman graduate council. 
Fort Hays Kansas State Col., Hays, Kans. 
(M3-R37)M 4 o. GO. 

Albertson, M(aurice) M(erton). Shell Pe- 
troleum Corp., Houston, Tex. M20R35. E. 

Albin, T(homas) C(arlton). Forest Prod- 
ucts Chem. Co., Memphis, Tenn. M2yR.V>. 
CM. 

Albrech, Maximilian Claud. A.B., Cornell, 
06. Chief chemist, R. T. French Co.. 
Rochester, N. Y. (34 Iroquois St.) M39. C. 

Albrecht, George M(oritz). E.E.. Minne- 
sota. 06; LL.B., George Washington, r;. 
Member firm. Freeman, Sweet and Al- 
brecht. Cleveland. Ohio. M12. BM. 

Albrecht, Dr. Sebastian. Ph.D., California. 
26. 208 Delaware Ave., Delmar. N. Y. 
M02F06. D. 

Albrecht, Dr. William A(lbert). M.S., Illi- 
nois, 15; Ph.D., 19. Prof, soils, Univ. Mis- 
souri Col. Agric; chairman Dept. Soils. 
Missouri Agric. Exp. Sta., Columbia. Mo. 
M18F24. OCG. 

Albright, Charles E. M23R33D— . BCD. 

Albright, Dr. C(harles) L(eonard). Univ. 
Richmond. Richmond, Va. (M34F34R35) 
M39F34R39. BCI. 

Albright, Dr. John G(rover). M.S.. Ohio 
State, 16; Ph.D., Chicago, 33. Asst. prof, 
physics, Case School Applied Science, 
Cleveland, Ohio. (M29R32)M39F40. B. 

Albright, Dr. Penrose S(trong). M.S., 
Wisconsin, 29; Ph.D., 36. Chairman Div. 
Natural Science; prof, physical chemistry 
and dir. civilian pilot training, South- 
western Col., Winfield, Kans. (Q02 E. oth 
St.) (M26F3 3 R3S)M39F33- CB. 



Individual Members 



223 



Albright, Raymond W. A.R., Wisconsin, 
17. PR.es., Amor. Anode, Inc. Akron, 
( )hio. M39. C. 

Albright, W(illiam) D(onald). Beaver- 
lodge, Alta.. Canada. M30R39. OEK. 

Albritton, Dr. Claude C(arrol), Jr. M.A., 
Harvard, 34: Ph.D.. 36. Asst. prof, geol- 
ogy. Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, 
Tex. (3436 University Blvd.) M37F39. EF. 

Albritton, Dr. Errett C(yril). M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 21. Prof, physiology, George 
Washington Univ. School Med., Washing- 
ton. D. C. (518 Cumberland Ave., Somer- 
set, Chevy Chase, Md.) M34F34. N. 

Albro, Miss Helen T(ucker). A.M., Brown, 
23; Ph.D., 27. Head Biology Dept., Spel- 
man Col., Atlanta, Ga. M25F33. F. 

Alcock. Dr. Nathaniel G(raham). M.A., 
Northwestern, 08; M.D., 12. Box 508, 
Iowa City, Iowa. M24. X. 

Aldecoa, Dr. Eladio R. D.D.S., D.M.D., 
Philippines. Pres. and dean, Col. Oral and 
Dental Surgery, Manila, P. I. M40. Xdl. 

Alden, Dr. B(ertram) F(rancis). M21D— . 
NF. 

Alden, Dr. Harold L(ee). M.S., Chicago, 
13; Ph.D., Virginia, 17. Asst. prof, as- 
tronomy, Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn.; 
astronomer charge Yale Univ. Observa- 
tory Southern Sta., Johannesburg, S. Af- 
rica. M21F23. DBA. 

Alderman, Dr. W(illiam) H(orace). 1380 
Raymond Ave., St. Paul, Minn. (M10F1S- 
R 3 2)M3sFi8. OG. 

Alderson, Wroe. A.B., George Washing- 
ton. Market analyst, Curtis Publishing 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa. (18 Buck Lane, 
Haverford, Pa.) M40. K. 

Aldinger, Miss Lenore. 207 N. Murray St., 
Madison, Wis. (?) M35R37. G. 

Aldous, Dr. A(lfred) E(van). M38D38, 
OG. 

Aldred, Dr. J(acob) W(illiam) H(uber). 
M.A., Indiana, 20; Ph.D., 29. Senior chem- 
ist, Dept. Chem. Engng., Tennessee Valley 
Authority, Wilson Dam, Ala. M34F34. C. 

Aldrich, Dr. C(harles) Anderson. 1189 
Oaklev Ave.. Winnetka, 111. M36R36. 
XQI. 

Aldrich, James Madison. Ph.B., Brown, 
10. Teacher. Park School, Brookline, 
Mass. (270 Boylston St.) M39. CA. 

Aldrich, Dr. John A(bram). M.S., Mich- 
igan, 15; Ph.D., 23. Prof, physics and as- 
tronomy, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
(M2 4 F26R32)M39F26. DBA. 

Aldrich, Dr. John Warren. Ph.D., West- 
ern Reserve, 37. Curator ornithology, 
Cleveland Mus. Natural Historv, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. M40. FG. 



Aldrich, Loyal Blaine. M.A.. Wisconsin. 
09. Asst. dir. Astrophysical Observatory, 
Smithsonian Inst.. Washington, I). C. 
M09F15. Bl). 

Aldrich, Paul P(ackard). B.S., North- 
western, 27. Chemist. Krey Packing Co.. 
St. Louis, Mo. (.4318 Rosalie St.) M31. C. 

Aldrich, Mrs. Richard. 117 W. 74th St., 
New York. X. Y. M13. 

Aldrich, Dr. Willard W(alker). Ph.D.. 
Maryland, 30. Senior horticulturist, U. S. 
Dept. Agric, Tndio, Calif. (M35F35R37)- 
M39F35. OG. 

Aleck, Dr. Adolph William. M.A., Clark, 
26; Ph.D., Xew York, 31. Evansville Col., 
Evansville, Ind. M29. Ql. 

Alexander, Brother (See Brother Major 
Alexander). 

Alexander, Dr. A(lexander) E(mil). Mel- 
lon Inst. Industrial Res., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
M34F34R38. E. 

Alexander, Miss Alida. A.M., Michigan, 
13. Prof, biology, MacMurray Col. 
Women, Jacksonville, 111. M28. G. 

Alexander, Prof. Carter. A.M., Missouri. 
08; Ph.D., Columbia, 10. Library prof., 
Columbia Univ. Teachers Col., X T ew York, 
X. Y. M11F15. Q. 

Alexander, Charles A(nderson). M.E., 
Cornell, 97. 1260 Clover Road, Rochester, 
N. Y. M29. MOK. 

Alexander, Charles Ivan. M.S., Texas 
Christian, 26; Ph.D., Princeton, 28. Dis- 
trict geologist, Magnolia Petroleum Co., 
Tyler, Tex. M25F33. EF. 

Alexander, Dr. Charles K(irkwood). Ph.D., 
California Inst. Tech., 37. Asst. prof, and 
acting chairman Mathematics Dept., Oc- 
cidental Col., Los Angeles, Calif. (588 
Perm St., Pasadena, Calif.) M40. AB. 

Alexander, Dr. Charles P(aul). Ph.D., 
Cornell, 18. Prof, entomology and head 
Dept. Entomology and Zoology-, Massa- 
chusetts State Col., Amherst, Mass. M18- 
F26. F. 

Alexander, Chester S. M.A., Chicago. 
Seminole Hotel, Fulton, Mo. M37. HIK. 

Alexander, D(aniel) Basil W(illiam). 
M06F15D38. CM. 

Alexander, Dr. Duncan L. M29D38. NIL. 

Alexander, Prof. (Edward) Gordon. M.A.. 
Princeton, 25; Ph.D., 31. Prof, biology 
and head Dept., Univ. Colorado, Boulder, 
Colo. (765 14th St.) M22F33. FG. 

Alexander, Eleanor G. (See Eleanor Alex- 
ander Jackson). 

Alexander, Dr. Franz (Gabriel). M.D., 
Budapest, 12. Dir. Inst. Psychoanalysis; 
assoc. prof, psychiatry, Univ. Illinois Col. 
Med.; member attending staff, Cook 
County Psvchopathic Hosp., Chicago, 111. 
M36F38. XI. 



224 



Directory of Members 



Alexander, Dr. Frederick (Archibald 
Duncan). M.D.,C.M., Queen's, 33. Dir. 
anestnesia, Albany Hosp. ; assoc. prof, 
anesthesia and assoc. physiology and 
pharmacology, Albany Med. School, Al- 
bany, N. Y. M40. NpDL. 

Alexander, Dr. Harry L. 310 Skinker 
Road, St. Louis, Mo. M31R32. N. 

Alexander, Dr. Hugh S(tuart). A.M., Min- 
nesota, 05; Ph.D., 31. Prof, geology, Mac- 
alester Col., St. Paul, Minn. (1710 Port- 
land Ave.) M08. EB. 

Alexander, Dr. Ida M(ary). M32D35. 
NIF. 

Alexander, Dr. J. W. 29 Cleveland Lane, 
Princeton, N. J. M24F25. A. 

Alexander, Jerome. M.Sc, College City 
New York, 99. Consulting chemist and 
chem. engineer, 50 E. 41st St., New York, 
N. Y. (320 Riverside Drive) M17F22. 
CMB. 

Alexander, Dr. Kliem. M.A., George Pea- 
body, 28; Ph.D., Iowa, 38. Assoc, prof, 
chemistry, West Texas State Col., Canyon, 
Tex. M40. C. 

Alexander, Dr. Leonard J(ay). M.S., Wis- 
consin, 28; Ph.D., 34. Assoc, plant pa- 
thologist, Ohio Agric. Exp. Sta., Wooster, 
Ohio. M33F38. GO. 

Alexander, Dr. Lloyd E(phraim). Ph.D., 
Rochester, 36. Asst. prof, biology, Fisk 
Univ., Nashville, Tenn. M39. FGN. 

Alexander, Prof. L(owell) M(elville). 
M.A., Cincinnati, 17; Ph.D., 25. Prof, 
physics, Univ. Cincinnati, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. M39F40. BAM. 

Alexander, Miss Lucy M(aclay). B.S., Illi- 
nois, 24. Assoc, home economics special- 
ist, U. S. Bur. Home Economics, Wash- 
ington, D. C. (2801 Adams Mill Road) 
M35F35- C. 

Alexander, Dr. Lyle T(homas). Ph.D., 
Maryland, 35. Chemist, U. S. Bur. Plant 
Industry, Washington, D. C. (14 Quincey 
St., Hyattsville, Md.) M39. OC. 

Alexander, Brother Major. L.Sc, Mon- 
treal, 29. Prof, biology, Mt. St. Louis 
Col., and St. George Pedagogical Inst., 
Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 
M31F32. GFN. 

Alexander, Mrs. Marion Isely. 765 14th 
St., Boulder, Colo. M28R38. FG. 

Alexander, Dr. Max. M.D., Univ. and 
Bellevue, 17. Asst. surgeon, Community 
Hosp.; asst. gynecologist, St. Luke's 
Hosp., New York, N. Y. (32 W. 82nd St.) 
M29. NB. 

Alexander, Thomas R. Carnegie Inst. 
Tech., Pittsburgh, Pa. M35F35R37. 

Alexander, Prof. William Henry. M.A., 
Virginia. Senior meteorologist (retired), 
U. S. Weather Bur., Columbus, Ohio. 
(Hotel Normandie) M23F25. B. 



Alexanderson, Dr. Ernst F(redrik) 
W(erner). Sc.D., Union, 26; Ph.D., Up- 
sala (Sweden). Consulting engineer, Gen. 
Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. (8 
Adams Road) M29F29. MKI. 

Aley, Dr. Robert J(udson). 425 E. 86th 
St., New York, N. Y. M00F06R34. Q- 

Alfaro, Heraclio. 138 Beacon St., Boston, 
Mass. M36R37. 

Alfend, Samuel. B.S., Washington Univ., 
23. Chemist, U. S. Food and Drug Admin- 
istration, St. Louis, Mo. (5915 Cates Ave.) 
M34F34. CNF. 

Alfred, Brother Bernard (See Brother 
Bernard Alfred Welch). 

Alger, Dr. Harry B(utter). Ph.D., Cornell. 
Chemist, Detroit Creamery Nat. Dairy 
Products. Detroit, Mich. (13505 Griggs 
Ave.) M40. CNO. 

Alger, Dr. John L(incoln). 235 Doyle 
Ave., Providence, R. I. M39R39. QAB. 

Alger, Philip L(angdon). M.A., St. Johns 
(Maryland), 15; M.S., Union, 20. Staff 
asst. to vice pres. charge engng., Gen. 
Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. (1758 
Wendell Ave.) M29F31. MQK. 

Alicata, Dr. Joseph E(verett). Zoology 
Div., U. S. Bur. Animal Industry, Wash- 
ington, D. C. M34F34R34. F. 

Alinsky, Saul (David). 5553 Kimbark 
Ave., Chicago, 111. M36R36. KHI. 

Allaman, Mrs. Haidee H. 1453 Woodward 
Ave., Lakewood, Ohio. M29R34. BDA. 

Allan, Dr. D(enison) Maurice. A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard. Prof, psychology and 
ph.losophy, Hampden-Sydney Col., Hamp- 
den-Sydney, Va. M39. I. 

Allan, Dr. Frank N(athaniel). M.D., To- 
ronto, 28. Physician, Dept. Internal Med., 
Lakey Clinic, Boston, Mass. (33 St. Paul 
St., Brookline, Mass.) M29F33. NC. 

Allan, Dr. Warde B(aunton). M.D..C.M., 
McGill. Assoc, medicine, Johns Hopkins 
Univ. and Hosp., Baltimore, Md. (24 E. 
Eager St.) M39. N. 

Allan, Prof. William. M.C.E., Brooklyn 
Polytechnic Inst., 32. Chairman Dept. 
Civil Engng., The City Col., New York, 
N. Y. (30-91 42nd St., Long Island City, 
N. Y.) M36. MBQ. 

Allard, Miss Lucile (Edna). State Normal 
School, Oswego, N. Y. (?) M36R36. KI. 

Allard, Romeo P(aul). M.S., Ph.D., Notre 
Dame. 4189 Jackson Ave., Culver City, 
Calif. M38. C. 

Allardyce, Dr. William John. M.A., Brit- 
ish Columbia, 21; Ph.D., McGill, 31- Asst. 
prof, biology, Univ. British Columbia, 
Vancouver, B. C, Canada. M39. NCG. 

Alldredge, Dr. Rufus Henry. Hosp. Rup- 
tured and Crippled, New York, N. Y. (?) 
M37R37. N. 



Individual Members 



225 



Allee, Prof. W(alter) G(oldsberry). Isi- 
dore Newman School, New Orleans, La. 
M19R35. CB. 

Allee, W(arder) C(lyde). S.M., Chicago, 
10; Ph.D., 12. Prof, zoology, Univ Chi- 
cago, Chicago, 111. (5537 University Ave.) 
M11F20. F. Secretary of Section on Zoology 
(F), 1918. 

Alleman, Dr. Gellert. Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 97; Sc.D., Gettysburg, 25. Prof, 
emeritus chemistry, Swarthmore Col., 
Swarthmore, Pa. (Wallingford, Pa.) Moi- 
F09. C. 

Allen, Miss Agnes (Morgan). M.A., Gree- 
ley State Teachers, 25; M.A., Clark, 34; 
Ph.D., 37. Assoc, prof, science and edu- 
cation, State Teachers Col., Flagstaff, 
Ariz. M3S. EHK. 

Allen, Dr. Alexander J(ohn). Ph.D., New 
York, 28. Assoc, prof., Dept. Physics, 
Univ. Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh, Pa. (3955 
Bigelow Blvd.) (M2 9 R32)M 3 7F38. BCN. 

Allen, A(lfred) H(orace). 646 Fearl St., 
Boulder, Colo. M24L25. C. 

Allen, Prof. Bennet M(ills). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 03; D.Sc, DePauw. Prof, zoology, 
Univ. California Los Angeles, Los An- 
geles, Calif. (909 Micheltorena St.) M04- 
F06. F. 

Allen, Prof. Charles E(lmer). Ph.D., Wis- 
consin, 04. Prof, botany, Univ. Wisconsin, 
Madison, Wis. (2014 Chamberlin Ave.) 
M05F08. G. Vice president for Section on 
Botanical Sciences (G), 1928. 

Allen, Prof. Charles Metcalf. M.S., Wor- 
cester Polytechnic Inst., 99; D.Eng., 29. 
Prof, hydraulic engineering and dir. 
Alaen Hydraulic Lab., Worcester Poly- 
technic Inst., Worcester, Mass. M02F33. 
DMO. 

Allen, Dr. Doris Twitchell. M.A., Maine, 
26; Ph.D., Michigan, 30. Attending psy- 
chologist, Children's Hosp. and Children's 
Convalescent Home, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
(Magnolia Ave., Glendale, Ohio) M31F33. 
IFQ. 

Allen, Dr. Durward L(eon). 115 Delano 
St., Allegan, Mich. M38R38. FG. 

Allen, E. Floyd. Ph.G., Philadelphia Col. 
Phar.. 83. 230 Oak Grove St., Minneapo- 
lis, Minn. M35. CHNp. 

Allen, Prof. Edgar. A.M., Brown, 16; 
Ph.D., 21 ; Sc.D., 36. Prof, anatomy, Yale 
Univ. Med. School, New Haven, Conn. 
(19 Ridgewood Ave., Hamden, Conn.) 
M21F25. FX. 

Allen, Dr. Ena A(lida). Zoology Div., 
U. S. Bur. Animal Industry, Washington, 
D. C. M 3 2F 3 3R34- FN. 

Allen, Miss Esther C(ampbell). M.S., Cal- 
ifornia. 32. Clinical laboratory technician, 
Camarillo State Hosp., Camarillo, Calif. 
M30F33. NFC. 



Allen, Dr. Ezra. A.M., Bucknell, 96; Sc.D., 
22; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 14. Zoological 
Lab., Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 
Pa. (Route 2, Box 9iA, DeLand, Fla.) 
M12F20. FGN. 

Allen, Francis H(enry). Editor (retired), 
Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston, Mass. (215 
La Grange St., West Roxbury, Mass.) 
M23F33. F. 

Allen, Frank W(illiam). 5030 Grand Cen- 
tral Terminal, New York, N. Y. M28R32. 

Allen, Frederick I. M29D38. E. 

Allen, Dr. F(rederick) J(ohn). M.S., Pur- 
due, 21 ; Ph.D., 30. Asst. prof, general 
chemistry, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, 
Ind. M29F33. CBQ. 

Allen, Dr. Frederick Madison. 1031 5th 
Ave., New York, N. Y. M36F36R39. N. 

Allen, George S(amuel). M.A.Sc, British 
Columbia, 35. Asst. forester, British Co- 
lumbia Forest Service, Victoria, B. C, 
Canada. (3010 Balfour Ave.) M40F40. 
GOC. 

Allen, Dr. Glover Morrill. M.A., Harvard, 
03; Ph.D., 04. Curator mammals, Mus. 
Comparative Zoology, and prof, zoology, 
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. M07- 
F13. F. 

Allen, Dr. Henry Butler. D.Sc, Temple. 
38. Sec. and dir., Franklin Inst., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. M39. M. 

Allen, Prof. Herman Camp. A.M., Kansas, 
05; Ph.D., Cornell, 12. Prof, chemistry, 
Univ. Kansas, Lawrence, Kans. M18. C. 

Allen, Howard. Treas.-sec. and tech. dir., 

D. D. Williamson and Co., Inc., Long 
Island City, N. Y. M 3 9- CMN. 

Allen, Dr. James H(arrill). M.D., Michi- 
gan, 30; M.S., Iowa, 38. Asst. prof, oph- 
thalmology, Univ. Iowa Col. Med., Iowa 
City, Iowa. (715 River St.) M40. N. 

Allen, Prof. John S(tuart). M.A., Minne- 
sota, 29; Ph.D., New York, 36. Asst. prof, 
astronomy and chairman physical science 
survey, Colgate Univ., Hamilton, N. Y. 
(29 Madison St.) (M3iF33R34)M37F33. 
DAB. 

Allen, Prof. Joseph. A.M., Harvard, 92. 
Assoc, prof., The City Col., New York, 
N. Y. M07F09. AKL. 

Allen, Dr. Kenneth D. A. 452 Metropoli- 
tan Bldg., Denver, Colo. M37R37. N. 

Allen, Miss Leah B(rown). A.M., Welles- 
lev, 12. Prof, astronomy, Hood Col., Fred- 
erick, Md. M18F23. DEQ. 

Allen, Dr. Leroy. M.A., Chicago, 20; Soc. 
Sc.D., Oklahoma City, 30. Prof, religion, 
Southwestern Col., Winfield. Kans. (1414 

E. 4 th Ave.) M31F36. K. 

Allen, Mrs. Madell Gille (Mrs. Frederick 
H. Allen). M.S., Washington, 17. 3915 
Henry St., Philadelphia, Pa. M39. FN. 



_'_'<> 



Directory of Members 



Allen, Miss Mary. M24U37. QEI. 

Allen, Miss Mary L. 64s Hickory St.. 
Kankakee, 111. M32R35. KCQ. 

Allen, Maxwell W. Box 268, Porterville, 
Calif. (?) M24F33R35. BDE. 

Allen, Miss Mildred. A.M., Clark. 17; 
Ph.D., 22. Assoc, prof, physics, Mt. Hol- 
yoke Col., South Hadley. Mass. (88 Mont- 
view St., W. Roxbury, Mass.) M23F30. B. 

Allen, Dr. O(scar) N(elson). M.A., Texas. 
27; Ph.D.. Wisconsin, 30. Assoc, prof, 
bacteriology. Univ. Hawaii, Honolulu, 
Hawaii. M31F33. G. 

Allen, Prof. Ray (Leroi). M.A.. Mt. Alli- 
son, 19. Prof, physics, Univ. Western On- 
tario, London, Out., Canada. M40F40. 
BAC. 

Allen. Dr. Reginald B(ryant). M07F01)- 
D38. ADM. 

Allen, Robert McDowell. M.A., Kentucky, 
10. Pres., Vigex, Inc., and Vitamin Food 
Co.. Inc., New York, N. Y. M33. C. 

Allen, R(olland) C(raten). M.A., Wiscon- 
sin, oS ; D.Eng., Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Inst., 39. Geologist; exec, vice pres., Ogle- 
bav Norton and Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 
(Aurora St., Hudson, Ohio.) M18F21. E. 

Allen, Dr. Ruth F(lorence). M.A., Wis- 
consin, 07; Ph.D., 00. 2709 Dwight Way, 
Berkeley, Calif. M24l r 25. G. 

Allen, Dr. Samuel (James Mcintosh). 
M.A.S., McGill. 01 ; Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins, 
06. Prof, experimental physics, Univ. Cin- 
cinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. M31F32. B. 

Allen, Mr. Shirley W(alter). M.F., Iowa 
State, 29. Prof, forestry. Univ. Michigan. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. (1302 Washtenaw Ter- 
race) M29F31. O. 

Allen, Dr. S(imeon) ■ C(arlyle). M.D., 
Tufts, 2~ . Dir. res.. Health Res. Founda- 
tion; dermatologist. Liberty Mutual [ns. 
Co., Boston, Mass. (615 Commonwealth 
Ave., Newton Center, Mass.) M30. N. 

Allen, Prof. Victor T(homas). M.S.. Min- 
nesota, 22; Ph.D., California, 28. Prof, and 
dir. geology, St. Louis Univ.. St. Louis. 
Mo. M34F34. E. 

Allen, Willard H. Du Pont Bldg., Wil- 
mington, Del. M29R33. ('<>. 

Allen, Dr. Willard M(yron). M.S.. R, .Ches- 
ter, 21) ; M.D.. 32. Prof, obstetrics and 
gynecology, Washington Univ. School 
Med., St. "Louis. Mo. M3f>F38. \C. 

Allen, Dr. William. Canada House, Tra- 
falgar Square, London, England. M34- 
F34R3Q. OK. 

Allen, Prof. William F(itch). A.M., Stan- 
ford, 03; Ph.D., Minnesota, 15. Head 
Dept. Anatomy. Univ. Oregon Med. 
School, Portland, Oreg. (3047 S. East- 
Salmon St.) M05F21. N. 



Allen, Dr. W(illiam) R(ay). M.A., Indi- 
ana. 14; Ph.D., 20. Prof, zoology, Unix. 
Kentuckv, Lexington. Kv. (417 Clifton 
Ave.) M17F23. F. 

Allen, Prof. W(infred) E(mory). A.M.. 
Lawrence, 04. Asst. prof, biology, Scripps 
Inst. Oceanographv, Univ. California, La 
Jolla, Calif. M13F16. FG. 

Allenburger, Dr. C(hristian) A(lexander). 
M.D.. Rush. 05. Columbus. Nebr. M20. N. 

Allender, Miss Christia Hysel. M.S.. Okla- 
homa, 34 Teacher biologv. Public Schools, 
Tulsa. Okla. (435 S. Gary St.) M36. FG. 

Aller, Frank D(urwood). M.E., Colorado 
School Mines, 02. 1218 ifith St.. Golden. 
Colo. M19F25. CEM. 

Alles. Dr. Gordon A(lbert). Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia Inst. Tech., 26. Lecturer pharma- 
cology. Univ. California School Med., San 
Francisco; res. assoc. biology, California 
Inst. Tech., Pasadena, Calif. (1316 W. 
Haven Road. San Marino, Calif.) M29F33. 
CNp. 

Alley, John Dinsmore. 1 107 Richmond 
Ave.. Swissvale, Pittsburgh, Pa. M21R32. 
CMB. 

Ailing, Dr. Eric L. M.D., Columbia, 19. 
Keene, X. Y. M26. ABC. 

Ailing, Prof. Harold Lattimore. M.A., Co- 
lumbia, 17; Ph.D.. 20. Prof, and chairman 
Dept. Geology, Univ. Rochester. Roches- 
ter. X. Y. (31 Barrington St.) M11F22. 
BCE. 

Allis, Dr. Edward Phelps, Jr. LL.D.. Wis- 
consin, 03; M.D., Groniugen, 14. Palais 
de Carnoles, Menton, S. France. M02F05- 
L14. XF. 

Allis, Prof. William Phelps. M.S.. Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech.. 24; D.Sc, Nancy. 24. 
Asst. prof, mathematical physics, Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., Cambridge. Mass. 
M24L31F33. BA. 

Allison, Dr. C(harles) Edward. 2017 W. 
4th St.. Williamsport, Pa. M02F06R38. X. 

Allison, Dr. Franklin E(lmer). M.S., Iowa 
State, 15; Ph.D., Rutgers, 17. Senior 
chemist, U. S. Bur. Plant Industry, Wash- 
ington. D. C. M28F30. CGX. 

Allison, Prof. Fred. M.A., Virginia. 21 ; 
Ph.D.. 22. Head Dept. Physics. Alabama 
Polytechnic Inst., Auburn, Ala. M17F26. 

bd! 

Allison, Dr. Ira S(himmin). Ph.D., Min- 
nesota. 24. Prof, geology, Oregon State 
Col., Corvallis. Oreg. (2^10 Harrison St.) 
M 281-3 1. E. 

Allison, Dr. James B(oyd). Ph.D., Iowa 
State, 27. Asst. prof, biochemistry, Rut- 
gers Univ., New Brunswick, N. T. M2QF30. 
CFN. 

Allison, Dr. L(oy) W. M.A., George Pea- 
body, 29; Ph.D., 30. Head Dept. Psychol- 
ogy, State Teachers Col.. Jacksonville, 
\la. (500 S. Pelham Road) M34F34. I, 



Individual Mem hers 



227 



Allison, Dr. Robert G(lenn). M.D., Mary- 
land, 12. Asst. prof, roentgenology, Univ. 
Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. (2T08 
Humboldt Ave. S.) M34. N. 

Allison, Dr. Robert V(errill). M.Sc, Rut- 
gers, 22; Ph.D., 23. Head Dept. Chemistry 
and Soils, Univ. Florida Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Gainesville, Fla. M23F27. CG. 

Allison, Prof. Samuel K(ing). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, jj. Assoc, prof, physics, Univ. Chi- 
cago, Chicago. 111. M24F27. BC. 

Allison, Vernon C(harles). A.M., Clark, 
16. Picatinnv Arsenal, Dover, N. 1. M28. 
EFH. 

Allison, Dr. Wilfred John. M.D., Johns 
Hopkins. 53. Med. dir., Southwestern Life 
Ins. Co., Dallas, Tex. (6Q48 Lakeshore 
Drive) M40. \IF. 

Allmond, D(avid) R(obinson), Jr. B.S., 
Delaware, 22. Asphalt and contractor 
salesman, Standard Oil Co. California, 
Salt Lake City, Utah. (University Club) 
M28. MQ. 

Allner, Fred A. Lexington Bldg., Balti- 
more. Md. M17. MP. 

Allouse, Bashir Elias. Dipl., Higher 
Teachers Training Col., Baghdad. Zool- 
ogv teacher. Central Secondary School, 
Baghdad, Iraq. M.39. FBK. 

Allport, Dr. Floyd H(enry). Ph.D., Har- 
vard, in. Prof, political and social psy- 
chology, Maxwell School, Syracuse Univ., 
Svracuse, X. Y. (485 Buckingham Ave.) 
M25F25. IK. 

Allred, Berten W. M.S., Utah Agricul- 
tural. Chief Range Conservation Div., 
Northern Great Plains Region, U. S. Soil 
Conservation Service, Lincoln. Nebr. (801 
Elmwood Ave.) M40. GEH. 

Allyn, Prof. Harriett M(ay). M.Sc, Chi- 
cago, 10; Ph.D., u. Academic dean and 
prof, anthropology, Mt. Holvoke Col., 
South Hadley, Mass. M28F37. HF. 

Alma, Sister M. (See Sister M. Alma Le 
Due). 

Alma, Sister Mary (See Sister Mary Alma 
McNicholas ). 

Almaden, Dr. Phillip (Joseph). Unix-. Ar- 
kansas School Med., Little Rock. Ark. 
M38R38. NX. 

Almajose, Prof. Crisostomo. B.S., Philip 
pines. Hydraulic engineer. Mapua Inst. 
Tech., Box 14 15, Manila, P. I. M30F30. 
MAB. 

Almand, Dr. Joseph M (orris). M.S., Em- 
ory, 25 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 35. Prof. 
chemistry, YVeslevan Col., Macon, Ga. 
M38. C. 

Almon, Dr. Lois. M.A., Ph.D.. Wiscon- 
sin, 32. State Board Health Lab., Rhine- 
lander. Wis. M40. GNF. 



Almstedt, Prof. Hermann (Benjamin). 
Ph.D., Chicago, on. Prof, and chairman 
Dept. Germanic Languages, Univ. Mis- 
souri, Columbia, Mo. M20F32. LIK. 

Almy, Dr. John E(dwin). M.A., Nebraska, 
ii7 : Ph.D., Berlin, 00. Prof, experimental 
physics, Univ. Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebr. 
(2300 A St.) M01F01. BC. 

Almy, Dr. L(loyd) H(uber). M.S., George 
Washington; Ph.D., Columbia. Res. chem- 
ist, H. J. Heinz Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. (46 
Dinsmore Ave., Crafton) M39. C. 

Alofsin, Dr. Louis M. M18D39. N. 

Alonza, Sister M. (See Sister M. Alonza 

Smith). 

Aloyse, Sister Mary ( See Sister Mary 
Aloyse Ellingson). 

Alpers, Prof. Bernard Jacob. M.D., Har- 
vard, 23 ; Sc.D., Pennsylvania, 30. Prof, 
neurology, Jefferson Med. Col., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. (in N. 49th St.) M39 N. 

Alpher, Dr. Isadore M. M.D., George 
Washington. 2091 18th St. NW., Washing- 
ton, D. C. M40. N. 

Alsberg, Dr. Carl Lucas. M.A., Columbia, 
00; M.D., 00. Dir., Giannini Foundation, 
Univ. California, Berkeley, Calif. M05F08. 
KCO. Vice president for Section on Chem- 
istry (C), 19 13. 

Alschuler, Mrs. Rose H. Staff dir., Win- 
netka Public School Nurseries, Winnetka; 
staff dir. Chicago Teachers Col. Nursery 
and dir. W.P.A. Nursery Schools, Chi- 
cago. 111. (705 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, 
111.) M38. [Q. 

Alsentzer, Dr. Harry A., Jr. Ph.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 26. Assoc, prof, chemistry, Univ. 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. M30F33. C. 

Alt, Dr. Howard L(ang). 73 E. Elm St.. 
Chicago, 111. (?) M33R35. N. 

Altaker, Dr. Robert R. D.V.M., Alabama 
Polytechnic Inst. Veterinarian, 461 1 N. 
Hutchinson St., Philadelphia, Pa. M39. N. 

Altamura, Mario. Sc.M., New York, 34. 
Res. chemist, Socony Vacuum Oil Co., 
Inc., Paulsboro, N. J. (1048 65th St.. 
Brooklyn, N. Y.) M33. C. 

Altenburg, Prof. Edgar. M.A., Columbia, 
12; Ph.D., 16. Asst. prof, biology, Rice 
rnst., Houston, Tex. M31F32. F. 

Alteneder, Miss Louise E(mma). M.A., 
New York, 30; Ph.D., 38. Instr., State 
Teachers Col., Paterson, N. J. (185 E. 
33rd St.) M37. IQ. 

Alter, Bruno E(ric) K(urt), Jr. Student. 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Inst., Brooklyn. 
N. Y. (21 Davies Ave., Diimont, N. J.) 
M39F40. BAC. 

Alter, Dr. Dinsmore. M.S., Pittsburgh, 10; 
Ph.D., California, 16. Dir. Griffith Ob- 
servatory, Los Angeles; res. assoc. statis- 
tics. California Inst. Tech.. Pasadena, 
Calif. M19F23. ABD. 



228 



Directory of Members 



Alter, Prof. Nicholas M. M.D., Hungary, 
14. Dir. labs., Margaret Hague Hosp., 
Jersey City, N. J. (410 Fairmount Ave.) 
M23F33. N. 

Alter, Dr. S(amuel) M(itchell). 676 S. 
Westlake Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. M36- 
R39. N. 

Althausen, Dr. Darrell. Ph.D., Illinois, 32. 
Res. supervisor, Hiram Walker and Sons, 
Inc., Peoria, 111. (Jefferson Hotel) M38- 
F39. c. 

Altiere, Edward S. A. 486 Friendship St., 
Providence, R. I. M37R38. IQ. 

Altmaier, Dr. Carl L(ewis), Jr. M.A., 
Pennsylvania, 26; Ph.D., 30. Asst. prof, 
psychology and sec. admissions, Trinity 
Col., Hartford, Conn. (102 Vernon St.) 
M32F33 IQK. 

Altmann, Dr. Margaret. Dr.Agr., Bonn, 
28; th.D., Cornell, 38. Res. assoc, Dept. 
Psychobiology, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, 
\ T . Y. (508 University Ave.) M39. F. 

Altshuler, Dr. Samuel Simon. M.D., Mich- 
igan, 25. Attending physician, Wm. J. 
Seymour Hosp., Eloise: instr. clinical 
medicine, Wayne Univ. Col. Med.; physi- 
cian out-patients, Harper Hosp.; office, 
313 David Whitnev Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 
M39. N. 

Alvarez, Dr. Walter C(lement~>. M.D., 
Stanford, 05. Prof, medicine, Univ. Min- 
nesota; senior consultant, Div. Med., 
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. M24F27. N. 

Alves, Mrs. Eileen E. M21D35. HFG. 

Alves, Henry L(ewis). Chief chemist, 
U. S. Customs Lab., San Francisco, Calif. 
M13. C. 

Alvey, Dr. C(lifford) H(arry). M32D35. 
FN. 

Alving, Dr. Alf S. M.D., Michigan, 27. 
Asst. prof, medicine, Univ. Chicago, Bil- 
lings Hosp., Chicago, 111. (5701 Black- 
stone Ave.) M37. NC. 

Alvir, Dr. A(ntonio) D(elgado). Box 489, 
Manila, P. I. M34F34R34. EM. 

Alvord, John W(atson). C.E., Wisconsin, 
13. Senior member. Alvord. Burdick and 
Hawson, Chicago, 111. (210 Sterling Ave., 
Winter Park, Fla.) M07F11L31. MKI. 

Alwart, Harold J(ohn). M.S., California 
Inst. Tech., 37. Chief engineer, Mc- 
Cracken Contracting Co., Chicago, 111. 
(3436 N. Leavitt St.) M39. MPB. 

Alway, Frederick J(ames). Ph.D.. Heidel- 
berg, 97; D.Sc, Toronto, 27. Prof, soil 
chemistry and chief Div. Soils. Univ. 
Minnesota, St. Paul. Minn. (1386 Gran- 
tham St.) M08F11. CO. 

Amacker, J(ames) C(leveland). 1017 Col- 
lege St., Columbus, Miss. (?) M32R33. H. 

Amado, Juan J., Jr. E.E., Cornell. Chief 
engineer, Panama Electrica SA, Panama 
City, Panama. M39. MAB. 



Amata, Sister. St. Mary-of-the- Woods 
Col., St. Mary-of-the-Woods, Ind. M34- 
R 3 4- ABC. 

Amberg, Prof. C(harles) R(hodimer). 
M.S., Illinois, 29. Prof, ceramic engineer- 
ing, New York State Col. Ceramics, Al- 
fred, N. Y. M31F32. MCE. 

Amberg, Dr. Emil. M.D., Heidelberg, 94. 
Consulting otologist, Grace Hosp.; ad- 
junct staff, Harper Hosp.; aurist, Detroit 
School Deaf; consulting otolaryngologist, 
North End Clinic, Detroit, Mich. (1244 
Boston Blvd. W.) M07F09. N. 

Amberg, Dr. Samuel. M.D., Heidelberg, 
98. 720 2nd St. SW., Rochester, Minn. 
M24F27. N. 

Amberson, Dr. J(ames) Burns, Jr. M.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 17. Prof, medicine, Co- 
lumbia Univ. Col. Physicians and Sur- 
geons; visiting physician charge tubercu- 
losis service. Bellevue Hosp., New York, 
X. Y. (6 S 1 W. 238th St.) M34F34. N. 

Ambrose, Dr. A(nthony) M(ichael). M.S., 
Fordham, 27; Ph.D., 29. Asst. prof, phar- 
macology, Univ. Louisville School Med., 
Louisville, Ky. (2123 Tvler Lane) M31- 
F33. NpCQ. 

Ambrose, Arthur Warren. Empire Oil and 
Refining Co., Bartlesville. Okla. M28F28- 
R37. EM. 

Ambrosia, Sister Mary (See Sister Mary 
Ambrosia Fitzgerald). 

Ameel, Dr. Donald J(ules). M.A., Michi- 
gan, 30; Sc.D., 33. Instr. zoology. Kan- 
sas State Col., Manhattan, Kans. M39. F. 

Amen, Dr. Elisabeth W(heeler). A.M., 
Vassar, 23; Ph.D., Radcliffe, 25. Prof, and 
head Dept. Psychology and Education, 
Wheaton Col., Norton, Mass. M40. I. 

Amend, William John C(onrad). Ch.E., 
Columbia, 29. Chem. engineer, E. I. du 
Pont de Nemours Co., Buffalo, N. Y. (169 
Euclid Ave., Kenmore, N. Y.) M31. MCN. 

Amer, Harry S. Westinghouse Lamp Co., 
Bloomfield, N. J. M31R37. MBC. 

Amerine, Dr. Maynard A. Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia, 36. Junior enologist, Univ. Cali- 
fornia, Davis, Calif. M38F39. GO. 

Ames, Prof. A(delbert), Jr. A.M., Dart- 
mouth, 21. Prof, research physiological 
optics. Dartmouth Col., Hanover, N. H. 
M34F34. BIN. 

Ames, Dr. Adeline. A.M., Nebraska. 04; 
Ph.D., Cornell, 13. Prof, biology, Sweet 
Briar Col., Sweet Briar, Va. M24F32. G. 

Ames, Charles Lesley. A.B., Harvard, 06; 
LL.B., St. Paul College Law, 12. Treas., 
West Publishing Co.; managing dir. 
Amer. Law Inst., St. Paul, Minn. M34. 
EH. 

Ames, Dr. Edward S(cribner). M.A., 
Drake, 91 ; Ph.D., Chicago, 95. Dean Dis- 
ciples Divinity House, Univ. Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. M07F10. IK. 



Individual Members 



229 



Ames, Edward W(esley). A.M., Columbia. 
Geologist, Box 921, Denver, Colo. M35. 
EM. 

Ames, Prof. Marion A. Elmira Col., EI- 
mira, X. V. M34F34R34. CN. 

Ames, Prof. Oakes. A.M., Harvard, 99 ; 
D.Sc. Washington Univ., 38. Res. prof. 
botany and dir. Botanical Mus., Harvard 
Univ.,' Cambridge, Mass. (North Easton, 
Mass.) M01F05. G. 

Amick, Chester A(lbert). A.M., Indiana, 
21. 121 E. Maple St., Bound Brook, N. J. 
M34F34. c. 

Amick, Prof. H(arold) C(lyde). M.A., 
North Carolina, 23. Univ. Tennessee, 
Knoxville. Tenn. M31F33. EHM. 

Amill, Juan Angel. Plantation owner, La 
Ballena. Guanica, P. R. (Box 367, Yauco, 
P. R.) M40. 

Amirikian, Arsham. 2305 Tunlaw Road 
\'\V.. Washington. D. C. M32R32. MLA. 

Ammann, Othmar H(erman). 272 Rock- 
away Ave.. Boonton, N. J. M20F32R39. M. 

Ammerman, Clinton P. B.S., Brooklyn 
Polytechnic Inst. Chemist. Chas. Pfizer 
and Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. M3S. CGM. 

Ammons, Miss Nellie (Perrel). M.A., 
West Virginia, 23; Ph.D., Pittsburgh, 37. 
Asst. prof, botany, West Virginia Univ., 
Morgantown, W. Va. (229 Glendon Ave.) 
M29F38. G. 

Amneus, Thomas (Axel). 526 59th St., 
Oakland, Calif. M38R38. MAB. 

Amon, Fred H(ughes). M.S., Alleghany, 
17. Technical dir., Godfrey L. Cabot. Inc., 
Boston, Mass. (13 Maple Road, Weston, 
Mass.) M39. CPM. 

Amoss, Dr. Harold L(indsay). M.S., Ken- 
tucky, 07; M.D., Harvard, 11; Dr.P.H., 
12; Sc.D., George Washington, 22. Con- 
sultant medicine, Grasslands Hosp.. East 
View; White Plains Hosp., White Plains; 
United Hosp., Port Chester, N. Y.; Green- 
wich Hosp.. Greenwich, Conn. (21 Field 
Point Road, Greenwich, Conn.) M24F27. N. 

Amoss, Harry E. D.Paed., Toronto, 16. 
Dir. professional training, Dept. Educa- 
tion, Toronto, Ont., Canada. M38. Q. 

Amsden, Dr. George S(amuel). M.D., 
Harvard, 06. Acworth, N. H. M28F33. 
IHQ. 

Amstutz, N(oah) S. Res. engineer and 
patent attorney, Chicago Road, Val- 
paraiso, Ind. M08. BM. 

Amundsen, Prof. Lawrence H(ardin). 
Ph.D., Florida, 35. Asst. prof, chemistry, 
Univ. Connecticut, Storrs, Conn. M38. C. 

Anacletus, Sister M. Registrar, St. Mary 
of the Springs Col., Columbus, Ohio. M39. 
FG. 



Anastasi, Prof. Anne (Mrs. J. P. Foley, 
Jr.). Ph.D., Columbia, 30. Asst. prof, psy- 
chology, Queens Col., Flushing, N. Y. 
M32F33. I. 

Anastasia, Sister (See Sister Anastasia 
Maria). 

Anderegg, Dr. Frederick O(sband). A.M., 
Harvard, 12; Ph.D.. 15. Consulting spe- 
cialist building materials, Corning Fiber- 
glas Corp., Newark, Ohio. M20F25. CB. 

Anderegg, Gustavus A(dolphus). M.A., 
Harvard, 02. Lockbourne, Ohio. M18F32. 
MBH. 

Andersen, Miss Alice M. M.A., Nebraska, 
21. Seed Lab., U. S. Bur. Plant Industry, 
Washington, D. C. M23F31. G. 
Andersen, Dr. Axel G(unerius) H(oijord). 
M.S., Columbia, 32; Ph.D., 36. Res. metal- 
lurgist. Phelps Dodge Corp., Long Island 
City, N. Y. (-»' Remsen St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y.) M40. MBC. 

Andersen, C(hristian) T(heodore). M.A., 
Michigan, 26. Asst. dir. instructional re- 
search, Detroit Public Schools; asst. prof, 
education, Wayne Univ., Detroit, Mich. 
(1354 Broadway) M40. QI. 

Andersen, Prof. Emma N(athalia). Ph.D.. 
Chicago. 27. Dept. Botany, Univ. Ne- 
braska, Lincoln, Nebr. M20F21. G. 

Andersen, Dr. Hans P. M.S., Oklahoma 
A. and M., 29; Ph.D., Iowa, 31. Chemist, 
Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. M39. C. 

Anderson, A(aron) J. Dir. sales, Werner 
G. Smith Co., New Orleans, La. (101 
Beverly Drive) M39. CKP. 

Anderson, Alexander. Box 267, Fullerton, 
Calif. M36R37. MEB. 

Anderson, Dr. Alexander P(ierce). M.S., 
Minnesota, 95; Ph.D., Munich, 97. Private 
laboratory, Red Wing, Minn. M96F99. G. 

Anderson, Alfred C(onrad). B.S., North 
Dakota State, 12. Assoc, soil science, U. S. 
Bur. Plant Industry, Washington, D. C. 
M27F33. O. 

Anderson, Dr. Alfred L(eonard). M.S., 
Idaho, 23; Ph.D., Chicago, 31. Asst. prof, 
geology, Cornell Univ.; asst. geologist, 
U. S. Geological Survev, Ithaca, N. Y. 

M38. E. 

Anderson, Prof. Andrew W(ork). Macal- 
ester Col., St. Paul, Minn. M10R34. IQ. 

Anderson, Prof. Arthur. M.Sc, Nebraska, 
23; Ph.D., Ohio State, 32. State repre- 
sentative, U. S. Bur. Agric. Economics; 
assoc. agronomist, Univ. Nebraska Agric. 
Exp. Sta.. Lincoln, Nebr. (1140 S. 52nd 
St.) M22F24. OK. 

Anderson, Dr. Arthur Forrest. M.D., Tufts, 
16. 122 E. 76th St., New York, N. Y. M39. N. 

Anderson, Dr. Arthur (von) K(rogh). 
M.S., Minnesota, 15; Ph.D., 23. Prof, 
phvsiological chemistry, Pennsylvania 
State Col., State College, Pa. (123 S. 
Sparks St.) M22F32. CNO. 



230 



Directory of Members 



Anderson, Dr. Bertil G(ottfrid). M.S.. 
Iowa. 29 ; Ph.D., 30. Asst. prof, biology, 
Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland; mem- 
ber instructional staff, Franz Theodore 
Stone Lab.. Ohio State Univ., Put-in-Bav, 
( Ihio. M32F33. FX. 

Anderson, C. Vivian, ijii Union Trust 
BIdg.. Cincinnati, Ohio. M24R39. 

Anderson, Carl B(ernard). S.B., Washing- 
ton, 12. District geologist. Gulf Refining 
Co., Mattoon. III. ( 1 1 20 Wabash Ave.) 
M34F.U. EMC 

Anderson. Carl D(avid). Ph.D., California 
Inst. Tech., 30. Prof, physics. California 
Inst. Tech., Pasadena, Calif. M39F40. 
BDC. 

Anderson, C(arl) George. M.S., Minne- 
sota, 28. Plant quarantine inspector, U. S. 
Bur. Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 
Brownsville, Tex. M25. G. 

Anderson, Prof. C(arl) L(eonard). M.S.. 
Dr.P.H., Michigan. Assoc, prof, physiol- 
ogy and public health. Utah State Agric. 
Col., Logan. Utah. M40. NQ. 

Anderson, Miss Carrolle E. M.S.. Massa- 
chusetts State. 35. Instr. biologv, Adelphi 
Col., Garden City, X. V. M39. GF. 

Anderson, Clifford N. 463 West St., New 
York, X. Y. M39R39. DM. 

Anderson, Dr. C(lyde) Max(well). 160 
Manhattan Ave., Hermdsa Beach, Calif. 
M.38R38. X. 

Anderson, Dr. David Allen. 2801 Park 
Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. M12F21R33. 1Q. 

Anderson, Dean C. Dept. Agronomy and 
Plant Genetics, Univ. Farm, St. Paul, 
Minn. M36R37. OG. 

Anderson, Don S. Dept. Agric. Eco- 
nomics. Unix. Wisconsin Col. Agric, 
Madison, Wis. M33R34-.KO. 

Anderson, Donald B(enton). M.A.. Ohio 
State, 22; Ph.D., 25. Prof, botany. North 
Carolina State Col., Raleigh, X. Car. M23- 
F31. G. 

Anderson, Miss Dorothy M(inerva). 
M.Sc, Michigan State, 33. Instr. biologi- 
cal sciences, Hood Col., Frederick, Md. 
M40. F. 

Anderson, Dr. Douglas (Smith). M.A., 
Tulane, 92; LL.D., 37; D.Sc, Washing- 
ton and Lee, 33. Dean emeritus, Tulane 
Univ. Col. Engng., New Orleans, La. 
(Mandeville. La.) M00F10. MBA. 

Anderson, Edgar (Shannon). M.S., Har- 
vard, 20: D.Sc. 22. Prof, botany, Wash- 
ington Univ.; geneticist, Missouri Botani- 
cal Garden, St. Louis, Mo. M22F31. G. 

Anderson, Edmund G(ustave) E(ric). 
A.M., Clark, 22. Chemist, C. V. Chapin 
Hosp., Providence, R. I. M39. CN. 

Anderson, Edward. Univ. Tulsa, Tulsa, 
Okla. M30F33R33. M. 



Anderson, Edwin J(oseph Arthur). M.S., 
Cornell, 25. Asst. prof, entomology, Penn- 
sylvania State Col., State College, Pa. 
M29F39. F. 

Anderson, Miss Elda E. M.A., Wisconsin. 
24. Asst. prof, physics, Milwaukee-Downer 
Col., Milwaukee, "Wis. M34F40. BCD. 

Anderson, Prof. Ernest. M.S.. Texas. 04: 
Ph.D.. Chicago, 09. Prof, chemistry and 
head Dept., Univ. Arizona, Tucson. Ariz. 
M21F25. C. 

Anderson, Dr. Ernest Gustaf. Ph.D., Cor- 
nell, 20. Div. Biology, California Inst. 
Tech., Pasadena, Calif. M10F21. FG. 

Anderson, Miss Esther S(anfreida). Box 
1 182, Station A, Lincoln, Nebr. M23R32. E. 

Anderson, Evald. B.S., California. 13. 
Technical dir.. Western Precipitation 
Corp., Los Angeles, Calif. (1841 AVarw'ick 
Road. San Marino, Calif. I M23F25. CBM. 

Anderson, F. Arthur. Burdick Corp., Mil- 
ton, Wis. M22R32. BMP. 

Anderson, Dr. Frank L. M24D35. 

Anderson, Frank M(arion). 58 Hillcrest 
Road, Berkeley, Calif. M13F15R33. E. 

Anderson, Fred T. A. Box mi, Lancaster, 
Calif. M33R34. CAB. 

Anderson, Dr. Frederick. Inverness, Calif. 
M38R39. EH I. 

Anderson, Dr. Gaylord W(est). M.D., 
Harvard, 28. Prof, and head Dept. Pre- 
ventive Med. and Public Health. Univ. 
Minnesota. Minneapolis, Minn. ( 1621 E. 
River Road) M40. X. 

Anderson, Dr. George H(arold). A.M.. 
Stanford, 20: Ph.D.. California Inst. Tech.. 
53. Dir. industrial research, Texas Power 
and Light Co.. Dallas. Tex. M40. EKC. 

Andersen, Dr. George M(cCullough). 831 
Park Ave.. Baltimore. Md. M32R38. X. 

Anderson, Dr. Gustavus Edwin. 645 La- 
homa Ave., Norman, Okla. M30R32. EFG. 

Anderson, H. Milton. 205 Second St. S.. 
Virginia. Minn. M31R32. CB. 

Anderson, Prof. Harold H(omer). Ph.D., 
Geneva, 20. Asst. prof, psvchologv, Uniw 
Illinois, Urbana, 111. (^03 W. Illinois St.) 

M30F33. IQ. 

Anderson, Prof. Harold V(ictor). Lehigh 
Univ., Bethlehem. Pa. M34F34R36. C. 

Anderson, Dr. H(arry) B(ertram). M.D..- 
C.M., London. Consulting physician and 
med. referee. Imperial Life Assur. Co., 
Toronto. Ont., Canada. M38. GX. 

Anderson, Dr. H(arry) W(arren). Ph.D.. 

Illinois, 17. Prof, horticultural pathology, 
Univ. Illinois Agric. Col.; chief horticul- 
tural pathologv, Illinois Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Urbana, 111. M11F13. GO. 

Anderson, Howard T. M.A., California, 
35. Instr. earth sciences, Los Angeles City 
Col.. Los Angeles, Calif. M35. EF. 



Individual Members 



231 



Anderson, J. Carver. Univ. Chicago, Chi- 
cago, 111. M32R33. IFB. 

Anderson, Prof. J(acob) P(eter). M.S., 
Ii>ua State. 16. Box 5 ;o. Juneau, Alaska. 
M [4F25. GO. 

Anderson, Dr. John Arlington. M.Sc, 
Wisconsin. 22; Ph.D., 20. Assoc, prof. 
bacteriology, Rutgers Univ., New Bruns- 
wick, X. J. M29F33. ex. 

Anderson, Prof. John A(ugust). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 07. Physicist, Mt. Wilson 
Observatory, Carnegie Inst. Washington 
Pasadena, Calif. M18F18. DB. 

Anderson, Prof. John E(dward). A.M., 
Harvard, 15; Ph.D., 17. Prof, psychology 
and dir. Inst. Child Welfare, Univ. Minne- 
sota, Minneapolis, Minn. M24F25. IQ. 
Secretary of Section on Psychology (I), 
rQjg-jj ; vice president, 1934. 

Anderson, Dr. John F. M.D., Virginia, 95. 
Dir. Biol. Lab., New Brunswick, X. J.; 
vice pres. and member board directors, 
E. R. Squibb and Sons, X T e\v York, X. Y. 
( 195 College Ave., Xew Brunswick, X. J.) 
M07F08. X. 

Anderson, Dr. Judson L(owell). Ph.D.. 
Johns Hopkins, 28. International Petro- 
leum Co.. Via Talara, Xegritos, Peru, 
S. A. (2104 Rosedale St., Baltimore, Md.) 
(M.3oR32)M37. EBC. 

Anderson, Miss Laura J(ustine). M.S., 
Tulane, 35. Teacher biology, Sophie B. 
Wright High School, New Orleans, La. 
I8221 Spruce St.) M38. FGQ. 

Anderson, Dr. Leroy. 294 Saratoga Ave., 
San Jose, Calif. M35F35R38. O. 

Anderson, Dr. Lewis E(dward). A.M., 
Duke; Ph.D., Pennsylvania. Instr. botany, 
Duke Univ.. Durham, X. Car. (2016 Mvr- 
tle Drive) M38F39. G. 

Anderson, Prof. Marlowe George. M.A.. 
Northwestern, 30. Asst. prof, biology, New 
Mexico State Col., State College, X. Mex. 
M31. F. 

Anderson, Merton B. M.S.. Minnesota. 
35. Instr., Howard Univ. Col. Med., Wash- 
ington, D. C. M38. XF. 

Anderson, Meta L. (See Meta Anderson 

Post). 

Anderson, Dr. M(yron) S(allee). M.S.. 
Iowa State, 16; Ph.D., George Washing- 
ton. 22. Senior chemist, U. S. Bur. Plant 
Industry. Washington, D. C. (1433 Man- 
chester Pane XW.) M25F33. CO. 

Anderson, Prof. Paul Russell. Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia. 33. Prof, philosophy, Lake Erie 
Col.. Painesville, Ohio. M38. QLK. 

Anderson, Dr. R(oss) P(eter). Ph.D., 
Cornell, 12. Sec. Div. Refining, Amer. Pe- 
troleum lust., Xew York, N. Y. M18F33. 
CM. 

Anderson, Prof. Rudolph J(ohn). Ph.D.. 
Cornell, hi. Prof, chemistry, Yale Univ., 
Xew Haven, Conn. M18F21. CGO. 



Anderson, Dr. R(udolph) M(artin). 
Ph.D., Iowa, 06. Chief Div. Biology, Nat. 
Mus. Canada; consulting zoologist, Lands. 
Parks and Forests Branch, Dept. Mines 
and Resources. Ottawa, Out.. Canada. (58 
Government Driveway) M22F27. F. 

Anderson, Dr. Russell H(oward). M.A.. 
Illinois. 25; Ph.D.. 29. Curator agric. tex- 
tiles and forestry, Mus. Science and In- 
dustry. Chicago. 111. M40P40. LOQ. 

Anderson, Prof. Russell L(loyd). M.S.. 
Pittsburgh, 30; Ph.D., 33. Prof, biology 
and chairman Div. Mathematics and 
Sciences, Tohnson C. Smith Univ., Char- 
lotte, N. Car. M31. FNG. 

Anderson, Dr. Ruth. Univ. California Los 
\ngeles, Los Angeles. Calif. M34F34R35. 
FX. 

Anderson, Dr. Thomas F(oxen). Ph.D., 
California Inst. Tech. Instr., Dept. Chem- 
istrv. Univ. Wisconsin. Madison, Wis. 
M39. CBF. 

Anderson, Prof. W(alter) S(ewell). Univ. 
Kentucky Agric. Exp. Sta.. Lexington, 
Ky. M18F23R34. F. 

Anderson. William. M20D37. CGM. 

Anderson, Prof. William. A.M., Harvard, 
14; Ph.D., 17. Prof, and chairman Politi- 
cal Science, Univ. Minnesota. Minneapo- 
lis. Minn. (111 Melbourne Ave. SE.) 
M31F36. K. 

Anderson, William Arthur, Jr. Dept. Bot- 
anv, Unix. Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. M27- 
F33R.U. G. 

Anderson, Prof. W(illiam) B(allantyne). 
Ph.D., Wisconsin, 06. Prof, physics, Ore- 
gon State Col.. Corvallis, Oreg. (310 N. 
26th St.) M17F25. BDE. 

Anderson, W(illiam) E(lijah). Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania, 13. Prof. mathematics, 
Miami Univ., Oxford. Ohio. (112 E. Wal- 
nut St.) M35F35. A. 

Anderson, Dr. Winslow S(amuel). M.S.. 
Minnesota. 23; LL.D., Florida Southern, 
33. Dean and prof, chemistrv, Rollins 
Col., Winter Park, Fla. M34F3V CQ. 

Andervont, Dr. Howard B(ancroft). Sc.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 26. Senior biologist, Nat. 
Cancer Inst., U. S. Public Health Service, 
Bethesda, Mtl. (11 W. Woodbine St.. 
Chevy Chase, Md.) M25F33. X. 

Andes, Dr. Ralph V. Ph.D., Iowa State, 
35. Chemist. Res. Dept.. Westvaco Chlo- 
rine Products Co.. South Charleston, W. 
Va. (334 Montrose Drive) M36. CA. 

Andrade, Dr. Manuel J(ose). Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia, 20. Dept. Anthropology, Univ. 
Chicago, Chicago, 111. M34. HL. 

Andreau, Roland L. 4227 Van Nuvs Blvd., 
Sherman Oaks, Calif. M33. CBX.' 

Andrew, Barbara Louise. 4906 N. Ganten- 
bein Ave.. Portland. Oreg. M32R34. G. 



232 



Directory of Members 



Andrew, Dr. Dorothy M. Pennsylvania 
Col. Women, Pittsburgh, Pa. M39R39. 
INF. 

Andrew, Seymour L(ansing). A.B., Har- 
vard, to. Chief statistician, Amer. Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co., New York, 
N. Y. M32F40. K. 

Andrews, Champe S. M29D36. QK. 

Andrews, David A(rthur). M.A., Missouri, 
28. Assoc, geologist, U. S. Geol. Survey, 
Washington, D. C. (5412 Allan Road) 
M31F33. E. 

Andrews, Prof. Donald H. Tohns Hopkins 
Univ., Baltimore, Md. M27F32R35. CB. 

Andrews, E. T. Box 601, Mt. Union, Pa. 
M34R35. MAB. 

Andrews, Prof. Ethan Allen. Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 87. Prof, emeritus zoology, Johns 
Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, Md. (107 E. 
Lake Ave.) M0SF09. F. 

Andrews, (Everett) Philip. M.A., Cali- 
fornia, 33. Chief field geologist, Socony 
Vacuum Oil Co., Caracas. Venezuela, S. A. 
M40. EMC. 

Andrews, Prof. Frank M(arion). A.M., 
Indiana, 95 ; Ph.D., Leipzig, 02. Prof, 
plant physiology. Indiana Univ.. Bloom- 
ington, Ind. (901 E. 10th St.) M02F03. E. 

Andrews, George Reid. A.B., Columbia, 
14; B.D., Union Theological, 17. Mt. 
Gilead, N. Car. M38F40. KIF. 

Andrews, Mrs. George Reid (Mrs. Ruth 
Hopper). Pinefields, Mt. Gilead, N. Car. 
M 3 bR 3 9. KIQ. 

Andrews, Gerald Smedley. B.Sc.F., To- 
ronto, 30. Air survey engineer charge Air 
Survey Section, British Columbia Forest 
Service, Victoria, B.C., Canada. M38. 
MEO. 

Andrews, Dr. Harry -L. Ph.D., Illinois. 
Chairman Div. Biology and Health, City 
College (West Side), Chicago, 111. (25 E. 
Delaware Place) (M37R38)M 4 o. FG. 

Andrews, Horace. C.E., Yale, 72. 3634 
Bay View Road, Coconut Grove, Fla. 
M28F31. MDE. 

Andrews, Dr. Howard L. 44 Turner Ave., 
Riverside, R. I. M34F34R36. B. 

Andrews, John S. 1729 Q St. NW., Wash- 
ington, D. C. M35F35R35. F. 

Andrews, John Watkins. 42 W. 93rd St., 
New York, N. Y. M31R34. BOC. 

Andrews, Dr. J(ohn) W(endell). M34F34- 
D36. C. 

Andrews, Dr. Justin (Meredith). Sc.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 26. Dir. Div. Malaria and 
Hookworm Service, Georgia Dept. Public 
Health, Atlanta, Ga. M25F32. FN. 

Andrews, Dr. Launcelot W. 32 Glen St., 
YVilliamstown, Mass. M07F91R32. BC. 



Andrews, Dr. Lemar M. Warsaw, N. Y. 
M33R34. ND 

Andrews, Loring B. 6 Weldon Road, 
Newton, Mass. M27F33R37. DA. 

Andrews, Dr. Mallory Sinclair. M.D., Vir- 
ginia, 25. Physician, 203 Medical Arts 
BIdg., Norfolk, Va. (825 Westover Ave.) 
M39. NIP. 

Andrews, Mary R(uggles). M25F31D34. 
BC. 

Andrews, Dr. Roy Chapman. M.A., Co- 
lumbia, 13; Sc.D., Brown, 26, Beloit, 29. 
Dir., Amer. Mus. Natural History, New 
York, N. Y. M10F32. F. 

Andrews, Roy C(hester). Box 57, Route 
2, Eugene. Oreg. M39R39. CG. 

Andrews, Dr. T(homas) G(ayleon). M.A., 
Vanderbilt, 27; Ph.D., Minnesota, 32. 
Assoc, prof, geology, Univ. Alabama; asst. 
geologist, U. S. Geol. Survev, University, 
Ala. M38. EMH. 

Andronescu, Dr. Demetrius Ion. Str. 
Washington 16-A, Parcul Boneparte, Buc- 
arest, Roumania. M18F27R32. G. 

Andrus, Lucius B. Indianapolis Athletic 
Club, Indianapolis, Ind. M17F28R37. M. 

Andrus, Dr. William DeWitt. New York 
Hosp., New York, N. Y. M28F33R35- N. 

Anduze, Paul. Division de Malariologia, 
Apartado Postal 1509, Caracas, Venezuela, 

S. A. M38R3S. N. 

Angela, Sister Helen (See Sister Helen 
Angela Dorety). 

Angelo, Dr. Ernest. M.S., Cornell, 24; 
Ph.D., Minnesota, 34. Agent, U. S. Bur. 
Plant Industrv, Bogalusa, La. M40F40. 
OG. 

Angerer, Dr. C(lifford) A(ckermann). 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania. 37. Instr. physiol- 
ogy, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. 
(M38R38)M 4 o. F. 

Angier, James F(ranklin). B.S., George 
Washington, 33. Asst. physicist, Civil 
Aeronautics Authority, Washington, D. C. 
(239 Maple Ave., Takoma Park, Md.) 
M36F40. BFG. 

Angier, Prof. Roswell P(arker). A.M., 
Harvard, 01; Ph.D., 03; A.M., Yale, 17. 
Prof, psychology and chairman Dept.; 
dir. lab. and assoc. dean Graduate School, 
Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn. (140 
Edgehill Road) M06F11. I. 

Angle, Dr. Edward John. M13F15D40. 
FN. 

Angle, William Parker. 3j|o8 Floyd Ave., 
Richmond, Va. M37R37- MAB. 

Angrist, Dr. Alfred. M.D., Long Island 
Med. Col., 26. Assoc, prof., New York 
Med. Col., New York; pathologist and dir. 
labs., Queens Gen. Hosp., Jamaica. Jew- 
ish Memorial Hosp., New York, and Phy- 
sicians Hosp., Jackson Heights. N. Y. 
(164-25 Grand Central Parkwav, Tamaica. 
N. Y.) M35. N„ 



Individual Members 



233 



Angulo y Gonzalez, Dr. A(rmando) 
W(andegercito). A.M., Kansas, 24; Ph.D., 
26. Wistar Inst., Philadelphia, Pa. M29- 
F31. FN. 

Annand, Dr. P(ercy) N(icol). M.A., 
Stanford, 22; Ph.D., 28. Asst. chief, U. S. 
Bur. Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 
Washington, D. C. (2343 N. Vermont St., 
Arlington, Va.) M2SF33. OFG. 

Anneberg, Dr. (Adrian) Reas. M.D., Iowa, 
32. Surgeon, Carroll, Iowa. (13 10 Simon 
Ave.) M40. NI. 

Annina, Sister. St. Peter High School, 
Keokuk, Iowa. M37R37. A. 

Annis, Dr. Albert D(avid). M.A., Iowa, 
31; Ph.D., 39. Res. asst., Dept. Psychol- 
ogy, Univ. Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. M40. 
IK. 

Ann : s, Leonard. 32 Hanover St., Lynn, 
Mass. (?) M29R32. CEB. 

Ansbacher, Dr. H(einz) L. Ph.D., Colum- 
bia, 37. Editor, Abstract References Psy- 
chological Index, 25 Claremont Ave., New 
York, N. Y. M38. IHQ. 

Ansbacher, Mrs. H(e'nz) L. (Dr. Rowena 
Ripin). 25 Claremont Ave., New York, 
N. Y. M33F33R39. I. 

Ansbacher, Dr. S(tefan). M.S., Geneva, 
29; D.Sc, 33. Assoc. Div. Exp. Med., 
Squibb Inst. Med. Res.. New Brunswick, 
X. J. M39. NC. 

Anslow, Prof. Gladys A(melia). A.M., 
Smith, 17; Ph.D., Yale, 24. Prof, physics, 
Smith Col., Northampton, Mass. (72 Dry- 
ads Green) M21F31. B. 

Anson, Dr. Mortimer L. Ph.D., Cam- 
bridge, 26. Assoc, Rockefeller Inst. Med. 
Res., Princeton, N. J. M39. NCF. 

Anspach, Dr. Charles L(eroy). M.A.. Ash- 
land, 20; M.A., Michigan, 23; Ph.D., 30. 
Pres., Central State Teachers Col., Mt. 
Pleasant, Mich. (409 S. College St.) M25. Q. 

Ant, Dr. Morris. 277 Eastern Parkway, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. M36R37. N. 

Antevs, Dr. Ernst (Valdemar). Ph.D., 
Stockholm, 17. Res. assoc, Carnegie Inst. 
Washington, Globe, Ariz. (The Corral) 

M27F27. E. 

Anthes, Dr. John A(llen). Ph.D.. Minne- 
sota. 39. Res. chemist. Union Oil Co. 
California. Wilmington, Calif. (312-B Car- 
roll Park East, Long B ach, Calif.) M40. C. 

Anthony, Miss Elizabeth S(tevens). Box 
23, Touisset, Mass. M34R34. FG. 

Anthonv, James A. 120 W. 228th St., New 
York, N. Y. M37R37- MAB. 

Anthonv, Sister M. (See Sister M. An- 
thony Payne). 

Anthon-', Dr. M("ron) V(ern~n>. M.S., 
Ohio State. 32: Ph.D.. 35. Plant mgr., 
Stauffer Chem. Co., Chauncev. N. Y. (12 
Glenwolde Park, Tarrvtown, N. Y.) M31- 
F40. FO. 



Anthony, Dr. Roy D(avid). M.S. A., Cor- 
nell, 13; Ph.D., 20. Res. prof, horticulture, 
Pennsylvania State Col., State College, 
Pa. (125 Hillcrest Ave.) M17F24. OG. 

Antopol, Dr. William. M.D., Long Island 
Col. Hosp., 27. Pathologist and dir. labs., 
Newark Beth Israel Hosp., Newark, N. J. 
(2 Custer Ave.) M39. NC. 

Antrobus, Miss Edna M. M.S., Cornell, 39- 
Educational dir. and science instr., West 
Jersey Homeopathic Hosp. School Nurs- 
ing, Camden, N. J. M35- N. 

Apfel, Dr. Earl T(aylor). M.S., Iowa, 25; 
Ph.D., 26. Prof, geology, Syracuse Univ., 
Syracuse, N. Y. (943 Westmoreland Ave.) 
M29F31. E. 

Apfelbaum, P(ercy) Max. M.A., Colum- 
bia, 27; Ph.D., 33- Asst. prof., Dept. 
Chemistry, The City Col., New York, 
X. Y. M34F34. CBN. 

Apgar, Dr. Charles S(chierer), Jr. M.S.. 
Pittsburgh. 27: Ph.D., 30. Instr. anatomy, 
Cornell Univ. Med. Col., New York; mgr. 
Cornell Anatomy Farm, Mohegan Lake, 
N. Y. (Mohegan Lake, N. Y.) M34F34. 
FNK. 

Aplington, Dr. H(enrv) W(ebster), Jr. 
A.M., Columbia; Ph.D., Cornell. Instr. 
biology, Colby Col., Waterville, Maine. 
M40. F. 

Aponte, Jose I(srael). B.S., Ferris Inst., 
37. Box 828, Santa Isabel, P. R. M39. 
CNp. 

App, Dr. Frank. Ph.D., Cornell, 19. Dir. 
res., Deerfield Packing Corp.. Bridgeton. 
N. J.; consultant and technical adviser, 
Gen. Foods. New York, N. Y. (Bridge- 
ton, N. J.) M34F34. O. 

Appel, Dr. Fred(erick) W(hipple). St. 

Tohn's Col., Annapolis, Md. M28F33R36. 
FNO. 

Apperly, Prof. Frank L(ongstaff). M.A., 
Oxford, 12; M.D., 20; M.D., Melbourne, 
.23; D.Sc, 24. Prof, pathology, Med. Col. 
Virginia, Richmond, Va. M37F38. N. 

Apperman, Dr. Isaac. 25 W. 81st St., New 
York, N. Y. M33R34- NKC. 

Apperson, Miss Sarah V(irginia). M.A., 
Nebraska, 23; Ph.D., 40. 2420 Sheridan 
Blvd., Lincoln, Nebr. M40. IQ. 

Apple, Joseph H(enry). Hood Col., Fred- 
erick, Md. M02R34. IQ. 

Applebaum, Dr. Edmund. D.D.S., New 
York Col. Dentistry. 22. Asst. prof, his- 
tology. Columbia Univ. School Dental and 
Oral 'Surgery, New York, N. Y. M36F38. 
Nd. 

Applebaum. S(amnel) B(ernard). 285 
Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. M39- 
R39. CMX. 

Applebaum, Mrs. Stella B. 54 Riverside 

Drive, New York, N Y. M39R39. N. 



234 



Directory of Members 



Applebaum, William. B.A., Minnesota. 
Dir. market res., Economy Grocery Stores 
Corp., Boston, Mass. (8 Choate Road, 
Belmont, Mass.) M40. EK. 

Appleby, Dr. John I. M.A., Missouri, iS; 
M.D., Minnesota, 20. 105^ E. Main St., 
Bellevue, Ohio. M40. N. 

Applegate, Miss Amy (Ruth Reverra). 
M.S.. Chicago, 28. Teacher physiology, 
Bloom Township High School, Chicago 
Heights, 111. (14.28 Schilling Ave.) M29. G. 

Appleman, Dr. Charles O(rville). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 10. Dean graduate school and 
prof, botany and plant physiology, Univ. 
Maryland, College Park, Md. M10F16. 
GCO. 

Appleton, Prof. John B(argate). Dept. 
Geography, Scripps Col., Ciaremont Col- 
leges, Claremont, Calif. M27F31R34. EK. 

Appleton, Dr. J(oseph) L(uke) T(eas- 
dale). D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 14; Sc.D., 
Hamilton, 35. Prof, bacteriopathology, 
Univ. Pennsylvania School Dentistry, 
Philadelphia, Pa. M22F33. Nd. 

Appleton, Dr. L(illa) Estelle. M13F15D — . 
HIQ. 

Appleton, Marc. 708 W. 102nd St., New 
York, X. Y. M36R37- QG. 

Appuhn, William E(rnest) F(red). M.A.. 
Columbia, ?o. 84 hi 86th St., Wood Haven. 
\. V. M2iF 3 3- M. 

Aquinas, Sister Mary (See Sister Mary 
Aquinas Flood). 

Aravosis, John Sperds. B.S., Armour Inst. 
Ssi X. Parkside Ave.. Chicago, 111. M38. 
M. 

Araya, Samuel Pavez. Casilla 3624, Santi- 
ago, Chile, S. A. M35R35. 

Arburua, Dr. Joseph M. 26 Fell St., San 
Francisco, Calif. M31R34. X. 

Arcaya, Dr. Pedro M. 2150 Wyoming Ave. 
WW, Washington, D. C. M28R36. BEH. 

Arceneaux, Dr. George. Ph.D., Cornell, 
39. Agronomist, U. S. Dept. Agric. 
Houma, La. M35F35. 0. 

Archbald, Sister Mary Aquinas (Sara T. 
Archbald). Rosemont Col.. Rosemont, Pa. 
M22R38. CQ. 

Archer, Dr. Allan F(rost). M.A., Michi- 
gan, 33 ; Ph.D., 36. Ecologist and dir. res.. 
State Dept. Conservation, Montgomery. 
Ala.; honorary curator mollusca, Alabama 
Mus. Xatural Historv, University, Ala. 
M34. F. 

Archer, L(uther) B(unyan). M.S., E.E.. 
Illinois. 1206 W. Charles St., Champaign, 
111. M36. MKQ. 

Archer, Dr. Vincent W(illiam). M.D.. 
Virginia, 23. Prof, roentgenology, Univ. 
Virginia; roentgenologist, Univ. Virginia 
llusp. and Martha Jefferson Hosp.. Char- 
lottesville, Va. M34F34. X. 



Archer, Dr. W. Harry. 4601 Bayard St., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. M35R39. X. 

Archer, Dr. W(illiam) Andrew. London 
Hall, 13th and M Sts. NW„ Washington, 
I). C. (M2 S R32)M 3 8R3S. G. 

Archibald, Dr. Edgar Spinney. LL.D., 
Manitoba, 28; D.Sc, Acadia, 30. Dir. Exp. 
Farms, Central Exp. Farm, Dominion 
Dept. Agric, Ottawa, Ont., Canada. M39- 
F40. OGM. 

Archibald, Prof. John G(eddie). M.Sc, 

Massachusetts State, 24. Res. prof, animal 
husbandry, Massachusetts State Col., Am- 
herst, Mass. (164 Montague Road, Xorth 
Amherst, Mass.) M40F40. OC. 

Archibald, Prof. R(aymond) C(lare). 
A.M., Harvard, 97; Ph.D., Strassburg, 00; 
Hon. D., Padua, 22; LL.D., Mt. Allison, 
23. Prof, mathematics, Brown Univ.. 
Providence, R. I. M04F06. AL. Secretary of 
Section on Mathematics (A), 1925-27 ; vice 
president, 1938; vice president for Section 
on Historical and Philological Sciences (L), 

T937- 

Arenberg, David L(ewis). M.A., Clark, 36. 
Res. asst.. Blue Hill Observatorv, Milton, 
Mass. M38F40. BAC. 

Arendall, Hy Hudson. Elks Club, Omaha, 
Xebr. M39. CFN. 

Arenson, Prof. Saul B(ryan). M.A., Ne- 
braska, 18; Ph.D., 24. Prof, inorganic 
chemistry, Univ. Cincinnati, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. M23F33. C. 

Argabright, Miss LaVerne. Western State 
Teachers Col.. Kalamazoo, Mich. M29R33. 
GF. 

Arguelles, Dr. Angel Severe D.Sc, Illi- 
nois. Dir., Bur. Science, Manila, P. I. 
(479 Burgos, Pasay, Rizal) M34F34. C. 

Argy, Dr. William P. 1150 Connecticut 
Ave.. Washington, D. C. M35R37. N. 

Ariano, Dr. Raffaele. D.Eng., Torino, 20: 
D.Math., 23. 14 Via Luigi Mangiagalli, 
Milano, Italy. M38. M. 

Arkin, Prof. Aaron. M.A., Wisconsin, 10; 
M.D., Rush, 12; Ph.D., Chicago, 13. Assoc, 
prof, medicine, Rush Med. Col.; prof, and 
chairman Dept. Med., Cook County Grad- 
uate School; dir. Chicago Lab., Chicago, 
111. (190 E. Pearson St.) M13F21. X. 

Arkley, Prof. L(orne) M(cKenzie). M.Sc. 

McGill. Head Mechanical Engng., Queen's 

Univ., Kingston, Ont., Canada. M36. 
MAB. 

Arlitt, Dr. Ada Hart. Ph.D., Chicago, 17. 
Head Dept. Child Care and Training, 
Univ. Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. M12- 

F23. Hiy. 

Armacost, Robert. Box 875, West Los 
Angeles, Calif. M32R32. GF. 

Armer, Miss Annie A. Incarnate Word 
Col., San Antonio, Tex. M32R33. GF. 



Individual Mkmhkks 



235 



Armfield, L(uverne) E(ugene). Facilities 
engineer, Wisconsin Telephone Co.. Mil- 
waukee, Wis. M38. DBM. 

Armitage, John W. ri8 S. 53rd St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. (?) M30R33. 

Armsby. Prof. H(enry) H(orton). Mis- 
souri School Mines, Rolla, Mo. M36R37. 
MQK. 

Armstrong, Bryon. I'h.G.. Northwestern, 
93. 708 W. College Ave., lacksonville, 111. 
M35. CNp. 

Armstrong, Dr. Charles. M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 15; Sc.D., Mt. Union, 33. Senior 
surgeon, U. S. Public Health Service. Nat. 
Inst. Health. Washington, D. C. M34F34. 
X". 

Armstrong, Dr. Clairette P. M.A., Colum- 
bia, 00; Ph.D., New York, 31. Chief psy- 
chologist. Psychiatric Clinic. Domestic- 
Relations Court, New York, N. Y. (140 E. 
46th St.) L29F33. I. 

Armstrong. Col. Donald. (U.S.A.) A.M., 
Columbia, 10. U. S. Army. Chicago Ord- 
nance District, Chicago, 111. (5807 Dor- 
chester Ave.) M10L11. BM. 

Armstrong. Dr. Donald B(udd). M.A.. 
Columbia, 12; M.D., 12; M.S., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 13; D.Sc, Lafayette, 
23. Third vice pres.. Metropolitan Life 
Ins. Co., New York, N. Y. M25F31. NKI. 

Armstrong, Lt. Col. Francis T(uttle). 
B.A., Columbia. 12. Prof, military science 
and tactics. Yale Univ., New Haven, 
( dun. Li 1 . E. 

Armstrong, Dr. George M(iller). M.A.. 
Wisconsin, 17; Ph.D.. Washington Univ., 
21. Head Dept. Botany and Bacteriology, 
Clemson Agric. Col., Clemson, S. Car. 
M21F25. GO 

Armstrong, George Simpson. =52 Wall St., 
New York. X. Y. M36R38. KCO. 

Armstrong, Rev. H(ousen) Parr. 3240 
Lockridge St.. Kansas City, Mo. M36- 
R36. IQK. 

Armstrong, Dr. John Wilbur. M.D.. Ver- 
mont, 24. Assoc, college physician, Berea 
Col., Berea. Ky. M32. NIF. 

Armstiong, L(yndon) K. Consulting min- 
ing engineer. 704 Peyton Bldg., Spokane, 
Wash. (E-.2515 17th Ave.) M07F18. BF.K. 

Armstrong. Dr. Mervyn V. 85 Pierrepont 

Si., Brooklyn. N. Y. M36R36. N. 

Armstrong, Dr. S. Howard, Jr. M.D., Har- 
vard. 39. Fellow medicine and physica 
chemistry, Harvard Med. School, Boston, 
Mass. (1 Primus Ave.) L39. 

Armstrong, Dr. S(amuel) T(reat). M.D., 
Washington Univ., 79; Ph.D., 86. Med. 
dir., Hillbourne Farms, Katonah, N. Y. 
Mo(,Lo7F33. IN. 

Armstrong, Dr. Wallace D. Univ. Minne- 
sota, Minneapolis, Minn. M35F35R36, C. 



67th St., New- 



Armstrong, Warren Putnam, s Prospect 
Place, New York, X. Y. L34. MBA. 

Arnason, Dr. T(homas) J(ohann). M.Sc. 
Saskatchewan, .^ ; Ph.D.. Wisconsin. 34. 
Asst. prof, biology, Univ. Saskatchewan, 
Saskatoon, Sask.. Canada. M37F39. GFH. 

Arnaud, Miss Elaine (Pauline). M.A., 
George Washington, 33. Teacher, Public- 
Schools, Washington, D. C. (1500 21st 
St. NW.) M30. CEI. 

Arnaud, Joseph J(ohn). B.S., Col. City 
New York, 89. Consulting physicist and 
mathematician. 1500 21st St. NW., Wash 
ington, D. C. M20F33. BDC. 

Arndt, Dr. C(harles) H(omer). M.S.. Pur- 
due. 16; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 21. Assoc, 
botanist. South Carolina Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Clemson. S. Car. M18F23. G. 

Arnett, Eugene. L24D38. 

Arnett, Jerome C. Aurora, W. Va. M37- 

R37. x. 

Arnheim, Dr. Ernest E. 49 E. 96th St., 
New York, N. Y. M36R36. N. 

Arnim, Dr. S(umter) S(mith). D.D.S.. 
Northwestern : Ph.D.. Yale. Asst. prof, 
operative dentistry. Med. Col. Virginia 
Dental School, Richmond, Va. M40. Nd. 

Arnold, Dr. Alma C. 9 W 
York. X. Y. M07R36. IN. 

Arnold. Dr. Bion J(oseph). M.S.. Hills- 
dale, 87; M.Ph.. 89: D.Eng.. Nebraska. 
11; D.Sc. Armour, 07. Chairman, Board 
Supervising Engineers, Chicago Traction 
Co.; pres., Arnold Engng. Co., and Elgin, 
Belvidere and Rockford Railway Co.. 
Chicago, 111. MoiF*o3. M. Vice president for 
Section on Engineering (D), 1915. 

Arnold, Dr. Charles Harrison. M.D., Chi- 
cago Col. Med. and Surgery, 13. Surgeon, 
Lincoln, Nebr. (2480 Lake St.) M40. N. 

Arnold, Dr. Chester Arthur. Ph.D., Cor- 
nell, 20. Asst. prof, botany and curator 
fossil plants, L T niv. Michigan, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. M26F31. G. 

Arnold, Miss Clio. M.A., Columbia, 22. 
Instr., Defiance Col., Defiance, Ohio. M38. 
KIL. 

Arnold. Dr. Eric A(nderson). M.A., Illi- 
nois. 24; Ph.D.. Western Reserve. 31. 
19075 Meredith Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. M38. 
CBM. 

Arnold, Dr. Francis J. M.D.. Vermont, 
01. 182 Pearl St., Burlington, Vt. M37. N. 

Arnold, Dr. Harry L(oren). M.D., Michi- 
gan, 11. 881 Young St., Honolulu, Hawaii. 
M24. N. 

Arnold, Henry C. F. Ph.Ch., Columbia. 
Asst. supt. charge production, E. R. 
Squibb and Sons, Brooklvn, N. Y. (43 
Willow St., Floral Park, N. Y.) M39. 
NpCM. 



236 



Directory of Members 



Arnold, Prof. Herbert E. Box 128, Wes- 
leyan Station, Middletown, Conn. M35- 
F35R37. A. 

Arnold, Prof. Herbert J(ulius). M.A., Co- 
'umbia, 27; Ph.D., 36. Asst. prof, natural 
sciences, Columbia Univ. Teachers Col., 
New York, N. Y. (88 Morningside Drive) 
M29F38. QED. 

Arnold, Howard C(linton). M.A., Ohio 
State, 16. 76 Standish Blvd., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. M22. ABC. 

Arnold, Dr. Hubert Andrew. Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia Inst. Tech., 39. 2480 Lake St., Lin- 
coln, Nebr. M39. AB. 

Arnold, Dr. John G(eorge), Jr. M.A., 
Wesleyan, 32; Ph.D., New York, 34. Prof, 
biology and chairman Dept. Biology and 
Dept. Med. Tech., Loyola Univ., New Or- 
leans, La. (2328 Lowerline St.) M35. FGN. 

Arnold, John W(illiam). A.M., Illinois, 
23. Engineer, Western Union Telegraph 
Co.; instr., R.C.A. Insts., New York, 
N. Y. (37 Washington Square) M24L29- 
F31. MA. 

Arnolds Dr. Lloyd. A.M., Texas Christian, 
18; M.D., Vanderbilt, 19. 5S44 Stony 
Island Ave., Chicago, 111. M24F27. N. 

Arnold, Dr. Norman K(iefer). Ph.D., 

Yale, 32. Asst. prof, zoology, Dartmouth 
Col., Hanover, N. H. (6 Rope Ferrv 
Road) M34- F. 

Arnold, Dr. Orlan M. Ph.D., Wisconsin. 
Walker Lab., Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., 
Troy, N. Y. M38. CBN. 

Arnold, Prof. Paul J(ames). M.A., George 
Peabody, 29. Prof, biology, State Teachers 
Col., Jacksonville, Ala. M38. FGQ. 

Arnold, Philip M(ills). B.S., Washington 
Univ., 32. Chem. engineer, Phillips Petro- 
leum Co., Bartlesville, Okla. (6516 Linden 
Road, Kansas City, Mo.) M37. MC. 

Arnold, Dr. Ralph. 812 Subway Terminal 
Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. M02F06R32. E. 

Arnold, Robert B(acon). M.S., Rose Poly- 
technic Inst.. 10. Chief Res. Dept., To- 
bacco By-Products and Chem. Corp., 
Richmond, Va. M27. CFO. 

Arnold, Samuel, III. Wilson Drive, Ben 
Avon Heights, Pittsburgh, Pa. M28. MBC. 

Arnold, Weld. 374 Commonwealth Ave., 
Boston, Mass. L22F31. BCE. 

Arnold, Dr. William Shannon. M.S., Amer. 
International Acad., 22; Sc.D., 30. Chief 
chemist, C. M. Pitt and Sons Co., Balti- 
more, Md. (511 Nottingham Road, Ten 
Hills) M25F33. CM. 

Arnon, Dr. D(aniel) I(srael). Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia, 36. Instr. truck crops, Univ. Cali- 
fornia; junior plant physiologist, Cali- 
fornia Agric. Exp. Sta., Berkeley. Calif. 
M38F40. GCO. 



Arnott, E(dward) H(ugh). Pres., Arnott 
Exterminating Co.; owner, Arnott Fumi- 
gating Co. and Arnott Termite Control 
Co., Indianapolis, Ind. (.5530 Kenwood 
Ave.) M38. F. 

Arnow, Dr. L(eslie) Earle. Ph.D., Minne- 
sota, 34. Instr. physiological chemistry, 
Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. (529 
Oak St. SE.) M38F39. CN. 

Arnstein, Dr. Henry. M25F31D34. MC. 

Amy, Prof. H(enry) V(inecome). Ph.D., 
Gottingen, 96; Ph.M., Philadelphia Col. 
Phar., 19. Col. Phar., Columbia Univ., 
New York, N. Y. M08F11. CNp. 

Aronberg, Dr. Lester. Ph.D., Chicago. 
1306 E. 54th St., Chicago, 111. M28F32. B. 

Aronson, Dr. Joseph D(avid). M.D., Phil- 
adelphia Medico-Chirurgical Col., 08. 
Assoc, prof, bacteriology, Henry Phipps 
Inst., Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 
Pa. M17F27. GN. 

Aronson, Dr. Moses J. Ph.D., Sorbonne, 
27. Asst. prof, philosophy. Col. City New 
York, New York, N. Y. M37. KHL. 

Aronson, Dr. Roland S(igurd). M.D., 
Vermont, 31. Asst. pathologist, Lankenau 
Hosp.; pathologist, Div. Cancer Control, 
Pennsylvania Dept. Health; assoc, Univ. 
Pennsylvania Graduate School Med., Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. (2029 Delancey St.) M39. N. 

Arps, Dr. George F. M10F11D39. IQ. 

Arrhenius, Dr. Olof Wilhelm. Ph.D., 
Stockholm, 20. Gamla Haga, Stockholm, 
Sweden. M26F27. GOC. 

Arriagada, Carlos Guillermo. Casilla 9. 
Vallenar, Chile, S. A. M30R32. M. 
Arringdale, Roger L(andrith). Pres., 
Eastern Engng. Co.; dir., Seismograph 
Sta., Portland, Maine. (211 Ocean Ave.) 
M40. E. 

Arrington, Dr. Ruth E. Ph.D., Columbia, 
32. 2526 N. Jefferson St., Arlington, Va. 
M31F36. KIQ. 

Arsenian, Dr. Seth. Ph.D., Columbia, 37- 
\sst. prof, psychology and dir. Bur. Psy- 
chological Testing and Guidance, Spring- 
Held Col., Springfield, Mass. M38. IQL. 

Arthur, Charles W(alter). Ph.B., Brown. 
18. Citv bacteriologist and assoc. health 
officer, Pasadena, Calif. M33. N. 

Arthur, Dr. J(oseph) C(harles). M.S., 
Iowa State, 77. Prof, emeritus botany, 
Purdue Univ.. La Fayette, Ind. (915 Co- 
lumbia St.) M72F85E24. G. Secretary of 
section on Biology (F), 1S86. Vice president 
for Section on Botany (G), 1895. 

Arthur, Dr. John M(orris). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 26. Biochemist, Boyce Thompson 
Inst. Plant Res., Inc., Yonkers, N. Y. 
M21F25. G. 

Arthur, Walter. A. O. Smith Corp., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. (?) Mi7R32- C. 



Individual Members 



237 



Artran, A(rrion) Pierce. Owner, Artran 
Industries, Los Angeles, Calif. M38. FGN. 

Artschwager, Dr. Ernst. Ph.D., Cornell, 
18. Pathologist, U. S. Bur. Plant Industry, 
Mesilla Park, N. Mex. M22F25. FG. 

Artus, Miss Marjorie. B.S., Milwaukee 
State Teachers, 38. Student, Marquette 
Univ. Graduate School, Milwaukee, Wis. 
(1810 E. Cumberland Blvd.) M39. GF. 

Artz, Miss Lena C(lemens). A.M., George 
Washington, 35. Teacher, Washington- 
Lee High School, Arlington, Va. (644 N. 
Jackson St.) M32. G. 

Arutunoff, Armais (Sergeevich). B.S., 
Petrograd Polytechnic Inst., 17. Pres., 
Reda Pump Co., Bartlesville, Okla. M37- 
L39. M. 

Arvin, Sister M. Agnes. M.A.. Creighton, 
22. Pres.. Catholic Col., Guthrie, Okla. 
M22. 

Asana, Dr. J(ehangir) J(amasji). M.A., 
Bombav 15, Cambridge. 24. Gujarat Col., 
Ahmadabad, Bombay Presidency, India 
M31. hKQ. 

Asch, Abraham B(ernard). 350 Madison 
Ave., New York, N. Y. M33R34. BM. 

Asdell, Prof. Sydney A(rthur). M.A., 
Cambridge, 26; Ph.D., 25. Prof, animal 
physiology. New York State Col. Agric, 
Ithaca, N. Y. M34F34. NOH. 

Asenjo, Dr. Conrado F(ederico). M.S., 
Wisconsin, 38 ; Ph.D., 40. Res. assoc. 
chemistry. School Tropical Med., San 
Juan, P. R. M37. CNG. 

Ash, Charles S. 254 Polhemus Ave., Menlo 
Park, Calif. M22. C. 

Ash, Dorsey. 23 11 Corona Court, Berke- 
ley, Calif. M29R35. DAB. 

Ash, (Frederick) Elton. M.A., Clark, 38. 
Res. asst., Iowa Child Welfare Res. Sta., 
Iowa City, Iowa. M40. IQ. 

Ash, Lt. Col. James E(arle). M.D.. Penn- 
sylvania, 05. Curator. Army Med. Mus., 
Washington, D. C. M39. N. 

Ash, Dr. Roy P(hillip). A.M., Ph.D., 
Brown Asst. prof, biology. Col. William 
and Mary, Williamsburg, Va. M38. FN. 

Ashbaugh, Dr. Ernest J(ames). M.A., In- 
diana, 13; Ph.D., Iowa, 19. Dean, Miami 
Univ. School Education, Oxford, Ohio. 
M37F32. Q. Vice president for Section on 
Education (Q), 1940. 

Ashbrook, Dr. Donald S(inclair). Ph.D., 

Pennsylvania. 01. 320 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. M02F33. C. 

Ashburn, Dr. Howard G(ilmer). Ph.D., 
West Virginia, 36. Asst. prof, chemistry, 
Tennessee Polytechnic Inst., Cookeville, 
Tenn. M38. CBA. 



Ashby, Dr. Winifred M(ayer). M.Sc, 
Washington, 05; Ph.D., Minnesota, 21. 
Bacteriologist and health officer, St. Eliza- 
beths Hosp., Washington, D. C. (305 10th 
St. NE.) M28F33- N. 

Ashdown, Dr. Avery A(llen). A.M., 
Rochester, 16; Ph.D., Massachusetts Inst. 
Tech., 24. Assoc, prof, chemistry and mas- 
ter graduate house, Massachusetts Inst. 
Tech., Cambridge, Mass. M25F33. C. 

Ashe, Dr. Benjamin (I.). M.D., Cornell, 
24. Assoc, clinical prof, medicine, Colum- 
bia Univ. and New York Post Graduate 
Hosp.; asst. prof, clinical medicine, Cor- 
nell Univ. Med. Col.; assoc. attending 
physician and chief Med. and Metabolic 
Clinics, New York Post Graduate Hosp.; 
assoc. visiting physician, Bellevue Hosp.; 
visiting physician, Welfare Hosp., New 
York, N. Y. (889 Lexington Ave.) M34- 
F34. N. 

Ashford, Dr. Theo(dore) A(skounes). 
S.M., Chicago, 34; Ph.D., 36. Instr. chem- 
istry and examiner physical sciences, 
Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. M38. CBQ. 

Ashkenaz, Dr. David M(orton). A.M., 
Ph.D., Columbia. 2138 31st St., Long 
Island City, N. Y. M37. NFL 

Ashley, Burton. Box 1801, Wichita, Kans. 
M38R38. E. 

Ashley, George H(all). M.A., Stanford, 
92; Ph.D., 94; Sc.D., Lehigh, 37. State 
geologist, State Capitol, Harrisburg, Pa. 
(3037 N. Front St.) M02F03. EF. Vice 
president for Section on Geology and Geog- 
raphy (E), 1926. 

Ashley, Prof. Laurence M (arvin). M.A., 
Michigan, 32. Asst. prof, micro-anatomy, 
Col. Med. Evangelists, Loma Linda, Calif. 
M40. FNG. 

Ashley, Samuel E(dward) Q(ualtrough). 
41 Bartlett Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. M35- 
R37. CB. 

Ashley-Montagu, Prof. M(ontague) 
F(rancis). Ph.D., Columbia, 37. Assoc, 
prof, anatomy, Hahnemann Med. Col. and 
Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. M36F40. QIL. 

Ashman, Edward T(homas). M.A., New 
York, 32. Teacher and head Dept. Mathe- 
matics, Darien High School, Darien, 
Conn. (11 Fairview Ave.) M37F38. ABC. 

Ashman, Prof. George C(romwell). M.S., 
Chicago, 05; Ph.D., 08. Prof, and head 
Dept. Chemistry, Bradley Polytechnic 
Inst., Peoria, 111. M17F33. C. 

Ashman, Prof. Richard. M.S., Tulane, 20; 
Ph.D., 25. Louisiana State Univ. Med. 
Center, New Orleans, La. M16F31. N. 

Ashworth, Dr. O. O. 312 Med. Arts Bldg., 
Richmond, Va. M39. N. 

Ashworth, Dr. U(ral) S. Ph.D., Missouri, 
33. Res. dairy chemist, State Col. Wash- 
ington, Pullman, Wash. M40F40. CON. 



08 



Directory of Members 



Asmundson, Prof. V(igfus) S(amundur). 

M.S., Cornell, 20; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 30. 
Assoc, prof, poultry husbandry, Univ. 
California, Davis, Calif. M30F35. OF. 

Aspegren, Herman. North Shore Point, 
Norfolk, \ a. M27R32. C. 

Aspinwall, John. M.A., St. Stephens, 7S. 
Balmville Road, Xewburgh, X. Y. Moo. M. 

Assmuth, Rev. Joseph. Ph.D., Berlin, 10. 
Head Dept. Biology, Fordham Univ., Xew 
York, X. Y. M31F33. F. 

Astwood, Dr. Edwin B(ennett). M.D.,- 
C.M., McGill, 34; Ph.D., Harvard, 39. 
Assoc, obstetrics. Johns Hopkins Univ.; 
asst. obstetrician, Johns Hopkins Hosp., 
Baltimore, Md. (4228 Loch Raven Blvd.) 
M40. XFC. 

Atchison, Prof. Clyde S(hephard). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 07; LL.D., Westminster 
(Pennsylvania), 34. Prof, mathematics, 
Washington and Jefferson Col., Wash- 
ington, Pa. (442 E. Beau St.) M24F33. A. 

Atchley, Dr. Dana Winslow. M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 15. Assoc, prof, medicine, Co- 
lumbia Univ., Xew York, N. Y. (262 Oak- 
wood Road, Englewood, N. J.) M24 
F33. N. 

Athearn, Dr. Clarence R. 084 Waring Ave., 
Xew York, X. Y. M38R38. QKI. 

Atherton, J(oseph) Ballard. E.E., Prince- 
ton, 35. Graduate student, Ohio State 
Univ., Columbus, Ohio. (130 E. Lane 
Ave.) M38. MBA. 

Athy, Dr. L(awrence) F(erdinand). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 25. Chief geophysicist. Conti- 
nental Oil Co., Ponca City. Okla. (612 
McFadden Drive) M28F31. E. 

Atkins, H(enry) Pearce (Jr.). M.Sc, 
Brown, 37. Graduate asst., Univ. Roches- 
ter, Rochester, X. Y. M40. A. 

Atkinson, Prof. Albert A(lgernon). Ohio 
Univ., Athens, Ohio. Mo8Fi6R37- BM, 

Atkinson, Prof. Alfred. M.S., Cornell, 12; 
D.Sc, Iowa State, 20. El Encanto Estates, 
Tucson, Ariz. M10F24. O. 

Atkinson, Clinton E(dwin). B.S., Wash- 
ington, 37. Scientific asst., International 
Pacific Salmon Fisheries Commission, 
Xew Westminster, B. C, Canada. (317 
3rd Ave.) M38. FG. 

Atkinson, Dr. Donald T(aylor). M.D., 

Hosp. Col. Med. (Louisville), 02. 827 Med. 
Arts Bldg., San Antonio, Tex. (Huebner 
Road) M24. N. 

Atkinson, J(ames) D(udley), Jr. M.S., Tu- 
lane, 35. Res. chemist, Buckeye Cotton 
Oil Co., Memphis, Tenn. M39. CMI. 

Atkinson, Miss Margaretta. M.S., Penn- 
sylvania, 29. Teacher biology, Philadel- 
phia High School Girls, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Berwyn, Pa.) M27. GF. 



Atkinson, R(alph) W(aldo). E.E., Iowa 
State, 11. Dir. High Voltage Labs., Gen. 
Cable Corp., Bayonne, X. J. (206 Watch- 
uug Fork St., Westfield, N. T.) M30F32. 
MBA. 

Atkinson, Prof. Robert d'E(scourt). Royal 
( Jbservatorv, Greenwich, London, Eng- 
land. M 3 iF32R37- BD. 

Atkinson, Prof. W. R. Southwestern 
Univ., Memphis, Tenn. M32R32. IQ. 

Atkinson, W(illiam) F(rederick) V(anno- 
vous). Consulting engineer, 31 Xanton 
Ave., Toronto, Ont., Canada. M25. MEL 

Atlas, Dr. Meyer. A.M., Columbia, 30; 
Ph.D., 35. Instr., Yeshiva Col., Xew York, 
X. Y. (100 Lefferts Ave., Brooklyn, X. Y.) 
lM37R37)M40. F. 

Atlee, Dr. John L(ight). M.D., Pennsyl- 
vania, 00; D.Sc, Franklin and Marshall, 
15. 3,7 E. Orange St., Lancaster, Pa. M29. 

Atsatt, Miss Sarah R(ogers). M.S., Cali- 
fornia, 12; Ph.D., 31. 405 Hilgard Ave., 
Los Angeles, Calif. M13F33. FQ. 

Atterbury, Mrs. Boudinot. M.A., Cornell, 
17; Ph.D., Colombia, 23. 601 Middle Xeck 
Road, Great Xeck, X. Y. M24F27. X. 

Atwater, Mrs. Betty Ransom. 737 Termi- 
nal St., Los Angeles, Calif. M38R38. GO. 

Atwater, Christopher G. M.E., Stevens 

Inst. Tech., 91. The Barrett Co., Xew 

York, X. Y. (Cobb Lane, Tarrvtown, 
X. Y.) M37F40. OCG. 

Atwater, Miss Helen W(oodward). B.L., 
Smith, 97. Editor, "Journal Home Eco- 
nomics," Amer. Home Economics Assn., 
Washington, D. C. M25F31. KQ. 




Atwell, Ernest A(lleyne). M.Sc, McGill, 
25. Asst. timber pathology, Forest Prod- 
ucts Labs., Ottawa. Out., Canada. M24- 
1?» CC\ 



F32. GO. 

Atwell, Harold V. B.S., Massachusetts 
Inst. Tech., 18. Supervisor Organic Res. 
Dept., The Texas Co., Beacon, X. Y. (69 
X. Elm St.) M40. CKO. 

Atwell, Prof. Wayne J(ason). A.M., Mich- 
igan, 15; Ph.D., 17. Prof, anatomy, Univ. 
Buffalo, Buffalo, X. Y. M22F24. NF. 

Atwood, F(rancis) C(larke). S.B., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 14. Pres., Atlantic 
Res. Assoc, Inc., Newtonville, Mass. (104 
Atwood Ave.) M34F34. C. 

Atwood, Prof. Horace. M.S., Cornell, 97. 
Prof, emeritus agriculture, West Virginia 
Univ., Morgantown, W. Va. (Box 1138, 
Stuart. Fla.) M34F34. O. 



Individual Members 



239 



Atwood, Dr. Wallace W(alter). Ph.D.. 
Chicago, 03. Pres. and prof, physical and 
regional geography, Clark Univ., Worces- 
ter. .Mass. (160 Woodland St.) M07F10. 
EL. 

Atwood. Dr. Wallace W(alter), Jr. M.A., 
(lark, 27: Ph.D., 30. Assoc, prof, physiog- 
raph) and regional geography, Clark 
Univ., Worcester ; geographer, Bahson 
[nst., Bahson Park, Mass. (88 Morning- 
side Road, Worcester, Mass.) M34F34. E. 

Atwood, Dr. W(infred) M(cKenzie). 
Ph.D., Chicago, 13. Prof, plant physiol- 
ogy, Oregon State Col., Corvallis, Oreg. 
u'14 X. 7th St.) M11F15. G. 

Aubel, Prof. C(liff) E(rrett). Dept. Ani- 
mal Husbandry. Kansas State Col., Man- 
hattan, Kans. M34R38. CFO. 

Auchter, Dr. E(ugene) C(urtis). M.S., 
Cornell, 18; Ph.D., 23. Chief U. S. Bur. 
l'lant Industry, Washington, D. C. M17- 
F24. GO. Vice president for Section on Ag- 
riculture i O ), 1937- 

Auer, Dr. John. M.D., Johns Hopkins, 
02. Prof, pharmacology and dir. Dept, 
St. Louis Univ. School Med., St. Louis, 
Mo. (i9?6 McCausland Ave.) M17F18. 
Np. 

Auger, Charles L(ouis). R.D. 135. Ridge- 
wood. X. J. Mi8R34- 

Augur, Allison W(ix). 125 W. nth St., 
Claremont, Calif. M21R36. B. 

Augustina, Sister M. (See Sister M. 
Augustina Brobston). 

Augustine, Dr. Donald L(eslie). Sc.D., 
Johns Hopkins. 23. Asst. prof, compara- 
tive pathology and tropical medicine, 
Harvard Med. School and School Public 
Health, Boston, Mass. ( 1464 Beacon St., 
Waban, Mass.) M25F33. XF. 

Auld, Mrs. Gertrude S. Red Cloud, Xehr. 
M38R38. X1K. 

Aull, W(illiam) B(arre). B.S.. Clemson, 
07. Vice dean School Agric. and assoc. 
prof, bacteriology. Clemson Agric. Col., 
Clemson, S. Car. M29F31. GON. 

Ault, J(esse) W(illiam). 4834 Biona 
Drive. San Diego, Calif. M32R33. QIK. 

Ault, Dr. Orvill E. Normal School, Ot- 
tawa, Out., Canada. M38R38. Q. 

Auringer, Dr. Horace E. M.D.. Albany 
Med. Col.. 12. Box 426, Addison, N. Y. 
M23. X. 

Ausemus, Dr. Elmer R(ex). M.S., Wash- 
ington State, 24; Ph.D., Minnesota. 32. 
Assoc, agronomist, U. S. Dept. Agric, 
Univ. Farm, St. Paul, Minn. M27F33. OG. 

Austin, Arthur (Brand). 266 Funston Ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. M34. BCD. 



Austin, F. E. E.E., Norwich. Austin Ave.. 
Hanover, X. H. M39. CDF. 

Austin, Frederick J(ames). Ph.C, Michi- 
gan, 07. Chief Analytical and Res. Dept.. 
Richard Hudnut, Xew York. X. Y. (126 
Green Ave., Brooklyn, X. Y.) M18. C. 

Austin, Dr. J(ames) Harold. M.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 08. Prof, research medicine, 
Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 
M12L13F15. NCF. 

Austin, Lloyd. B.S., California, 20. In 
charge Inst. Forest Genetics, Placerville, 
Calif. M27F33. OG. 

Austin, Miss Mary L(ellah). M.A., Welles- 
ley, 22\ Ph.D., Columbia, 27. Asst. prof, 
zoology, Wellesley Col., Wellesley, Mass. 
(Horton House) M28F33- F. 

Austin, Dr. Richard S(isson). M.D., Har- 
vard, 11. Prof, pathology, Univ. Cincin- 
nati Col. Med. and Cincinnati Gen. Hosp., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. M22F33. X. 

Austin, Dr. Stanley W(illiam). Ph.D.. 
Iowa, 33. Asst. biologist, U. S. Soil Con- 
servation Service, Salina, Kans. (m E. 
Wilson St.) M30. G. 

Austin, Thomas Sherwood. M.A., Buffalo, 
40. Graduate asst., Dept. Zoology, Univ. 
Buffalo, Buffalo, X. Y. M40. F. 

Austin, Dr. William C( lardy). M25F33- 
D35. N. 

Austin, William E. 2446 University Ave., 
Xew York. N. Y. M26F33. CI. 

Auten, Dr. Hanford L(ouis). M.D., North- 
western, 37. Physician and surgeon (oph- 
thalmologist), 6 X. Michigan Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (423 Wisconsin Ave., Oak Park. 
111.) M 3 9- X. 

Auten, Dr. Mary. M.A., Ohio State. 22; 
Ph.D.. 33. Assoc, prof, biology, Ashland 
Col.. Ashland, Ohio. M35F35- F. 

Auten, Robert W(ilson). 310 Maxcy Hall. 
Providence, R. I. M33R34. C. 

Avent, Dr. Joseph E(mory). Univ. Ten- 
nessee, Knoxville, Tenn. M39R39. IQ. 

Averill, Dr. Lawrence A(ugustus). Ph.D., 
Clark, 15. Prof, psychology, State Teach- 
ers Col., Worcester, Mass. M28F31. I. 

Averitt, Paul. M.S. Kentucky. 31. Dept. 
Geology, Univ. Kentucky, Lexington, Kv. 
M36. E. 

Averitt, S(axe) D(abney). M.S.. Ken- 
tucky, 00. Kentucky Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Lexington, Ky. M21F31. BCE. 

Avers, Henry G(odfrey). A.B.. George 
Washington, 13. Chief mathematician. 
Div. Geodesy, U. S. Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, Washington, D. C. (4109 38th 
St. NW.) M2 5 F33- MDE. 

Avery, Dr. Bennett F(ranklin). M.D.. 
Michigan, 25; M.S., 26. Prof, anatomy, 
Amer. Univ. Beirut, Beirut, Syria. M39. X. 



240 



Directory of Members 



Avery, Miss Evelyn C. M.S., Chicago, 29. 
Assoc, prof, euthenics, Elmira Col., El- 
mira, N. Y. M34. NC. 

Avery, Dr. George S(herman), Jr. M.S., 
Dartmouth, 26; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 27. 
Prof, botany and dir. Connecticut Arbo- 
retum, Connecticut Col., New London, 
Conn. M28F28. G. 

Avery, Prof. George T(rue). A.M., Har- 
vard, 17; Ph.D., Stanford, 24. Prof, psy- 
chology, head Dept. Rural and Vocational 
Education, and dir summer session, Col- 
orado State Col., Fort Collins, Colo. (401 
E. Laurel St.) M21F31. IQ. 

Avery, Dr. Oswald T(heodore). M.D., Co- 
lumbia, 04; Sc.D., Colgate, 21 ; LL.D., Mc- 
Gill, 35. Member, Rockefeller Inst. Med. 
Res., New York, N. Y. M25F27. N. 

Avery, Paul Carson. M.S. A., Tennessee, 
28. Asst. plant quarantine inspector, U. S. 
Bur. Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 
Harlingen, Tex. (Box 845, Mission, Tex.) 
M30. FKE. 

Avery, Dr. Priscilla. M29F31D39. GO. 

Avinoff, Dr. A(ndrey). D.Sc, Pittsburgh, 
27. Dir. Carnegie Mus., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(University Club) M34F34. F. 

Avis, Frederick R. A.B., Brown. Dir. biol- 
ogy, Worcester Acad., Worcester, Mass. 
M40. FG. 

Axel, Dr. Robert. A.M., Ph.D., Columbia. 
Asst. dir. Bur. Res. and Statistics, New 
York State Dept. Social Welfare, New 
York, N. Y. (1710 Andrews Ave., Bronx) 
M39. KIA. 

Axelrad, B. A. B.S., Rice. Freeport, Tex. 
M39. CEK. 

Axelrad, Dr. Sol. M.D., Long Island Col. 
Hosp., 28. Pathologist, St. Catherine's 
Hosp. and Lutheran Hosp., Brooklvn, 
N. Y. (85-14 85th St., Woodhaven, N. Y.) 
M38. NCB. 

Axelrod, Stanley. 12561 3rd Ave., Detroit, 
Mich. M38R38. N. 

Axtmayer, Prof. Joseph H(erman). M.A., 
Columbia, 26; Ph.D., 27. Assoc, prof, 
chemistry, School Tropical Med., San 
Juan, P. R. (Ponce de Leon Ave., 3, 
Miramar) M37. CBN. 

Ayer, Charles F. Vice chairman, Boyce 
Thompson Inst. Plant Res., Inc., Yonkers, 
N. Y. (1 Slocum St., New Rochelle, N. Y.) 
M27. 

Ayer, Dr. (Guy) Darrell (Jr.). M.D., Em- 
ory, 33. Pathologist, Mary Imogene Bas- 



sett Hosp.; dir. lab., Otsego County Pub- 
lic Health Lab., Cooperstown, N. Y. (13 
River St.) M40. N. 

Ayer, James Bourne. M.D., Harvard, 07. 
Prof, neurology, Harvard Med. School, 
Boston, Mass. (1350 Canton Ave., Milton, 
Mass.) M17F23. N. 

Ayers, John C(ar). Dept. Biology, Univ. 
South Carolina, Columbia, S. Car. M38- 
R 3 9- FEG. 

Ayers, Theodore T(homas). Yale Univ., 
New Haven, Conn. M26F33R37. G. 

Aymerich, Frank E. University Club, 
Paseo de la Reforma 150, Mexico, D. F., 
Mexico. M21R37. KP. 

Aymond, Dr. Branch John. M.D., St. 
Louis. Dir. Div. Education and Res., Bur. 
Parish Health Administration, New Or- 
leans, La. (M36R37)M39. N. 

Ayres, Dr. B(urt) W(ilmot). M.A., Tay- 
lor, 00; Ph.D., 02. Vice pres. and prof, 
philosophy, Taylor Univ., Upland, Ind. 
M38. IQK. 

Ayres, Dr. Gilbert B(allou). Ph.D., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 34. Res. biochemist, 
bacteriologist and mycologist, Amer. 
Cyanamid Co., Stamford, Conn. (6 Wash- 
ington Court) M32F38. NCB. 

Ayres, Dr. H(iram) D(outhitt). M.A., 
Cornell, 04; Ph.D., 13. Prof, emeritus 
phvsics, Univ. Wichita, Wichita, Kans. 
M18F31. B. 

Ayres, Ira H. 33 W. 46th St., New York, 
N. Y. M31. CBM. 

Ayres, J. G. Inst. Juvenile Res., Chicago, 
111. (?) M31R32. HFK. 

Ayres, Dr. Leonard P(orter). A.M., Bos- 
ton, 02; Ph.D., 10; D.C.S., 23; LL.D., 
Rochester, 30; Litt.D., Portia Law School, 
38. Vice pres., Cleveland Trust Co., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. M11F16. QK. Vice president for 
Section on Education (L), 1916. 

Ayres, Waldemar A(lexander). A.B., An- 
tioch, 32. Market res., International Busi- 
ness Machines Corp., New York, N. Y. 
M39F40. B. 

Ayres, Prof. W(illiam) L(eake). Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania, 27. Assoc, prof, mathe- 
matics, Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
(1204 Henry St.) M38F39. A. 

Ayrs, Mr. O(rla) L(acount). B.S., Michi- 
gan Agric, 02. Agriculturist, Tennessee 
Coal, Iron and Railroad Co., Birmingham, 
Ala. (1001 28th Place S.) M14. O. 



B 



Babasinian, Dr. Vahan S. M06F10D39. C. 

Babb, Arnold. Q27 17th St., Knoxville, 
Tenn. M36R37. M. 

Babb, Dr. Maurice Jefferis. Ph.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 10. Prof, mathematics, Univ. 



Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. (157 
Cricket Ave., Ardmore, Pa.) (M08F11- 
R33)M39Fn. ADL. 

Babbitt, Albert E. 11 17 Kenwood St., 
Jackson, Miss. M22R32. A. 



Individual A 1 km bers 



24] 



Babbott, Dr. Frank L(usk). M.D., Colum- 
bia, 18; LL.D., Amherst, 33. Pres., Long 
Island Col. Med., Brooklyn, N. Y. (Camp- 
bell Road, Bernardsville, N. J.) M23F35. N. 

Babcock, Allen H. M13D— . BDM. 

Babcock, Dr. Donald E(ric). M.A., Ohio 
State, 33; Ph.D., 35. Industrial fellow, 
Mellon Inst. Industrial Res., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. (ion Tropical Ave.) M38. CBA. 

Babcock, Prof. Earle B. M07F31D— . 
I.KQ. 

Babcock, Prof. Ernest B(rown). M.S., 
California, 11. Prof, genetics, Univ. Cali- 
fornia, Rerkeley. Calif. M06F11. GFO. 

Babcock, Harold D(elos). B.S., California, 
07. Physicist, Mt. Wilson Observatory". 
Carnegie Inst. Washington, Pasadena, 
Calif. M10F15. BD. 

Babcock, Dr. Harriett (Sprague). M.A., 
Columbia, 23; Ph.D., 30. Dir. research 
abnormal psychology, 119 E. 19th St.; 
consulting psychologist, Vocational Ad- 
justment Bur., New York, N. Y. (15 
Gramercy Park) M31F33. IHK. 

Babcock, K. W. 418 E. Dudley St., 
Maumee, Ohio. (?) M24F25R35. FG. 

Babcock, O(rville) G(ormon). B.S., Col- 
orado Agric, 10. Assoc, entomologist, 
U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant Quar- 
antine, Sonora, Tex. M26F33. F. 

Babcock, William Cary. A.B., Wisconsin, 
18. Partner, W. C. Babcock Grain Co.; 
pres., W. C. Babcock Construction Co., 
Inc., Rensselaer, Ind. M38. MO. 

Babcock, Dr. W(illiam) Wayne. M.D., 
Col. Physicians and Surgeons (Baltimore), 
93, Pennsylvania, 95; M.C., Medico- 
Chirurgical (Philadelphia), 00; A.M., Penn- 
sylvania College. 04; LL.D., Temple, 32. 
Prof, surgery and clinical surgery, Temple 
Univ.; chief surgical service, Temple 
Univ. Hosp.; surgeon, Philadelphia Gen. 
Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. (11 St. Asaph's 
Road, Bala, Pa.) M04F33. N. 

Babe, Jose Manuel. 433 W. 34th St., New 
York, N. Y. M25R32. M. 

Baber, Dr. E(rl) A(rmitage). M.D., Louis- 
ville, 09. Supt., Long View State Hosp.; 
asst. prof, psychiatry, Univ. Cincinnati 
Col. Med., Cincinnati, Ohio. M17F33. N. 

Babiy, Dr. Paul Peter. Ph.D., Vienna, 24. 
Curator, New York State Col. Agric, Cor- 
nell Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. M30F33. F. 

Bach, Dr. Ernest (Norman). D.D.S., Mich- 
igan, 18. 305 Professional Bldg., Toledo, 
Ohio. M40. NdCO. 

Bach, James H(enry). 144s B St., San 
Diego, Calif. M31. BEM. 

Bach, Walter J(ohnston). M.S., Washing- 
ton State, 22. Agric. advisory and super- 
vision service. Bach Agric. Service, Wes- 
laco, Tex. (M 2 sF3iR36)M38F3i. GO. 



Bacharach, Dr. George. 736 W. 173rd St., 
New York, N. Y. M39. CB. 

Bache-Wiig, Prof. Sara. M.S., Cornell, 10; 
Ph.D., 39. Assoc, prof, botany, Smith Col., 
Northampton, Mass. (36 Prospect Ave.) 
M39. G. 

Bachman, B(enjamin) B(yron). Vice 
pres. charge engng., Autocar Co., Ard- 
more, Pa. M17. M. 

Bachman, Prof. George W(illiam). A.M.. 
Columbia, 23; Ph.D., Chicago, 27. Prof, 
parasitology, Columbia Univ., New York, 
N. Y.; dir., School Tropical Med., San 
Juan, P. R. M34F34- N. 

Bachmann, Dr. Freda M(arie). M.A.. 
Miami, 08; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 12. 821 
Woodville St., Toledo, Ohio. M17F21. 
GNO. 

Bachmann, Dr. (Jean) George. M.D., Jef- 
ferson, 07; M.S., Emory, 22. Prof, physi- 
ology, Emory Univ. School Med., Emory 
University, Ga. (10S8 Lullwater Road, 
Atlanta, Ga.) M12F21. NF. 

Bachrach, Dr. William H(arris). M.S., 
Northwestern, 37; Ph.D., 39. Cedars of 
Lebanon Hosp., Los Angeles, Calif. M40. N. 

Back, Dr. Ernest Adna. Ph.D., Massa- 
chusetts Agric, 07. U. S. Bur. Entomol- 
ogy, Washington, D. C. Mo7Fi3- F. 

Back, Robert. B.S., Illinois, 13. Technical 
engineer, Wahl Co., Chicago, 111. (3753 
N. Fremont St.) M40. BCM. 

Backer, Prof. Leslie H. M.E., Stevens 
Inst. Tech., 09. Assoc, prof, chemistry, 
Stevens Inst. Tech., Hoboken, N. J. (32 
Tulip St., Summit, N. J.) M33. C. 

Backus, Cyrus D(ay). M.S., George Wash- 
ington, 05. Examiner, U. S. Patent Office, 
Washington, D. C. M08F15. MBA. 

Backus, Myron P(ort). Dept. Botany, 
Univ. Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. M31F33- 
R34. G. 

Bacon, Dr. Alfons Rosthorn. M.D., Illi- 
nois, 22. Instr. obstetrics and gynecology, 
U^niv. Illinois; assoc. obstetrician and 
gynecologist, Grant Hosp.; med. dir., Sal- 
vation Army Dispensary, Chicago, 111. 
(580 Hawthorne Place) M30. N. 

Bacon, Miss Annette L(ouise). A.B., 
Wellesley, 29. Sec, Dept. Entomology, 
Amer. Mus. Natural History, New York, 
N. Y. M37- F. 

Bacon, Prof. Arthur A(very). A.M., Dart- 
mouth, 01. Prof, physics, Amer. L T niv. 
Beirut, Beirut, Syria. M03F11. B. 

Bacon, Charles E(dward). 50 Beacon St.. 
Boston, Mass. M37R37. BC. 

Bacon, Dr. Charles S., Jr. M.S., Chicago, 
23 ; Ph.D., Vienna, 26. Asst. prof., Dept. 
Geology, Texas A. and M. Col., College 
Station, Tex. M30. E. 

Bacon, Dr. Charles S(umner). 2333 Cleve- 
land Ave., Chicago, 111. M07F18R37. NQK. 



242 



Directory of Members 



Bacon, Dr. Charles W(alter). A.M., Clark, 
07; Ph.D.. 11. Physiologist, U. S. Dept. 
Agric, Washington. D. C. (43 12 Yuma St. 
X\Y.) M17F33. CGO. 

Bacon, Prof. Clara L(atimer). M.A., Chi- 
cago, 04; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 11. Prof. 
emeritus mathematics, Goucher Col., Bal- 
timore, Md. (2316 X. Calvert St.) M24- 
L33F33. A. 

Bacon, Dr. Edythe A. 13231 Meyers Road, 
Detroit, Mich. M31R37. X. 

Bacon, Dr. Egbert K(ing). M.S.. Michi- 
gan, 23; Ph.D., 26. Asst. prof, chemistry, 
Union Col., Schenectady, X. Y. M28F33. 
CQ. 

Bacon, Ellis W. Vice pres., treas., and 
Med. Dept. editor, T. B. Lippincott Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. (227 S. 6th St.) M18. 
KNO. 

Bacon, Dr. Franklin James. Ph.D., Wis- 
consin, 25. Prof, botany and pharmacog- 
nosy, Western Reserve Univ.; dir. Squire 
Valleevue Farm. Cleveland, Ohio. M28- 
F31. GX T C. 

Bacon, Frederick S(ayford). A.M., Har- 
vard, 17. Res. chemist, Watertown, Mass. 
(42 Hyde Ave., Newton, Mass.) M38. C. 

Bacon, Prof. George P(reston). A.M., 
Dartmouth, 00. Prof, emeritus physics, 
Tufts Col., Medford, Mass. (53 Highland 
St., Cambridge, Mass.) M07F16. BM. 

Bacon, Jack C. 57 Strawberry Hill Court, 
Stamford, Conn. M39. C. 

Bacon, Dr. Raymond F. A.M., DePauw, 
00; Ph.D., Chicago, 04; Sc.D., Pittsburgh, 
18, DePauw. iq. Consulting chemist, 500 
5th Ave., New Y/ork. N. Y. (17 Rock- 
ledge Road, Bronx ville, N. Y.) M12F15. C. 

Bacon, Wallace W(inn). M28D34. GX. 

Badalik, Miss Elizabeth Annette. M.S., 
Marquette, 40. Student" Marquette Univ.. 
Milwaukee, Wis. (1424 X. 2^rd St.) 
M39. G. 

Bade, Dr. William Frederic. MnF3iD36. 
LH. 

Baden, Martin W. Box 520. Winrield. 
Kans. M28K33R39. E. 

Badertscher, A(mos) Edison. M.S., Rut- 
gers, 30. Chief entomologist, McCormick 
and Co.. Baltimore, Md. do-? Bonnie Hill 
Road, Towson, Md.) M39. FCP. 

Badertscher, Prof. Jacob A. Ph.D., Cor- 
nell, 14. Prof, anatomy, Indiana Univ. 
School Med.. Bloomington, Ind. (312 S. 
Fess Ave.) M17F21. X. 

Badger, George F(ranklin). Herman 
Kiefer Hosp., Detroit, Mich. M32R34. 
NKA. 

Baehne, G(eorge) W(alter). J.D., New 
York, 31. International Business Ma- 
chines Corp., New York, N. Y. (Box 136, 
Darien, Conn.) M35. KM P.. 



Baehr, Dr. George. M.D., Columbia, 08. 
Clinical prof, medicine, Columbia Univ.; 
attending physician, Mt. Sinai Hosp.; 
consulting physician, St. Joseph's Hosp. 
and Rockaway Beach Hosp., New York, 
X. Y.. and Monmouth Memorial Hosp., 
Long Beach, N. J. M06F25. N. 

Baekeland, George. E.M., Colorado School 
Mines, 21. Vice pres., Bakelite Corp., New 
York, X. Y. (Southport, Conn.) M34F34. E. 

Baekeland, Dr. L(eo) H(endrik). D.Xat.- 
Sc, Ghent. 84; D.Ch., Pittsburgh, 16; 
D.Sc, Columbia, 29; D.A.Sc, Brussels, 
34; LL.D., Edinburgh, 37. Honorary prof, 
chemical engng., Columbia Univ., New 
York, N. Y. (3715 Main Highway, Coco- 
nut Grove, Fla.) M06F08L24. C. 

Baer, B(ernard) E(dward). C.E., Cincin- 
nati, 16. Baer Engng. and Construction 
Co.. Kansas City, Mo. M21. ML. 

Baer, Clarence E(ugene). M.A., Colum- 
bia, 26. 71 W. 5th St.. Oswego, N. Y. M34- 
F34. QBC. 

Baer. Henry M. n 60 Park Ave., New 
York, N. Y. M39. C. 

Baer, Dr. Walter H. M.D., Illinois, 31. 
Managing officer, Manteno State Hosp., 
Manteno, 111. M38. INK. 

Bagg, Dr. Halsey J(oseph). M.A., Colum- 
bia, 15; Ph.D., 18. Biologist, Memorial 
Hosp., Xew York, X. Y. M29F30. FX1. 

Bagg, Dr. Rufus M(ather). Box 386, Ap- 
pleton, Wis. M00F03R34. E. 

Baggaley, Ralph. Arlington Apartments. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Loi. EM. 

Bagley, Dr. Charles, Jr. Latrobe Apart- 
ments, Baltimore, Md. M11F27R34. X. 

Bagley, Miss Mariana (Dasch). 100; 
famestown Crescent, Norfolk, Va. M38. 
KLN. 

Bagley, Dr. William C(handler). M.S.. 
Wisconsin, 98; Ph.D., Cornell. 00; Ed.D.. 
Rhode Island State, 19. Prof, emeritus 
education, Columbia L T niv. Teachers Col.. 
Xew York. X. Y\ M08F10. Q. 

Bagley, Dr. William R. M.D., Michigan. 
501 Woodland Ave.. Duluth. Minn. M38. 
XBE. 

Bagnall, Dr. J(ohn) Stanley. D.D.S.. Dal- 
housie, 21. Prof, dentistry. Dalhousie 
Univ., Halifax. X. S., Canada. ( ~S Larch 
St.) M36. NdQ. 

Bagusin, Dr. A(lexis) M(atthew). M.D., 
Harvard, 21. Physician, 5726 Cross Coun- 
try Blvd., Mt. Washington, Baltimore, 
Md. M24. XFG. 

Bahm, Dr. Archie J(ohn). M.A., Michi- 
gan, 30; Ph.D., a. Asst. prof, philosophy 
and sociology, Texas Tech. Col., Lub- 
bock, Tex. M36. IK. 



Individual Members 



243 



Bahner, Dr. Carl T(abb). M.S., Chicago. 
28; Th.M.. Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary. 31; Ph.D., Columbia. 36. Prof. 
chemistry, Carson-Newman Col., Jeffer- 
son City, Tenn. M40. CNQ. 

Bahr, Frederick C(harles). Vice pres. and 
gen mgr., Parts Div., Chrysler Corp., De- 
troit. Mich. (41 Renaud Road, Crosse 
Pointe Shores, Mich.) M29. FKM. 

Bahrs, Dr. Alice M(atilda). M.A., Cali- 
fornia, 2- ; Ph.D.. (Oregon, 30. Head Dept. 
Science, St. Helen's Hall Junior Col., 
Portland, Oreg. (Martha Washington 
Hotel) M28F33. N. 

Bahrt, George M(artin). M.S., Nebraska, 
25. Assoc, soil technologist, U. S. Dept. 
Agric, Orlando, Fla. ( 1 5 1 6 S. Osceola St.) 
M2QF40. COE. 

Baier, Dr. Joseph G(eorge), Jr. M.Sc, 
Rutgers, 29; Ph.D.. Wisconsin. 32. Assoc, 
prof, zoology, Univ. Wisconsin, Mil- 
waukee Center, Milwaukee, Wis. M33. FN. 

Bailey. Alfred M(arshall). A.B., Iowa. 16. 
Dir., Colorado Mus. Natural History, 
Denver. Colo. (4340 Montview Blvd.) 
M37. F. 

Bailey, Dr. Benjamin Franklin. M.D.. 
Hahnemann. 81. Pres. and mgr.. Creen 
Cables Sanatorium, Lincoln, Nebr. M17- 
F33- N. 

Bailey. Dr. Cameron V(ernon). M.D..- 
C.M.. McGill, 00. Clinical prof, medicine, 
New York Post Graduate Med. School, 
Columbia Univ., New York, N. Y. (235 
E. 22nd St.) M21F27. N. 

Bailey, Dr. Clyde H(arold). M.S., Minne- 
sota. 16; Ph.D., Maryland, 21. Vice dir., 
Minnesota Agric. Exp. Sta. ; prof, agric. 
biochemistry, Univ. Earm, Univ. Minne- 
sota, St. Paul. Minn. M18F24. GO. 

Bailey, D(ixon) L(loyd). M.S., Minne- 
sota, 21; Ph.D., 24. Assoc, prof, plant 
pathology, Univ. Toronto, Toronto, Ont., 
Canada. (428 Glencairn Ave.) M23F25. 
GO. 

Bailey, Dr. Edna W(atson). M.S.. Cali- 
fornia, 07; Ph.D.. 10. Assoc, prof, educa- 
tion, Univ. California, Berkeley, Calif. 
(1022 Spruce St.) M19F31. QFI. 

Bailey, Miss Ethel H. Mechanical engi- 
neer, Montclair Public Library, Montclair, 
N. J. (17 Montclair Ave.) M25F25. MK. 

Bailey, Dr. Frank William. M.A., Mani- 
toba, 29; M.D.. Rush, 39. Prof, zoology, 
Los Angeles City Col., Los Angeles, Calif. 
(1038 Hartzell St., Pacific Palisades, Calif.) 
M40. NF. 

Bailey, Gordon. 1 1 Ocean St., Kogarah, 
N.S.W., Australia. M32R32. MBC. 

Bailey, Dr. Guy W(inifred). LL.D.. Ver- 
mont, Norwich, Middlebury, 21. Pres.. 
Univ. Vermont and State Agric. Col., 
Burlington, Vt. (203 S. Willard St.) M40. I. 



Bailey, Dr. H(arold) W(ood). M.A.. Illi- 
nois, 24; Ph.D., 2(1. Dir. Personnel Bui., 
(id. Liberal Arts and Sciences and asst. 
prof, mathematics, Univ. Illinois, Crbana, 
111. M.UF34. A. 

Bailey, Prof. Irving W(idmer). M.F., Har- 
vard, 09; D.Sc. Wisconsin. 31. Prof, plant 
anatomy. Harvard Univ., Cambridge. 
Mass. M 11F15. ( ,. 

Bailey, Dr. J(ames) R(obinson). Ph.D.. 
Munich, 96. Dept. Chemistry, Univ. Texas, 
Austin, Tex. M34F34. C. 

Bailey, Dr. John Hays. Ph.D.. Chicago, 
28; D.P.H., Michigan. 38. Asst. prof, bac- 
teriology and public health, Loyola Univ. 
School Med., Chicago. 111. (6507 Minerva 
\ve.) M28F33. N. 

Bailey, Dr. John Wendell. M.S., Missis- 
sippi State, 17; A.M., Cornell, 25; M.A., 
Harvard, zy ; Ph.D., 28. Prof, biology, 
Univ. Richmond, Richmond. Va. ; dir. 
biological research. Chesapeake Corp., 
West Point, Va. M17F33L38. FG. 

Bailey, Miss L. Lorene. 3005 Stevens St., 
Parsons, Kans. M32R32. EG. 

Bailey, Prof. Lewis Birdwell. M.S., Texas 
A. and M.. 30. 331 Mt. Pleasant St., Pitts- 
burg. Tex. M34. CQM. 

Bailey. Dr. Liberty Hyde. LL.D., Wis- 
consin. 07. Alfred. 08; Litt.D.. Vermont, 
10; D.Sc, Puerto Rico, .12. 103 Sage Place. 
Ithaca, N. Y. M13F87. GO. Vice president 
for Section on Agriculture (M), ryr.f. Pres- 
ident, rgj6. 

Bailey, Lynn H(amilton). A.B., Swarth- 
more, 17. Co-partner sales office, Alco- 
Gravure Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. (205 Fern- 
brook Ave.. Wyncote, Pa.) M37. K. 

Bailey, Dr. Orville Taylor. M.D.. Union. 
Instr. pathology, Harvard Med. School, 
Boston, Mass. M40. NCF. 

Bailey, Dr. P. L., Jr. Dept. Biology, Col. 

City New York. New York, N. Y. M35- 

F35R38. FN I. 

Bailey, Prof. Paul F. B.S., Loyola South. 

26. Asst. prof, chemistry, Loyola Univ., 

New Orleans, La. (4610 Perrier St.) M40. 

CFN. 

Bailey, Prof. Reed W(arner). M.S., Chi- 
cago. 27. Dir.. U. S. Intermountain Forest 
and Range Exp. Sta., Ogden, Utah. M29- 
F 3 3- ED. 

Bailey. R(ussell) M. B.S., Maine, 28. 
Assoc, geneticist, Maine Agric. Exp. Sta., 
( Jrono, Maine. M34F34. < »FG. 

Bailey, Samuel M. U. S. Engineer Office, 
Louisville, Ky. M39R39. EH. 

Bailey, Miss Sarah Watson. M.S., Middle- 
bury. 26; A. M., Radcliffe, 30; Ph.D., 36. 
15 Campden Road, Scarsdale, N. Y. M27. F. 

Bailey, Dr. Thomas Laval. M.A., Cali- 
fornia, 21 ; Ph.D., 26. Regional geologist. 
Shell Oil Co., Inc., Houston, Tex. (2518 
Prospect Ave.) M24F31. E. 



244 



Directory of Members 



Bailey, Prof. Thomas Leonard. 229 W. 

Midland St., Shawnee, Okla. M32R32. 
CBO. 

Bailey, Dr. William M(arshall). M.S., 
Chicago, 13; Ph.D., 32. Prof, botany and 
head Dept., Southern Illinois State Nor- 
mal Univ., Carbondale, 111. (506 S. Pop- 
lar St.) M36F38. G. 

Bailey, Miss Yvonne Adele. Lindenwood 
Col., St. Charles, Mo. M36R37. FC. 

Baillie, Prof. W(illiam) H(arold) T(revor- 
row). M.A.. Toronto, 12; M.D., 28. Assoc. 
prof, mammalian anatomy, Univ. Toronto, 
Toronto, Out., Canada. (152 Stibbard 
Ave.) M39. FNH. 

Bailor, Prof. Edwin M(aurice). M.A., 
Washington State, 16; Ph.D., Columbia, 
24. Prof, psychology, Dartmouth Col., 
Hanover, N. H. (8 Brockway Road) M34- 
F34. I. 

Baily, Dr. Joshua L(ongstreth), Jr. A.M.. 
Ffaverford. 13; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins, 38. 
Res. assoc, San Diego Mus. Natural His- 
tory, San Diego, Calif. (443 s Ampudia 
St.) M27. FAD. 

Bain, Henry F(ranklin). M.S., Brown, 17. 
2209 38th St. NW., Washington, D.C. 
M25F33. G. 

Bain, Read. A.M., Oregon. 21; Ph.D.. 
Michigan. 26. Prof, sociology and head 
Dept., Miami Univ., Oxford, Ohio. (116 
Tallawanda Road) M35F37- KHI. 

Baines, M. Carroll. M32D35. N. 

Bair, Prof. W(illiam) H(arry). Ph.D., 
California, 20. Box 483. Potsdam, N. Y. 
M24F40. B. 

Baird, Arthur C. Vice principal (retired), 
Tavlor Allerdice High School, Pittsburgh, 
Pa! (920 East End Ave.) M08. AD. 

Baird, Charles. M29D40. 

Baird, Dr. Don O. M.A., Columbia, 28; 
Ph.D., 30. Prof, biology, Sam Houston 
State Teachers Col., Huntsville, Tex. M29- 
F38. QFG. 

Baird, Edgar A(lan). Ph.D., Wisconsin, 
20. Scientific staff, Chicago Apparatus 
Co., Chicago, 111. M21F31. G. 

Baird, Kenneth E. Philadelphia Coke Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. M29R38. CM. 

Baird, Robert Logan. Box 324, Ann Ar- 
bor, Mich. M24. FGQ. 

Baitsell, George A(lfred). M.A., Yale, 09; 
Ph.D., 14. Prof, biology, Yale Univ., New 
Haven, Conn. M17F20. FG. Secretary of 
Section on Zoological Sciences (F), 1937. 

Bakenhus, Rear Adm. R(euben) E(dwin). 
B.S., Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 96. Rear 
admiral retired, U. S. Navy; consulting 
engineer, 142 Maiden Lane, New York, 
X. Y. (51 5th Ave.) M18F31. M. 



Baker, Prof. A(lbert) W(esley). B.S.A.. 
Toronto, 11. Prof, systematic entomology 
and zoology, Ontario Agric. Col., Guelph, 
Ont., Canada. M13F20. F. 

Baker, Alexander D(ouglas). MacDonald 
College, Que., Canada. M29R32. FO. 

Baker, Dr. Alson. M.D., Louisville, 05. 
Physician, Berea, Ky. M24. HN. 

Baker, Dr. A(rthur) Latham. M28F95D34. 
GFC. 

Baker, Carl I(rving). M.A., Columbia, 2~. 
Gen. foreman, Vacuum Tube Shop, West- 
ern Electric Co., Inc., New York, N. Y. 
(Pearl River, N. Y.) M27. MBK. 

Baker, Charles S. M.A., Columbia, 12; 
LL.B., George Washington, 13. Lawyer, 
Washington, D. C. (4959 Hillbrook Lane 
NW.) M37. K. 

Baker, Dr. C(lifton) A(yres). M31D39. 
IQ. 

Baker, Dr. Clinton L(yle). Ph.D., Colum- 
bia, 33. Assoc, prof, biology, Southwest- 
ern Univ., Memphis, Tenn. M36. FG. 

Baker, Dr. E. H. 5312 Hyde Park Blvd.. 
Chicago, 111. (?) M30R32. N. 

Baker, E(dgar) G(ates) Stanley. 506 S. 
Grant Ave., Crawfordsville. Irid. M31R35. 
FCN. 

Baker, Dr. Edward B. 928 Pallister Ave., 
Detroit, Mich. M31R33. BAC. 

Baker, Dr. Edward William. Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia, 38. Junior entomologist, U. S. Bur. 
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Cal- 
zada Mexico-Tacuba 295, Colonia Ana- 
huac. Mexico. D.F., Mexico. M40. F. 

Baker, Dr. Elsworth Frederick. M.D., 
Manitoba, 28. Chief Women's Service, 
State Hosp., Marlboro, N. J. M38. N. 

Baker, Ernest L. B.S., Maine, 03. Pres.. 
Pyramid Process Co., Inc., East Roches- 
ter, N. Y. M34F34- C. 

Baker, Mrs. Estelle Hukel. Stephenville. 
Tex. M34. BEQ. 

Baker, Dr. Ezra F. c/o First Nat. Bank, 
Louisville, Ky. M06F15R37. H. 

Baker, Frank C(ollins). B.S., Chicago 
School Science, 95. Curator emeritus. 
Mus. Natural History, Univ. Illinois, Ur- 
bana, 111. M07F21. EF. 

Baker, Frank Elmer. A.M., Allegheny, 13: 
L.H.D., 29; A.M., Harvard, 09. Pres., 
State Teachers Col., Milwaukee, Wis. (601 
E. Day Ave.) M30. 

Baker, Frederick A. M29D— . B. 

Baker, George A (lien). 3016 Edwards St., 
Alton, 111. M32R32. A. 

Baker, Dr. Gladys E(lizabeth). M.Sc. 
Iowa, 32; Ph.D., Washington Univ., 35. 
Instr. biology, Hunter Col., New York. 
N. Y. (soi W. 13th St.) M37F39. GF. 



Individual Members 



245 



Baker, Glenn J(ackson). M.A., Wiscon- 
sin, 32. Engineer, Win. M. Barret, Inc.. 
Shreveport, La. M31. E. 

Baker, Prof. Harry A(rnold). M34F34D37. 
BCM. 

Baker, Dr. Harry J(ay). A.M., Michigan, 
18; Ph.D., jo. Dir. psychological clinic, 
Detroit Public Schools, Detroit. Mich. 
Mji F25. IQ. 
Baker, Prof. H(erbert) J(onathan). M39- 

D39. Q. 

Baker, Dr. Howard B. M.D., Michigan, 
98. 4867 Hamilton Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
M30. EF. 

Baker, Dr. Hugh P(otter). M.F., Yale, 04; 
D.Oec, Munich, 10; LL.D., Syracuse, 33. 
Pres., Massachusetts State Col., Amherst, 
Mass. M02F11. EGQ. 

Baker, Prof. Ida M(ay). A.M., Columbia, 
_'4; Ph.D., Ohio State, 37. Assoc, prof, 
mathematics. Western Reserve Univ., 
Cleveland, Ohio. (2196 Ambleside Drive) 
M34F34. A. 

Baker, Dr. John C(lark). M.S., Columbia, 
15; Ph.D., 16; D.Sc, Upper Iowa, 29. 
Vice pres. and chief chemist, Wallace 
Tiernan Co. ; chief chemist, Novadel 
Agene Corp., Newark, N. J.; sec, Lucidol 
Corp., Buffalo, N. Y. (67 Eagle Rock 
Way, Montclair, N. J.) M19F33. CN. 

Baker, Dr. Kenneth F(rank). Ph.D., Wash- 
ington State, 34. Asst. prof, plant pathol- 
ogy, Univ. California Los Angeles; asst. 
plant pathologist, California Agric. Exp. 
Sta., Los Angeles, Calif. M38F39. G. 

Baker, Miss Lora. M.A., Indiana, 23. 
Route 3, Hartford City, Ind. M34. E. 

Baker, Dr. Margaret Rock. M.D., Pitts- 
burgh, 32. Pathologist, Children's Hosp., 
Akron, Ohio. (633 W. Market St.) M28. 
NAC. 

Baker, Mrs. Norman H. (Dr. M. Jeannette 
Lieber). 626 Summit Ave. W., Fergus 
Falls, Minn. M31R33. NFB. 

Baker, Percy H(ayes). M.S., Pittsburgh, 
30. Asst. prof, biology, Virginia State 
Col., Ettrick, Va. M40. FG. 

Baker, Dr. Ralph D(oris). M.S., Kansas, 
31; Ph.D., California Inst. Tech., 38. 
Asst. prof., Dept. Mechanical Engng., 
Univ. Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. (2633 
Beverly St.) M40. MBI. 

Baker, R(ay) J(erome). B.Sc, Hawaii, 
34. Photographer, 191 1 Kalakaua Ave., 
Honolulu, Hawaii. M40. GKF. 

Baker, R(aymond) F(rank). Ph.B., Yale, 
12. Chief geologist, The Texas Co., New 
York, N. Y. M34F34. E. 

Baker, Prof. Richard Philip. M08F10- 
D37. A. 

Baker, Prof. Robert H(orace). Ph.D., 

Pittsburgh, 10. Univ. Illinois Observatory, 
Urbana, 111. M24F25. DB. 



Baker, Dr. Roger Denio. M.D., Harvard, 
28. Asst. prof, pathology, Duke Univ. 
School Med.; asst. pathologist, Duke 
Hosp., Durham, N. Car. (11 11 Watts St.) 
M34F34- N. 

Baker, Prof. R(oss) A(llen). A.M., De 
Painv, 07; Sc.D., 37; Ph.D., Wisconsin. 
14. Prof, chemistry, Commerce Center, The 
City Col., New York, N. Y. (101 Lake- 
side Drive, Baldwin, N. Y.) M07F15. C. 

Baker, Samuel Sweigart. A.B., Case, 05. 
Mgr. Thermometer Div., Amer. Thermo- 
meter Co., St. Louis, Mo. (450 Somerset 
Ave., Webster Groves, Mo.) M40. BDM. 

Baker, Prof. Thomas A(lexander). 240 
Orchard Road, Newark, Del. M28F3iR34- O. 

Baker, Dr. Thomas S(tockham). M25- 
F25D39. KLM. 

Baker, W(ebster) E(merson) Byron. Mgr. 
paper research, New York and Pennsyl- 
vania Co., Inc., and Costanea Paper Co., 
Lock Haven, Pa. (15 W. Church St.) 
M18. CBG. 

Baker, Wilfred H(armon). Route 1, James- 
ville, N. Y. M38R39. MA. 

Baker, William A(ddison), Jr. 3218 Ewing 
St., Houston, Tex. M23R39. EF. 

Baker, William E(llmore). County agric. 
agent, U. S. Dept. Agric, Boise City, 
Okla. M38. HE. 

Baker, Prof. Woolford Bales. M.S., 
Emory, 20; Ph.D., Columbia, 26. Prof, 
biology, Emory University, Ga. (1304 
Durand Drive NE., Atlanta, Ga.) M39F31. 
GF. 

Bakes, Frank P. Speech Clinic, Univ. 
Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. M36R36. IQK. 

Bakewell, Prof. Charles M(ontague). A.M., 
Harvard, 92; Ph.D., 94; A.M., Yale, 05. 
Prof, emeritus philosophy, Yale Univ., 
New Haven, Conn. M04F06. IK. 

Bakhmeteff, Dr. Boris A(lexander). 
D.Eng., St. Petersburg, 12. Prof, civil 
engng., Columbia Univ., New York, N. Y. 
(250 W. 57th St.) M38. M. 

Bakhuyzen, Dr. H(endrick) L(eo) van de 
Sande. 424 E. 1st St., Tucson, Ariz. (?) 
M29F31R36. GCB. 

Bakke, Dr. A(rthur) L(awrence). M.S., 
Iowa, 11; Ph.D., Chicago, 17. Res. prof., 
Iowa Agric. Exp. Sta., Ames, Iowa. 
M10F16. G. 

Bakke, Dr. E(dward) Wight. 333 Cedar 
St., New Haven, Conn. M37R37. K. 

Bakst, Leon H. 45 Barrows St., Provi- 
dence, R. I. M32R33. CN. 

Bakwin, Prof. Harry. M.D., Columbia, 17. 
Asst. prof, pediatrics, New York Univ. 
Col. Med.; assoc. attending pediatrician, 
Bellevue Hosp., New York, N. Y. ; at- 
tending pediatrician, Seaside Hosp., Staten 
Island, N. Y. M32. HN. 



246 



Directory of Members 



Bakwin, Dr. Ruth Morris. M.D., Cornell, 
23; M.A., Columbia, 29. Dir. pediatric-*, 
New York Infirmary Women and Chil- 
dren; instr. pediatrics, New York Univ. 
Col. Med.; asst. pediatrician, Bellevue 
Hosp., New York, N. Y. M32. HN. 

Balce, Sofronio. Univ. Philippines, Manila, 
P. I. M34R35- CB. 

Balch, Francis Noyes. A.M., Harvard, 97. 
60 State St., Boston, Mass. M01F13. 
FHE. 

Balchen, Bernt. Northrop Aircraft Corp., 
Englewood, Calif. (?) M35F35R35. M. 

Balderston, Prof. Mark. Ph.D., Columbia, 
26. Prof, physics, Lafavette Col., Easton, 
Pa. (856 Mixsell St.) M22F33- B. 

Baldes, Dr. E(dward) J(ames). A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard; Ph.D., London. Assoc, 
Div. Physics and Biophysical Res., Mayo 
Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, 
Minn.; assoc. prof, biophysics, Univ. 
Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. (1135 1st 
St. N.W., Rochester, Minn.) M40. NB. 

Baldinger, Dr. Lawrence H(enry). M.S., 
Notre Dame, 31; Ph.D., 33. Asst. prof, 
chemistry, Univ. Notre Dame, Notre 
Dame, Ind. (814 E. Corby Blvd., South 
Bend, Ind.) M36F38. CN. 

Baldock, Russell. Box 154, Blacksburg. 
Va. M34R36. BAC. 

Baldridge, Dr. Clifford John. Court House, 
Hamilton, Ohio. M25R32. NIL. 

Balduf, Prof. Walter V(alentine). M.S., 
Ohio State, 20; Ph.D., 22. Assoc, prof, 
entomology, Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 111. 
M20F25. F. 

Baldwin, Erdmann Dwight. Paia, Maui, 
Hawaii. M33R3S. EKM. 

Baldwin, Dr. Francis Marsh. A.M., Illi- 
nois, 07; Ph.D., 17. Prof, zoology, Univ. 
Southern California, .Los Angeles, Calif. 
M20F21. F. 

Baldwin, Frank L(ove). 310 William St., 
East Orange, N. J. M35R37. B. 

Baldwin, Dr. Henry I(ves). M.F., Yale, 

22; Ph.D., 31. Asst. forester charge forest 

research, New Hampshire Forestry and 

Recreation Dept., Hillsboro, N. H. M21- 

F31. GOE. 

Baldwin, Herbert B(elcher). M94E39D39. 

CF. 

Baldwin, Dr. Ira Lawrence. M.S., Purdue, 
21 ; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 26. Prof, bac- 
teriology, Univ. Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 
M28F29. GON. 

Baldwin, Dr. Kate Wylie. 11 17 Spruce 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. M17R33. N. 

Baldwin, Mark. D.Sc, Earlham, 33. U. S. 
Bur. Chemistry and Soils, Washington, 
D. C. M29F31. OEG. 

Baldwin, Dr. Robert C(hester). Box 46, 
Univ. Connecticut, Storrs, Conn. M34- 
R34. LK. 



Baldwin, Roger S(herman). Hotel Kings- 
bury. Waterburv, Conn. M23F32R^X. 
KQH. 

Baldwin, S(amuel) Prentiss. L98F00D38. 
FE. 

Baldwin, Walter A. Box 14, Cambridge, 
Mass. M20. CB. 

Baldwin, Dr. Wesley M(anning). A.M., 
Cornell, 09; M.D., 11. Box 441, York- 
Beach, Maine. M33F33. NHF. 

Bales, Prof. Paul D(obson). A.M., Indiana, 
29. Assoc, prof, physics, Howard Col., 
Birmingham, Ala. M35F35. B. 

Balfour, Dr. Donald Church. M.D., 
Toronto, 06; LL.D., Carlton, 34. Prof, 
surgery, Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis; 
dir. Mayo Foundation and head, Div. Sur- 
gery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. (427 
6th Ave. SW.. Rochester, Minn.) M28- 
F33. N. 

Balfour, Dr. M(arshall) C(oulter). M.D., 
Harvard, 26. Far East representative. 
Rockefeller Foundation, Shanghai, China. 
(115 Cathay Mansions) M34F34. NFM. 

Balinkin, Dr. Isay A(lexander). M.Sc, 
Cincinnati, 26; Ph.D., 29. Instr. physics, 
Univ. Cincinnati; consulting physicist, 
Cambridge Tile Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. M28F33. B. 

Balkam, Miss Barbara J. Box 196, Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. M38R38. IQA. 

Ball, Prof. Albert. A.B., Cornell, 01. Prof, 
physics, Cooper Union, New York, N. Y. 
M07F16. BM. 

Ball, Dr. Carleton R(oy). M.S., Iowa 
State, 99; D.Sc, 20. Exec sec. Co- 
ordinating Committee, U. S. Dept. Agric, 
Land-Grant Colleges, and Tennessee Val- 
ley Authority, Washington, D. C. (3814 
Jocelyn St. NW.) M00F02. OGK. 

Ball, Dr. C(harles) Olin. M.S., George 
Washington, 22; Ph.D., 26. Asst. to dir. 
res., Amer. Can Co., New York, N. Y. 
(32 Sycamore Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y.) 
M34F34. CBG. 

Ball, Dr. Clarence Franklin. M.D., Amer. 
Med. Missionary Col. (Chicago), 02. Sur- 
geon, Rutland Hosp.; dir.. X-ray and 
Radium Inst., Rutland, Vt. ; chairman, 
Vermont State Cancer Commission, Mont- 
pelier, Vt. (23 Washington St., Rutland, 
Vt.) M36. NE. 

Ball, Edwin (Lawrence). Ph.M., Wis- 
consin, 39. Graduate asst. botany, Univ. 
Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. M40. G. 

Ball, Dr. Elmer D(arwin). Univ. Arizona 
Agric. Exp. Sta., Tucson, Ariz. M01F03- 
R38. FO. 

Ball, Dr. Gordon H(arold). M.S., Pitts- 
burgh, 21 ; Ph.D., California, 24. Assoc, 
prof. zoology, Univ. California Los 
Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif. M24F30. 
FGN. 



Individual Members 



247 



Ball, Dr. John D(udley). Ph.D., Marquette, 
28. Prof, physics, Mt. Mary Col., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. (2715 N. Stowell Ave.) 
M38F38. MBD. 

Ball, John O(lsen). M.A., Denver. 13954 
S. Reno St., Los Angeles, Calif. M39. 
QAM. 

Ball, Dr. John R(ice). A.M., North- 
western, 19; Ph.D., Chicago, 27. Assoc, 
prof, geology and geography, Northwest- 
ern Univ., Evanston, 111. (701 Emerson 
St.) M29F31. EFH. 

Ball, Dr. Josephine. Ph.D., California, 29. 
Asst. psychobiology, Henry Phipps Psy- 
chiatric Clinic, Johns Hopkins Univ., 
Baltimore, Md. M31F33. INF. 

Ball, Prof. Oscar Melville. Texas A. and 
M. Col., College Station, Tex. M18F21R39. 
EG. 

Ball, Mrs. Rachel Stutsman. Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 28. Consulting psychologist, 27 W. 
Curtin St., Bellefonte, Pa. M29F33. IQK. 

Ball, Robert Jaudon. 209 N. Palm Drive, 
Beverly Hills, Calif. M 3 oR35- IKQ. 

Ball, Miss Rose. M29D — . 

Ball, Dr. Stanley Crittenden. Ph.D., Yale, 
15. Curator zoology, Peabody Mus. Nat- 
ural History; assoc. prof, biology, Yale 
Univ., New Haven, Conn. M22F31. F. 

Ball, Prof. T(heodore) R(olly). M.S., 
Ph.D., Illinois. Washington Univ., St. 
Louis, Mo. M35F35- C. 

Ball, Prof. Thomas F(auntleroy). Univ. 
South Carolina, Columbia, S. Car. M34- 
F34R37. M. 

Ball, W(illiam) Howard. 1861 Ingleside 
Terrace NW., Washington, D. C. M31R35. 
FG. 

Ballard, Prof. Charles W(illiam). Phar.D., 
Columbia, 08; A.M., n; Ph.D., 26. Dean, 
Columbia Univ. Col. Phar., New York, 
N. Y. M34F34. GNp. 

Ballard, Mrs. Foster K. (Ruth G. Mason). 
M.S., Chicago, 29; Ph.D., 32. Teacher, 
Wright Junior Col., Chicago, 111. (636 
Wellington Ave.) L38. A. 

Ballard, John William. Texas Christian 
Univ., Fort Worth, Tex. M34R34. KQ. 

Ballard, Dr. Stanley S(umner). Ph.D., 

California, 34. Asst. prof, physics, Univ. 
Hawaii; collaborator chemistry and soils, 
Hawaii Agric. Exp. Sta., Honolulu, 
Hawaii. M39F40. B. 

Ballard, W(illiam) S(alisbury). A.B., 
Illinois, 04. Senior pathologist fruit dis- 
eases, U. S. Dept. Agric, Fresno, Calif. 
(1717 Del Mar Ave.) M11F13. GCO. 

Ballard, Dr. W(illiam) W(hitney). Ph.D., 
Yale, 33. Asst. prof, biology, Dartmouth 
Col., Hanover, N. H. (Norwich, Vt.) 
M34F40. F. 



Ballentine, Robert. A.B., Princeton, 37. 
Graduate student biology, Princeton Univ.. 
Princeton, N. J. (133 Buckingham Road, 
Upper Montclair, N. J.) M30. FC. 

Bailer, Dr. Warren R(obert). A.M., 
Nebraska, 27; Ph.D., 35. Assoc, prof, edu- 
cational psychology, Univ. Nebraska 
Teachers Col., Lincoln, Nebr. (3045 N. 
52nd St.) M37. I. 

Balliet, Dr. Thomas M(inard). 600 W. 
116th St., New York, N. Y. M99F03R39. 

QI. 

Ballon, Harry C(larence). M.D., CM., Mc- 
Gill, 23. 1414 Drummond St., Montreal, 
Que., Canada. M32F38. N. 

Ballou, Prof. Charles H(erbert). B.S., 
Cornell, 14. Prof, entomology, Escuela de 
Agriculture; chief, Dept. Entomology, 
Kstacion Exp. de Agric. y Zootecnia, 
El Valle, Venezuela, S. A. M14F39. FGO. 

Ballou, Dr. Frank W(ashington). Frank- 
lin School Bldg., Washington, D. C. 
Mi 4 F2 I R 3 5. Q- 

Ballou, Dr. Willard Alger. M.A., Columbia, 
15; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 33. Connecticut 
Junior Col., Bridgeport, Conn. M17F33. 
ABQ. 

Balmer, H(arold) F(rederick). M.A., 
Toronto, 24. Asst. curator, Dept. Physics, 
Mus. Science and Industry, Chicago, 111. 
M35F35. DB. 

Balsbaugh, Prof. J(ayson) C(lair). M.S., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 24. Assoc, 
prof, electric power production and dis- 
tribution, Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 
Cambridge, Mass. M34F34. M. 

Baltazar, Eulalio P. Univ. Philippines, 
Manila, P. I. M32R32. GOF. 

Baltzan, Dr. D. M. M.D.,C.M., McGill. 
McMillan Bldg., Saskatoon, Sask., Canada. 
M39- NK. 
Baltzell, Mrs. William Hewson. L29D38. 

Bamber, Lyle E(dward). M.S., Illinois, 
27. Library asst. charge Natural History 
Library, Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 111. M38. F. 

Bamberger, Edgar S. B.A., Johns Hopkins, 
03. Trustee, Inst. Advanced Study, Prince- 
ton, and Newark Univ., Newark, N. J. 
(100 Gregory Ave., West Orange, N. J.) 
M29. 

Bamberger, Prof. Florence Eilau. M.A., 
Columbia, 15; Ph.D., 22. Dir., Johns 
Hopkins Univ. Col. Teachers, Baltimore. 
Md. M18F21. LQ. 

Bamberger, L. Richard. 1 Wall St., New- 
York, N. Y. M28. H. 

Bamford, William B(rokaw). C.E., 
Princeton, 00. 614 10th Ave., Belmar, 
N. J. M29. KIM. 

Banay, Dr. Ralph S. M.D., Budapest, 20. 
Dir. clinical psychiatry, Boston State 
Hosp., Boston, Mass. M36. NI. 



_> 4 8 



Directory of Members 



Bancroft, Mrs. E. C. (Edith Susan 
Whitaker). A.M., Radcliffe, 17; Ph.D., 
j j. Hamilton, N. Y. M21F31. GFN. 

Bancroft, George Herbert. M.S., West Vir- 
ginia, 31; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 37. Instr. 
physics, Hobart Col., Geneva, N. Y. (405 
Washington St.) M31F40. B. 

Bancroft, Dr. George R(ussell). Ph.D.. 
Yale, 17; D.Sc, Acadia, 34. Prof, phy- 
siological chemistry, Jefferson Med. Col., 
Philadelphia, Pa. (436 Gainesboro Road, 
Drexel Hill, Pa.) M21F33. CN. 

Bancroft, Miss Jessie Hubbell. M.P.E., 
Springfield, 26. Lake Placid Club, Lake 
Placid, N. Y. M07F15. N. 

Bancroft, Prof. Merle Fowler. A.B., Yale, 
13. Box 190, Wolfville, N.S., Canada. 
M25F25. E. 

Bancroft, Dr. William Wallace. A.M., 
Pennsylvania, 21; Ph.D., 31. Prof, phi- 
losophv, Ursinus Col., Collegeville, Pa. 
(942 Main St.) M32. HI. 

Bandeen, Dr. Stanley G. M.D. 514 Breslin 
Bldg., Louisville, Ky. M38. CNI. 

Bandler, Dr. Leon. 211 Central Park W., 
New York, N. Y. (?) M18R33. N. 

Bane, Miss Lita. 1208 California St., 
Urbana, 111. M31F37R37. KQ. 

Banerjee, K. C. 3 Charnock Place, Cal- 
cutta, Bengal, India. M33R33. M. 

Banet, Mrs. Sarah C. (Sarah C. Cohen). 
M.A., California, 32. Teacher, Dept. 
Biology, Julia Richman High School, 
New York, N. Y. (304 W. 102nd St.) 
M30. GFQ. 

Bangham, Ralph V(andervort). M.A., 
Haverford, 17; Ph.D., Ohio State, 23. 
Prof, biology, Col. Wooster, Wooster, 
Ohio. (1004 X. Bever St.) M23F33. F. 

Bangham, Walter N(icholas). S.M., Har- 
vard, 29. Dir., Plant Res. Dept., Goodyear 
Rubber Plantations Co., Colok Merangir, 
E.C. Sumatra. N.E.I. (47 Mellen St., Ash- 
mont, Boston, Mass.) M29F32. FGO. 

Bangs, Edward H(ugh). 168 Addison 
Road, Riverside, 111. M17. M. 

Bangson, Prof. John S(tuver). M.S., 
Susquehanna, 17. Dept. Biology, Berea 
Col., Berea, Ky. M27F33. FG. 

Banker, Dr. Howard J(ames). A.M., 
Columbia, 00; Ph.D., 06. 14 Myrtle Ave., 
Huntington, N. Y. M02F05L23. G. 

Banks, Prof. Burnwell Bernard. M.S.. 
Atlanta, 37. Asst. prof, chemistry, North 
Carolina Agric. and Tech. Col., Greens- 
boro, N. Car. (360 W. Bragg St.) M30. 
CBX. 

Banks, Dr. George B(ernard). Ph.D., 
Niagara, 37 . Prof. physical science, 
Niagara University, N. Y. (931 Maple 
Ave., Niagara Falls, N. Y.) Mi8F^8. 
CBA. 



Banks, Henry Ward, III. 206 E. 10th St.. 
New York, N. Y. M17F28R33. C. 

Banks, Nathan. M.S.', Cornell, 90. Curator 
insects, Mus. Comparative Zoology; assoc. 
prof, emeritus zoology, Harvard Univ., 
Cambridge. Mass. (Holliston, Mass.) 
M34F34. F. 

Bannister, Miss Ruth D(elia). M.A.. 
Northwestern, 16. Teacher physics, Roose- 
velt High School, Chicago, 111. (2102 Or- 
rington Ave., Evanston, 111.) M24L29. 
BDE. 

Banta, Prof. A(rthur) M(angun). A.M., 
Indiana, 04; Ph.D., Harvard, 07. Prof, 
biologv, Brown Univ., Providence, R. I. 
M03F13. FGH. 

Banta, Miss Edna. Nature Mus., Mc- 
Cormicks Creek State Park, Spencer, lnd. 
M34. GF. 

Banta, H(enry) E(ugene). M.A., Rice, 30; 
Ph.D., 32. Geophysicist, Independent Ex- 
ploration Co., Houston, Tex. M40F40. B. 

Bantel, Prof. E. C. H. Univ. Texas, Austin, 
Tex. M32R3A. M. 

Banting, Mrs. Mary Ingraham (Mrs. 
Henry Ingraham) (Miss Mary A. Ingra- 
ham). 303 S. Cornwall St., Baltimore, Md. 
M29R37. GCB. 

Banzhaf, E. Steel Union, Inc., Chamber 
Commerce Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. M36. M. 

Banzhaf, Dr. Henry Leo. D.D.S., Michi- 
gan, 86; LL.D., Pittsburgh, 34. Dean, 
Marquette Univ. Dental School, Mil- 
waukee. Wis. (3234 N. Hackett Ave.) M33. 
NdQ. 

Banzon, Julian (Ruben). B.S., Philippines, 
26. Instr., Univ. Philippines, Laguna, 
P. I. M39F40. CPO. 

Barach, Dr. Alvan L(eroy). M.D., Colum- 
bia, 19. Asst. prof, clinical medicine. 
Columbia Univ. Col. Physicians and Sur- 
geons; asst. attending physician, Presby- 
terian Hosp., New York, N. Y. M38. N. 

Barach, Dr. Joseph H(ayem). M.D., 
Pittsburgh, 03. Med. dir., Falk Clinic; 
assoc. prof, medicine, School Med. and 
School Dentistrv, Univ. Pittsburgh, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. (4745 Beacon St.) M22F33. N. 

Barada, A(ndrew) S. Vice pres. and gen. 
mgr., Luziers Inc., Kansas City, Mo. 
(Bannister and Noland Roads, Lees Sum- 
mit, Mo.) M26. C. 

Baranovsky, Cyril. 614 Huron St., Toronto, 
Out., Canada. M37R37. BM. 

Barban, Charles. B.S., Col. City New 
York, 17. Consulting chemist and chemi- 
cal engineer, 521 5th Ave., New York, 
N. Y. M35. CMN. 

Barber, Dr. C(arroll) Glenn. M.D., Ohio 
State, 20; M.A., Western Reserve, 30. Asst. 
orthopedic surgeon, Univ. Hosp.; assoc. 
orthopedic surgeon, Rainbow Hosp.; visit- 
ing orthopedic surgeon, St. Vincent's 
Charity Hosp., Cleveland, Ohio. (17022 
Delaware Ave.") M40. N. 



[individual Mkm bees 



249 



Barber, Ernest R. 1200 S. Broad St.. Now 
Orleans. La. M19F20. F. 

Barber, Dr. George W(are). M.Sc, Har- 
vard, J5 ; Sc.D., 27. Assoc, entomologist, 
U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant Quaran- 
tine. New Haven. Conn. M20F33. F. 

Barber, Harry C(lark). jj Garden St., 
Boston. Mass. M29R34. AQ. 

Barber, Harry G. M.A.. Nebraska. 96, 
Harvard, g8. Assoc, entomologist. I'. S. 
Bur. Entomology and Plant Quarantine. 
U. S. Xat. Mus.. Washington, 1). C. 

M.uEu- F. 

Barber, Herbert L. Box 97, Williams. 
Mont. M31R34. K. 

Barber. Herbert S(pencer). Assoc, en- 
tomologist, U. S. Dept. Agric, Wash- 
ington, D. C. M07F14. F. 

Barber, Dr. I(ra) G(arnett). Ph.D.. Chi- 
cago, 21. Western Electric Co., Chicago, 
111. M34F34. B. 

Barber, J(ohn) H(enry). Box 777, Liver- 
more, Calif. M24R36. FG. 

Barber, L(anas) S(purgeon). 5.56 \\ . 
College Ave.. Tallahassee, Fla. M.uR.iv F 

Barber. Miss Lena A(melia). M.S., Michi- 
gan J 11. Prof, biology. Meredith Col. 
Raleigh. N. Car. (3401 Clark Ave.) 
M23F33. FG. 

Barber, Dr. M(arshall) A(lbert). A.M.. 
Ph.D., Harvard. Missouri City. Mo. 

L34F34: n: 

Barber, Prof. Ruth A(rmour). M.A. 
Colorado. 3s. Assoc, prof, biology. Hills- 
dale Col., Hillsdale. Mich. M38. FG. 

Barbour. Prof. Carrie A(deline). Univ. 
Nebraska. Lincoln. Xebr. M03F15. E. 

Barbour, Prof. George B(rown). M.A., 
Edinburgh, 10 Cambridge, 18; Ph.D.. 
Columbia, 29. Dean College Liberal Arts 
and prof, geology, PJniv. Cincinnati, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. M38. E. 

Barbour, Dr. Henry G(ray). M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 10. Assoc, prof, pharmacology 
and toxicology, Yale Univ., New Haven. 
Conn. (656 Prospect St.) M18F21. N. 

Barbour, Dr. Orville. 528 lefferson Bldg.. 
Peoria. Til. M36R36. -V 

Barbour, Philip R. Rimini, Mont. M33R33. 
EL. 

Barbour, R(obert) B(ruce). 656 N. Inter- 
lachen Ave., Winter Park. Fla. M38. BCE. 

Barbour, Dr. Thomas. A.M., Harvard, 08; 
Ph.D.. 10; Sc.D., Havana. 30, Dartmouth, 
35. Prof, zoology, dir. Univ. Mus. and 
Mus. Comparative Zoology, Harvard 
Univ., Cambridge, Mass. M02F07L25. F. 

Barbulesco, C. D. M.S.. Bucharest; E.E., 
Paris. Antioch Col., Yellow Springs. Ohio. 
M38. MQ. 



Barck, Dr. Carl (Eugen). A.M.. Karlsruhe, 
76; M.D., Freiburg, 81. Prof, emeritus 
ophthalmology, St. Louis Univ., St. Louis, 
Mo. (3438 Russell Ave.) M02. N. 

Barclay, Dr. B. D. Dept. Botanv, Univ. 
Tulsa, Tulsa, Okla. M31F32R32. GO. 

Barclay, Dr. Earle H(erbert). Ph.D., 

Johns Hopkins, 22. ,\sst. supt. ( ctg. mill I. 
Champion Paper and Fibre Co., Hamilton, 
Ohio. (306 S. D St.) M29F33. CBM. 

Barclay, Gordon L. Dept. Psychology, 

Svracuse Unix., Svracuse, N. Y. M32R33. 
INF. 

Barclay, Margaret E(thel). Thomas Jef- 
ferson High School, Brooklyn, X. "\ 

M25. gfq; 

Barcroft, David P. Attorney at law, First 
Nat. Bank Bldg., Madera, Calif. M37. 
DCB. 

Bard, Dr. Philip. A.M.. Harvard, 25; 
Ph.D.. 27. Prof, physiology, Johns Hop- 
kins Univ. School Med.. Baltimore, Md. 
M29F33. NF. 

Bardeen. Prof. Charles R(ussell). Moi- 
F61D35. N. 

Bardin, Dr. James C(ook). M.D., Vir- 
ginia. 00. Prof. Romantic languages, Univ. 
Virginia. University, Va. M32. L. 

Bardwell. Dr. Dwight C(ooley). Ph.D.. 
California, 21. Lab. dir.. Nitrogen Div., 
Solvay Process Co., Syracuse, X. V. 
M25F25. C. 

Bardwell, Prof. Fred Leslie. 909 E. 4th St.. 
Northfield, Minn. M08F10R39. CM. 

Bardy, Dr. Joseph. M.D.. Pennsylvania, 
n; A.M.. 21; Ph.D., 2:,. Instr., Olney 
High School. Philadelphia. Pa. ( Bellerich 
Apartments, 13th and Spruce Sts.) M23- 

F33. Q- 

Bare. Clarence O(wen). A.M.. Kansas. 24. 
Box 7062, Richmond, Va. M25F33. F. 

Bareis, Miss Grace M(arie). Ph.D., Ohio 
State, 09. Asst. prof.. Ohio State Univ., 
Columbus, Ohio. (Canal Winchester. 
( >hio.) M31F33. ABD. 

Bareuther, Prof. Charles A(dam). C.E., 
Pennsylvania, 31. Prof, physics, Central 
High School and Drexel Inst. Tech.; 
special engineering examiner. Civil Serv- 
ice Commission. Philadelphia, Pa. (5533 
Greenway Ave.) M27F40. BCA. 

Barger, Miss Panzy L. M.A.. Illinois. 
William Woods Col. Fulton, Mo. M36. 
FG. 

Barkan, Dr. Adolf. M02F09D — . X. 

Barkan, Dr. Hans. M.D.. Harvard. 10. 
Prof. ophthalmology, Stanford Univ. 
School Med., San Francisco, Calif. (2351 
Clay St.) M14F16. \. 

Barkby, H(arry). 217 Hillcrest Ave., New 
Castle, Pa. M25R32. MEG. 



250 



Directory of Members 



Barkelew, James T. Patent attorney, 413 
Edison Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. (39 2 S. 
Arroyo Blvd., Pasadena, Calif.) M40. KBD. 

Barker, Charles A(lfred). 501 Wood St., 
Piqua, Ohio. M28. F. 

Barker, Dr. Ernest F(ranklin). M.A., 
Michigan, 13; Ph.D., 15. Prof, physics, 
Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. (18 
Ridgeway) M19F27. B. 

Barker, Prof. Franklin D(avis). Mio- 
F11D36. FN. 

Barker, Prof. George Alexander. Colorado 
State Teachers Col., Greeley, Colo. M32- 
R32. EH. 

Barker, H(oward) H(ill). M25F25D38. 
CBM. 

Barker, J(oseph) W(arren). M.S., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 25. Dean engng., 
Columbia Univ., New York, N. Y. (417 
W. 117th St.) M32F33. MQB. Vice presi- 
dent for Section on Engineering (M), 19 37- 

Barker, Dr. M. Herbert. M.D., Rush; 
M.S., Northwestern. Asst. prof, medicine, 
Northwestern Univ. Med. School, Chi- 
cago, 111. M40. N. 

Barker, Dr. Nelson W. 725 7th St. SW., 
Rochester, Minn. M30R32. N. 

Barker, Dr. Paul S. M.D., Washington 
Univ., 20. Assoc, prof, internal medicine, 
Univ. Michigan; physician, Div. Internal 
Med., University Hosp., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
(2124 Devonshire Road.) M35F35. N. 

Barker, Dr. Prince Patanilla. M.D., 
Howard, 23. Chief, Acute Mental Service, 
Veterans Administration Facility, Tus- 
kegee, Ala. M38F38. NIK. 

Barker, Prof. Roger G(arlock). M.A., 
Stanford, 30; Ph.D., 34- Asst. prof, educa- 
tional psychology, Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 
111. (5344 Greenwood Ave.) (M32R36)M40. 
IFQ. 

Barker, Dr. S(amuel) B(ooth). Ph.D., 
Cornell, 36. Res. fellow medicine and asst. 
physiology, Cornell Univ. Med. Col., New 
York, N. Y. M38. N. 

Barksdale, W(alter) Lane. A.B., North 
Carolina, 37. Technician, Carolina Orchid 
Growers, Inc., Southern Pines, N. Car. 
M40. O. 

Barlett, Dr. Helen Blair. Ph.D., Ohio 
State, 31. Petrographer, A C Spark Plug 
Div., Gen. Motors. Flint, Mich. M36. 
ECM. 

Barlow, DeWitt D(ukes). 930 Woodland 
Ave., l'lainfield, N. J. M22. ADM. 

Barlow, Dr. John. A.M., Brown, 96; Sc.D., 
Middlebury, 31. Vice pres., dean Science 
and Business and dean of men. Rhode 
Island State Col., Kingston, R. I. M02F21. 
F. 

Barlow, Dr. William E(dward). M08- 
F11D38. CB. 



Barnard, Chester I(rving). D.Sc, Rutgers, 
36; LL.D., Newark, 37. Pres., New Jersey 
Bell Telephone Co., Newark, N. J. (333 
Forest Road, South Orange, N. J.) M39- 
F40. HIK. 

Barnard, Dr. Frank P. D.M.D., Harvard. 
507 Main St., Worcester, Mass. M40. NdO. 

Barnard, Dr. Harry E. Corn Industries 

Res. Foundation, Indianapolis, Ind. M34- 

F34R34. CN. 

Barnard, J(ohn) D. Le Sueur, Minn. M39. 

OGM. 

Barnard, Dr. John W(alter). Dept. 
Anatomy, Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. (?) M37R37. NF. 

Barnes, Claude T. 359 10th Ave., Salt Lake 
City, Utah. M22. FGO. 

Barnes, Clifford A. Oceanographic Inst., 
Woods Hole, Mass. M40. 

Barnes, Dr. Earl E(lmer). M.S., Ohio 
State, 23; Ph.D., 29. Assoc, agronomy, 
Ohio Agric. Exp. Sta., Wooster, Ohio. 
M28F31. O. 

Barnes, Prof. Elinor J(ulia). M.A., Ohio 
State, 29; Ph.D., 31. Beaver Col. Women, 
Jenkintown, Pa. M32. IQK. 

Barnes, Prof. Fred Asa. M.C.E., Cornell, 
98. Prof, railroad engng., Cornell Univ., 
Ithaca, N. Y. (409 E. Elmwood Ave.) 
M06F12. MQK. 

Barnes, G(arnett) F(reeman). M.A., 
Indiana, 20; Ph.D., 31. Prof, mathematics 
and physics, Judson Col., Marion, Ala. 
M36F36. B. 

Barnes, Mrs. Grace. 3715 Speedway, Aus- 
tin, Tex. M32R32. F. 
Barnes, Harold. M27D— . Q. 
Barnes, Dr. Harry Elmer. Scripps-Howard 
Newspapers, 230 Park Ave., New York, 
N. Y. M22F23R34. HL. Vice president 
for Section on Historical and Philological 
Sciences (L), 19 -7 ■ 

Barnes, Dr. Howard T(urner). D.Sc, 
McGill, 00. Prof, emeritus physics, Mc- 
Gill Univ., Montreal, Que., Canada. 
(Queen City Park, Vt.) M06F09L25. B. 

Barnes, Dr. James. M.A., Dalhousie, 00; 
Ph.D., Tohns Hopkins, 04. Technical ad- 
viser, Franklin Inst., Philadelphia, Pa. 
M19F21. B. 

Barnes. Prof. Kenneth B(oyd). M.S.. 
Chicago, 24. Prof, and head Dept. Chemis- 
trv. Heidelberg Col., Tiffin, Ohio. (52 
Ohio Ave.) M22F33. C. 
Barnes, Dr. Le Roy L(esher). Ph.D., 
Cornell. Asst. prof, biophysics, Cornell 
Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. (706 Hanshaw Road) 
M-10F40. BFN. 

Barnes, Dr. Milford Edwin. M.D., Rush, 
14; Dr.P.H., Johns Hopkins, 25. Prof, 
and head Dept. Hygiene and Preventive 
Med.; dir. University Dept. Health and 
ilir. State Hygiene Lab., Univ. Iowa, Iowa 
City, Iowa. M38F38. X. 



Individual Members 



251 



Hillegass 
CBA. 



Ave. 



Barnes, Dr. T(homas) Cunliffe. D.Sc, 
Harvard, 28. Asst. prof, biology, Yale 
Univ., New Haven, Conn. M34F34- F. 

Barnes, Dr. Virgil E. 1522 23rd St., 
Galveston. Tex. (?) M35F3SR35. E. 

Barnes, William O. M17D3Q. M. 

Barnett, Benjamin. 2523 
Berkeley. Calif. M31R32. 

Barnett, Miss Claribel R(uth). B.L.S., 
New York State Library School, 20. 
Librarian, U. S. Dept. Agric., Washing- 
ton D. C. (1661 Crescent Place NW.l 
M25F29. OFG. 

Barnett, D(onald) G(ilbert). A.B., Indiana. 
21. Geologist, Union Producing Co., Hous- 
ton, Tex. M25. E. 

Barnett, Edwin S. 701 1 Cresheim Road, 
Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. M12R35. C. 

Barnett, Harold M(ontgomery). Pawnee 
City, Nebr. M31F33R36. CNO. 

Barnett, Dr. Henry L(ewis). M.D., Wash- 
ington Univ., 38. Res. asst. pediatrics, 
Washington Univ. School Med.; resident 
physician, St. Louis Children's Hosp., 
St. Louis, Mo. M40. N. 

Barnett, Horace L(eslie) 
Michigan State Col., East 
M34R36. G. 



Dept. Botany, 
Lansing, Mich. 



Ph.C, Massa- 
Senior analyst, 



Barnett, John O(swald). 

chusetts Col. Pharmacy, 28 

fohn Wveth and Bros., Inc., Philadelphia, 

Pa. (4121 N. 8th St.) M39. CAB. 

Barnett, Mrs. Lelia Jefferson Harvie. A.B.. 
Cornell, 01. 939 Thayer Ave., Westwood 
Hills, Los Angeles, Calif. M34F34. B. 

Barnett, Prof. Robert J(ohn). M.S., 
Kansas State, 11. Kansas State Col., 
Manhattan, Kans. M18F31. OG. 

Barnett, Miss Ruth Ella. B.Sc, Phila- 
delphia Col. Phar. and Science, 36. 
Chief pharmacist, Allentown Hosp., Allen- 
town, Pa. M38. NpC. 

Barnett, Prof. S(amuel) J(ackson). Ph.D., 
Cornell, 98. Prof, physics, Univ. California 
Los Angeles: res. assoc. physics, Cali- 
fornia Inst. Tech., Pasadena, Calif. M07- 
Fio. B. 

Barnett, William M(cClure). Washington 
Col., Chestertown, Md. M37. FGQ. 

Barney, Dr. Edgar Starr. M18F33D— . Q. 

Barney, Dr. Ida. Ph.D., Yale, 11. Res. 
asst., Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn, (no 
Linden St.) M11F15. DA. 

Barney, Prof. Raymond Livingston. Mid- 
dlebury Col., Middlebury, Vt. M25R32. F. 

Barnhart, Dr. John H(endley). A.M., 
Wesleyan, 93; M.D., Columbia, 96. New 
York Botanical Garden, New York, N. Y. 
M00F03L11. G. 

Barnum, Dr. Charlotte C(ynthia). M87- 
F96D34. AK. 



Barnum, Clyde C. 1926 Ferry St., Mar- 
tinez, Calif. M28F32R36. G. 

Barnwell, Prof. George Winchester. M.A., 
Pennsylvania, 26. Assoc, prof., Stevens 
Inst. Tech., Hoboken, N. J. M35- KMT - 

Barnwell, Dr. John B. Univ. Hosp., Ann 
Arbor, Mich. M35R36. N. 

Barol, Alfred. B.Sc, Pennsylvania. Dir. 
labs., John Wveth and Brother, Inc., 
Philadelphia, Pa. M35. NCB. 

Barondes, Dr. R. deRohan. M.D., Cali- 
fornia, 17. Dir., Foundation Med. Res., 
San Diego, Calif. (1870 4th Ave.) M35. N. 

Baronowsky, James E. 921 Sparta St., 
Chester, 111. M32R32. BAI. 

Barr, Arvil S(ylvester). A.M., Indiana, 15; 
Ph.D., Wisconsin, 29. Prof, education, 
Univ. Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. M22F22. 
Q. Secretary of Section on Education (Q), 

Barr, Dr. David Preswick. M.D., Cornell; 
LL.D., Centre. Prof, medicine, Washing- 
ton Univ.; physician in chief, Barnes 
Hosp., St. Louis, Mo. (1155 N. Berry 
Road) (M34F34R34)M 4 oF 3 4. N. 

Barr, Mrs. Estelle DeYoung. M.A., Pitts- 
burgh, 15. 450 Riverside Drive, New York, 
X. Y. M32. AQI. 

Barr, Prof. H(arry) L(a Rue). M.A., 
Wabash, 13. Assoc, prof, biology, Loui- 
siana State Normal Col., Natchitoches, La. 
(118 Lee St.) M34. GFO. 

Barr, John Henry. M02F03D37. M. 

Barral-Souto, Dr. Jose. Docter en Ciencias 
Economicas, Buenos Aires, 25. Prof, 
estadistica and jefe Inst. Biometria, 
Facultad de Ciencias Economicas, Univ. 
Buenos Aires; actuario, La Franco Argen- 
tina, Compania de Seguros, Buenos Aires, 
Argentina, S. A. (Cardoba 1450) M40. KA. 

Barre, Dr. Henry J(ohn). M.S., Iowa 
State, 33; Ph.D., 38. Res. asst. prof., Agric. 
Engng. Section, Iowa Agric. Exp. Sta.; 
agent, charge corn storage investigations, 
U. S. Bur. Agric. Chemistry and Engng., 
Ames, Iowa. M40F40. MOB. 

Barre, Prof. Henry W(alton). A.M., 

Nebraska, 10. 6451 Barnaby St. NW., 
Washington, D. C. M07F11. GO. 

Barret, Dr. Harvey P(ark). M.D., Louis- 
ville, 08. Charlotte, N. Car. M25F33. FN. 

Barret, William M(orris). E.E., Tulane, 31. 
Pres., William M. Barret, Inc., and Engng. 
Res. Corp., Shreveport, La. M32. BEA. 

Barrett, Dr. Dorothy M(oss). Ph.D., 
Columbia, 38. Instr., Dept. Psychology, 
Hunter Col., New York, N. Y. (22 E. 
38th St.) M40. IQ. 

Barrett, Elliott P(ierce). M.A., Columbia, 
26; Ph.D., 33. Senior industrial fellow, 
Mellon Inst. Industrial Res., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. M31F38. CBA. 



252 



Directory of Members 



Barrett, Harold S(pencer). A.B.. Brown. 
37. Student, Harvard Med. School, Bos- 
ton, Mass. (152 Vanderbilt Hall) M38. 
NHL 

Barrett, Dr. Harry McWhirter. Univ. 
Colorado, Col. Education, Boulder, Colo. 

M37R37. Q. 

Barrett, Prof. James T(heophilus). A.M., 
Illinois, 07; Ph.D., Cornell, 10. Prof. 
plant pathology, Univ. California; plant 
pathologist, Univ. California Agric. Exp. 
Sta., Berkeley, Calif. M07F13. GO. 

Barrett, Rev. John I(gnatius). Ph.D., 
Loyola, 23; LL.D.. Gonzaga (Washing- 
ton), 23. 415 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 
M24. Q. 

Barrett, John P. M.Sc, Ohio State, 32. 
Entomologist and parasitologist, Res. 
Dept.. Armour and Co., Chicago, 111. (7213 
Yates Ave.) M40. F. 

Barrett, Dr. Leland. D.D.S., Pennsylvania. 
05. 133 W. 72nd St., New York, X. Y. 
M32. Nd. 

Barrett, Prof. Leslie B(urns). Ph.C, 
Massachusetts Col. Phar., 22. Prof, biology 
and pharmacognosy, Connecticut Col. 
Phar., New Haven, Conn. (165 Maple 
St.) M34F34- GNdF. 

Barrett, Leslie Park. Vice pies., Inter- 
state Iron Co. and Jones and Laughlin 
Ore Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. M25F25. E. 

Barrett, Miss Mary F(ranklin). 64 Park 
Ave.. Bloomfield, X. J. M26R34. OG. 

Barrett, Prof. Sampson K(irby). E.E., 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Inst., 10. New York 
Univ., Universitv Heights, New York. 
X. Y. M19F25. BM. 

Barrett, Dr. S(amuel) A(lfred). M.S., 
California, 06; Ph.D.. 08. Dir. emeritus, 
Milwaukee Public Mus., Milwaukee, Wis. 
M38F38. HD. 

Barrett, Samuel J. Burnsville, W. Ya. (?) 

M34R34. CBA. 

Barrett, Storrs B(arrows). M07F13D37. 

DB. 

Barrett, Dr. W(illiam) C(lark), Jr. West- 
ern Reserve Univ. School Med., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. M36R39. FNG. 

Barrett, W(illiam) L(afayette), Jr. M.S., 
Texas A. and M., 35. Junior entomologist, 
U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant Quaran- 
tine, Uvalde, Tex. M37. F. 

Barris, Ralph W. George Washington 
Univ. School Med.. Washington, D. C. 
M33F38. N. 

Barron, Dr. E. S. Guzman. Dept. Med. 
Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. M33F33. NC. 

Barron, George D(avis). Box 217, Rve, 
X. Y. M06F33. M. 

Barron, Prof. John Hall. B.S.A., Cornell. 
Extension agronomist, Cornell Univ., 
Ithaca, X. Y. (14S Cascadilla Park) 
M24F31. OQE. 



Barron, Leonard. M19F31D38. GO. 

Barron, Dr. Moses. M.D., Minnesota, 11. 
Prof, medicine, Univ. Minnesota, Minnea- 
polis, Minn. (2101 Pillsburv Ave.) M25- 
F27. X. 

Barrow, Dr. Bernard. 129 Chilean Ave., 
Palm Beach, Fla. Mo8R34- X. 

Barrow, Miss Elva. North Carolina Col. 
Women, Greensboro, X. Car. M24R32. 
CND. 

Barrows, Dr. Albert L(loyd). M.S.. 
California, 12; Ph.D., 17. Executive sec. 
Nat. Res. Council, Washington, D. C. 
M11F15. F. 

Barrows, Dr. E(dward) Fletcher. 520 E. 
Jackson St., Monmouth, Oreg. M34R35. F. 

Barrows, Miss Florence L(ouise). M.S., 
Connecticut Agric. Col., 27 ; Ph.D., 
Columbia, 35. Stafford Springs, Conn. 
M25F33. GNC. 

Barrows, Frank E(lisha). M.P.L., George 
Washington, 12, Georgetown, 14. Partner, 
Pennie, Davis, Marvin, and Edmonds, 165 
Broadway, New Y'ork, X. Y. (79 Ridge- 
wood Ave., Glen Ridge, X. J.) M18. C. 

Barrows, Prof. W(illiam) E(dward). 40 
Myrtle St., Orono, Maine. M39R39. MQ. 

Barrows, Prof. William M(orton). S.M., 

Harvard, 06; S.D., 20. Ohio State Univ.. 

Columbus, Ohio. M06F11. F. 

Barrus, Prof. M(ortimer) F(ranklin). 

Ph.D., Cornell, 11. Forest Home, Ithaca, 

X. Y. M18F23. GO. 

Barry, Prof. Frederick. A.M., Harvard, 09; 

Ph.D.. 11. Prof, historv science, Columbia 

Univ., Xew York, X. Yi. M12F15. CLB. 

Barry, Dr. Herbert, Jr. Ph.D.. Harvard, 29. 
Lecturer, Tufts Col., Medford; res. assoc, 
Metropolitan State Hosp., Waltham, Mass. 
(14 Kirkland Place, Cambridge, Mass.) 
M38F38. XI. 

Barry, John G(erald). S.B., Massachusetts 
Inst. Tech. Consulting mining geologist 
and engineer, El Paso, Tex. (1611 X. Mesa 
Ave.) M22F33. EMC. 

Barsky, Dr. George. M.A., Ph.D., Colum- 
bia, 22. Pres., Barskv and Strauss, Inc., 
Xew York, X. Y. M2SF33. CBM. 

Barss, Dr. Alden F(orrest). M.S., Oregon 
State, 14; Ph.D., Chicago, 29. Prof, and 
head Dept. Horticulture, U T niv. British 
Columbia, Vancouver. B. C, Canada. 
M14F31. GO. 

Barss, Howard P(hillips). S.M., Harvard, 
09. Principal botanist, Office Exp. Stas., 
I'. S. Dept. Agric, Washington, D. C. 
M09F15. GO. 

Barss, John S(edgwick). A.M., Harvard, 
23. Instr. phvsics, Phillips Acad., And- 
over, Mass. (Hidden Field) M24. BQA. 

Bartell, Prof. F(loyd) E(arl). M.A., Michi- 
gan, 08; Ph.D., 10. Prof, chemistry, Univ. 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. (1919 Scott- 
wood Ave.) M18F25. C. 



Individual Members 



253 



Bartelmez, G(eorge) W(illiam). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 10. Prof, anatomy, Univ. Chi- 
cago, Chicago, ill. M30F31. FN. 

Bartels, Dr. Henry Arthur. D.D.S., Colum- 
bia, 27. Asst. prof., Columbia Univ. School 
Dentistry; asst. bacteriologist, Branch 
Lab., New York State Dept. Health, New- 
York, X. Y. M29F29. Xd. 

Barth, Carl G(eorge Lange). M08L25F28- 
D39. M. 

Barth, Prof. L(ester) G(eorge). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 29. Asst. prof, zoology, Colum- 
bia Univ., New Vork, N. Y. M28F33. F. 

Barth, Dr. Tom F. W. 2801 Upton St., 
XW., Washington. D. C. M34F34R35. EB. 

Barthelman, C(larence) H(oward). M.A., 
Harvard, 34. Teacher, Fresnal Ranch 
School. Tucson, Ariz. (17219 Fernshaw 
Ave., Cleveland, Ohio) M 3 9- DBC. 

Barthelmess, Harriett M. (See Harriett 
Barthelmess Morrison). 

Bartholomew, Elam. M12F31D34. G. 

Bartholomew, Prof. E(ibert) T(homas). 
Ph.D., Wisconsin, 14. Prof, plant phy- 
siology, Univ. California; plant phy- 
siologist, Univ. California Citrus Exp. 
Sta., Riverside, Calif. M11F13. G. 

Bartky, Dr. Walter. Univ. Chicago, Chi- 
cago, 111. M28F30R36. AD. 

Bartle, Dr. Glenn G(ardner). M.A., 
Indiana, 23; Ph.D., 32. Dean faculty and 
prof, geologv, Univ. Kansas Citv, Kansas 
City, Mo. M31F33. E. 

Bartlet, Miss Gertrude. 1435 Cornell Drive, 
Dayton, Ohio. (?) M32R33. 

Bartlett, Prof. Boyd W(heeler). M.A.. 
Columbia, 26; Ph.D., 33. Prof, physics, 
Bowdoin Col., Brunswick, Maine. (183 
Maine St.) M34F34. B. 

Bartlett, Dr. Charles J(oseph). M.A., 
Yale, 94; M.D., 95. Prof, emeritus path- 
ology, Yale Univ., Xew Haven; pathol- 
ogist, Grace Hosp.. Xew Haven; path- 
ologist and bacteriologist, Charlotte 
Hungerford Hosp., Torrington, Conn. 
(183 Bishop St., Xew Haven, Conn.) 
M17F27. X. 

Bartlett, Clark (Orrin). y i7 Hill Ave.. 
Wilkinsburg. Pa. M36R36. MA. 

Bartlett, Edward P(ayson). M.A., Har- 
vard. 13; Ph.D.. 15. Res. chemist, E. I. 
ilu Pont de Nemours and Co.. Wilming- 
ton, Del. (806 Berkelev Road) M22F28. 
CE. 

Bartlett, E(dwin) R(ice). A.B., Dart- 
mouth. 04. Vice pres. and treas., Hooker 
Electrochemical Co.. Niagara Falls. X T . Y. 
(Lewiston, N. Y.) M18. C. 

Bartlett, Dr. Emily M(ary). Ph.D.. Stan- 
ford, 25. Instr. zoology, Univ. California 
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif. M25F33. 
FG. 



Bartlett, G(eorge) M(iller). MJ4F34D36. 
M. 

Bartlett, H(arley) H(arris). A.B., Har- 
vard, 08. Prof, botany and chairman Dept.; 
dir. Botanical Gardens, Univ. Michigan, 
Ann Arbor, Mich. M09F15. G. 

Bartlett, Miss Harriett M. M.A., Chicago, 
27. Educational dir., Social Service Dept., 
Massachusetts Gen. Hosp., Boston, Mass. 
(<)*<) Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Mass.) 
M36. K. 

Bartlett, Dr. J(ohn) F(rank). A.M., West 
Virginia, 27; Ph.D., 32. Prof, chemistry. 
Marshall Col., Huntington, W. Va. M34. C. 

Bartlett, John P(omeroy). LL.B., Yale, 81. 
Senior member, Bartlett, Evre, Scott and 
Xeal, 36 W. 48th St., Xew York, X. Y. 
(42 W. 58th St.) M06. 

Bartlett, Miss Katharine. M.A., Denver, 30. 
Curator anthropology, Mus. Xorthern 
Arizona, Flagstaff, Ariz. M30. HE. 

Bartlett, L(awrence) M(atthews). B.S., 
Massachusetts State, 39. Dept. asst., 
Massachusetts State Col., Amherst, Mass. 
M40. F. 

Bartlett, Dr. Russell S(turgis). Ph.D., 
Yale. 24. Instr. science, Phillips Exeter 
Acad., Exeter, X. H. M24F33. B. 

Bartley, Dr. Elias H. 164 Clinton St., 
Brooklyn, X. Y. MS4FQ4R3-;- C. 

Bartley, Mrs. Irving D. (Clara Hartley). 
Baldwin City, Kans. M31F33R37. FGX. 

Bartling, F. William. 916 119th St., 
Whiting, Ind. M32R35. CM. 

Barto, Miss Elizabeth. Lab. Vertebrate 
Genetics, Univ. Michigan. Ann Arbor. 
Mich. M38. FGH. 

Bartol, George. M11F18D36. M. 

Barton. Prof. Arthur W(illis). Ph.D., 
Northwestern, 18. Prof, and head Dept. 
Biologv, Kansas State Col.. Havs, Kans. 
(808 Elm St.) M20F33. CGX. 

Barton, Dr. Donald Clinton. M11F21- 
L37D39. EM. 

Barton, Dr. Edward W. M.D., Cincinnati, 
01. Physician. 24S E. Main St., Alhambra. 
Calif. M29. X. 

Barton, Prof. George A(aron). 131 New- 
ton St.. Weston, Mass. M24F3iR.?7- I- 
I'ice president for Section on Historical and 
Philological Sciences (L), 1933. 

Barton, George E., Jr. 60 S. Washington 
St., Rochester, N. Y. M32R32. QK. 

Barton, G(eorge) E(stes). M.S., George 
Washington, 95. Chief chemist. Whitall 
Tatum Div., Armstrong Cork Co., Mill- 
ville, X. J. (227 Pine St.) M97F98. C. 

Barton, Dr. (George Samuel) Horace. 
D.Sc.A.. Laval. Deputy Minister, Domin- 
ion Dept. Agric, Ottawa, Out.. Canada. 
(Mj3F32R37)M39F32. O. 



254 



Directory of Members 



Barton, Dr. Helen. 1027 Spring Garden 
St., Greensboro, N. Car. M32R32. A. 

Barton, Dr. Henry A(skeau). M.A., 
Princeton, 24; Ph.D., 25. Dir., Amer. Inst. 
Physics, New York, N. Y. M28F30. B. 
Secretary of Section on Physics (B), 1933 — . 

Barton, Hugh M(itchell), Jr. B.A., Texas, 
38. Asst. geophysical research, Phillips 
Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, Okla. (900 
Johnstone St.) M40F40. B. 

Barton, James P. B.S., Minnesota, 27. 
Mgr. Electrical Sheet Sales Bur., Carnegie 
Illinois Steel Corp., Pittsburgh, Pa. (438 
Sulgrave Road, Chatham Village) M35. 
MB. 

Barton, Dr. John C(haplin). M.D., 
Minnesota, 34. Physician and surgeon, St. 
Helens, Oreg. M40. N. 

Barton, John W(ynne). M27D36. QK. 

Barton, Dr. Samuel G(oodwin). Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania, 06. Assoc, prof, astronomy, 
Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. {33 
N. 61st St.) M07F10. DA. 

Barton, Dr. Thomas F(rank). Southern 
Illinois State Normal Univ., Carbondale, 
111. M37R37. EK. 

Barton, Prof. Vola Price. A.M., Mt. 
Holyoke, 17; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 23. 
Prof. and chairman Dept. Physics, 
Goucher Col., Baltimore, Md. (2500 Ken 
Oak Road) M26F31. BDA. 

Bartoo, Dr. D(orr) R(aymond). M.S., 
Grove City, 24; Ph.D., Chicago, 28. Head 
Dept. Biology, Tennessee Polytechnic 
Inst., Cookeville, Tenn. M31F33. GE. 

Bartow, Prof. Edward. M.S., Ph.D., 
Gottingen, 95 ; D.Sc, Williams, 23. Prof, 
and Head Dept. Chemistry and Chemical 
Engng., Univ. Iowa, Iowa Citv, Iowa. 
(304 Brown St.) M98F06. C. 

Bartow, Miss Virginia. M.A., Illinois, 21 ; 
Ph.D., 23. Asst. prof, chemistry, Univ. 
Illinois, Urbana, 111. M34F34. C. 

Bartram, Edwin B(unting). Res. assoc, 
Acad. Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, Pa., 
and Bernice P. Bishop Mus., Honolulu, 
Hawaii; hon. curator, Farlow Herbarium, 
Cambridge, Mass. (Bushkill, Pa.) M28F31. 
G. 

Bartsch, Dr. Paul. M.S., Iowa, 99; Ph.D., 
05 ; Sc.D., George Washington, 37. Cura- 
tor divs. mollusks and cenozoic inverte- 
brates, U. S. Nat. Museum ; prof, emeritus 
zoology. George Washington Univ., Wash- 
ington, D. C. (1456 Belmont St.) M02F06. 
F. 

Baruch, Dr. Emanuel deMarnay. Mi 8- 
F32D35. NIL. 

Barus, Dr. Carl. M84F87D35. B. Vice pres- 
ident for Section on Physics (B), 1897. 

Barwick, Prof. Arthur R(ichardson). 
M.Sc, New York, 22; Ph.D., 26. Assoc, 
prof, geology and head Dept. Geology 
and Geography, Catholic Univ. Amer., 



Washington, D. C. (10 Wessex Road, 
Sligo Park Hills, Silver Spring, Md.) 
M32F33. DE. 

Bascom, Miss Florence. A.M., Wisconsin, 
87; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 93- Prof- 
emeritus geology, Bryn Mawr Col., Bryn 
Mawr, Pa. (Williamstown, Mass.) M9-2- 
F97L10. E. 

Bascom, K(ellogg) F(inley). Northwest 
Clinic, Minot, N. Dak. M2iFa6R34- N. 

Bascom, Dr. William R(ussell). M.A., 
Wisconsin, 36; Ph.D., Northwestern, 39. 
Instr. anthropology, Northwestern Univ., 
Evanston, 111. M40. H. 

Bashenoff, Dr. V. I. Mashkoff pereulok 1. 
Moscow, U.S.S.R. M35R37- MB. 

Basherov, Prof. Samuel. M.S., Minnesota, 
22. Prof, animal husbandry, Univ. Puerto 
Rico Col. Agric. and Mechanical Arts, 
Mayaguez, P. R. M29F32. F. 

Bashore, Harry W. 3930 Huntington St. 
NW, Washington, D. C. M38. MO. 

Bashour, Dr. Joseph T(amir). Ph.D., New 
York, 34. Res. asst., Dept. Chemistry. 
Columbia Univ., New York, N. Y. (1950 
Andrews Ave.) M39. CN. 

Basinger, A(lmon) J(ay). M.S., Ohio 

State, 20. Assoc, Univ. California Citrus 

Exp. Sta., Riverside, Calif. (4925 Grove 
Ave.) M20F26. F. 

Baskin, Dr. Morris J. M.D., Colorado, 18. 
425 Republic Bldg., Denver, Colo. M38. N. 

Bass, Dr. C(harles) C(assedy). Dept. 
Med., Tulane Univ., New Orleans, La. 
M31F33R39. N. 

Bass, John F., Jr. Bass Biol. Lab., Engle- 
wood, F!a. M37. F. 

Bass, Dr. Lawrence W(ade). Ph.D., Yale. 
22. Asst. Dir., Mellon Inst. Industrial Res., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. M30F33. CK. 

Bass, Dr. (Mary) Elizabeth. M.D., 
Woman's Med. Col. Pennsylvania. 1430 
Tulane Ave., New Orleans, La. M32. N. 

Bass, N(athan) W(ood). M.S., George 
Washington, 22. Senior geologist, U. S. 
Geological Survey, Tulsa, Okla. (2433 
E. 24th St.) M38. E. 

Basseches, Joseph L. Chem.E., Columbia, 
13. Instr. physics, New York City Board 
Education, New York, N. Y. (1314 Elder 
Ave.) M29. CB. 

Bassett, Preston R(ogers). M.A.. Amherst, 
26. Vice pres. charge engng., Sperry 
Gyroscope Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. (104 
Broadway, Rockville Center, N. Y.) 
M24F40. B. 

Bassett, Walter G(uy) R(iker). New 
York Trust Co., New York, N. Y. M29R35. 
MDE. 

Bassett, William H(astings). M06F09D34. 
CBM. 



Individual Members 



555 



Bassler, Dr. Harvey. Amer. Mus. Natural 
History, New York, N. Y. M09F25R35. 
EF. 

Bassler, Dr. R(ay) S(mith). M.S., George 
Washington, 03; Ph.D., 05. Head curator 
geology, U. S. Nat. Mus.; prof, geology, 
George Washington Univ., Washington, 
D. C. M08F11. EFG. 

Bassoe, Dr. Peter. M.D., Col. Physicians 
and Surgeons (Chicago), 97. Clinical prof, 
neurology, Rush Med. Col., Chicago, 111. 
(103 1 Michigan Ave., Evanston, 111.) 
M07F11. N. 

Bast, Prof. T(heodore) H(ieronymus). 
Ph.D., Chicago, 22. Prof, anatomy. Univ. 
Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. (Shorewood 
Hills) M23F25. N. 

Bast, Dr. Victor A(ugust). M24F33D37. C. 

Bastidas, Carlos Manuel. Box 156, Cia 
Azucarera Valdez. Guayaquil, Ecuador, 
S.A. M 3 2R 3 3- OGF. 

Bastin, Prof. Edson S(underland). M.S., 
Chicago, 03; Ph.D., 09. Prof, economic 
geology and chairman Dept. Geology and 
Paleontology, Univ. Chicago. Chicago, 111. 
M22F22. E. Vice president for Section on 
Geology and Geography (E), 1930. 

Batchelder, Dr. Alan C(oleman). Ph.D., 
California, 39. Res. asst. medicine, Johns 
Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, Md. M40. 
CNB. 

Batchelder, Charles F(oster). Peter- 
borough, N. H. M04F07. F. 

Batchelder, Dr. Esther L(ord). M.A., 

Columbia, 25 ; Ph.D., 29. Dir. home 

economics, Rhode Island State Col., 

Kingston, R. I. (M33F33R35) M39F33. 
CNF. 

Batchelder, Prof. P(aul) M(ason). M.A., 
Princeton, 10; Ph.D., Harvard, 16. Assoc, 
prof, pure mathematics, Univ. Texas, 
Austin, Tex. (808 W. 22nd St.) M25F33. 
ADB. 

Batcheller, Birney Clark. D.Sc, Middle- 
bury, 38. Wallingford, Vt. M25. BDM. 

Batchelor, H(arry) D(avid). National 
Carbon Co., Inc., Cleveland, Ohio. M34- 
F 34 - C. 

Batchelor, Dr. L(eon) D(exter). Ph.D., 
Cornell. 11. Dir. and horticulturist. Univ. 
California Citrus Exp. Sta., Berkeley; 
prof, horticulture. Univ. California, River- 
side, Calif. M22F24. OEG. 

Batchelor, Roger P. M.D., Johns Hopkins, 
15. 117 Columbia Ave., Palmerton, Pa. 

M36. N. 

Bateman, Fred(eric) H(arlan). Grenloch, 
N. J. M36F40. OM. 

Bateman, F(rederick) W(illard). D.E., 
Worcester Polytechnic Inst., 36. Still 
River, Mass. M25. M. 

Bateman, George F(rederick). Cooper 
Union, New York, N. Y. M08F16. MQ. 



Bateman, Prof. George M(onroe). M.S., 
Cornell, 26; Ph.D., 27. Head Dept. 
Science and prof, chemistry, Arizona 
State Teachers Col., Tempe, Ariz. (1106 
Van Ness Ave.) M34F34. C. 

Bateman, Dr. J. Fremont. M.D. Columbus 
State Hosp., Columbus, Ohio. M39. N. 

Bateman, Prof. William G(eorge). 630 
University Ave., Missoula, Mont. M18- 
F25R33. C. 

Bates, B. L. M. Murray Hill Hotel, New- 
York, N. Y. L17. 

Bates, Clifford W(hitman). M25F33D37. 
MB. 

Bates, Emmert Warren. A.B., Yale, 32. 
Exec, asst., Amer. Book Co., New York, 
N. Y. M38. KQI. 

Bates, Harry H(oward). M.E., Virginia 
Polytechnic Inst. Works engineer, West- 
inghouse Electric and Mfg. Co., Lester, 
Pa. (300 Glenloch Road, Ridley Park, 
Pa.) (M3oR32)M39- MAB. 
Bates, Onward. M25D — . M. 

Bates, P(haon) H(ilborn). B.S., Pennsyl- 
vania. 02. Head chemist ceramics, Nat. 
Bur. Standards, Washington, D. C. (3835 
Livingston St. NW.) M08F14. C. 

Bates, Dr. Robert L(atimer). M.S., Iowa, 
36; Ph.D., 38. Junior geologist, The Texas 
Co., Midland, Tex. M38. E. 

Bates, Dr. Robert L(ee). M.A., Johns 
Hopkins, 20; Ph.D., 24. Prof, psychology, 
Virginia Military Inst., Lexington, Va. 
(310 Letcher Ave.) M22F25. IQ. 

Bates, Dr. Robert W(esley). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 31. Investigator, Carnegie Inst. 
Washington, Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y. 
M33. FNC. 

Bates, Dr. Roger G(ordon). M.A., Duke, 
36; Ph.D., 37. Asst. physical chemist, 
Nat. Bur. Standards, Washington, D. C. 
(41 17 37th St. NW.) M40. C. 

Bates, Prof. Stuart J(effery). M.A., Mc- 
Master, 09; Ph.D., Illinois, 12. Prof, phy- 
sical chemistry, California Inst. Tech., 
Pasadena, Calif. M28F32. C. 

Batha, V(incent') P. Carroll Col., Wau- 
kesha, Wis. M33R33. B. 

Batson, Mrs. Eleanor H. 3502 Hamilton 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. M20. N. 

Batson, Dr. Oscar Vivian. A.M., Missouri, 
18; M.D., St. Louis, 20. 3502 Hamilton 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. M20F27. N. 

Battey, Miss Zilpha C(urtis). A.M., 
Illinois, 18. Asst. prof, home economics, 
Univ. Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. M40. 
CN. 

Battle, Dr. Helen I(rene). M.A., Western 
Ontario. 24; Ph.D., Toronto, 28. Assoc, 
prof, zoology, Univ. Western Ontario, 
London, Ont., Canada. (132 Mamelon St.) 
M30F33. FGH. 



256 



Directory or Members 



Baudisch, Dr. Oskar. Ph.D., Zurich, 04. 
Dir. research, Saratoga Springs Authority, 
Saratoga Springs, N. Y. M31F38. CGB. 

Bauer, Miss B(ertha) T(herese). 238 
Main St. E.. Hamilton, Ont., Canada. 
M39. 

Bauer, Dr. C(lyde) Maxwell. Ph.D., Colo- 
rado. 32. Park naturalist, Nat. Park Serv- 
ice; exec, sec, Yellowstone Library and 
Mus. Assn., Yellowstone Park, Wyo. 
M24F25. E. 

Bauer, Frederick. M.S., Connecticut State. 
Kent, Conn. M34. F. 

Bauer, Dr. F(rederick) C(harles). 812 
Pennsylvania Ave., Urbana, 111. M36F36- 

R37. 6. 

Bauer, Dr. George N(eander). M.S., 
Iowa, 98; Ph.D., Columbia, 00. Prof, 
mathematics, Univ. New Hampshire, Dur- 
ham, N. H. (99 Madburv Road) M29F31. 
KA. 

Bauer, Comdr. George W(illiam). U.S.N.R. 

530 Chestnut St.. San Francisco, Calif. 
M28. C. 

Bauer, Dr. Johannes H. M.D., Upsala. 
400 E. 52nd St., New York, N. Y. M40. N. 

Bauer, Dr. John Albert. M.D., Toronto, 
98. Member consulting staff, City Hosp., 
Hamilton, Ont., Canada. (238 Main St. E.) 
M39. NEH. 

Bauer, Dr. John T(rexler). M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 25. Dir., Ayer Clinical Lab., 
Pennsylvania Hosp.; instr. surgical path- 
ology, Univ. Pennsylvania Graduate 
School Med.; instr. medicine, Univ. 
Pennsylvania School Med., Philadelphia, 
Pa. (3 Hampden Ave., Narberth, Pa.) 
M33. N. 

Bauer, Dr. Walter. M.D., Michigan, 22. 
Assoc, prof., tutor medicine and dir., 
Robert W. Lovett Memorial Foundation 
Study Crippling Disease, Harvard Med. 
School; physician, Massachusetts Gen. 
Hosp., Boston, Mass. (268 Woodward St., 
Wabari, Mass.) M31F33. N. 

Bauer, William Malcolm. 31-D Shaler 
Lane, Cambridge, Mass. M33R37. MBA. 

Baugh, Miss Ruth E(mily). M.A., Clark, 
26. Univ. California Los Angeles, Los 
Angeles, Calif. M28F33. E. 

Baughman, Dr. Imo P(earl). M.A., Stan- 
ford, 19; Ph.D., 22. Instr. chemistry, Los 
Angeles City Col., Los Angeles, Calif. (640 
N. Kenmore Ave.) M34F34. C. 

Baughman, Dr. Mary Barney. M.D. 400 
W. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. M39. 
NLQ. 

Bauguess, Dr. Lyle C(lyde). Ph.D., Iowa, 
34. Dept. Pharmacology. Univ. Iowa, Iowa 
Citv, Iowa. (223 E. Bloomington St.) 
M39. CNG. 

Baum, Betty (See Mrs. Betty Baum 
Saner). 



Baum, Dr. Harry L. M.D., Pennsylvania, 
10. 510 Republic Bldg., Denver, Colo. 
M37. X. 

Bauman, Dr. Everett O(llendorf). M.D., 
Long Island Col. Med. 17 Hillside Ave., 
Newark, X. J. M39. NCF. 

Bauman, Dr. Louis. M.D., Columbia, 01. 
i" Linwood Road, Xew Rochelle, X. Y. 
M17F21. CX. 

Baumann, Dr. Emil J(acob). Ph.D., Yale. 
16. Chemist, Montefiore Hosp., New York, 
X. Y. (45 Lynwood Road, Scarsdale, 
X. Y.) M18F27. X. 

Baumann, L(ewis) A(lbert). 1905 Ogden 
Ave., Superior, Wis. M37R38. COM. 

Baumberger, Prof. J(ames) Percy. M.S.. 
Harvard, 16; D.Sc. 18. Prof, physiology, 
Stanford University, Calif. (328 Churchill 
Ave., Palo Alto, Calif.) M13F27. FKN. 

Baumeister, Prof. Theodore, Jr. M.E., 
Columbia, 22. Assoc, prof, mechanical 
engng., Columbia L T niv., New York, N. Y. 
M28F33. MB. 

Baumgarten, Dr. Solomon. M33D — . N. 



Baumgarten, Dr. Walter. M.D., Wash- 
ington Univ., 96. Instr. clinical medicine, 
Washington Univ. School Med.; dir., 
Dept. Med., St. Luke's Hosp.; asst. visit- 
ing physician, Barnes Hosp., St. Louis, 



LOU L 111 V. 

. Med., St. Luk^ o 
ing physician, Barnes Hosp 
Mo. (5032 Westminster Place 



Dept. 111CU., Jl. l^UhC 3 liusp, 

Barnes Hosp., 

■~e) M39. XHF 



Baumgartner, Dr. E(dwin) A. A.M., 
Kansas, 11; Ph.D., Minnesota, 15; M.D., 
Washington Univ., 19. Pathologist, New- 
ark State School, Newark, X. Y. Mi 7- 
F25. X. 

Baumgartner, Dr. Luther L(eroy). M.S.. 
Ohio State, 36; Ph.D., 40. Mammal 
ecologist, Ohio Wild Life Res. Unit, 
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. (915 
S. Sandusky Ave.) M38. FGO. 

Baumgartner, Dr. W(illiam) J(acob). 
A.M., Kansas, 01 ; Ph.D., Munich, 29. 
Prof, zoology, Univ. Kansas, Lawrence, 
Kans. M07F1 1. F. 

Baur, Dr. L(orenz) S(imon). Ph.D., 
Wisconsin, 35. Res. chemist, M. and R. 
Dietetic Labs., Inc., Columbus. Ohio. 
M39. C. 

Bausch, Carl L(ouis). M.E., Syracuse, 00. 
Vice pres. and mgr. res. and engng., 
Bausch and Lomb Optical Co., Rochester, 
X. Y. (635 St. Paul St.) M31F32L37. MB. 

Bausch, Dr. Edward. A.M., Rochester, 08; 
LL.D., 31. Chairman board, Bausch and 
Lomb Optical Co.; dir., Tavlor Instrument 
Co. and Lincoln-Alliance Bank and Trust 
Co.; vice pres.. Rochester Trust and Safe 
Deposit Co. and Monroe County Savings 
Bank. Rochester. N. Y. (663 East Ave.) 
M77F83E31. ABF. 

Bavetta, Lucien. n 79 Exposition Blvd., 
Los Angeles. Calif. M35R35. FCG. 



Individi ai, Members 



-\v 



Bawden, Dr. William T(homas). Ph.D., 
Columbia, 14. Head Dept. Industrial Edu- 
cation, Kansas State Teachers Col., Pitts- 
burg. Kans. M.36. Q. 

Baxter, Prof. Gregory P(aul). A.M., 
Harvard, 07; Ph.D., 90; S.D., Michigan, 

29. Prof, chemistry. Harvard Univ. and 
Radcliffe Col.. Cambridge, Mass. M04F06. 
CBE. 

Baxter, Dr. Mildred Frances. A.M.. 
Michigan. 22; Ph.D., 25. Psychologist, 
Board Education. Cleveland, Ohio, (9732 
Logan Court XE.) M->XF33- I. 

Bay, Harry X. Cole Camp. Mo. M30F31- 
R32. E. 

Bay, J. Christian. Librarian, John Crerar 
Library, Chicago, 111. M31F38. GL. 

Bayard, Kenneth O(scar). M.S., Arizona. 

30. Assoc, economist, U. S. Dept. Agric, 
Washington. D. C. (2607 36th Place XW.i 
M38. MEQ. 

Bayfield, Mrs. Edward G. (Esther R. 
Zurcher). Wooster, Ohio. M36R37- FGX. 

Bayfield, Dr. Edward G(eoffrey). M.S. A.. 
McGill, 24: Ph.D.. Ohio State. 31- Head 
Dept and prof, milling industry. Kansas 
State Col.. Manhattan, Kans. M32F33. OC. 

Bayles, G(eorge) H(armon). C.E., West 
Virginia, 02. 421 Richwood Ave., Morgan- 
town, W. Va. M39. M. 

Bayless, Dr. Francis. M.D., Indiana. 29. 
Senior instr. pathology, Western Reserve 
Univ. Inst. Pathologv, Cleveland, Ohio. 
M40. X. 

Bayley, P(aul) L(everne). M.A., Illinois. 
14; Ph.D.. Cornell, 23. Prof, physics. 
Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem. Pa. M27F33. B. 

Bayley, Dr. W(illiam) S(hirley). Ph.D.. 
Johns Hopkins, 86. Prof, emeritus geology, 
Univ. Illinois. Urbana, 111. M03F05. E. 

Bayliff, William H(enry). M.S.. Okla- 
homa, 29. Tutor, St. Tohns Col., Annapolis, 
Md. M29. FG. 

Baylis, Dr. Adelaide B(rooks). Sc.D.. 
Pittsburgh, 37. 040 Park Ave., New York. 
X. Y. M24. X. 

Baylis, Prof. Charles A(ugustus). A.M.. 
Washington. 24: Ph.D., Harvard. 26. 
Assoc, prof, philosophy, Brown Univ., 
Providence, R. I. (42 Aberdeen Road. 
East Providence. R. 1.) M30F34. KAI. 

Bayne-Jones, Dr. S(tanhope). M.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 14; M.A.. 17. Prof, 
bacteriology and dean, Yale Univ. School 
Med.; dir., Board Scientific Advisers, 
Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund Med. 
Res., X T e\v Haven. Conn. (87 Trumbull 
St.) M18F31. N. Vice president for Section 
on Medical Science (N ), 1935. 

Bayroff, Dr. A(bram) G(ustavus). 70 W. 
s 1 st St., Bayonne, X. J. M32F33R34. IFX. 

Bays, Carl A(ndrew). Sun Oil Co,, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. M36R37. E. 



Baysinger, Dr. S. L. Rolla, Mo. M30- 
U32. X. 

Bazett, Prof. H(enry) C(uthbert). M.D., 
Oxford, 19. Prof, physiology, Univ. Penn- 
sylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. M34F27. X. 

Bazzoni, Dr. Charles B(lizard). Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania, 14. Chief geophysicist, Sun 
Oil Co., Philadelphia, Pa. (Rogers Lane, 
Wallingford, Pa.) M25F27. B. 

Beach, Dr. Charles Coffing. M.D., Colum- 
bia, 82. 54 Woodland St., Hartford, Conn. 
Moi. X. 

Beach, Edith. 812 Illinois St., Lawrence, 
Kans. M30R36. F. 

Beach, H(arold) K. 1'h.B., Yale, 04. Plant 
engineer, Bayway Div., Phelps Dodge 
Copper Products Corp., Elizabeth, X. J. 
(803 West End Place. Cranford, N. T.) 
M31. MBA. 

Beach, Dr. Irving T(racy). Ph.D., Cornell 
27. Prof, chemistrv. Col. Ozarks, Clarks- 
ville, Ark. M20. C. 

Beach, Prof. J(erry) R(aymond). 13 
Kingston Road. Berkelev, Calif. M32F33- 
R35- NFO. 

Beach, Dr. Walter Spurgeon. M.S., Michi- 
gan Agric, 15; Ph.D., Illinois, 18. Buck- 
hart Lab.. Pennsylvania State Col., State 
College, Pa. (M20F21 R34)M39F2i. G. 

Beadle, G(eorge) W(ells). M.Sc, Ne- 
braska, 27; Ph.D., Cornell, 30. Prof, biol- 
ogy (genetics), Stanford University, Calif. 
M29F32. FG< ). 

Beadle, Leslie D(ewey). M.A., Ohio, 37. 
Instr. biological sciences, State Teachers 
Col., Platteville, Wis. (2m Elmer St.) 
M30. F. 

Beadles, Miss Jessie Rachel. B.S., Illinois. 
24. Asst. animal nutrition, Univ. Illinois. 
Urbana. 111. (11 10 W. Oregon St.) M30. 
CN. 

Beal, Mrs. C. Davison (See Mrs. Con- 
stance Davison Mail). 

Beal, Dr. George D(enton). Phar.D., 
Scio, 07; A.M., Columbia, 10; Ph.D. 11: 
Sc.D., Mt. Union. 33; Phar.M., Philadel- 
phia Col. Phar., 33. Asst. dir., Mellon Inst. 
Industrial Res., Pittsburgh, Pa. M25F25. 
CX. Secretary of Sec/ion on Chemistry (C), 
rgi 7. 

Beal, James Hartley. Route 1. Cocoa. Fla. 
M18F33. CGN. 

Beal, Prof. John M(ann). M.S.. Missis- 
sippi State, 13; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 27. 
Prof, botany, Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. 
M19F24. GO. 

Beal, Walter H(enry). M.E.. Virginia 
Polytechnic Inst., 86. 1852 Park Road 
\\Y.. Washington. D. C. M02F16. CO. 

Beale, Miss Alice. 29 Chauncy St., Cam- 
bridge Mas-. M20R34. F. 



258 



Directory of Members 



Beale, Mrs. J. H. (Helen Alice Purdy). 
Ph.D., Columbia, 29. Plant pathologist, 
Boyce Thompson Inst. Plant Res., Inc., 
Yonkers; res. assoc, Columbia Univ. Col. 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 
N. Y. (59 Sunset Drive, Croton on Hud- 
son, N. Y.) M20F25. G. 

Beam, Dr. J(ohn) Albert, iqo Clinton 
Ave.. Tiffin, Ohio. M17R39. FG. 

Beam. Miss Rachel. 540 Ocean Ave., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. M37. GQ. 

Beaman, Charles O(rson). East View 
Junior High School, White Plains, N. Y. 
M25R32. G. 

Beams, Prof. H(arold) W(illiam). A.M., 
Northwestern, 26; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 29. 
Prof, zoology, Univ. Iowa, Iowa City, 
Iowa. M28F32. F. 

Beams, J(esse) W(akefield). M.A., Wis- 
consin, 22; Ph.D., Virginia, 25. Prof, 
physics, Univ. Virginia, Charlottesville, 
Va. M27F28. B. 

Bean, Dr. C(harles) Homer. Ph.D., 
Columbia, 12. Head Dept. Psychology, 
Louisiana State Univ., University, La. 
(3101 Dalrvmple Drive, Baton Rouge, La.) 
M12F25. IQ. 

Bean, Donald P(ritchett). Univ. Chicago 
Press, Chicago, 111. M21. IK. 

Bean, E(rnest) F. A.M., Wisconsin, 11. 
State geologist, Wisconsin Geol. and 
Natural History Survey, Madison, Wis. 
(Sweet Briar Road, Shorewood Hills) 
M17F21. E. 

Bean, Dr. Francis J(arvis). Univ. 
Nebraska Hosp.. Omaha, Nebr. M30F32- 
R32. N. 

Bean, Dr. John W(illiam). M.A., Michi- 
gan, 25 ; Ph.D., 30. Asst. prof, physiology, 
Univ. Michigan Med. School, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. (M 3 3F33R33M35F33R38)M 4 oF33. 
NB. 

Bean, Mrs. R. J. (Elizabeth Smith). M.A., 
Wisconsin, 12; Ph.D., 15. Instr. histology 
and embryology, Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, 
N. S., Canada. M16F20. F. 

Bean, Dr. R(obert) Bennett. M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 04. Prof, anatomy, Univ. Vir- 
ginia, Charlottesville, Va. M07F11. H. 
Vice president for Section on Anthropology 
ill), 1926. 

Bean, Ross S(moot). Univ. Hawaii, Hono- 
lulu, Hawaii. M28F33R37. G. 

Beans, Dr. H(al) T(rueman). A.M., 
Nebraska, 00; Ph.D., Columbia, 04. 
Columbia Univ., New York, N. Y. 
M37F37. C. 

Bear, Dr. Firman E(dward). M.Sc, Ohio 
State, 10; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 17. Prof, 
agricultural chemistry, Rutgers Univ.; 
head Dept. Crops and Soils, New Jersey 
\giic. Exp. Sta., New Brunswick, N. J, 
Mi 4 Ft6. COG. 



Bear, Dr. Harry. D.D.S., Med. Col. 
Virginia School Dentistry, 13. Dean and 
prof., Med. Col. Virginia School Dentistry, 
Richmond, Va. M38F39. Nd. 

Beard, Dr. Edmund E(arl). M.D., Western 
Reserve, 22. Senior clinical instr. medi- 
cine. Western Reserve Univ. School Med.; 
visiting physician, St. Luke's Hosp. and 
City Hosp. Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio. 
(3 11 5 Edgehill Road, Cleveland Heights) 
M39. N. 

Beard, Dr. H(arold) C(hatfield). M.A., 
Columbia; M.S.. Ph.D., Pennsylvania 
State. State Teachers Col., Kutztown, Pa. 
M38. CQ. 

Beard, Dr. Howard H. Dept. Biochemis- 
try, Louisiana State Med. Center, New 
Orleans, La. M31F33R38. N. 

Beard, James T(hom). 58 Washington 
Ave., Danbury, Conn. M07F12R36. ME. 

Beard, Dr. J(oseph) Howard. A.M., St. 
John's (Annapolis), 12; M.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 12. Prof, hygiene and Univ. Health 
Officer, Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 111. (1005 
S. Race St.) M29F33. NQ. 

Beard, Dr. Joseph W(illis). M.D., Vander- 
bilt, 29. Asst. prof, surgery, Duke Univ. 
School Med., Durham, N. Car. M3SF38. N. 

Beard, Leslie C(arrington), Jr. Ph.D., 
Tohns Hopkins, 22. Chemist, Socony- 
Vacuum Oil Co., Inc., New York, N. Y. 
(10 Maple St., Brooklyn, N. Y.) M21F33. 
CB. 

Beard, Dr. Paul J. 1441 Hamilton St., 
Palo Alto, Calif. M39- NPM. 

Beard, Dr. Raimon L. Ph.D., Yale, 39. 
Res. asst. entomology, Connecticut Agric. 
Exp. Sta., New Haven, Conn. M40. F. 

Beard, S(tanley) D(rew). Ph.B., Yale, 07. 
Dir., Lederle Labs., Inc., Pearl River, 

N. Y. Mn. CN. 

Bearden, Prof. J(oyce) A(lvin). Ph.D., 

Chicago, 26. Prof, physics, Johns Hopkins 
Univ., Baltimore, Md. (312 Southway St.) 
M40F40. B. 

Beardslee, Henry C(urtis). M.A., Western 
Reserve, 93. Perry, Ohio. M17F31. GFE. 

Beardsley, Prof. A. E. M30F01D37. FGE. 

Beardsley, Dr. E(dward) J(ohn) G(illes- 
pie). M.D., Jefferson, 02. Clinical prof, 
medicine, Jefferson Med. Col., Philadel- 
phia, Fa. (1919 Spruce St.) M24. N. 

Beardsley, Dr. Niel F(reeborn). M.S., 
Northwestern, 20; Ph.D., Chicago, 32. 
Instr. physics. Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. 
(6109 Kimbark Ave.) M22F33. B. 

Bearss, Miss (Queen) Esther. B.S., 
Otterbein, 24. Clerk. War Dept., Wash- 
ington, D. C. (201 8th St. NW.) M25. K. 

Beasley, Dr. J(ames) O(tis). M.S.. Texas 
A. and M., 34: Ph.D., Harvard, 39- 
Agronomist, Texas Agric. Exp. Sta., Col- 
lege Station, Tex. M40F40. GO. 



Individual Members 



259 



Beath, Prof. Orville A(ndrew). M.A., 
Wisconsin, 12. Res. chemist, Univ. 
Wyoming, Laramie, Wyo. M38. CGE. 

Beaton, Dr. Lindsay E(ugene). M.S., 
M.D., Northwestern, 40. Interne, Passa- 
vant Hosp., Chicago, 111. (914-B Crain 
St., Evanston, 111.) M39. NHF. 

Beaton, Mrs. Lindsay Eugene (Suzanne 
Lord). 914-B Crain St., Evanston, 111. 
M39. G. 

Beattie, Margaret. Dept. Hygiene, Univ. 
California, Berkeley, Calif. " M35R36. N. 

Beattie, R(olla) Kent. Div. Forest Pathol- 
ogy, U. S. Bur. Plant Industry, Wash- 
ington, D. C. M11F15R39. G. 

Beattie, W(illiam) R(enwick). Box 74, 
Bladensburg, Md. M29F31R37. OGQ. 

Beatty, C. Francis. 31 Murray Hill Road, 
Scarsdale, N. Y. M 3 SR39- EFL. 

Beatty, Dr. Harold A(shton). Ph.D., 
Princeton, 31. Asst. dir., Chem. Res. Lab., 
Ethyl Gasoline Corp., Detroit, Mich. (723 
E. Milwaukee Ave.) M34F34. C. 

Beauchamp, Dr. Wilbur (Lee). Ph.D., 
Chicago. Dept. Education, Univ. Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. M38. Q. 

Beaulieu, Roland. Sta. CKAC. St. Hya- 
cinthe, Que., Canada. M36R36. MAF. 

Beaumont, Dr. Arthur B(ishop). Ph.D., 
Cornell, iS. Soils technologist, U. S. Farm 
Credit Administration, Washington, D. C. 
(285 Amity St., Amherst, Mass.) M22- 
F24. O. 

Beaumont, Dr. John H(erbert). Ph.D., 
Minnesota, 25. Dir., Hawaii Agric. Exp. 
Sta., Honolulu, Hawaii. M18F24. OGF. 

Beaver, Dr. D(avid) J(ohn). A.M., Colum- 
bia, 17; Ph.D., 21. Asst. dir. res., Monsanto 
Chem. Co., Nitro, W. Va. (College Hill, 
St. Albans, W. Va.) M28F33. C. 

Beaver, Hugh. M36D39. B. 

Beaver, Dr. J. Lynford. M.S., Lehigh, 22; 
Sc.D., Harvard, 32. Prof, electrical engng., 
Lehigh Univ.. Bethlehem, Pa. (402 High 
St.) M26F26. MQB. 

Beaver, Prof. J(acob) J(ulius). M.A., 

Columbia, 16; Ph.D., 21. Asst. prof, 

chemistry. Columbia Univ., New York, 
N. Y. M28F33. C. 

Beaver, Dr. Paul C(hester). M.S., Illinois, 
29; Ph.D., 35. Asst. prof, biology. Law- 
rence Col., Appleton, Wis. M38. FNQ. 

Beaver, Dr. William C(arl). M.S., Ohio 
State, 20; Ph.D., 28. Prof, and head Dept. 
Biologv, Wittenberg Col., Springfield, 
Ohio. (M2 4 R 3 2)M35F35. FGN. 

Beazell, Dr. J(ames) M(yler). M.S., M.D., 
Ph.D., Northwestern. Instr. research, 
Northwestern Univ. Med. School, Chicago, 
111. (71 1 1 S. Shore Drive) M40. N. 



Beazell, William Preston. Litt.D., Alle- 
gheny, 28. 255 Greenway S., Forest Hills, 
N. Y. M29. 

Bebb, Dr. Walter S. 49 S. Garfield Ave., 
Hinsdale, 111. M30R32. N. 

Beber, Dr. A(dolph) J(oseph). M.S., 
Minnesota, 32; Ph.D., 37. Assoc, prof, 
biology and chemistry, State Teachers 
Col., Springfield, Mo. M38. GCF. 

Beber, Dr. M(eyer). St. Elizabeths Hosp., 
Washington, D. C. M31R32. CN. 

Bechdel, Dr. Samuel Irvin. Dept. Dairy 
Husbandry, Pennsylvania State Col., State 
College, Pa. M28F31R33. OCF. 
Bechtel, Dr. A(lbert) R(ieff). Ph.D., Cor- 
nell, 21. Prof, botany, Wabash Col., Craw- 
fordsville, Ind. (708 W. Wabash Ave.) 
M38F39. G. 

Bechtoldt, William. 139-60 86th Road, 
Jamaica, N. Y. M33R34. CBA. 
Beck, Alfred D(ykeman). M.A., Colum- 
bia, 31. Teacher general science, W T ade 
Jr. High School, New York, N. Y. (170 
Claremont Ave.) M30. QB. 

Beck, Charles B. 219 E. Decatur Ave., 
Willow Grove, Pa. M27R32. M. 

Beck, Dr. Claude S(chaeffer). M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 21; Sc.D., Franklin and Mar- 
shall, 38. Assoc, prof, surgery, Western 
Reserve Univ. School Med.; visiting 
assoc. surgeon, Univ. Hosps.; neuro- 
surgeon, Cleveland City Hosp., Cleveland, 
Ohio. M40. N. 

Beck, Prof. E(dwin) C(ecil). Dilston Mill 
Cottage, Corbridge-on-Tyne, England. 
M37F38R38. NO. 

Beck, Dr. Gilbert M. M.D. 40 North St., 
Buffalo, N. Y. M38. NI. 

Beck, Louis C(harles). 49 Painter St., 
Pasadena, Calif. (M33R33) M36R37. IKL. 

Beck, Dr. Lyle V(ibert). M.S., Washing- 
ton Univ., 30; Ph.D., Pittsburgh, 33. 
Instr. physiologv, Hahnemann Med. Col., 
Philadelphia. Pa. (3645 Locust St.) (M35- 
R 3 6)M 4 o. NFC. 

Beck, Sister Mary Cleophas. M.S., Catho- 
lic, 34. Teacher science and mathematics, 
St. Joseph Presentation Acad., Berkeley, 
Calif. M36. BCA. 

Beck, Samuel J. 74 Fenwood Road, Bos- 
ton, Mass. M35F35R3S- I. 

Beck, V(ere) Russell. A.M., Columbia, 32. 
Teacher, High School, Brookline, Mass. 
(179 Kent St.) M40. QBC. 

Beck, Dr. William A(nthony). M.Sc, Fri- 
bourg, 12; Ph.D., 26. Res. prof., Insti- 
tutum Divi Thomae, Cincinnati; assoc. 
prof, biologv, Univ. Dayton, Davton, 
Ohio. M28F28. GFB. 

Beck, Dr. William Carl. M.D. Assoc. Dept. 
Surgery, Illinois Univ. Col. Med.; assoc. 
surgery, Cook County Hosp.; attending 
surgeon, St. Joseph Hosp., Chicago, 111. 
(2305 N. Commonwealth Ave.) M36. N. 



260 



Directory of Members 



Becker, Dr. A(rman) E(dward). A.M., 
Harvard, 10; Ph.D., 17. Standard Oil De- 
velopment Co., New York, N. Y. M29- 
F32. B. 

Becker, Dr. Carl Emil. 1214 W. Hilton St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. M24R34. N. 

Becker, Prof. Elery R(onald). D.Sc, 
Johns Hopkins, 23. Prof, zoology, Iowa 
State Col., Ames, Iowa. M21F33. FN. 

Becker, Mrs. Frances. Dept. Zoology, 
Univ. Denver, Denver, Colo. M34R35. F. 

Becker, George G(rover). B.S., Cornell. 
Senior entomologist, U. S. Bur. Entomol- 
ogy and Plant Quarantine, Washington, 
D.'C. M18F20. G. 

Becker, Harry C(arroll). M.S., Illinois, 
37. Graduate student, Univ. Illinois, Ur- 
bana, 111. (8 E. Willow St., Beacon, N. Y.) 
M39. C. 

Becker, Irwin A(twood). Michael Reese 
Hosp., Chicago, 111. M07. CEG. 

Becker, Dr. Joseph A(dam). Ph.D., Cor- 
nell, 22. Res. physicist, Bell Telephone 
Labs., New York.'N. Y. M28F28. B. 

Becker, Miss (Julia) Ernestine. M.A., 
Johns Hopkins, 28. Assoc, biochemistry, 
Johns Hopkins Univ. School Hygiene and 
Public Health, Baltimore, Md. (4015 Dor- 
chester Road) M40. CN. 

Becker, Prof. S(ylvanus) A. Lehigh Univ., 
Bethlehem, Pa. M34F34^34- % 

Beckers, Dr. William G. Bolton, N. Y. 
M36R36. M. 

Becket, Dr. Frederick M(ark). A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 90; Sc.D., 29; LL.D., McGill, 34. 
Consultant, Pinion Carbide and Carbon 
Corp., New York, N. Y. M18F31. M. 

Beckett, Mr. Bergie B(array). M.E., Cor- 
nell, 04. Rate engineer, Pacific Gas and 
Electric Co., San Francisco, Calif. (1029 
Ramona St., Palo Alter, Calif.) M35. M. 

Beckett, Prof. S(amuel) H. Univ. Cali- 
fornia Citrus Exp. Sta., Riverside, Calif. 
M34F34R35. M. 



Beckman, H. O. 

Mass. M39. 

Beck 

21. 



10 Pearl St., Dedham, 



kman, Dr. Harry. M.D., Louisville. 
21. Dir. Dept. Pharmacology, Marquette 
Univ. School Med., Milwaukee, Wis. (561 
N. 15th St.) M 3 2F33- NpFL. 

Beckman, Joseph M(ichael). 3301 Clifton 
Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio. M36R36. G. 

Becknell, Prof. G(uy) G(aillard). M.S., 
Northwestern, os ; Ph.D., Clark, 11. Prof, 
physics, Univ. Tampa, Tampa, Fla. (6900 
Dixon Ave.) M07F16. B. 

Beckner, Col. Lucien. 411 Belgravia Court, 
Louisville, Ky. M26F33. EHL. 

Beckwith, Miss Angie M(aria). A.B., 
Michigan. Junior pathologist, U. S. Bur. 
Entomology and Plant Quarantine. Wash- 
ington. D. C. M10F15. G. 



Beckwith, Charles S(tewart). M.Sc, Rut- 
gers, 24. Chief, Cranberry and Blueberry 
Kes. Lab., New Jersey Agric. Exp. Sta.. 
Pemberton, N. J. M24F28. F. 

Beckwith, Prof. Cora Jipson. Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia, 14. Vassar Col., Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y. M13F20. F. 

Beckwith, Mrs. Daniel. 79 Prospect St., 
Providence, R. I. L29. 

Beckwith, Edward P(ierrepont). Garrison, 
N. V. M11L13. CM. 

Beckwith, Dr. Ethelwynn R(ice) (Mrs. W. 
E. Beckwith). M.A., Western Reserve, 09; 
Ph.D., Radcliffe, 25. Prof, mathematics. 
Milwaukee-Downer Col., Milwaukee, Wis. 
(16131 Lake Ave., Cleveland, Ohio) M24- 
F33. AKD. 

Beckwith, Henry T(rueman). B.A., Stan- 
ford, 08. 224 E. Hillcrest Blvd.. Monrovia, 
Calif. M17. CEM. 

Beckwith, Dr. T(heodore) D(ay). M.S., 
Hamilton, 06; Ph.D., California, 20. Prof. 
bacteriology, Univ. California Los An- 
geles, Los Angeles, Calif. M06F11. N. 

Becraft, Prof. R. J. 606 N. 4th East St.. 
Logan, Utah. M26R32. GO. 

Bedard, Prof. Avila. M.A., Laval; M.F., 
Vale. Dean, Ecole d'Arpentage et du 
Genie Forestier, Quebec; Deputy Minister 
Lands and Forests, Quebec, Que., Canada. 
(541 St-Cyrille St.) M40F40. OG. 

Bedard, W(illiam) Delles. Forest Insects 
Field Sta., Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. M31R36. F. 

Bedell, Dr. Frederick. M.S., Cornell, 91; 
Ph.D., 92. Prof, emeritus physics, Cornell 
Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. (1147 Lura St.. Pasa- 
dena, Calif.) M92F94E39. BM. Secretary of 
Section on Physics (B), 1897. 

Bedwell, Dr. J(esse) L(eonard). M.S., 
Oregon State, 24; Ph.D., Yale, 32. Pa- 
thologist, Div. Forest Pathology, U. S. 
Dept. Agric, Portland, Oreg. M34F34. G. 

Bee, Nai Kim. Government Lab., Maharat 
Road, Bangkok, Siam. M22R34. C. 

Beebe, Dr. Ralph A(lonzo). Amherst Col., 
Amherst, Mass. M25F28R35. C. 

Beebe, Dr. William. Sc.D., Colgate, 28: 
LL.D., Tufts, 28. Dir., Dept. Tropical Res., 
New York Zool. Soc, New York Zool. 
Park, New York, N. Y. (33 W. 67th St.) 
M03F05. FED. 

Beebe-Center, Dr. J(ohn) G(ilbert). Ph.D.. 
Harvard. 152 Puritan Road, Swampscott, 
Mass. M38F38. T. 

Beebee, Culver. 1821 E. 30th St.. Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. M23R33. DBM. 
Beebee, Frederic Scripps. Quadrangle. 
Iowa City, Iowa. M30R32. 

Beecham, Dr. Clayton T. M.D., Minne- 
sota. Instr. obstetrics, Univ. Pennsyl- 
vania; asst. obstetrician and gynecologist, 
Kensington Hosp. Women and Philadel- 
phia Hosp.; assoc. obstetrician, Chestnut 
Hill Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. (5123 
Wavne Ave.. Gc-rmantown) M30. N. 



I \ dividual Members 



261 



Beecher, Dr. Henry K. A.M., Kansas, 27; 
M.D., Harvard. 32. Assoc, anesthesia, Har- 
vard Med. School; anesthetist in chief, 
Massachusetts Gen. Hosp., Boston, Mass. 
M40. X. 

Beeler, Dr. Raymond, 2^ E. Ohio St.. In 
dianapolis, [rid. M38F38R38. X. 

Beeley, Arthur L(awton). l'ni\. Utah, 
Salt Lake City, Utah. M19R36. II IK. 

Beenken, Prof. May Margaret. A.M., Chi- 
cago, 26; Th.D., 28. Head Dept. Mathe- 
matics, State Teachers Col., Oshkosh, 
Wis. M34F34. A. 

Beer, Dr. Edwin. M06F08D38. X. 

Beer. Paul. C.E.. Rensselaer Polytechnic. 
Pres.. Flvnn Dairy Co., Des Moines, Iowa. 
(2828 Grand Ave.') M30. M. 

Beer, Dr. Tomas. Compahia Mexicana de 
Explosives, Dinamita, Dgo., Mexico. M33- 
R34. C. 

Beerbaum, Arthur J(ulius). 4910 X. 
Keeler Ave., Chicago, 111. M18R39. MDE. 

Beerman, Dr. Herman. 4841 Osage Ave.. 
Philadelphia, Pa. M31R33. XFG. 

Beers, Miss Catherine V(irginia). A.M., 
Ndftn western, 15; Ph.D., Columbia, 38. 
Asst. prof, zoology, Univ. Southern Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles, Calif. M24F33. FGQ. 

Beers, C(harles) Dale. A.M.. Xorth Caro- 
lina, 22; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 25. Univ. 
Xorth Carolina, Chapel Hill. X. Car. M24- 
F26. F. 

Beers, Prof. F(red) S(turges). Examiner, 
exec, sec, and prof, education. Univ. 
Georgia, Athens, Ga. M38F40. QHI. 

Beers. Norman R(itner). 445 \Y. 23rd St.. 
New York. X. Y. M39. ABM. 

Beers, Roland F(rank). S.M., Massachu- 
setts Inst. Tech., 28. Pres.. Geotechnical 
Corp., 1702 Tower Petroleum Bldg., Dal- 
las. Tex. M36. MBE. 

Beeskow, Herbert C(harles). M.Sc. Chi- 
cago, 24. Asst. prof, botany. Michigan 
State Co!., E. Lansing, Mich. M25F33. 
GC. 

Beeson, Dr. Jasper L(uther). A.M., Ala- 
bama, 90: LL.D., 29: Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 53. Milledgeville, Ga. M06F09. C. 

Beeson, Dr. M(alcolm) A(lfredL 300 
Duck St., Stillwater, Okla. M34F34R37. O. 

Beetharn, R(obert) B(earl). M.Sc. Ohio 
State. 137 29th St. Drive SE.. Cedar 
Rapids. Iowa. M38. MBA. 

Beezer, Prof. Gerald R(enaut). M.A., 
Gonzaea (Spokane), 19; M.Sc, 34. Prof, 
chemistry, Seattle Col., Seattle. Wash. 
M39. C. 

Beeeman. Dr. Louis. M.S., Michigan. 97: 
Ph.D.. Chicago, 10. Prof, physics. Iowa 
State Teachers Col.. Cedar Falls. Iowa. 
M10F31. B. 



Begg, Dr. Alexander S(wanson). M.D., 
Drake, 07. Dean and prof, anatomy. Bos- 
ton Univ. School Med., Boston, Mass. (45 
Hastings St., West Roxburv, Mass.) Mi 2- 
F27. N, 

Behney, Dr. Charles A(ugustus). M.D.. 
Pennsylvania, 17. Assoc, obstetrics and 
gynecology, Univ. Pennsylvania School 
Med., Philadelphia, Pa. (30 Manor Road. 
Wynnewood, Pa.) M28. X. 

Behney, William Hudson. 68 Bradlt \ 
Road, Burlington, Vt. M27R32. FGE. 

Behnke, John A(lden). M.A., Harvard. 29. 
Editor, W. B. Saunders Co.. Philadelphia, 
Pa. M40. FGC. 

Behre, C(harles) Edward. M.F., Yale, 17. 
Dir.. Xortheastern Forest Exp. Sta., Xew 
Haven, Conn. (65 L'nderhill Road, Ham- 
den, Conn.) M24F31. OG. 

Behre, Dr. Charles H(enry), Jr. Ph.D.. 
Chicago, 25. Assoc, geologist, U. S. Geol. 
Survey ; cooperating geologist, Pennsyl- 
vania State Geol. Survey; prof, economic 
geology, Northwestern Univ., Evanston. 
111. M^2iF2/. E. 

Behre, Dr. Ellinor H(elene). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 18. Louisiana State Unix., Univer- 
sity, La. M13F26. F. 

Behre, Dr. Jeanette Allen. Ph.D., Cornell, 
22. Res. assoc, Northwestern Univ. Med. 
School. Chicago; res. chemist, Union 
Central Life Ins. Co., Cincinnati. Ohio. 
(21 18 Sherman Ave., Evanston, 111.) M21- 

F33. ex. 

Behrens, Dr. Charles A(ugust). M.S., 
Michigan, 10; Ph.D., 13. Prof, bacteriol- 
ogy, Purdue Univ., La F'ayette, Ind. (1020 
3rd St.. West Lafayette. Ind.) M17F33. N. 

Behrens, Dr. Otto K(arl). M.A.. Illinois, 
53; Ph.D., ?5. Instr., Dept. Biochemistry, 
Cornell Univ. Med. Col., New York, N. Y. 
M40. CN. 

Beier, Dr. A. L. M.D., Marquette. Box 
340, Chippewa Falls, Wis. M38. NIH. 

Beik, Dr. Arthur Kennedy. Ped.M.. New 
York. 09; Ph.D., Clark, 13. Prof, educa- 
tion, New York State Col. Teachers, Al- 
bany, N, Y. M29F34. IQ. 

Beilly, Dr. Jacob S(aul). 899 St. Marks 
Ave.. Brooklyn. N. Y. M38R38. NC. 

Beinecke, Frederick W(illiam). Ph.B. 
Senior vice pres., Sperry and Hutchinson 
Co., Xew York. N. Y. (Green Ave., Madi- 
son. X. J.) M28L31. 

Beinhart, E(rnest) G(eorge). B.Sc, Iowa 
State, 10. Senior tobacco technologist. 
Eastern Regional Res. Lab., Philadelphia, 
Pa. (s2oi X. 1 6th St., Arlington, Va.) 
(M28Fi5R35)M3 9 Fi5. GOK. 

Beinke, Sidney C. B.S. District range ex- 
aminer, I'. S. Agric. Adjustment Admin- 
istration, Pullman, Wash. (5505 4th Axe. 
S.. Seattle. Wash.) M40. GE, 



262 



Directory of Members 



Beise, Miss Dorothy. Univ. Michigan, 
Ann Arbor, Mich. M37R37. IQ. 

Beitel, Dr. Robert J(ames), Jr. A.M., 
Clark, 33; Ph.D., 35. Fhysiological opti- 
cist, Amer. Optical Co., Southbridge, 
Mass. M37. IN. 

Bekkedahl, Dr. Norman. M.S., George 
Washington, 29; Ph.D., American, 31. 
Assoc, chemist, Nat. Bur. Standards, 
Washington, D. C. (4825 45th St. NW.) 
M33F33. C. 

Belcher, B(ascom) A(nthony). M.S., Em- 
ory, 29. Asst. agronomist, U. S. Sugar 
Plant Field Lab., Cairo, Ga. M30F40. 
FGO. 

Belcher, Donald. Rockefeller Inst. Med. 
Res., New York. N. Y. (?) M34F34R34 
BC. 

Belcher, Donald Ray. A.M., Columbia, 15. 
Asst. chief statistician, Amer. Telephone 
and Telegraph Co., New York, N. Y. (550 
Prospect St., Westfield, N. J.) M25F38. 
AK. 

Belchetz, Dr. Arnold. M.Sc, South Africa, 
24; Ph.D., Cambridge, 29. Engineer proc- 
ess and development, M. W. Kellogg Co., 
New York, N. Y. (45 Kew Gardens Road, 
Kew Gardens, N. Y.) M40. CMB. 

Belda, Prof. Walter H. M.A., St. Francis 
Seminary, 27. Prof, biology, St. Francis 
Seminary, St. Francis, Wis. M39. F. 

Belding, James (Walker). 630 Oakes 
Blvd., San Leandro, Calif. M38. MEA. 

Belk, Miss Ethel. Dept. Botany, Miami 
Univ., Oxford, Ohio. M39. GCF. 

Belkin, Dr. Morris. A.M., Harvard, 28; 
Ph.D., 35. Res. asst., Dept. Pathology, 
Yale Univ. School Med., New Haven, 
Conn. M39. NF. 

Belknap, Mrs. William. Oscawana on 
Hudson, N. Y. (?) L29.- 

Bell. Dr. Alfred H(annam). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 26. Geologist and head Oil and Gas 
Div., Illinois State Geol. Survey, Urbana, 
111. M25F31. E. 

Bell, Dr. A(rchibald) Weir. M. A., Cali- 
fornia, 27 \ Ph.D., 36. Chairman, Life 
Sciences Dept.. Los Angeles City Col., 
Los Angeles, Calif. (365 S. Hoover St.) 
M24. F. 

Bell, Mrs. Charles J. Twin Oaks, Woodley 
Road, Washington, D. C. M30. 

Bell, Dr. Clifford. Ph.D., California, 25. 
Assoc, prof, mathematics, Univ. California 
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif. (105 14 
Rochester Ave.) M28F33. A. 

Bell, Dennistoun M. Broadview, Amagan- 
sett, N. Y. M22L27. NC. 

Bell, Mrs. Dorothea Lyford. 16 Lawrence 
Ave., West New Brighton, Staten Island. 
N. Y. (?) M36R36. BAM. 



Bell, Edward J(anes), Jr. M.S., Wisconsin, 
29. Chief, Program Marketing Section, 
Western Div., U. S. Agric. Adjustment 
Administration. Washington, D. C. (621 1 
Utah Ave. NW.) M31. KOG. 

Bell, Eric Franklin. M.A., Ohio State, 27. 
Psychologist, Boys' Industrial School, 
Lancaster, Ohio. M35. IKQ. 

Bell, Frank F(rederick). 6263 Richmond 
Ave., Dallas, Tex. M30R36. M. 

Bell, Frederic S(omers). M32D38. GQ. 

Bell, Prof. Hugh M(cKee). State Teachers 
Col., Chico, Calif. M31R33. IQK. 

Bell, J. H. M32D34. 

Bell, Dr. J(ames) Carleton. M.A., Har- 
vard, 03; Ph.D., 04. Prof, education, City 
Col., New York, N. Y. (1032-A Sterling 
Place, Brooklyn, N. Y.) M07F10. IQ. 

Bell, Dr. J(ames) E(dgar). Ph.D., Illi- 
nois, 13. Prof, chemistry, California Inst. 
Tech., Pasadena, Calif. M18F25. C. 

Bell, James F(ord). B.S., Minnesota. 
Chairman board. Gen. Mills, Inc., Minne- 
apolis, Minn.; dir., Amer. Telepbone and 
Telegraph Co., New York, N. Y.. Pull- 
man Co.. Chicago, 111., and Northwest 
Nat. Bank, Minneapolis, Minn. M13. 

Bell, Dr. John M(alseedV 826 Jule St., 
St. Joseph, Mo. M17R32. N. 

Bell, John W(eston). Si Winter St., Whit- 
man, Mass. M39. HCI. 

Bell, D*-. Joseph Clark. M.D.. Harvard, 2 j. 
402 Heyburn Bldg., Louisville, Ky. 
M36. N. 

Bell, Miss Laura. 142S Spruce St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. M12F31. EK. 

Bell, Dr. Leo P. M27D34. N. 

Bell, Marion (See Mrs. T. F. Wiesen). 

Bell, M(artin) A(verill). M.S., Towa State, 
28. Supt., Southern Great Plains Field 
Sta., U. S. Bur. Plant Industry, Wood- 
ward, Okla. M32. OG. 

Bell, Olin G(rogan). Box 548, Laredo, 
Tex. M31R34. EM. 

Bell, Prof. Raymond F(rank). M.S.. Mich- 
igan, 38. Prof, mathematics, Eastern 
Washington Col. Education, Cheney, 
Wash. (Smithers, W. Va.) M40. ABQ. 

Bell, Dr. Raymond M(artin). A.M., Syra- 
cuse, 30; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State, 37. 
Asst. prof, physics, Washington and Jef- 
ferson Col., Washington, Pa. (440 E. Beau 
St.) M40F40. B. 

Bell, Dr. W(illiam) B(onar). M.S.. Iowa, 
03; Ph.D., 05. Chief, Div. Wildlife Res., 
U. S. Bur. Biol. Survey. Washington, D. C. 
(803 Rittenhouse St.) M06F21. F. 

Bell, William H(oward). A.M., Indiana. 
Milford, Ohio. M39. CN. 



Individual Members 



263 



Bell, W(illiam) Randal. 751 George St., 
New Haven, Conn. M37R37. NF. 

Bell, Dr. Willis H(arvey). Ph.D., Chicago, 
32. Assoc, prof, biology, Univ. New Mex- 
ico, Albuquerque, N. Mex. M34. G. 

Bellamy, Albert William. Univ. California 
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif. M20F20- 
R34. FG. 

Bellamy, B. C. Lamont, Wyo. M21F38. 
ABC. 

Bellamy, Dr. George A(lbert). H.H.D., 
Western Reserve, 38. Dir., Hiram House, 
2723 Orange Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. M40. 
IKQ. 

Bellaschi, P(eter) L(ouis). M.S., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 28. Section engineer, 
Westinghouse Electric and Mfg. Co., 
Sharon, Pa. M35. BMA. 

Beller, William C(harles). M.A., Colum- 
bia. 18 W. 85th St., New York, N. Y. M37- 
F40. BDM. 

Beller, William Frank. M06D36. FK. 

Bellis, A. E. Bellis Co., Branford, Conn. 
M38. C. 

Bellis, Prof. Arthur Emmons (Arthur Em- 
mons). M.S., Michigan, 10. 1901 Arapa- 
hoe St., Golden, Ohio. (Mi8R32)M37- B. 

Bellis, Dr. Carroll J(oseph). M.S., Minne- 
sota, 32; Ph.D., 34; M.D., 36. Fellow sur- 
gery, Univ. Minnesota Hosps., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. M39. N. 

Bellis, Henry (Anthony). B.S., California. 
806 Georgia St., Manila, P. I. M38. CNL. 

Bellows, Dr. John G. M.D., Illinois, 30; 
M.S.. Northwestern, 35; Ph.D., 39. Assoc, 
ophthalmology, Northwestern Univ. Med. 
School, Chicago, 111. (720 N. Michigan 
Ave.) M37. NC. 

Bellows, Miss Marjorie T. Westchester 
County Dept. Health, White Plains, N. Y. 
M31R35. KAN. 

Bellows, Dr. Roger M. M.A., Ohio State, 
31; Ph.D., 35. Assoc, prof., Dept. Psy- 
chologv, Univ. Maryland, College Park, 
Md. M37F40. IQ. 

Belmont, Hon. Perry. Box 58, Newport, 
R. I. M06L07. 

Bels, Basil A. 346 West End Ave., New 
York, N. Y. M32R32. M. 

Belt, Dr. Arthur Elmer. M.S., M.D., Cali- 
fornia. 1893 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, 
Calif. M28F33. N. 

Belt, Haller. Bausch and Lomb Optical 
Co., 593 Market St., San Francisco, Calif. 
M37R37. B. 

Beltran, Prof. Enrique. D.Sc.N., Mexico, 
32; M.C.B.. Columbia, 33. Chief, Proto- 
zoology Lab., Inst, de Salubridad y En- 
fermedades Tropicales ; prof, zoology, 
Univ. Mexico, Mexico, D. F., Mexico. 
M33F26. FGN. 



Beltz, Dr. J(ohn) Carl. M.Sc, Ohio State. 
33; Ph.D., 38. Prof, chemistry, State 
Teachers Col., St. Cloud, Minn. (202 
Beverly Apts.) M39. CQ. 

Bemis, Alan C(ogswell). M.A., Massachu- 
setts Inst. Tech., 30. Res. assoc, Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., Cambridge, Mass. 
(Cochituate Road, Wayland, Mass.) 
M36. B. 

Bemisderfer, Franklin R. M.A., Columbia, 
31. Teacher science curriculum, John 
Marshall High School and James Ford 
Rhodes High School, Cleveland. Ohio. 
(2251 Brockwav Road, Cleveland Heights) 
(M 3 5R3S)M 4 o. Q. 

Benade, Prof. James Martin. A.M., Prince- 
ton, 16. 6 Napier Road, Lahore, India. 
M29F32. BMQ. 

Benbrook, Dr. E(dward) A(ntony). 
V.M.D., Pennsylvania, 14. Prof, and head 
Dept. Veterinary Pathology, Iowa State 
Col., Ames, Iowa. (2318 Baker St.) M30- 
F33. NF. 

Benda, Miss Rosel F. M.A., Columbia. 10 
W. 65th St., New York, N. Y. M39. GCQ. 

Bender, Albert M. LL.D., California; 
M.A., Litt.D., Mills College. 311 Califor- 
nia St., San Francisco, Calif. M37. D. 

Bender, Prof. Harold B(ohm). 42 High- 
land Ave., Windsor, Conn. M34F34R36. 
GFN. 

Bender, Prof. Harold H(erman). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 07; Phil.L.D., Kansas, 
22; Litt.D.. Lafayette, 24. Prof. Indo- 
German philology, chairman Dept. Orien- 
tal Languages and Literatures, Princeton 
Univ.. Princeton, N. J. (120 FitzRandolph 
Road) M24F30. L. 

Bender, Dr. Howard L(eonard). M.A., 
Marietta, 17; Ph.D., Columbia, 25. Res. 
chemist, Bakelite Corp., Bloomfield, N. J. 
(7 Carteret St.) M39. C. 

Bender, Prof. John F(rederick). A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 22; Ph.D., 27. Prof, school ad- 
ministration, Univ. Oklahoma, Norman, 
Okla. M29F31. Q. 

Bender, Dr. R(aymond) C(layton). Ph.D., 
Cornell, 30. Res. chemist. Borden Co., 
Bainbridge, N. Y. M33F33. CN. 

Bendove, Dr. Raphael A. M.D., Albany 
Med. Col., 22. Asst. prof, clinical medi- 
cine, New York Post Graduate Med. 
School, Columbia Univ.; asst. clinical 
prof, medicine, Long Island Col. Med., 
New York, N. Y. (M3iR33)M 3 5. NLI. 

Bendrat, Dr. T(homas) A(lbert). 125K 
Wilkinson St., Montgomery, Ala. (?) 
M32R32. EFG. 

Benecke, Alex. 67 Walworth Ave., Scars- 
dale, N. Y. M29. 

Benedek, Dr. Therese F. M.D., Budapest, 
16. Clinical and res. assoc. and lecturer, 
Inst. Psychoanalysis, 43 E. Ohio St., Chi- 
cago, 111. M38. NIH. 



264 



Directory of Members 



Benedek, Dr. Tibor. M.D., Budapest, 19, 
Leipzig, 22. Staff dermatologist, Michael 
Reese Hosp., Chicago, 111. M39. NG. 

Benedict, Dr. C. H(arry). D.Eng.. Michi- 
gan Col. Mines, 32. Lake Linden, Mich. 
M34F34. Mi 

Benedict, Don M(arion). Dept. Biology, 
Temple Univ., Philadelphia. Pa. M18F31- 
R34. G. 

Benedict, Dr. Francis G(ano). Nutrition 
Lab., Carnegie Inst. Washington, Boston, 
Mass. M05F08R37. FN. 

Benedict, Dr. H(arris) M(iller). M.A., 
Cincinnati, 30; Ph.D.. Chicago, 32. Assoc, 
plant physiologist, U. S. Bur. Plant In- 
dustry, Cheyenne, Wyo. M37F39. G. 

Benedict, Dr. Harry Y(andell). M07F11- 
D37. AD. 

Benedict, Dr. H(oward) C(ourtney). M.A.. 
Stanford, 24; Ph.D., Northwestern, 31. 
Assoc, prof, chemistry, Chico State Col., 
Chico. Calif. M29F33. CN. 

Benedict, R(alph) C(urtiss). Ph.D.. Co- 
lumbia, 11. Prof, biology, Brooklyn Col.: 
resident investigator, Brooklyn Botanic 
Garden, Brooklyn, N. Y. (1819 Dorches- 
ter Road) M0SF11. FG. 

Benedict, Dr. Ruth (Fulton). Ph.D.. Co- 
lumbia, 2,1. Dept. Anthropology, Columbia 
Univ.. New York, N. Y. (M31F33R34)- 
M37F33. H. 

Benedict, Stanley R(ossiter). M18F21D36. 
C. 

Benedict, Dr. William L(emuel). M.D., 
Michigan, 12. Prof, ophthalmology. Univ. 
Minnesota Graduate School Med.. Roches- 
ter. Minn. (000 8th St. SW.) M24F31. 
BX. 

Benedix, Miss Agnes W. 20 Brookridge 
Ave.. Tiickahoe', N. Y. M29R33. GFN. 

Benfield, Dr. A. E. Ph:D., Cambridge. 38. 
Instr. physics, Williams Col.. Williams- 
town. Mass. M35F40. BE. 

Benfield, A(bel) MCorris). 107s California 
St.. San Francisco. Calif. M18. DM. 

Ben^ord, Frank (A.). E.E.. Michigan. 10. 
Phvsicist. Gen. Electric Co., Schenectadv, 
X.'Y. (1643 Rugby Road) M24F31. B. 

Bengtson. Dr. Ida AGbertina). M.S.. Chi- 
cago, 13; Ph.D.. 10. Senior bacteriologist. 
Nat. Inst. Health, Washington, D. C. 
M25F33. N. 

Bengston, Prof. Nels A(ugust). Ph.D.. 
("lark, 2y. Dean. Junior Div. ; prof, geog- 
raphy and chairman Dept.. Univ. Ne- 
braska, Lincoln. Nebr. M17F25. E. 

Benham, Prof. Rhoda Williams. Ph.D.. 
Columbia. 31. Asst. prof, dermatology, Co- 
lumbia Univ. Col. Phvsicians and Sur- 
geons, New York, N. Y. M21F33. GN. 

Ben'amin. Dr. C(harles) H(enry). M2S- 
F2SD37. M. 



Benjamin, Edward B. 1415 Whitney Bldg., 
New Orleans. La. M32R38. 

Benjamin, Harold. A.M.. Oregon, 24; 
Ph.D., Stanford. 2 Evelvn Place, Calvert 
Hills Hyattsville, Md. M31F32. QIK. 

Benjamin, Mrs. Helen R(irkin). 263 East- 
ern Parkwav. Brooklyn, N. Y. M30R32. 
CFG. 

Benjamin, Dr. Julien E. M.D.. Cincin- 
nati. 12. Assoc, prof, medicine, Univ. Cin- 
cinnati. Cincinnati. Ohio. (3635 Wash- 
ington Ave.) M31F33. NFL 

Benkert, Joseph Mohney. 722 Maplewood 
Ave., Ambridge, Pa. M29R32. F. 

Benkesser, Grant E. E.E., Syracuse. 332 
N. Alahambra Ave., Monterey Park, Calif. 
M39. MKB. 

Benner, Dr. R(aymond) C(alvin). M.A., 
Wisconsin, 06; Ph.D.. 09. Dir. res., Car- 
borundum Co., Niagara Falls, N. Y. M17- 
F33. CME. 

Benner, Dr. Walter M. M.A., Pennsyl- 
vania, 26; Ph.D., 31. Res. assoc, Dept. 
Botany, Acad. Natural Sciences: teacher 
biology, Benjamin Franklin High School, 
Philadelphia. Pa. (5636 Loretta Ave.) 
M34F34. G. 

Bennett, Dr. A(bram) E(lting). M.D., 
Nebraska. 21. Asst. prof, neuropsychiatry, 
Univ. Nebraska Col. Med.; dir. Psychi- 
atric Dept.. Clarkson Memorial Hosp., 
Omaha: consulting neurologist. State 
< )rthopedic Hosp. and State Hosp. In- 
sane, Lincoln. Nebr. (5406 Izard St., 
Omaha, Nebr.) M40. N. 

Bennett, Dr. A(rthur) L(awrence). Ph.D.. 
Chicago, ^t,; M.D.. Rush, 37. Assoc, prof, 
physiology and pharmacology. Univ. Ne- 
braska Col. Med.. Omaha, Nebr. M38. 
X'pBC. 

Bennett, Dr. C(arlyle) W(ilson). M.S. 
Michigan State, 20: Ph.D., Wisconsin, 26. 
Pathologist. I*. S. Dept. Agric, Riverside. 
Calif. M2XF31. G. 

Bennett, Dr. Clarence E(dwin). Sc.M.. 
Brown, 21: Ph.D., 30. Head Dept. Physics. 
Univ. Maine. Orono, Maine. M24F31. 
BAM. 

Bennett, Dr. Donald M(enzies). M.A.. 
Wisconsin. 23: Ph.D.. 26. Assoc, prof. 
physics,. Univ. Louisville, Louisville. Ky. 
(1810 Fleming Road) M36F36. B. 

Bennett. Prof. Edward. E.E.. Western 
Pennsylvania, 07. Chairman Dept. and 
prof, electrical engineering. Univ. Wis- 
consin, Madison, Wis. M18F25. MQB. 

Bennett, Emmett. M.Sc, Massachusetts 
State, 34. Asst. res. prof, chemistry, 
Massachusetts State Col., Amherst. Mass. 
M34. CGF. 



Bennett. F. W. 770 Boyd Ave., 

Rouge, La. M31R32. 



Baton 



I mhyiiu'al Members 



26: 



Bennett, F(rank) L(uverne). B.S., Illi- 
nois, 16. Teacher biology, Spearfish State 
Normal School. Spearfish, S. Dak. M24. 
GFO. 

Bennett, Dr. George Allen. M.D., Munich, 
37. Assoc, anatomy, Daniel Baugh Inst. 
Vriatomy, Jefferson Med. Col., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. M40. \. 

Bennett, Dr. Granville A(llison). M.D., 
Iowa, 25. \sst. prof, pathology, Harvard 
Med. School. Boston, Mass. (220 Dorset 
Road, Waban, Mass.) M3SF38. N. 

Bennett, Harris S(hell). C.E., Purdue, 27. 
Assoc, engineer, U. S. Engineers Office. 
Los Angeles, Calif. (913,3 S. Harvard 
Blvd.) M39. MAB. 

Bennett, Harry. B.S., New York, 17. 
Chemical dir.. Glyco Products, Inc., New 
York, X. Y. (148 Lafayette St.) M29F38. 
CB. 

Bennett, Dr. (Henry) Stanley. M.D., Har- 
vard, 36. Instr. anatomy and pharmacol- 
ogy, Harvard Univ. Med. School, Boston, 
Mass. (56 Greenough St., Brookline, 
Mass. I M40. Xp. 

Bennett, Dr. Henry W(ells) N(ewell). 
M.D., University and Bellevue, 04. Derma- 
tologist, Elliot Hosp., Balch Hosp., and 
llillsboro Hosp., Manchester, X. H. (1448 
Elm St.) M23. N. 

Bennett, Holly Reed. 1207 Astor St., Chi- 
cago, 111. M28R32. E. 

Bennett, (Ivan) Dewey. M.A., Wyoming, 
27. Instr. science, Junior Col., Garden 
City, Kans. i 802 X. 4 th St.) M29. QGF. 

Bennett, Dr. J. H. 460 W. Market St.. 
York. Pa. M32R32. X. 

Bennett, Dr. James Percy. A.M., Missouri, 
1?; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 18. Univ. Califor- 
nia, Berkeley. Calif. M13F16. GOC. 

Bennett, John Godolphin. Dir., British 
Coal Utilisation, Res. Assn. Exp. Sta., 54 
Victoria St., London, England. M38. ABC. 

Bennett, Dr. John N(ewton). Drurv Col., 
Springfield, Mo. M06R32. IQA. 

Bennett, J(ohn) William. 69 Rochelle St., 
Springfield. Mass. M28. MAB. 

Bennett, Lee F. A.B.. Indiana. Gen. insur- 
ance. Saginaw. Mich. (614 Fitzhugh St.) 
M07. E. 

Bennett, Miss Mary A(llison). A.M.. Chi- 
cago, 26. 62? E. Carroll St., Macomb, 111. 
M31. FGQ. 

Bennett, Dr. Paul H. D.D.S.. Atlanta 
Southern Dental Col. Valley Nat. Bank 
P.ldg.. Tucson. Ariz. M40. XdK. 

Bennett, Lieut. Rawson, II. M.S.. Cali- 
fornia, -1,7. Bur. Navigation, U. S. Navy 
Dept., Washington, D. C. M38. MA. 

Bennett, Robert G. sos Webster St.. Mis- 
hawaka, Ind. M38. CB. 



Bennett, Robert R(aymond). M.S., Xc- 
braska. Junior geologist, V. S. Geol. Sur- 
vey, Austin, Tex. M40. E. 

Bennett, Wallis R. 414 N. Salisbury St., 
West Lafayette, Ind. M33R33- 

Bennett, Dr. Willard H. M.Sc, Wisconsin. 
26; Ph.D., Michigan, 28. Dir. res., Elec- 
tronic Res. Corp., Newark, Ohio. (.136 
Fairfield Ave.) M39. B. 

Bennett, William Ogle, Jr. B.S.. Lehigh, 
32. Supervisor physical res. lab., Hamilton 
Watch Co., Lancaster, Pa. (330 College 
Ave.) M36F40. BM. 

Bennighof, Prof. C(loyd) L(awrence). 
S.M., Chicago, 22. Asst. prof, biology, 
Western Maryland Col., Westminster, Md. 
(31 Ridge Road) M29F33. F. 

Bennington, Dr. N. L. Dept. Biology, Col. 
Wooster. Wooster, Ohio. ( ?) M36R37. F. 

Bennion, Dr. Milton. M.A.. Columbia, o; ; 
Ed.D., L T tah, 31. Dean School Education, 
prof, philosophy and education, and dir. 
summer session, Univ. Utah, Salt Lake 
City, Utah. (2^85 Seventh East St.) M08- 

F21. y. 

Bennitt, Dr. Rudolf. A.M.. Boston, 21 ; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard, 23. Prof, zoology, 
Univ. Missouri, Columbia, Mo. (120 
Edgewood Ave.) M25F32. FGO. 

Benoist, E. J. Casilla 1285, Valparaiso, 
Chile, S. A. M19F31R32. EM. 

Benoit, Prof. Jacques. Docteur en Medi- 
cine, Docteur es Sciences, Strasbourg. 
Prof. d'Histologie, Faculte <le Medecine. 
Alger, France. M37. FG. 

Benoliel. S. D. Merion, Pa. M28R32. C. 

Benscoter, Stanley (Urner). M.S., Illi- 
nois, 35. Junior engineer, U. S. Engineers 
Office, Boston, Mass. (1050 Beacon St.) 
(M34R34)M 3 6. MA. 

Bensend, Dwight W(infred). B.S., Minne- 
sota, 37. Instr. forestry, Univ. Minne- 
sota, UniV. Farm, St. Paul, Minn. M39- 
F40. OG. 

Benson, Prof. Charles E(mile). A.M., Ne- 
braska, 12; Ph.D., Columbia. 22. Chair- 
man Dept. Educational Psychology, New 
York Univ. School Education, New York. 
XL Y. (42 Carolin Road. Montclair, N. J.) 
M24F31. IQ. 

Benson, Dr. C(lara) C(ynthia). Ph.D., 
Toronto, 03. Prof, food chemistry. Univ. 
Toronto, Toronto. Out.. Canada. M22F25. 
CX. 

Benson, Frederic R(upert). M.S., New 
York, 38. Instr. chemistry. Bergen Junior 
Col., Teaneck, X. J. M39. CXI. 

Benson. Dr. Henry K(reitzer). Ph.D., 
Columbia, 07; D.Sc, Franklin and Mar- 
shall. 26. Prof, chemical engng., Univ. 
Washington. Seattle, Wash. (471c Uni- 
versity Way) M30F33. C. 



266 



Directory of Members 



Benson, John F(rancis), Jr. B.S., Virginia 
Polytechnic Inst. 41 Court St., Ports- 
mouth, Va. M40. MCB. 

Benson, Dr. Oscar A(lgot). A.M., Augus- 
tana, 14; Ph.D., Pittsburgh, 33. Pastor, 
Salem Lutheran Church, Chicago, 111. 
M34- KLQ. 

Benson, Dr. Robert L(ouis). M.A., Mich- 
igan, 04; M.D., Chicago, 10. Asst. clinical 
prof. medicine, Univ. Oregon Med. 
School, Portland, Oreg. (1414 S. W. 
Davenport St.) M34F34. N. 

Benson, Dr. Simon. M.S., Chicago, 29; 
Ph.D., 31. Dean pharmacy, Ferris Inst. 
Col. Pharmacy, Big Rapids, Mich. (220 
Winter Ave.) M39. Np. 

Bent, Arthur E. A.M., Harvard, 23. Sec, 
Mt. Washington Observatory, Gorham, 
N. H.; res. assoc, Harvard Observatory, 
Cambridge, Mass. (Exeter, N. H.) M39. B. 

Bent, Dr. Henry E(dward). M.S., North- 
western, 23; Ph.D., California, 26. Prof, 
chemistry and dean Graduate School, 
Univ. Missouri, Columbia, Mo. M28F33. C. 

Bentley, Dr. Arthur F(isher). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 95. Paoli, Ind. M30F38. K. 

Bentley, DeSpence. Box 1086, Birming- 
ham, Ala. M31R32. CBK. 

Bentley, Dr. George P(atterson). M.S., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 34; Sc.D.. 37. 
Dir. res., Waltham Watch Co., Waltham, 
Mass. (20 Exeter St., Wollaston, Mass.) 
M40. MB. 

Bentley, Prof. Gordon M(ansir). M.A., 
Cornell, 01; M.S., Tennessee, 28. Head 
Dept. Entomology, Univ. Tennessee; 
state entomologist, Knoxville, Tenn. (141 
VV. Peachtree St.) M04F14. F. 

Bentley, Dr. Madison. Ph.D., Cornell, 98; 
LL.D., Nebraska. Prof, emeritus psychol- 
ogy, Cornell Univ., It-haca, N. Y.; con- 
sultant psychology, Library Congress, 
Washington, D. C. M04F06. I. Vice presi- 
dent for Section on Psychology (I), 1929. 

Bentley, Prof. William B(urdelle). Ohio 
Univ., Athens, Ohio. M02F03R36. C. 

Bentley, William Perry. 4214 Swiss Ave., 
Dallas, Tex. M23R34. MIE. 

Benton, Anne (Gertrude) (See Mrs. Anne 
B. Riebeth). 

Benton, Prof. Arthur F(erguson). A.M., 
Princeton, 19; Ph.D., 20. Prof, chemistry 
and chairman Faculty Chemistry, Univ. 
Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. M25F28. CB. 

Benton, Dr. Arthur L(ester). A.M., Ober- 
lin, 33; Ph.D., Columbia, 35. Instr., Stu- 
dent Personnel Bur., Col. City New York, 
New York; psychologist, Westchester 
Div., New York Hosp., White Plains, 
N. Y. M36F40. IQ. 

Benton, Prof. Ralph. M.S., California, 09; 
M.A., Southern California, 14. Box 573-J, 
Route 1, Rivera, Calif. M31. FG. 



Benton, Thomas B(ennett), Jr. Student, 
Flagstaff High School, Flagstaff, Ariz. 
M39. D. 
Bentz, Dr. Charles A. M28F31D — . N. 

Benz, Prof. Harry E(dward). M.A., Iowa, 
25 ; Ph.D., 27. Prof, education, Ohio 
Univ., Athens, Ohio. (38 Fairview Ave.) 
M36F36. QA. 

Bequaert, Dr. Joseph C. Harvard Univ. 
Med. School, Boston, Mass. M24F25R37. 
FGN. 

Beran, Theodore. M17F32D36. M. 

Berastegui, Henry. E.E., Linares (Spain), 
12. Equipment engineer, Western Elec- 
tric Co., Kearny, N. J. (629 Forest Ave., 
Westfield, N. J.) M25. M. 

Berberich, Dr. Leo J. Res. and Develop- 
ment Div., Socony-Vacuum Corp., Pauls- 
boro, N. J. M34R36. MBC. 

Berenice, Sister M. (See Sister M. Beren- 
ice O'Neill). 

Berenice, Mother M. (See Mother M. 
Berenice Rice). 

Berens, Dr. Conrad. M.D., Pennsylvania, 
11. Ophthalmologist, 35 E. 70th St.; oph- 
thalmic surgeon and pathologist, New 
York Eve and Ear Infirmary, New York, 
N. Y. M24F38. NBC. 

Berens, Joanna S. (See Mrs. Alexander 
Roseman) . 

Beresford, Prof. Hobart. B.S., Iowa State, 
24. Head Dept. and prof, agric. engng., 
Univ. Idaho, Moscow, Idaho. M34. M. 

Berg, Dr. Benjamin N. M.D., Columbia, 
20. Assoc, pathology, Columbia Univ. Col. 
P'hysicans and Surgeons, New York, N. Y. 
M40. N. 

Berg, Dr. Clarence P(eter). M.A., Illinois, 
25; Ph.D.. 29. Assoc, prof, biochemistry, 
Univ. Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. (528 N. 
Dubuque St.) M32F33. CN, 

Berg, Dr. Ernst J(ulius). M.E., Royal 
Polytechnic (Sweden), 92; Sc.D., Union, 
08. Prof, charge electrical engng., Union 
Col., Schenectady, N. Y. (1336 Lowell 
Road) M11F15. M. 

Berg. Dr. William N(athan). Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia, 07. Teacher, Seward Park High 
School, New York, N. Y. (789 West End 
Ave.) M05F11. CFN. 

Bergeim, Dr. Olaf. M.S., Illinois, 12; 
Ph.D., Jefferson, 14. Assoc, prof, physio- 
logical chemistry, Univ. Illinois Col. Med., 
Chicago, 111. M13F32. C. 

Bergen, Miss Catharine. A.M., Columbia, 
35. Asst. physics, Hofstra Col., Hemp- 
stead N. Y. (116 14th St., Garden City, 
N. Y.) M36. QBD. 

Bergen, Harold B. McKinsey, Welling- 
ton and Co., New York, N. Y. M34R39. 
IMK. 



Individual Members 



267 



Bergen, Dr. John Tallmadge. A.M., Rut- 
gers. 92; D.D., 01. Pastor, Homewood 
Presbyterian Church ; prof. Christian phi- 
losophy, Northwest Evangelical Seminary, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (171 1 Xerxes Ave. 
N.) M30. 

Berger, Prof. Charles A(lbert). A.M., Bos- 
ton, 26; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 37. Prof, 
biology, Woodstock Col., Woodstock, Md. 
M29F33. FG. 

Berger, Dr. Curt E(rnesto Emilio). Ph.D., 
Berlin. 32. Dept. Psychology, Cornell 
Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. (201 Highland Ave.) 
M40. IHN. 

Berger, Miss Edla G. 14-11 161st St., 
Beechhurst, L. I., N. Y. M29. AD. 

Berger, Dr. E(dward) W(illiam). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 99. Entomologist. Florida 
State Plant Board, Gainesville, Fla. (223 
S. 9th St.) M06F14. FG. 

Berger, Miss Elsa W. M.A., Pennsylvania, 
16. 2037 E- Madison St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
M25. N. 

Berger, Miss Nanda M. 14-11 161st St., 
Beechhurst. L. I., N. Y. M29. AE. 

Berger, Dr. Samuel S. Chief Med. Dept., 
Mt. Sinai Hosp., Cleveland, Ohio. M36. 
NIH. 

Bergey, Dr. David H. M99F03D37. N. 

Berggren, Axel W. Route 2, Millington, 
N. J. (?) M31R32. CMA. 

Berggren, Miss Ruth E(lna) L(illian). 
A.M., Radcliffe, 23. 15 Adams St., Winter 
Hill, Mass. M29F33. C. 

Bergh, Dr. George S. M.D., Minnesota. 
33; M.S., Northwestern, 34. Instr., Dept. 
Surgery, Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, 
Minn. (2615 Park Ave.) M40. N. 

Berglund, Prof. Abraham. Ph.D., Colum- 
bia, 07. Univ. Virginia, Charlottesville, 
Va. M25F40. K. 

Bergman, Prof. H(enry) D(ale). D.V.M., 
Iowa State, 10. Prof, veterinary physiol- 
ogy and pharmacology and head Dept., 
Iowa State Col., Ames, Iowa. (21 19 Coun- 
try Club Blvd.) M31F33. NQC. 

Bergman, Dr. Herbert F(loyd). M.S., 
Minnesota, 15; Ph.D., 18. Goessman Lab., 
Massachusetts Agric. Col., Amherst, Mass. 
M08F16. G. 

Bergman, H(yman) C. 2625 3rd St., Santa 
Monica, Calif. (?) M34R35. CN. 

Bergman, W(alter) G(erald). A.M., Mich 
igan, 24; Ph.D., 29. Dir. res., Detroit Pub- 
lic Schools, Detroit, Mich. (74 Connecti- 
cut St., Highland Park, Mich.) M40. QIL. 

Bergmann, Dr. Max. Ph.D., Berlin, n. 
Member. Rockefeller Inst. Med. Res., New 
York, N. Y. M36F36. C. 

Bergmann, Prof. Werner. Ph.D., Gottin- 
gen, 28. Asst. prof, chemistry, Yale Univ., 
New Haven, Conn. M40. C. 



Bergner, Dr. A(nna) Dorothy. A.M., Co- 
lumbia. 27; Ph.D., 28. Cytologist, Car- 
negie Inst. Washington, Cold Spring Har- 
bor, N. Y. M28F33. FG. 

Bergquist, John G. M17D— . M. 

Bergquist, Dr. Stanard G(ustaf). M.S., 
Michigan, 26; Ph.D., 33. Prof, geology 
and head Dept. Geology and Geography, 
Michigan State Col., East Lansing, Mich. 
M40. E. 

Bergren, Leslie. Univ. High School, Univ. 
Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. M31R32. 
FQC. 

Bergsmark, Prof. Daniel R. Dept. Geology 
and Geography, Univ. Cincinnati, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. M34F34R34. E. 

Bergstresser, Prof. Kenneth A. Beaver 
Col., Jenkintown, Pa. M38. FG. 

Bergstrom, Prof. F(rancis) W(illiam). 
Ph.D., Stanford, 22. Assoc, prof., Dept. 
Chemistrv, Stanford University, Calif. 
M39. C. 

Bergtold, Dr. W(illiam) H(arry). M22- 
F33D36. FHN. 

Bergy, Prof. Gordon Alger. M.S., Michi- 
gan, 16. Prof, pharmacy. West Virginia 
Univ., Morgantown, W. Va. (317 Lebanon 
St.) M37F38. NpC. 

Bering, Miss Alma. Sheppard Pratt Hosp., 
Towson, Md. M36R36. N. 

Berkefeld, Paul C(unoL 2701 Regent St., 
Berkeley, Calif. M19. MP. 

Berkeley, L. M. 36 W. 91st St.. New York, 
N. Y. M24F38. DAB. 

Berkey, Prof. Charles P(eter). M.S., Min- 
nesota, 93; Ph.D., 97; Sc.D., Columbia, 
29. Prof, emeritus geology in residence, 
Columbia Univ.; consulting geologist, 
U. S. Bur. Reclamation, Tennessee Valley- 
Authority, and New York City Board 
Water Supply, New York, N. Y. (1076 
Cumbermede Road, Palisade, N. J.) Moi- 
F05. E. 

Berkey, Dr. Donald Keith. M.A., Cincin- 
nati, 31; Ph.D., 32. Physicist, Beech-Nut 
Packing Co., Canajoharie, N. Y. (14 Col- 
lege St., Hamilton, N. Y.) M31F38. BCN. 

Berkman, Dr. Anton H(eimer). M.A., 
Texas. 26: Ph.D.. Chicago, 36. Prof, and 
chairman Dept. Biol. Sciences, Texas Col. 
Mines and Metallurgy, El Paso, Tex. M28- 
F33. GF. 

Berkman, Dr. Sophia. 426 Surf St., Chi- 
cago, 111. M38. CB. 

Berkson, Dr. Joseph. M.A.. Columbia. 22; 
M.D.. Johns Hopkins, 27; D.Sc. 28. Head 
Div. Statistics and Biometry, Mayo Clinic ; 
assoc. prof., Univ. Minnesota, Rochester, 
Minn. M36F38. N. 

Berkwitz, Dr. Nathaniel J. 300 S. East 
Cecil St., Minneapolis, Minn. M35F35R35. 
IN. 



268 



Directory of Members 



Bed, Dr. Ernst. Ph.D., Zurich. 01. Res. 
prof, chemistry, Carnegie Inst. Tech., 
Pittsburgh. Pa. M34F38. C. 

Berlin, Dr. Henry. 1593 Rugby Road, 
West Englewood. X. J. M31R32. C. 

Berlin, Miss Leonore A. 33 Limvood St., 
Buffalo, X. Y. M31R38. FXG. 

Berliner, J. F. T. du Pont Ammonia Corp., 
du Pont Exp. Sta., Wilmington, Del. M26- 
F28R34. CBM. 

Berly, J(oel) A(nderson). B.Sc, Clemson, 
14. Asst. state entomologist, Clemson 
Agric. Col.. Clemson, S. Car. M28F33. F. 

Berman, Arthur (See Arthur Burton). 

Berman, Benjamin. Consulting engineer, 
member firm Hogan and Berman. Long 
Island City, X. Y. M35F38. MAB. 

Berman, Joseph. M.S.. Pennsylvania, 37. 
Res. assoc, Univ. Mus., Univ. Pennsyl- 
vania, Philadelphia. Pa. (500 \V. Lehigh 
Ave.) M40. EO. 

Berman, Dr. Louis. 12 E. 86th St.. New 
York. X. Y. M24. XHI. 

Bernadette, Sister M. (See Sister M. 
Bernadette Lies). 

Bernard, Merrill. Crowley, La. M32R32. M. 

Bernard, Pierre Arnold. C. C. Club, Xv- 
ack, N. Y. M19R36. BDI. 

Bernard, Richard. M.Sc, Laval. 36. Asst. 
dir.. Quebec Zool. Garden, Charlesbourg, 
Que., Canada. M38. CF. 

Bernard, Dr. Viola W. M.D.. Cornell. 36. 
Res. psychiatry, New York Psychiatric 
Inst, and Hosp,, New York, X. Y. M40. 
XCF. 

Bernard, Walter. Walpole, X. H. M29R32. 
MAB. 

Bernays, Edward L. 420 Lexington Ave.. 
New York. X. Y. M34R38. K. 

Berne-Allen, Dr. Allan, Jr. Ph.D., Colum- 
bia, 36. Semiworks supervisor, E. I. du 
Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Waynes- 
boro, Va. (532 Locust Ave.) M37. CM. 

Berner, Dr. Frank. 114 E. 54th St., Xew 
York, N. Y. M33R37. XI. 

Bernhardt, Harold F. 754 Fern St., 
Yeadon, Pa. M_'oR33- GL. 

Bernhardt, Dr. Karl Schofield. M.A., To- 
ronto, 20; Ph.D.. Chicago, 32. Asst. prof. 
psychology, Univ. Toronto; instr., Inst. 
Child Studv. Toronto, Ont.. Canada. M }6. 

[Q 

Bernheim, Dr. Alice R. M.D., Columbia, 
22. Asst. surgeon, New York Hosp., New- 
York, N. Y. M18. N. 

Bernheim, Dr. Bertram M(oses). M.I).. 
Johns Hopkins, 05. Assoc, prof, surgery, 
Johns Hopkins Med. School; asst. visit- 
ing surgeon, Johns Hopkins Hosp.; visit- 
ing surgeon, Union Memorial Hosp., 



Church Home and Hosp. Women Mary- 
land. Baltimore, Md. ( Pikesville, Md.) 
M34F34. X. 

Bernheim, Dr. Frederick. Ph.D., Cam- 
bridge, 28. Assoc, prof, physiology and 
pharmacology, Duke Univ. School Med.. 
Durham. X. Car. M'39. XpF. 

Bernheimer, Alan W(eyl). M.A., Temple, 
37. 2259 X. Park Ave.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

M36. XFE. 

Bernreuter, Prof. Robert G(ibbon). Ph.D., 
Stanford, 31. Assoc, prof, education and 
psychology and dir. Psycho-Educational 
Clinic. Pennsvlvania State Col.. State Col- 
lege. Pa. (628 X. Holmes St.) M34F34. 

Ql 

Bernstein, Prof. B(enjamin) A(bram). 
Ph.D.. California, 13. Prof, mathematics, 
Univ. California, Berkelev. Calif. M29F31. 
AID. 

Bernstein, Bernard. Clerical mechanic. 
Bur. Engraving and Printing; student. 
George Washington Univ.. Washington, 
D. C. (51 13 2nd St. XW.) M40. GFC. 

Bernstein, Prof. Felix. Ph.D.. Gottingen. 
01. Prof, biometrics, Dept. Anatomy. New- 
York Univ. Graduate School, New York. 
X. Y. M40. AHX. 

Bernstein, Dr. Ralph. M.D. 1X16 Pine St.. 
Philadelphia, Pa. M35. X. 

Bernstein, Dr. Saul. M.A.. Columbia. 28; 
Ph.D.. 57. Instr., Citv College, New York. 
X. Y. IM33R33)M3')'. XFC. 

Bernthal, Dr. Theodore (George). M.S.. 
Michigan. 27; M.D., 30. Asst. prof, physi- 
ology. Univ. Michigan Med. School, Ann 
Arbor. Mich. M35F35. NF. 

Bernton, Dr. Harry S(aul). M.D., Har- 
vard, 08. Clinical specialist allergy. U. S. 
Dept. Agric; prof, hygiene, Georgetown 
Univ. School Med.. Washington, D. C. 
(2013 O St. XW.) M36F36. XOC. 

Berrill, Dr. N(orman) John. Ph.D., D.Sc, 
London. Dept. Zoologv, McGill Univ.. 
Montreal. Que., Canada. M38F38. F. 

Berrisford, Dr. Paul D. 814 Lowrv Med. 
Arts Bldg.. St. Paul, Minn. M37R37. X. 

Berry, Dr. Charles Scott. A.M., Harvard, 
05 ; Ph.D.. 07. Prof, psychology and dir.. 
Bur. Special and Adult Education, Ohio 
State Univ.. Columbus. Ohio. M11F21. 
Q I K . 

Berry, Dr. Charles T(hompson). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 34. Res. asst. paleontol- 
ogy, instr. College Teachers, and instr. 
Summer School. Johns Hopkins Univ., 
Baltimore, Md. M40. EF. 

Berry, Prof. Charles W(illiam). S.B., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 95. Prof, heat 
engng., Massachusetts Inst. Tech.. Cam- 
bridge, Mass. M34F34 MAB. 

Berry, Edward C. Missouri Botanical 
( iarden, St. Louis, Mo. M38. 



Individual Members 



2(9 



Berry, Prof. Edward W(ilber). Sc.D., 
Lehigh. Prof, paleontology, dean Col. and 
provost, forms Hopkins I'niv., Baltimore, 
Md. M01F05. EFG. 

Berry, Dr. (Edward) Willard. Ph.Dl, 
Johns Hopkins, 29. Assoc, prof, and chair- 
man Dept. Geology, Duke Univ., Durham, 
N. Car. M.26F33. EFG. 

Berry. Dr. Eugene M(anasseh). M.S., 
Iowa. 17; Ph.D., 20. Head Dept. Mathe- 
matics, State Teachers Col., Ghadrdn, 
Xebr. M34F34. ABD. 

Berry, Frank. 1 1 1 Pacific St., Brooklyn, 
X. Y. M32R32. MH. 

Berry, Dr. George Packer. M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 25. Prof, bacteriology and head 
Dept.; assoc. prof. medicine, Univ. 
Rochester School .Med. and Dentistry, 
Rochester, \. V. M34F34. X. 

Berry, Dr. H. R. M32D 3 5- BMI. 

Berry, Prof. James A(lexander). M.Sc, 
Michigan State, 17. Assoc, bacteriologist, 
U. S. Frozen Pack Lab., Univ. Washing- 
ton, Seattle, Wash. M35. GX. 

Berry, John W(ilson). 27 Miners Bank 
Bldg., Pittston, Pa. M98. M. 

Berry, Dr. L(evette) J(oe), Jr. Ph.D., 
Texas, 39. Instr. zoology, Unix. Texas, 
Austin, Tex. M39- FGC. 

Berry, R. O. Texas Agric. Exp. Sta., Col- 
lege Station, Tex. M34R37. FX. 

Berry, Dr. S(amuel) Stillman. A.M., Har- 
vard, 10: Ph.D., Stanford, 13. 1145 W. 
Highland Ave.. Redlands, Calif. M00F15- 
L18. FEG. 

Berry, Tyler. Federal Radio Commission, 
Washington, D. C. M34R34. EFG. 

Berry, Wallace D. Hamakua Mill Co., 
Paauilo, Hawaii. M34R35. C. 

Berry, Prof. William. 220 Park St., New 
Haven, Conn. (?) M34F34R37. I. 

Berry, William H(enry). B.S., Kansas 
State. 34. Asst. agric. engineer, U. S. Soil 
Conservation Service, Window Rock, 
Ariz. ( Keams Canyon, Ariz.) M40. MOK. 

Berry, Prof. William J. Western State 
Col., Kalamazoo, Mich. M35R36. E. 

Berry, Prof. William J(ohnston). M.S., 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Inst., 04; A.M.. 
Harvard, 08. Prof, mathematics and head 
Dept.. Brooklyn Polytechnic Inst., Brook- 
lyn, X. Y. (224 St. Johns Place) MioFis. 
A Q. 

Bert, Prof. O(tto) F(rederick) H(erman). 
A.M., Geneva, 03; Sc.D., Thiel, 35. Prof. 

applied mathematics, Washington and 
Tefferson Col.. Washine-ton, Pa. (28 X. 
Lincoln St.) M18F33. AD. 

Bertha, Sister Mary (See Sister Mary 
Bertha Cregan). 



Bertholf, Prof. Lloyd M(illard). M.A.. 
Johns Hopkins. 25; Ph.D., 28. Dean fac- 
ulty and prof, biology, Western Maryland 
Col.; agent, U. S. Bur. Entomology and 
Plant Quarantine, Westminster, Md. M25- 
F33. FQK. 

Bertholf, William E. Junior scientific 
aide, U. S. Soil Conservation Service, 
Dept. Geology, Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 
111. M40. E. 

Bertsch, Dr. J. A. 3512 Halliday Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. M36R39. CM. 

Besancon, Robert M(artin). M.A., Illi- 
nois. Assoc, physics, Univ. Illinois Col. 
Phar., Chicago, "ill. M37F40. BAC. 

Besozzi, Leo. 52 Ruth St., Hammond, Inch 
M38R39. MAB. 

Bessemans, Dr. J. F. A. Albert. M.D.. 
Louvain, 12. Prof, bacteriology and hy- 
giene, Inst. Bacteriology and Hygiene, 
Univ. Ghent, Gand, Belgium. M35. X. 

Bessey, Dr. Ernst Athearn. M.A., Xe- 
braska, 98; Ph.D., Halle, 04. Prof, botany 
and dean Graduate School, Michigan 
State Col., East Lansing, Mich. (213 Uni- 
versity Drive) M00F01. G. Secretary of 
Section on Botany (G), igoi. 

Bessey, William H(iggins). M.S., Car- 
negie Inst. Tech., 35. Instr. physics, South 
Dakota State School Mines, Rapid City, 
S. Dak. M35F40. B. 

Best, Everett J. Monson, Mass. M31R32. 
EKQ. 

Best, Dr. Harry. M.A., George Washing- 
ton, 02, Gallaudet, 02, Columbia, 08; 
Ph.D., Columbia, 14; LL.D., Centre, 37. 
Prof, sociology and chairman Dept., Univ. 
Kentucky, Lexington, Ky. M36. KLH. 

Best, Dr. R. Russell. M.D., Harvard, 22. 
Assoc, prof, surgery and asst. prof, anat- 
omy, LTniv. Xebraska Col. Med., Omaha, 
Xebr. M29F31. X. 

Beth, Dr. Richard A(lexander). M.S., 
Worcester Polytechnic Inst., 29; Dr. Phil. - 
Nat., Frankfurt, 32. Assoc, prof, applied 
mathematics, Michigan State Col., East 
Lansing, Mich. M36F38. BA. 

Bethea, Dr. Oscar W(alter). M.D., Tu- 
lane, 11; M.Phar., Philadelphia Col. Phar- 
macy and Science, 35. Prof, clinical medi- 
cine. Tulane Univ. ; senior physician, 
Southern Baptist Hosp.; senior visiting 
physician, Charity Hosp., New Orleans. 
La. M18. X. 

Bethke, Mrs. Florence G. 9317 S. Damen 
Ave.. Chicago, 111. M29R35. Q. 

Betten, Dr. Cornelius. M.A., Lake Forest, 
15; D.Sc, 23; Ph.D., Cornell, 06. Dean, 
Univ. Faculty, Cornell Univ.; dir. resident 
instruction, Xew York State Col. Agric. 
and Home Economics, Ithaca, X T . Y. (3 
The Circle) M06F2S. FQO. 



270 



Directory of Members 



Betts. Dr. Emmett Albert. Ph.D., Iowa, 
31; Res. prof, and dir. Reading Clinic, 
Pennsylvania State Col., State College, Pa. 
M39F40. Q. 



Bibb, Prof. Samuel F(letcher). M.S., Chi- 
cago, 23. Assoc. prof. mathematics, 
Armour Inst. Tech., Chicago, 111. M40. 
AMQ. 



Betts, Prof. George H. M24F26D— . IQ. Bibbins, Arthur B. M04F06D36. E. 



Betts, Dr. Lester. M.D., Albany Med. Col., 
99. 813 Union St., Schenectadv, N. Y. 
M19. N. 

Beube, Dr. Frank E(dward). D.D.S., To- 
ronto. Instr. dentistry, Columbia Univ. 
School Dental and Oral Surgery; chief 
periodontia staff, Presbyterian Hosp., 
New York, N. Y. M38. NdQ. 

Beucler, William George. New Jersey 
State Hosp., Greystone Park, N. J. (M36- 
R 3 6)M38. NCP. 

Beum, Corlin O., Jr. B.I.E., Ohio State. 
38. Statistician, Amer. Youth Commission, 
Washington, D. C. (730 17th St. NW.) 
M38. MIK. 

Beutner, Dr. Reinhard (Heinrich). Dr.- 
Ing., Karlsruhe, 08; M.D., Ph.D., Berlin 
26; Prof, pharmacology, Hahnemann Med. 
Col., Philadelphia, Pa. (937 W. Roose- 
velt Blvd.) M39. Np. 

Bevan, Arthur. B.S.F., Washington, 20. 
Dir. Tropical Forest Exp. Sta., Rio Pied- 
ras, P. R. M40. OKG. 

Bevan, Dr. Arthur (Charles). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 21. State geologist, Virginia Geol. 
Survey, Charlottesville, Va. (Meadow- 
brook Hills) M18F31. EO. 

Bevan, Dr. Arthur Dean. 122 S. Michigan 
Ave., Chicago, 111. M07F09R38. N. 

Bevelander, Gerrit. Dept. Anatomy, New 
York Univ. Col. Dentistry, New York, 
N. Y. M 3 2R33- FN. 

Bevers, Plez T. Box 1323, Cleveland, Ohio. 
M28. MOC. 

Bevier, Dr. George M.D.. Stanford, 19. 
Yellow fever investigations, Rockefeller 
Foundation, P. O. Box 199, Georgetown, 
British Guiana. M05F35. N. 

Bevier, Dr. Isabel. 605 S. Lincoln Ave., 
Urbana, 111. M97F09R35. K. 

Bevin, Sydney. M.E., Cornell, 08. Chief 
engineer, Fiske Brothers Refining Co., 
Toledo, Ohio. M18F32. MDE. 

Bevin, Miss Sylvia. B.A., Mt. Holyoke, 35. 
Res. asst., Harvard Med. School, Boston, 
Mass. M40. F. 

Beyer, Harold George. A.B., Columbia, 34. 
Graduate student, Columbia Univ., New 
York, N. Y. (8435 85th Ave., Woodhaven, 
N. Y.) M38F40. B. 

Beyer, Dr. Hermann. Ph.D.. Wiirzburg. 
Assoc, archaeology, Middle Amer. Res. 
Inst., Tulane Univ., New Orleans, La. 
M40F40. HL. 

Beyers, Dr. Otto John. Huron Col., Hu- 
ron, S. Dak. (?) M37R37. IF. 



Bibbins, Francis E. 150 W. 64th St., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. M35. CNp. 

Bibby, Dr. Basil. Univ. Rochester School 
Med. and Dentistry, Rochester, N. Y. 
M37R37. N. 

Bicak, Dr. Joseph Francis. M.D., New 
York, 97. 3008 Perry Ave., New York, 
N. Y. M17. N. 

Bick, Dr. Edgar M. M.A., Columbia, 23; 
M.D., 27. Orthopedic surgeon, Lutheran 
Hosp., Lincoln Hosp. and Mt. Sinai 
Hosp., New York, N. Y. M36. NL. 

Bick, George H(erman). M.S., Tulane. 
2339 Valmont St., New Orleans, La. M40. 
FG. 

Bick, Rev. J. A. M.S., St. Louis, jo; M.A., 
15. St. Patrick's Rectory, Fort Wayne, 
Ind. M33. C. 

Bickel, Dr. Beatrice. M.D., Cleveland Med. 
Col., 96. Principal librarian, Army Med. 
Library, Washington, D. C. M25. HN. 

Bickel, Dr. Charles L(ester). Phillips 
Exeter Acad., Exeter, N. H. M39R39. 
CBE. 

Bickerdike, Dr. Ernest L(awrence). A.M., 
Southern California, 32; Ph.D., 37. Instr. 
science, Santa Barbara State Col., Santa 
Barbara, Calif. M39. CEB. 

Biddison, P. McDonald. B.S., Kansas 
State, 04. Consulting engineer, 704 Dallas 
Gas Bldg., Dallas, Tex. M25. M. 

Biddle, Dr. Anna E(leanor). Ph.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 28. School psychologist, South 
Philadelphia High School Girls, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. (1045 Drexel Ave., Drexel Hill, 
Pa.) M32F33. IQH. 

Biddle, George Drexel. 1010 5th Ave., New 
York, N. Y. M31R32. DNB. 

Biddle, Miss Georgina. 2017 DeLaucey 
Place, Philadelphia, Pa. M13R35. 

Biddle, Dr. Henry C. Univ. California 
Col. Phar., San Francisco, Calif. M28R32. C. 

Biddle, James G(arrett). Pres., James G. 
Biddle Co., Philadelphia, Pa. (Walling- 
ford, Pa.) M90E39. BM. 

Biddle, Dr. Russell L(ee). A.M., Colum- 
bia, 28; Ph.D., California Inst. Tech., 31. 
Asst. prof, biology, Col. City New York, 
New York, N. Y. M 3 sF35- FG. 

Biddle, William W. 21 17 Adelbert Road, 
Cleveland, Ohio. M30R32. IQK. 

Biddulph, Dr. Orlin. Ph.D., Chicago, 34. 
Asst. prof, botany, State Col. Washing- 
ton, Pullman, Wash. (104-B Columbia St.) 
M36F38. GB. 



Individual Members 



271 



Bidwell, Prof. Charles C(larence). Ph.D., 
Cornell, 14. Prof, and head Dept. Physics, 
Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pa. (Riegels- 
ville. Pa.) M14F16. B. 

Bieber, Prof. Charles Leonard. M.A., 
Iowa, 32. Prof, geology, North Central 
Col., Naperville. 111. (214 N. Huffman St.) 
M40. EQ. 

Bieberdorf, Dr. Fredrick Wilhelm. M.S., 
Iowa State, 27; Ph.D., 33. Assoc, prof, 
biologv, St. Olaf Col., Northfield, Minn. 
(209 N. Linden St.) (M36R36)M39. G. 

Bieberdorf, Prof. Gustav A. Dept. En- 
tomology. Oklahoma A. and M. Col., Still- 
water. Okla. M28F33R34. FGO. 

Biecher, Prof. George R. 40 N. Earl St., 
Shippensburg, Pa. M25R32. B. 

Biefeld, Dr. Paul. Denison Univ., Gran- 
ville, Ohio. M24F30R36. D. 

Biefield, Dr. L(awrence) P(aul). Dept. 
chemistrv, Purdue Univ.. West Lafayette, 
Ind. M36R37. CB. 

Bier, Dr. E. Roy. 7 Med. Arts Bldg., 
Winnipeg. Man., Canada. M35R38. N. 

Bierbaum, C(hristopher) H(enry). M.E., 
Cornell, 91. Vice pres. and consulting en- 
gineer, Lumen Bearing Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 
(113 Florence Ave.) M03F25L25. MCB. 

Bierbaum, E(dward) C. Foxholm, N. Dak. 
M17R33. OC. 

Biermacher, Prof. Norbert. Ph.D., Fri- 
bourg. 36. Head Dept. and prof, chemis- 
trv, Univ. Dayton, Davton, Ohio. M39. 
CX. 

Bierman, Dr. William. M.D., Columbia, 
17. Attending physical therapist, Mt. Sinai 
Hosp.; asst. clinical prof, therapeutics, 
New York Univ. Col. Med. ; assoc. medi- 
cine, Columbia Univ., New York, N. Y. 
M40. N. 

Bierring, Dr. Walter Lawrence. M.D., 

Iowa, 92. Commissioner, State Dept. 

Health, Des Moines, Iowa. (2840 Ridge 
Road) M17F33. N. 

Biester, Prof. Alice. A.M., Illinois, 13. 
Assoc, prof, nutrition, Univ. Minnesota, 
Univ. Farm, St. Paul, Minn. M14F33. 
CFN. 

Bieter, Prof. Raymond N(icholas). M.D., 
M.S., Minnesota, 24; Ph.D., 29. Assoc, 
prof, pharmacology, Univ. Minnesota, 
Minneapolis, Minn. M35F35. Np. 

Bifoss, Rev. C(allistus) G. 300 4th St. SE., 
Minneapolis, Minn. M31F33R39. FEQ. 

Bigelow, Dr. George H(oyt). M34F34D34. 
NKQ. 

Bigelow, Dr. Harriet W(illiams). M06F09- 
D34. DL. 

Bigelow, Dr. Henry B(ryant). M.A., Har- 
vard, 04; Ph.D., 06. Prof, zoology. Har- 
vard Univ.; curator oceanography, Mus. 
Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 
M02F09. F. 



Bigelow, Dr. Lucius A(urelius). Ph.D., 
Yale, 19. Assoc, prof, chemistry, Duke 
Univ., Durham, N. Car. (131 Pinecrest 
Road) M28F33- CQ. 

Bigelow, Mason H(untington). 1 Wall 
St., New York, N. Y. M32R39. H. 

Bigelow, Prof. M(aurice) A(lpheus). 
Ph.D., Harvard, 01 ; Sc.D., Columbia, 29. 
Prof, emeritus biologv, Columbia Univ., 
New York, N. Y. M02F03. FGQ. Secretary 
of Section on Zoology (F), 1908-12. 

Bigelow, Dr. Maurice H(ubbard). Mellon 
Inst. Industrial Res., Pittsburgh, Pa. M28- 
R35. CM. 

Bigelow, Prof. Robert Payne. Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins. 92. Prof, emeritus zoology and 
parasitology, Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 
Cambridge, Mass. (72 Blake Road, Brook- 
line, Mass.) M02F03. F. 

Bigelow, Prof. S(amuel) Lawrence. Ph.D.. 
Leipzig, 98. Prof, emeritus gen. and phys- 
ical chemistry, Univ. Michigan, Ann Ar- 
bor, Mich. (22 Milton Hill Road, Milton, 
Mass.) M02F03. C. 

Bigger, J(ohn) H(enry). B.S., Connecti- 
cut, 21. Assoc, entomologist, Illinois Nat- 
ural History Survey, Urbana, 111. (1018 
W. John St., Champaign, 111.) M24F33. F. 

Biggert, Mr. Florence Cotter, Jr. Vice 
pres. charge engng., United Engng. and 
Foundry Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. (108 Haw- 
thorn Ave., Crafton) M25. M. 

Bihn, Francis Louis. 3041 W. 12th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. M36R37. CGN. 

Bijjani, George Y. M.S., Illinois. Amer. 
Univ. Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, Syria. 
M38. FGO. 

Bijou, Sidney William. M.A., Columbia, 
36. Student, Dept. Psychology, Univ. 
Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. M39. IQH. 

Bilawsky, Harry. 22^ Bainbrids^e St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (?) M29R33. CFN. 

Bilchick, Dr. Edwin B(enjamin). M.D., 
Columbia. 876 Park Ave., New York, 
N. Y. M37- N. 

Bilger, Dr. Leonora Neuffer. Univ. 
Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii. M34F34R35. C. 

Billig, Dr. Albert L(eRoy). A.M., Colum- 
bia, 36; Ph.D., Temple Bar College, 39. 
Instr. mathematics, Allentown High 
School, Allentown, Pa. (1328 Gordon St.) 
M40. IQA. 

Billig, Dr. Florence Grace. M.A., Colum- 
bia, 19; Ph.D., 30. Assoc, prof, science 
education, Wayne Univ., Detroit, Mich. 
(4743 2nd Blvd.) M29F34. GFQ. 

Billings, A(sa) W(hite) K(enney). A.M., 
Harvard, 93. Vice pres. charge engineer- 
ing and construction, Brazilian Traction 
Light and Power Co., Ltd., and subsid- 
iaries in Brazil, 25 King St. W., Toronto, 
Ont., Canada. (Caixa do Correio No. 571, 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, S. A.) M17. MBC. 



272 



Directory of Members 



Billings, Dr. Edward G. M.D.. Indiana, 28. 
Dir., Psychiatric Liaison Dept., Colorado 
Gen. and Psychopathic Hosps.; assoc. 
prof, psychiatry, Univ. Colorado School 
Sled., Denver, Colo. (301 Ivanhoe St:) 
M38. XI. 

Billings, Dr. Frederick H(oratio). 351 
Cajon St., Redlands, Calif. M24F25R39. G. 

Billings, Miss H(annah) Louisa. M.A., 
Smith, 21. Asst. prof, physics, Smith Col., 
Northampton. Mass. (Hatfield, Mass.) 
M14F40. B. 

Billings, Prof. J(ohn) Harland. S.M., 
Harvard, Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 15. 
Prof, mechanical engng. and head Dept., 
Drexel Inst. Tech., Philadelphia, Pa. (30 
Cedarhrook Road, Ardmore, Pa.) M28F32. 
MKB. 

Billings, Prof. Marland P(ratt). A.M., 
Harvard, 25 : Ph.D., 27. Assoc, prof, 
geology , Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. 
(115 Dover Road, Wellesley, Mass.) 
M29F31. E. 

Billings, Dr. Otto. M.D., Vienna, 37. 
Resident psychiatrist. Highland Hosp.. 
Asheville, N. Car. M40. NIH. 

Billings, Samuel. U, S. Insecticide Testing 
Lab., Silver Spring, Md. M32R34. F. 

Billingslea, Fred(erick) Y(arnell). M.A., 
Western Reserve, 39. Asst. psychology, 
Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, Ohio. 
M40. I. 

Billingsley, Paul. M.A., Columbia, 10. Con- 
sulting geologist. "Still Waters." Burton, 
Wash. M09F31. E. 

Billington, Cecil. Hon. curator herbarium. 
LJniv. Michigan, Ann Arbor; asst. botanist. 
Cranbrook Inst. Science, Bloomfield Hills. 
Mich. (21060 Thirteen Mile Road, Bir- 
mingham, Mich.) M21F38. G. 

Billmyer, Prof. Carroll D(avis). Rhode 
Island State Col.. Kingston, R. I. M31- 
F33R37- M. 

Billow, Clayton O(scar). 1212 Ashland 
Ave., Wilmette. 111. M18. M. 

Bills, Dr. Arthur G(ilbert). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 26. Prof, and head Dept. Psychology. 
Univ. Cincinnati, Cincinnati. Ohio. Mjii- 
F31. I. 

Bills, Dr. Charles E(verett). A.M.. Johns 
Hopkins, 23; Ph.D.. 24. Res. dir., Mead 
Tohnson and Co.. Evansville. Ind. M2QF3?. 
CNF. 

Bills, Dr. Marion A. Ph.D., Bryn Mawr, 
17. Asst. sec, Aetna Life Ins. Co., Hart- 
ford, Conn. M34F34. I. 

Bills, Thomas S. Fox Movietone News. 
New York, N. Y. (?) M30R34. M. 

Biloon, Dr. Sol. M.D., Cornell, 19. Visit- 
ing physician, Mnntefiore Hosp. and 
Morrisania Hosp.; instr. medicine, Colum- 
bia Univ., New York. N. Y. (1950 An- 
drews Ave., Bronx) M20. N. 



Bilsing, Dr. S(herman) W(eaver). M.A., 
Ohio State, 13; Ph.D., 24. Head Dept. 
Entomology, Texas A. and M. Col., Col- 
lege Station, Tex. M17F26. F. 

Binckley, Col. George Sydney. Civil engi- 
neer and manufacturer scientific instru- 
ments. 8s7 S. San Pedro St., Los Angeles. 
Calif. (7831 Hillside Ave.) M34F34- BM. 

Binder, Prof. Rudolph M(ichael). Ph.D.. 
Columbia. 03. Prof, emeritus sociology. 
New York Univ., New York. N. Y. (157 
W. 57th St.) M17F31. K. 

Bindloss, Miss Elizabeth A(lmy). A.M.. 
Columbia, 38. Instr. botany, Connecticut 
Col., New London, Conn. (53 E. Main 
St.. Mystic, Conn.) M37. G. 

Binford, Henry Francis. B.S.. Howard. 
1723 S St. N\V.. Washington, D. C. M38. 
MBA. 

Binford, Prof. Raymond. S.M., Chicago, 
06; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 12. Guilford 
College, N. Car. M12F15. FEG. 

Bing, Dr. Franklin C(hurch). Ph.D., 
Yale, 30. Sec, Council Foods, Amer. Med. 
Assn.; asst. prof, physiology, Northwestern 
Univ. Med. School, Chicago, 111. (2651 
Hurd Ave., Evanston, 111.) M30F33. N. 

Binger, Dr. Carl (Alfred Lanning). M.D.. 

Harvard, 14. Asst. prof, clinical medicine. 
Cornell Univ. Med. Col.; asst. attending 
phvsician, Payne Whitney Clinic. New 
York, N. Y. M24F31. N. 

Binger, Walter D(avid). B.S., Massachu- 
setts Inst. Tech. Commissioner, Borough 
Works, Manhattan; consulting engineer. 
New York, N. Y. (182 E. 75th St.) M30. M. 

Bingham, Prof. Eugene C(ook). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 05; Sc.D., Middlebury, 36. 
Prof, research, Lafayette Col., Easton. Pa.; 
consulting chemist, Boorum and Pease 
Co., Brooklvn, N. Y. (602 Clinton Terrace, 
Easton, Pa.) M18F22. CB. 

Bingham, Dr. Harold C(lyde). A.M., Har- 
vard, 12; Ph.D.. Hopkins. 23. Sanbbrnton, 
N. H. M21F25. IQH. 

Bingham, Hon. Hiram. 900 F St. NW .. 
Washington, D. C. Mo7FnR35- E. 

Bingham, Mrs. Marjorie T(ellefsen) (Mrs. 
Burton F. Bingham). A.M.. Cincinnati, 20. 
Botanist, Cranbrook Inst. Science. Bloom- 
field Hills, Mich. M38. GQ. 

Bingham, Dr. N. Eldred. Ph.D., Columbia. 
39. Science teacher. Lincoln School. 
Columbia Univ. Teachers Col., New York. 
N. Y. U30 Morningside Drive) M38. Q. 

Bingham, Dr. W(alter) V(an Dyke). M.A.. 
Harvard, 07: Ph.D., Chicago, 08; Sc.D., 
Beloit, 29. Consulting psychologist, 110 
Washington Place, New York, N. Y.; 
professorial lecturer, Stevens Inst. Tech.. 
Hoboken. N. J. M08F11. I. 

Bingley, Prof. George A(lthoff). M.A., 
Princeton, 16. Tutor, St. John's Col.. 

Annapolis. Md. M27F33. ABM. 



I \mviih\u, Members 



2/3 



Binkley, Prof. A(lmon) M. M.S.. Lowa 
State, 23. Prof, horticulture and head 
Dept.; state horticulturist, Colorado State 
Col., Fort Collins, Colo. M40F40. O. 

Binney, Ralph L(oring). B.E.E., Michi- 
gan. 1 j. Vice pies, and metallurgist, Binney 
Castings Co., Toledo, Ohio. (2726 Tal- 
madge Road) M32. Mill. 

Binnion, R(andolph) B. M31D34. K. 

Binns, John R(,obinson). $3.3 W. 52nd St.. 

New York, X. Y. M28R35. M. 

Bioletti, Prof. Frederic T(heodore). Univ. 
California, Berkeley, Calif. M10F15R35. 
GFE. 

Birch, Carroll La Fleur. M.D., Illinois, 
25; M.S., 27. 1214 N. Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago. 111. M39. X. 

Birch, Raymond E. Cer.E., Ohio State. 37. 
Res. engineer, Harbison-Walker Refrac- 
tories Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. M34. ECL. 

Birchard, Walter H(enry). B.Sc, Queens, 
_>3. Divisional chemist, Fraser Companies 
Ltd., Edmundston, X. B., Canada. M40. C. 

Bircher, Prof. Louis J(acob). M.A., Mis- 
souri, 17; Ph.D., Chicago, 24. Prof, physi- 
cal chemistry, Vanderbilt Univ., Xashville, 
Tenn. (2507 Kensington Place) M25F25. C. 

Bird, Dr. Charles. Ph.D., Clark, 20. Prof, 
psychology, Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis. 
Minn. M23F25. 1. 

Bird, Charles Sumner. A.B., Harvard, 06. 
Chairman Board and Exec. Com., Bird 
and Son, Inc., East Walpole, Mass. 
M08L09. 

Bird, Emerson W(heat). Ph.D.. Iowa 

State, 29. Assoc, prof, dairj industry and 

chemistry, lowa State Col., Ames, Iowa. 
M30F33/CO. 

Bird, Prof. Grace E(lecta). M.A., Colum- 
bia, 16; Ph.D., Brown, 18. Prof, educa- 
tional psychology, Rhode Island Col. Edu- 
cation, Providence, R. I. (157 Cypress 
St.) M25F25. I. 

Bird, Prof. Harold C(rusius). C.E., Yale, 
11. Prof, civil engng. and chairman Dept.. 
Duke Univ., Durham, X. Car. M34F34. M. 

Bird, Henry. Entomologist, 600 Milton 
Road, Rye, X. Y. M05F14. F. 

Bird, Dr. H(erbert) R(oderick). M.S., 

Wisconsin, 35; Ph.D., 38. Assoc, prof, 

nutrition. Univ. Maryland, College Park, 
Md. M40. XFC. 

Bird, James W. Xorthfield. Mass. M32R32. 
CAB. 

Bird, John. 28 Kenne.lv St., Bradford, Pa. 
M25R33. EM P. 

Bird, Junius (Bouton). Asst. curator 
anthropology. Amer. Mus. Natural His- 
tory, Xew York, X. Y. M38. II. 

Bird, Lloyd Campbell. Ph.G., Med. Col. 
Virginia. Pres., Phipps and Bird. Inc., 
Richmond, Va. M38. CX. 

Bird, Dr. Milton Hawkins. Norwell, Mass. 
M31R32. IQH. 



Bird, Dr. Ralph D(urham). M.Sc., Mani- 
toba, 26; Ph.D.. Illinois, 29. In charge 
Dominion Entomological Lab., Brandon, 
Man., Canada. M29F33. FGE. 
Bird, Dr. Robert M(ontgomery). M07F09- 
D38. C. 

Bird, Whitworth Fontain. B.S., North 
Eastern College. Dir., Res. and Technical 
Control Dept., Collins and Aikman Corp., 
Philadelphia, Pa. ( "Stoweaway ," Rodgers 
Lane. W'allingford, Pa.) M39. 
Birdlebough, J(ohn) C(hester). M.S., 
Cornell, 39. Supervising principal, Phoe- 
nix High School, Phoenix, X. Y. M37. 
QBC. 

Birdsall, A(mos) G(lentworth). 2 Summit 
Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. M17. M. 

Birdsall, Lewis I(saac). M.A., Illinois, 09. 
Sulfate specialist, Gen. Chemical Co., Chi- 
cago, 111. (904 Vernon Ave., Glencoe, 111.) 
M17F33. CM. 

Birdseye, Clarence. Consultant, Gen. 
Foods Corp., Xew York, X. Y. (Glou- 
cester, Mass.) M38F39. CMB. 

Birdseye, Dr. C(laude) H(ale). Sc.D., 
Oberlin, 31. Chief, Div. Engraving and 
Printing, U. S. Geol. Survey, Washington, 
D. C. (22 Grafton St., Chevy Chase, Md.) 
M29F29. EM. 

Birge, Dr E(dward) A(sahel). Ph.D.. 
Harvard, 78, Rensselaer, 25; Sc.D., Pitts- 
burgh, 97; LL.D., Williams, 03, Wisconsin. 
15, Missouri, 19. Resident emeritus, Univ. 
Wisconsin; biologist, Wisconsin Geol. and 
Natural History Survey, Madison. Wis. 
(201 1 Van Hill Ave.) M03F05. F. 

Birge, Prof. Raymond T(hayer). M.A.. 
Wisconsin, 10; Ph.D., 14. Prof, physics 
and chairman Dept., Univ. California, 
Berkeley, Calif. M16F21. B. 

Birge, Willie Isabella. Dept. Biology, 
Texas State Col. Women, Denton, Tex. 
(M 3 iR33)M 3 6. EG. 

Birkeland, J. M. Dept. Bacteriology, Ohio 
State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. M36F38. X. 

Birkhahn, Robert C. 136 Oak St.. Wood- 
mere, X. Y. Mi8R33- M. 
Birkhaug, Dr. Konrad E(lias). M.D.. 
Johns Hopkins, 24; M.Sc, Rochester, 28. 
Geofvsisk Institute Bergen, Norway. M27- 
F31. N. 

Birkhead. L. M. 3425 Baltimore Ave.. 
Kansas City, Mo. M31R32. 

Birkhoff, Prof. Garrett. A.B., Harvard. 
10 Dana St., Cambridge, Mass. M39. A. 

Birkhoff, Prof. George D(avid). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 07; Sc.D., Brown, 23. Wisconsin. 
_■-. Harvard, 33, Pennsylvania. 38; Dr. 
Hon. Causa, Portiers, 33, Paris, 35, 
\thens, 36, Sofia, 30; LL.D.. St. Andrews, 
38. Prof, mathematics, Harvard Univ., 
Cambridge, Mass. (087 Memorial Drive) 
M09F11. AB. Vice president for Section on 
Mathematics and Astronomy (A), 1918. 
President, 1937. Member of the Executive 
Committee, 1938 — . 



274 



Directory of Members 



Birnbaum, Dr. Abraham S. 2021 Grand 
Concourse, New York, N. Y. M33R33. 
NHF. 

Birnie, Col. Rogers. M10L1 1F1 1D39. 
MAB. 

Biro, Dr. Charles. M.D., Budapest, 24. 
Surgeon, 302 Poplar Crescent, Saskatoon, 
Sask., Canada. M40. NCD. 

Birosel, Dr. D. M. Univ. Philippines, 
Manila. P. I. M34F34R34. CB. 

Bisbey, Bertha. 705 Missouri Ave., 
Columbia. Mo. M32. 

Bisby, Prof. G(uy) R(ichard). Manitoba 
Agric. Col., Winnipeg, Man., Canada. 
M17F21R32. G. 

Bisch, Dr. Louis E(dward). M.D., Colum- 
bia, 11; Ph.D., 12. Psychiatrist, 515 Madi- 
son Ave., New York, N. Y. M34F34. IN. 

Bisgard, J(ames) D(ewey). M.D., Har- 
vard. 5606 Farnam St., Omaha, Nebr. 
M38. NG. 

Bishop, C(arl) W(hiting). A.M., Colum- 
bia, 13. Assoc, archaeologv, Freer Gallery 
Art, Washington, D. C. "M28F32. HLE. 

Bishop, David W(akefield). A.B., Swarth- 
more, 34. Instr. zoology, Univ. Pennsyl- 
vania, Philadelphia, Pa. M40. FG. 

Bishop, Edna R(osena) (See Mrs. Edna 
Bishop Otto). 

Bishop, Dr. Eugene L(indsay). M.D., 
Vanderbilt, 14; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins, 
23. Dir. health, Tennessee Valley Author- 
itv, Chattanooga, Tenn. (1409 Riverview 
Road) M39. N. 

Bishop, Dr. F. Warner, n 48 5th Ave., 
New York, N. Y. M29R34. N. 

Bishop, Dr. Frederic L. Ph.D., Chicago, 
97. Prof, physics, Univ. Pittsburgh, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. M10F15. BM. Secretary of 
Section on Engineering -(D ) , 1918-19, and 
of Section on Engineering (At), 1920. 

Bishop, Dr. George D(ean). D.V.M., 
Kansas City, 12. Albany, Oreg. M33. FGN. 

Bishop, Dr. George H(olman). Ph.D., 
Wisconsin. Prof, biophysics, Washington 
Univ. School Med., St. Louis, Mo. (Sap- 
pington, Mo.) M40. N. 

Bishop, Howard B(erkey). B.S., Michigan. 
33 Prospect Hill Ave., Summit, N. J. 
M06F08. C. 

Bishop, Miss Isabel. 857 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. M34R36. 

Bishop, Dr. Louis B(ennett). M.D., Yale, 

88. 450 Bradford St., Pasadena, Calif. 
M01F08. F. 

Bishop, Dr. Louis Faugeres. M.A., 
Rutgers, 89; Sc.D., 20; M.D., Columbia, 

89. 1 1 72 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 
M08F11. NHK. 

Bishop, Dr. Louis Faugeres, Jr. M.D., 
Columbia, 25. Assoc, visiting physician, 
Bellevue Hosp., New York; consulting 



cardiologist, Rockaway Beach Hosp., 
Rockawav Beach, N. Y. (121 E. 60th St., 
New York, N. Y.) M36F38. NQ. 

Bishop, Prof. Mabel Lowell. A.M., Smith, 
08; Ph.D., Chicago, 23. Head Dept. 
Biology and prof, zoologv, Hood Col.. 
Frederick, Md. M16F21. FN. 

Bishop, Oliver F. 2055 Chapel St., New 
Haven, Conn. M23R32. O. 

Bishop, Prof. Sherman C(hauncey). 
Ph.D., Cornell, 25. Prof, zoology, Univ. 
Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. M31F32. F. 

Bishopp, Fred C(orry). U. S. Bur. En- 
tomology, Washington, D. C. M04F13R33. 
FN. 

Biskind, Dr. Gerson R. M.D., California, 
3,2. Assoc, chief pathology, Mt. Zion 
Hosp.; instr. pathology, Univ. California 
School Med., San Francisco, Calif. M40. N. 

Bissell, A. D., Jr. 100 S. Cauyga St., Wil- 
liamsville, N. Y. M29R33. 

Bissell, Dr. Dougal. M32D — . NHE. 

Bissell, Dr. Malcolm H(avens). M.A., 
Yale, 18; Ph.D., 21. Prof, geography, 
Univ. Southern California, Los Angeles, 
Calif. (1556 N. Hayworth Ave.) M18F31. E. 

Bissinger, George H(enry). B.S., Cornell, 
12. Dir. res. and sec.-treas., Philippine 
Sugar Assn., Manila, P. I. M24F40. OE. 

Bisson, Richard J(oseph). Barre Dry 
Cleansing Co., Barre, Vt. M32R32. KL. 

Bissonnette, Dr. T(homas) Hume. M.A., 
Queens, 13; Ph.D., Chicago, 23. Prof. 
biology, Trinity Col., Hartford, Conn.; 
instr. charge marine invertebrate zoology, 
Marine Biol. Lab., Woods Hole, Mass. 
(Wethersfield, Conn.) M24F30. FGN. 

Biswell, Dr. Harold H(ubert). A.M., 
Nebraska, 32; Ph.D., 34. Asst. conserva- 
tionist, San Joaquin Exp. Range, Califor- 
nia Forest and Range Exp. Sta., O'Neals, 
Calif. M37F39. G. 

Bitancourt, Agesilau A(ntonio). Ingenieur 
agronome, Paris, 19 Sub-dir., Institute 
Biologico de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 2821, 
Sao Paulo, Brazil, S. A. M34. GO. 

Bitter, Dr. Francis. Massachusetts Inst. 
Tech., Cambridge, Mass. M36F36R36. B. 

Bitting, Dr. Arvill W(ayne). M.D., Med. 
Col. Indiana, 00. 1030 Green St., San 
Francisco, Calif. M16L17F33. N. 

Bitting, Katherine Golden. M93F97L17- 
D36. G. 

Bittinger, Lt. Comdr. Charles. 3403 O St. 
NW., Washington, D. C. M24F31. B. 

Bittner, Prof. Walton Simon. A.M., Chi- 
cago, 28. Assoc, prof, sociology and assoc. 
dir. Extension Div., Indiana Univ., Bloom- 
ington, Ind. (822 Hunter Ave.) (M31- 
R 3 4)M 3 8. HK. 



Individual Members 



-75 



Bittson, A(nthony) John. E.E., Tomsk 
Imperial Inst. Tech., 15. Pres., A. John 
Bittson Engng. Co.. 1650 Broadway, New- 
York, X. Y. (400 W. 129th St.) M39. MR 

Bivins, Chalfant E. 179 Steuben St., 
Brooklyn. X. Y. M36R37. CE. 

Bixby, Prof. Frederick L(ouis). C.E., 

Neyada, 18. Acting head Dept. Civil 

Engng., Univ. Nevada. Reno, Nev. M34- 
F34. M. 

Bixby, Dr. W(illiam) Herbert. M.S., 
Michigan, 31 ; Ph.D.. 33; M.M.E., Chrysler 
Inst. Engng., 35. Instr. electrical engng., 
Wavne Univ., Detroit, Mich. (639 Webb 
Ave.) M40. MBA. 

Bizzell, Dr. William Bennett. LL.M., 
Illinois Col. Law, 11; D.C.L. 12; A.M., 
Chicago. 13; LL.D., Baylor, 19; Ph.D., 
Columbia, 21. Pres., Univ. Oklahoma, 
Norman, Okla. (407 W. Boyd St.) 
M10F15. K. 

Bjorksten, Dr. Johan Augustus. M.A.. 
Helsingfors, 27; Ph.D., 31. Chemist, 2243 
W. Harrison St., Chicago, 111. (450 Wright- 
wood Ave.) M33. CNG. 

Blaauw, Dr. Edmond E. M.D. 190 Ash- 
land Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. Mi 7. N. 

Black, Dr. Alex. M.S., Pennsylvania State, 
33; Ph.D., Rochester, 38. Asst. prof, ani- 
mal nutrition, Pennsylvania State Col., 
State College, Pa. M40F40. CON. 

Black, Dr. Arthur D(avenport). M33D37. 
N. 

Black, Dr. Arthur P(roctor). M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 26. 109 N. Oregon St., El Paso, 
Tex. M35F38. NC. 

Black, Dr. Benjamin Warren. M.D. 2701 
14th Ave., Oakland, Calif. M38. NK. 

Black, Charles N(ewbold). M30D35. 

MBC. 

Black, Charles S. Wake Forest, N. Car. 

M35F35R36. C. 

Black, Dr. Clarence J(ay). M.A., Kenyon, 

23; Ph.D., Ohio State, 31. Prof, chemistry 

and physics. Upper Iowa Univ., Fayette, 

Iowa. M29. CM. 

Black, Mrs. Fern B. M.A., Chicago, 20. 

Psychologist. Bur. Child Study. 228 X. 
LaSalle St.. Chicago, 111. (340 Normal 
Parkway) M39. IQ. 

Black, Glenn A. 815 Oakland Ave.. India- 
napolis. Ind. M38. H. 

Black, Harold S(tephen). U.S.. Worcester 
Polytechnic Inst. Member technical staff. 
Bell Telephone Labs., New York, N. Y. 
(6309 Alderton St., Elmhurst, N. Y.) M39- 
MBA. 

Black, Mrs. Howard John (See Dr. Zoe 
Black). 

Black, Dr. J(ames) G(ilbert). M.S., Ken- 
tucky. 22; Ph.D., Michigan, 29. Head 
Dept. Mathematics and Physics, More- 
head State Teachers Col., Morehead. Ky. 
M34F34. BA. 



Black, Dr. J(ames) H(arvey). M.D., 

Southern Methodist, 07. Prof, clinical 

medicine, Baylor Col. Med., Dallas, Tex. 
M17F33. X. 

Black, Dr. K(nox) Charlton. A.M., Har- 
vard, 26; Ph.D., 27. Engineer, Bell Tele- 
phone Labs., Xew York, N. Y. (62 Tower 
Hill Road, Mountain Lakes, N. J.) M30- 
F40. B. 

Black, Dr. L(indsay) M(acLeod). Ph.D., 
Cornell, 36. Asst., Dept. Animal and Plant 
Pathology, Rockefeller [nst. Med. Res.. 
Princeton, N. J. M31F39. CO. 

Black, Prof. Loren T. Ashland Col., Ash- 
land, Ohio. M31F33R34. A. 

Black, Prof. Luther A. Univ. Maryland. 
College Park, Md. M 3 iF33R3/- NO. 

Black, Prof. N(ewton) Henry. A.M.. 
Harvard, 06. Asst. prof, physics, Harvard 
Univ., Cambridge, Mass. (21 Follen St.) 
M01F11. BC. 

Black, R(alph) W(aldo). Park and Oak 
Sts.. Gardner, Mass. M22R33. I. 

Black, Robert Lovell. M.S., Michigan. 30. 
Teacher biology, Emmerick Manual Train- 
ing High School, Indianapolis, Ind. (1307 
Spring Hollow Road) M40. FG. 

Black, Prof. Robert M(offitt). E.M.. 
Michigan Col. Mines, 03. Prof, and head 
Dept. Mining Engng., Univ. Pittsburgh. 
Pittsburgh. Pa. M34F34. MKE. 

Black, Roy D. A.B.. Hanover. Box 12^. 
Wabash, Ind. M38. C. 

Black, Dr. Zoe (Mrs. Howard John Black). 

\.M.. Duke. 20; Ph.D., 35- Asst. prof, 
biology, Alabama Col., Montevallo, Ala. 
(305 Nabors St.) M31. FN. 

Blackberg, Dr. Solon N(athaniel). Med. 
dir. and dir. res.. Nutrition Res. Labs., 
322 S. Michigan Ave.. Chicago, III. M26- 
F38. N. 

Blackburn, McMaster S. 332 Encino Ave.. 
San Antonio, Tex. M32R32. BD. 

Blackfan, Dr. Kenneth D(aniel). M.D., 
Albany Med. Col., 05. Prof, pediatrics, 
Harvard Med. School; chief med. service. 
Children's Hosp.; med. dir., Infants' 
Hosp., Boston, Mass. (57 Laurel Road, 
Brookline, Mass.) M25F31. X. 

Blackman, Dr. M(aulsby) W(illett). A.M.. 
Kansas, 02; Ph.D., Harvard, 05. Senior 
entomologist, U. S. Bur. Entomology, 

Washington, D. ('. .\i12E15. I". 

Blackmer, James L. 111 Penhurst Park, 
Buffalo. X. Y. M31. DEG. 

Blackmon, G(ulie) H(argrove). M.S. A.. 
Florida. 27. Horticulturist and head Dept. 
Horticulture, Univ. Florida Agric. Exp. 
Sta., Gainesville, Fla. (332 E. Columbia 
St.) M28F33. o. 

Blackwelder, Prof. Eliot. Ph.D., Chicago, 
14. Prof, geology, Stanford L T niversit\ . 
Calif. M06F08. E. Vice president for Sec- 
tion on Geology and Geograpliy (E), 19 -'0, 



276 



Directory of Members 



Blackwelder, Dr. Richard E(liot). Ph.D.. 
Stanfoid, 34. Asst. curator coleoptera, 
Amer. Mus. Natural History, New York, 
X. Y. M36F39. F. 

Blackwell. Prof. Ashby C(arlyle). A.M., 
Randolph-Macon, 10. Vice pres., chair- 
man Natural Science Div., and prof, 
chemistry, Morris Harvey Col., Charles- 
ton, W. Va. (o-A Brookland Court) 
M35F35. c. 
Blackwell, C(arl) P(etty). M24F25D37. O. 

Blackwell, Otto B(ernard). B.S., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 06. Vice pres., Bell 
Telephone Labs., New York, X. Y. (15 
Xorth Drive. Plandome, N. Y T .) M27F28. 
MB. 

Blackwood, Prof. Oswald H(ance). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 20. Prof, physics, Univ. Pitts- 
burgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. (251 Lothrop St.) 
M33F33- B. 

Blagg, Amy Elizabeth. Hopkins Marine 
Sta., Pacific Grove. Calif. M36R38. F. 

Blaha, Dr. Jos. } Zemedelska, Brno. 
Czech. M37R38. O. 

Blain, Dr. Alexander W(illiam). M.D., 
Wayne. 06; M.S., 37. Prof, clinical sur- 
gery. Wayne Univ.; senior surgeon, Alex- 
ander Blain Hosp., Detroit, Mich. (2201 
Jefferson Ave. F.) M02F06. NQF. 

Blain, Dr. Walter L. M.A., Illinois, 21 ; 
Ph.D.. 26. Head Science Dept. and prof, 
biologv, Southeastern State Col., Durant, 
Okla. '(1324 W. Elm St.) M.3iF33- FG. 

Blaine, E(lmer) S(tyner). Kansas City 
Bridge Co., Baton Rouge, La. M36R.37. M. 

Blair, Prof. A(ugustine) W(ilberforce). 
\.M., Harvard. 06. Prof, agric. chemistry. 
Rutgers Univ.: soil chemist, New Jersey 
Agric. Exp. Sta., New Brunswick, X. J. 
(202 Lawrence Ave.) M08F18. CO. 

Blair, F(rancis) W(esley). A.M., Prince- 
ton 17. Chemical dir., Procter and Gam- 
ble Co., Ivorydale, Ohio. (Compton Road. 
Wyoming, Ohio) M36F38. C. 

Blair, Prof. G(ilbert) Bruce, M.A.. Wash- 
burn, 04. Assoc, prof, physics and astron- 
omy, Univ. Nevada, Reno, Nev. ( 1059 
Sierra St.) M27F31. BD. 

Blair, Dr. James S(tuart). A.M.. Kansas, 
20; Ph.D., Stanford, 24. Res. chemist, 
Amer. Can Co., Maywood, 111. M40. C. 

Blair, Dr. John E(dward). Sc.M., Brown, 

-•1: 1'b.D.. 23. Bacteriologist, Hosp. Joint 
Diseases, New York. X. Y. (26 Paulin 
Blvd., Leonia, X. J.) M24F33. X. 

Blair, Prof. J(oseph) C(ullen). M.S.A., 
Iowa State, 06; Sc.D., Wooster Poly- 
technic Inst., 19. 124 New Agric. Bldg.. 
LTniv. Illinois, Urbana, 111. M27F31. ( ). 

Blair, Prof. Julian M(acFarlane). M.A., 
Vanderbilt. 20; Ph.D., Stanford, 30. 1101 
Pennsylvania \ve., Boulder, Colo. M34F34. 
BC. 



Blair, Miss Mary C(onstance). Ph.D.. 
Xorthwestern, 22. Nora, 111. L22. GFO. 

Blair, Prof. Thomas A(rthur). A.B., 
Stanford, 04. Senior meteorologist, U. S. 
Weather Bur.; assoc. prof, meteorology, 
Univ. Xebraska, Lincoln, Nebr. M25F27. B. 

Blair, Dr. Vilray Papin. A.M., Christian 
Brothers Col., 94; M.D., Washington 
Univ., 93. 400 Metropolitan Bldg., St. 
Louis, Mo. M19F27. N. 

Blair. Dr. W(illiam) Reid. D.V.Sc. 
McGill, 02; LL.D., 28. Dir., New York 
Zool. Park, New York, X. Y. M28F33. F. 

Blair-Smith, H. M26D33. 

Blaisdell, Dr. Frank E(llsworth). M.D.. 
Cooper Med. Col., 89. Stanford Univ. 
School Med.. San Francisco, Calif. M08- 
F15. FN. 

Blaisdell, Dr. James Arnold. Prospect 
Place, La Jolla, Calif. M13F16R37. Q. 

Blake, Prof. Anna M(aud). M36D36. FG. 

Blake, Dr. Charles H(enry). Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech.. 29. Asst. prof, 
zoology, Massachusetts Inst. Tech., Cam- 
bridge. Mass. M27F33. F. 

Blake, Dr. Edwin M(ortimer). Ph.D. 
Columbia, 93. Drawer A, Pratt Station. 
Brooklyn, X. Y. M.uP.U- A HI. 

Blake, E(li) J(udson). M30D35. MBK 

Blake, Emmet Reid. M.S.. Pittsburgh. 33'. 
Asst. curator ornithology, Field Mus. Xat- 
ural History. Chicago, 111. M.v>. FEG. 

Blake, Dr. Francis G(ilman). M.D.. Har- 
vard. 13: M.A.. Yale. 21; Sc.D., Dart- 
mouth. 36. Prof, medicine, Yale Univ.; 
physician-in-chief, .Yew Haven Hosp., 
New Haven, Conn. M24F27. X. 

Blake, Dr. Frederic C(olumbus). Ph.D.. 
Columbia, 05. Dept. Physics. Ohio State 
Univ., Columbus, Ohio. (2107 luka Ave.) 
M08F08. B. 

Blake, Dr. Irving H(ill). A.M., Brown, 12; 
Ph.D., Illinois, 25. Prof, zoology and 
anatomy, Univ. Xebraska, Lincoln, Nebr. 
(1101 X. 45th St.) M13F32. ¥G. 

Blake, Dr. John Bapst. Xorth Cuhasset, 
Mass. M36R36. X. 

Blake, Dr. John T(wiss). Ph.D.. Massa- 
chusetts lust. Tech., 24. Dir. chemical 
res., Simplex Wire and Cable Co., Cam- 
bridge. Mass. (tjo Woodcliff Road. Xew- 
iim Highlands, Mass.) M34F34. C. 

Blake, Dr. Joseph A. M36F36D37: XF. 

Blake, Miss Sue Avis. A.M., Bryn Mawr, 
00. 661 S. Highland Ave., Merion, D a. 
M29. BAD. 

Blake, Mrs. Tiffany (Margaret Day). 
13m Astor St.. Chicago, 111. M21. 

Blake, Dr. W. G. u.s 14th Ave., Greeley, 
Colo. M31R37. X. 



I NDIVIDUAL MlC.M BERS 



277 



Blakely, Charles F(rancis). B.S., LL.B., 
George Washington. 601 19th St. NW., 
Washington, D. C. M36. 

Blakeman, Dr. Edward W(illiam). M.A., 
Wisconsin, 11; D.D., Lawrence, r8. 
Counselor religious education, Univ. 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. (5 Harvard 
Place) M38. K. 

Blaker, Ernest. Ph.D., Cornell, 01. Con- 
sulting physicist, K. T. Vanderhjlt Co., 
New York, X. Y. (616 Weber Ave., 
Akron, Ohio) M38F07. BC. 

Blakeslee, Dr. Albert F(rancis). A.M., 
Harvard. 00; Ph.D., 04; Sc.D., San 
Marcos, 25, Wesleyan, 31. Dir., Dept. 
Genetics, Carnegie Inst. Washington, Cold 
Spring Harbor, N. Y. M02F09. GI. 
Secretary of Section on Botany (G), 1916- 
/,-/ vice president, 1918. President, 1940. 

Blakeslee, Major Doraf Wilmot. 121 1 
Morningside Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. M18- 
R33. M. 

Blakeway, Willard F(rank). M.S., Chi- 
cago, 40. Instr. chemistry, Mishawaka 
High School, Mishawaka. Ind. (504 Lin- 
coln Way W.) M40. CAB. 

Blakiston, Kenneth M(ackenzie). M04- 
D37. XQ. 

Blanchard, Prof. Arthur A(lphonzo). 
Ph.D., Leipzig, 02. Prof, inorganic chemis- 
try, Massachusetts Inst. Tech., Cambridge, 
Mass. M07F10. C. Secretary of Section on 
Chemistry (C), 1918. 

Blanchard, F(rancis) B(ayley). Box 6r, 

Lodi, Calif. M36R39. MEB. 

Blanchard, Frank N(elson). M13F23D37. 

F. 

Blanchard, Prof. Frederic Thomas. M.A., 
Yale, 08; Ph.D.. 22. Prof. English, Univ. 
California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif. 
(1318 Maltman Ave.) M29F31. LQ. 

Blanchard, Dr. George W(esley). M24- 
L31D— . EI. 

Blanchard, Prof. Kenneth C(lark). Ph.D.. 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 29. New York 
Univ.. Washington Square, New York, 
X. Y. M34F34. CN. 

Blanchard, Dr. Phyllis (Mrs. Walter W. 
Lucasse). A.M., Clark, 18; Ph.D.. 20. 
Psychologist, Philadelphia Child Guidance 
Clinic; instr., Pennsylvania School Social 
Work, Philadelphia, Pa. M25F25. I. 

Blanchard, R(alph) A(rthur). Box 32, 
Urbana, 111. M2iF 3 3- FQ. 

Blanchard, Roland. B.A.. Minnesota, 19. 
Chief geologist. Mt. Isa Mines, Ltd., Mt. 
Isa, Queensland, Australia. M25L31. MEC. 

Blanchard, Prof. William Martin. M.A.. 
Randolph-Macon, 97; Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 00. Dean. Col. Liberal Arts and prof, 
emeritus chemistry, DePauw Univ., Green- 
castle, Ind. M07F11. C. 

Blanchet, Louis A. G. McDonogh High 
School. Xew Orleans, La. M34R35. BAC. 



Blanchet, Prof. Waldo (Willie) Emerson. 
M.S., Michigan, 36. Administrative dean, 
prof, science and head Dept., Fort Valley 
State Col., Fort Valley, Ga. M36. CBF. 

Blanck, Dr. Fred(erick) C(onrad). Ph.D.. 
Johns Hopkins. 07. Res. chemist. Quality 
Control Dept., II. I. Heinz Co.. Pittsburgh. 
Pa. M.28F33. C. 

Bland, Dr. P(ascal) B(rooke). nui 
Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa. M36R37. 
XLH. 

Blank, Arthur S(amuel). B.S., Trinity, 29. 
Chemist, Connecticut State Dept. Health, 
Hartford, Conn. (28 Milford St.) M31. CB. 

Blank, Miss Grace J. Chandler Court. 
Williamsburg, Va. M32R33. FNQ. 

Blank, Dr. Irvin H(aas). M.Sc, Cincin- 
nati, 27; Ph.D., 28. Res. fellow dermatol- 
ogy, Harvard Univ. Med. School, Boston, 
Mass. (S3 Cushing Ave., Belmont, Mass.) 
M29. CNB. 

Blank, Lester M(arion). Div. Plant 
Pathology, Texas Agric. Exp. Sta., College 
Station, Tex. M29F31R36. GO. 

Blankenhorn, Dr. M(arion) A(rthur). 
M.D., Western Reserve, 14; M.A., 20. 
6 Rural Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio. M28F33. N. 

Blanton, Dr. Smiley. 125 E. 57th St., 
Xew York, N. Y. M38R38. KNQ. 

Blasdale, Dr. Walter C(harles). Ph.D., 
California, 00. Prof, chemistry, Univ. Cali- 
fornia. Bc-kelev, Calif. (2514 College Ave.) 
M01F08. C. 

Blass, Dr. J. Lewis. 475 5th Ave., Xew 
York, N. Y. M33R38. NI. 

Blatchley, W(illis) S(tanley). A.M., In- 
diana, 91; LL.D., 21. 1558 Park Ave., 
Indianapolis, Ind. M30F31. F. 

Blatherwick, Dr. N(orman) R(obert). 
M.S., Illinois, 12; Ph.D., Yale, 14; Sc.D., 
Grinnell, 29. Dir. Biochemical Lab.. 
Metropolitan Life Ins. Co., Xew Y'ork, 
X. Y. M2 9 F 3 3- CN. 

Blau, Dr. L(udwig) W(ilhelm). M.A., 
Texas, 26; Ph.D., 29. In charge geophysics 
and production research, Humble Oil and 
Refining Co., Houston, Tex. (2027 Colquit 
Ave.) M28F33. BA. 

Blaydes, Prof. Glenn W(illiam). M.A.. 
Ohio State. 26; Ph.D., 31. Assoc, prof, 
botany, Ohio State L T niv., Columbus. 
Ohio. M26F33. GOQ. 

Blayney, Dr. J(ames) R(oy). D.D.S., 
Northwestern, 13; M.S., Chicago, 28. Dir.. 
Walter G. Zoller Memorial Dental Clinic, 
Billings Hosp., Chicago, 111. (5840 Stony 
Island Ave.) M33F33. Nd. 

Blayney, Dr. (Thomas) Lindsey. Ph.D., 
Heidelberg, 04; LL.D., Southwestern, 
Loyola (Louisiana), 23, Notre Dame, 24, 
Austin Col., 26. Dean and prof. German, 
Carleton Col.. Xorthfield, Minn. M24F32. 
LQK. 



278 



Directory of Members 



Blazek, Miss Mary (Rose). M.S., Colum- 
bia. 33. Assoc, prof, home economics, 
Alabama Col., Montevallo, Ala. M36. NCQ. 

Blechman, Elias. M.A., New York, 29. 
Samuel J. Tilden High School, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. M31. QN. 

Bleininger, A(lbert) V(ictor). Sc.D.. 
Alfred, 33. Chemist, Homer Laughlin 
China Co., Newell, W. Va. M07F11. C. 

Bless, Prof. Arthur A(aron). MS., Maine, 
20; Ph.D., Cornell, 27. Prof, physics, Univ. 
Florida, Gainesville, Fla. M29F33. BAC. 

Bless, R(obert) H(enry). Waterbury, Md. 
M36R36. MBC. 

Blest, C. E. 857 Arlington Ave., Oakland, 
Calif. M34R34. DBM. 

Bleyle, George A(lfred). B.S., Tufts, 33. 
Instr. mechanical engineering, Tufts Col. 
Engng. School, Tufts College, Mass. (977 
South St., Roslindale, Mass.) M40. MQ. 

Blichfeldt, Prof. H(ans) F(rederik). A.M., 
Stanford, 97; Ph.D., Leipzig, 98. Prof. 
emeritus mathematics, Stanford Univer- 
sity, Calif. (520 W. Crescent Drive, Palo 
Alto, Calif.) M17F17. A. 

Blincoe, Dr. Homer (Raymond). M.S., 
Kansas, 16; M.D., Tulane, 20. Prof, 
anatomy, Emory Univ. School Med., 
Emory University, Ga. M26F30. NF. 

Blinks, Prof. Lawrence R(ogers). A.M., 
Harvard, 25; Ph.D., 26. Prof, plant phy- 
siology, Stanford University, Calif. (M29- 
F3oR35)M 4 oF 3 o. GFC. 

Blinzler, Richard F. in Virgil Ave., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. M32R34. MB. 

Blish, Dr. Morris J(oslin). M.A., Nebraska, 
13; Ph.D., Minnesota, 15. Principal 
chemist, Western Regional Res. Lab., 
U. S. Bur. Agric. Chemistry and Engng., 
Albany, Calif. M18F24. CO. 

Blish, W. G. L84D— . "B. 

Bliss, Dr. A(llen) D(ouglass). A.M., Har- 
vard, 28; Ph.D., 34. Instr., Yale Univ., 
New Haven, Conn. M24F38. C. 

Bliss, Dr. A(ndrew) Richard, Jr. Phar.D., 
Columbia, 09; A.M., Howard Col., 12; 
LL.D., 32; M.D., Alabama, 14. Prof, 
pharmacology and dean pharmacy, How- 
ard Col., Birmingham, Ala. (Tutwiler 
Hotel) M11F22. CGNp. 

Bliss, Dr. Charles B(emis). West Brook- 
field, Mass. M00F05R38. IHK. 

Bliss, Dr. C(hester) I(ttner). M.A., 
Columbia, 22; Ph.D., 26. Consulting bio- 
metrician, 413 Columbus Ave., Sandusky, 
Ohio. M27F33. FNA. 

Bliss, Cornelius N. LL.D., New York, 37. 
Room 4000, 1 Wall St., New York, N. Y. 
L29F40. K. 

Bliss, Dr. Donald E(verett). M.S., Iowa 
State, 27 ; Ph.D., 31. Asst. plant pathol- 
ogist, Univ. California Citrus Exp. Sta., 
Riverside. Calif. M37F38. G. 



Bliss, Prof. G(ilbert) A(mes). M.S., Chi- 
cago, 98; Ph.D., 00; Sc.D., Wisconsin, 35. 
Prof, mathematics and chairman Dept., 
Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. M05L06F07. 
A. Vice president for Section on Mathe- 
matics (A), 1930. 

Bliss, H(oward) H(amilton). M.S., Cali- 
fornia, 13. Head Dept. Physics, Riverside 
Junior Col., Riverside, Calif. (5621 Grand 
Ave.) M27. QBM. 

Bliss, Dr. Malcolm A(ndrews). M18F33- 
D34. NKI. 

Bliss, Prof. Mary C(ampbell). M.A., 
Wellesley, 04; Ph.D., Radcliffe, 22. Prof, 
botany, Wellesley Col., Welleslev, Mass. 
(18 Allen St., Newbury Port, Mass.) 
M10F31. G. 

Bliss, Robert Woods. LL.D., Missouri, 
33, Syracuse, 34. 3101 R. St. NW., Wash- 
ington, D. C. L29F40. KIL. 

Bliss, Dr. Sidney (William). Ph.D., Har- 
vard, 25. Prof, biochemistry and head 
Dept., Tulane Univ., New Orleans, La. 
M30F32. CN. 

Bliss, Mrs. William H. L07D35. 

Blitzsten, Dr. N. L(ionel). M.D., Chicago, 
16. 20 Cedar St., Chicago, 111. M33. N. 

Bliven, Joseph E. Box 91, New London, 
Conn. M36. 

Blizzard, Dr. A(lpheus) W(esley). M.A., 
Cornell, 16; Ph.D., Columbia, 23. Res. 
botanist. Lab. Health and Sanitation, 
South Carolina Public Service Authority, 
Moncks Corner, Charleston, S. Car. (1902 
W. Home Ave., Hartsville, S. Car.) 
(M26F27R3 4 )M 4 oF27. GF. 

Bloch, Dr. Herman S(amuel). Ph.D.. 
Chicago, 36. Res. chemist. Universal Oil 
Products Co., Riverside, 111. (5472 Ellis 
Ave., Chicago, 111.) M40. CBM. 

Bloch, Dr. Robert Gustav. M.D., Munich, 
21. Assoc, prof, medicine, Univ. Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. M30F33. N. 

Block, D(avid) Julian. M25F31D39. BCM. 

Block, Dr. Harold. 514 Med. Arts Bldg., 
Dallas, Tex. M34R35. N. 

Block, Dr. Isidor. M24D34. B. 

Block, Dr. Richard J(oseph). Ph.D., 
Yale, 31. Res. assoc. biochemistry, New 
York State Psychiatric Inst, and Hosp., 
New York, N. Y. (Dunleer House, Cooper 
Road, Scarsdale, N. Y.) M34F34. CN. 

Block, Dr. Stanley R. Opt.D., Needles 
Inst. (Kansas City), 21. Box 1004, Waco, 
Tex. M34. B. 

Block, Dr. Walter D(avid). Ph.D., Mich- 
igan, 38. Res. assoc. biological chemistry, 
Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. M30. 
CN. 

Blocker, Rev. Hubert W(illiam). M.S., 
Iowa, 27; Ph.D., Michigan, 33. The Abbey 
Library. St. Benedict's Col., Atchison, 
Kans. M34. F. 



I ndividual Mem bers 



279 



Blodgett, Prof. F(orest) M(ilo). Ph.D.. 
Cornell, 14. Prof, plant pathology, Cornell 
Univ.; plant pathologist, Cornell Agric. 
Exp. Sta.. Ithaca. X. V. M18F23. G. 

Blodgett, Miss Gertrude. 855 Lexington 
Ave., New York. X. Y. M39. C. 

Bloede, Prof. Victor G(ustave). M22F3?- 
D3-. C. 

Bloedorn, Dr. Walter A(ndrew). M.D., 
Creighton, oq ; A.M., George Washington, 
16. Prof, medicine and dean, George 
Washington Univ. School Med.; med. dir.. 
George Washington Univ. Hosp., Wash- 
ington, D. C. (4617 Hawthorne Lane) 
M34F34. N. 

Blom, Frans. Tulane Univ., New Orleans, 
La. M25F31R38. H. 

Blomgren, Dr. Walter L(awrence). M ;o- 
D— . X. 

Blomquist, Prof. H(ugo) L(eander). 
Ph.D., Chicago, 21. Prof, botany and 
chairman Dept., Duke Univ., Durham, 
N. Car. (922 Demarius St.) M21F25. G. 

Blondel, Miss Dorothy M(arguerite). 
A.M., Columbia, 26. Chairman biology, 
Curtis High School, St. George, Staten 
Island, N. Y. (640 West End Ave., Xew 
York, X. Y.) M31. FGE. 

Blood, Miss Alice F(rances). Ph.D., Yale, 
10. Dir. School Home Economics and 
prof, mathematics, Simmons Col.. Boston, 
Mass. (9 Arlington St., Newton, Mass.) 
M29. QNC. 

Blood, Dr. H(eber) Loran. M.S., Utah 
State, 28; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 30. Agent, 
U . S. Bur. Plant Industry; plant pathol- 
ogist, Utah Agric. Exp. Sta., Logan, Utah. 
M30F31. GO. 

Bloodgood, Dr. Joseph Colt. M05F09D35. 
NIQ. 

Bloom, Lansing B(artlett). Univ. New 
Mexico, Albuquerque, X. Mex. M27R32. K. 
President of Southwestern Division, 1928. 

Bloom, Dr. Mortimer C(harles). Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 38. Res. 
chemist, Massachusetts Inst. Tech., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. (32 Alden St., Newton 
Highlands, Mass.) M37. CBE. 

Bloom, Solomon F. 76 Columbia Heights, 
Brooklyn, X. Y. M33R33. LK. 

Bloom, Dr. William. M.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 23. Assoc, prof, anatomy, Univ. 
Chicago, Chicago, 111. M27F33. X. 

Bloomenthal, Dr. Sidney. M.S.. Chicago. 
27; Ph.D., 29. Physicist, Chicago Air 
Pollution Survey. Dept. Public Works. 
Chicago, 111. (914 Carmen Ave.) M36F38. B. 

Bloomfield, Leonard. Ph.D., Chicago, 09. 
Prof. Germanic philology, Univ. Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. M23F29. L. Secretary of the 
Committee on Linguistics (Section L). 1929- 
36. 



Bloor, Dr. W(alter) R(ay). M.A.. Har- 
vard, 08; Ph.D., 11. Prof, biochemistry 
and pharmacology and assoc. dean, Univ. 
Rochester School Med. and Dentistry. 
Rochester, X. Y. (20 Alpine St.) M21F21. 
\ P C. 

Blossom, Mrs. D. S. (Elizabeth B.). 
Cedar Road, South Euclid, Ohio. L32. I. 

Blotner, Dr. Harry. M.D., Tufts, 24; A.M., 
Harvard, 31. Assoc, medicine, Peter Bent 
Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. (144 Clark 
Road, Brookline, Mass.) M40. XC. 

Blough, Miss Anna E(lizabeth). Manassas, 
Va. M37R37. AC. 

Blount, Mrs. Isabel (Westcott) H(arper). 

M.A.. Smith, 26; Ph.D., Yale, 32. Dept. 
Anatomy, Univ. Minnesota Med. School, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (500 Harvard St. SE.» 
M36. EX. 

Blount, Dr. Mary P(utnam). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 08. Teacher retired, Chicago 
Teachers Col., Chicago, 111. (Bvron, 111.) 
M13E21. F. 

Blount, Dr. Raymond F(rank). M.S., 
Arizona, 26; Ph.D., Yale, 31. Asst. prof, 
anatomy, Univ. Minnesota Med. School, 
Minneapolis. Minn (soo Harvard St. SE.) 
M30F33. FNO. 

Blucher, Joseph C(ooper). M.Sc, New 
York, 14. Purchasing agent, Fisher 
Flouring Mills Co., Seattle, Wash. (522 
X. 117th St.) M39. C. 

Bluhm, Solomon. M.A., Columbia, 15. 
245 W. 104th St., New York, N. Y. M37- 
QKL. 

Blum, Dr. Harold F(rancis). Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia, 27. Res. fellow, Nat. Cancer Inst., 
Bethesda, Md. (3000 39th St. NW., Wash- 
ington, D. C.) M28F33. NFB. 

Blum, Melvin E. Livermore Sanitarium. 
Livermore, Calif. M34. DAB. 

Blum, Dr. Theodor. D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 
09; M.D., 11; M.D., Vienna, 12. 101 E. 
79th St., New York, N. Y. M17F33. Nd. 

Blum, Dr. William. Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 
08. Chemist, Nat. Bur. Standards, Wash- 
ington, D. C. (215 Elm St., Chew Chase, 
Md.) M05F11. C. 

Blumberg, Dr. Harold. Sc.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 23. Res. fellow, Johns Hopkins Univ. 
School Hygiene and Public Health, Balti- 
more, Md., and Nat. Cancer Inst., Wash- 
ington, D. C. M38. NC. 

Blumberg, Prof. Henry. A.M., Columbia, 
08; Ph.D., Gottingen, 12. Prof, mathe- 
matics, Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Ohio. 
(76 E. Blake Ave.) M18F18. A. 

Blumenfeld, Dr. Charles Morris. M.A., 
Minnesota, 28; Ph.D., 32; M.D., 34. City 
Hosp., Cleveland, Ohio. M34F36. NF. 

Blumenstiel, Monroe A. 105 Dake Ave 
Rochester, X. Y. (?) M22R33. CKM. 



28o 



Directory of Members 



Blumenthal, David. Owner, Blumenthal 
Drug Co.; member firm, Medicinal Res. 
Labs., .Philadelphia, Pa. M40. GJ\C. 

Blumenthal, Hugo. Care Hallgarten, 44 
Pine St., .New York, N. Y. Lib. 

Blumenthal, Prof. Leonard M (ascot). 
M.S., Chicago, 24; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 
27. Assoc, prof, mathematics, Univ. Mis- 
souri, Columbia, Mo. (Frederick Apts.) 
(M28F33R34)M39F33- A. 
Blumenthal, Maurice. M26F28D40. MEL. 

Blumenthal, Reuben. E. R. Squibb and 
Sons, New Brunswick, N. J. M28R32. F. 

Blumenthal, Sidney. Chairman, Sidney 
Blumenthal and Co., Inc., New York, 
N. Y. (262 Central Park W.) M06. 

Blumer, Dr. George. M.D., Cooper Med. 
Col., 91; M.A., Yale, 07. Clinical prof. 
emeritus medicine, Yale Univ. School 
Med., New Haven, Conn. (841 Whitney 
Ave.) M08F11. N. 

Blumer, J(acob) C(orwin). B.S.A., Iowa 
State, 01. Private research, Clinton, Minn. 
M17F31. GEO. 

Blumer, Mary K. 410 Stuart St., Boston, 
Mass. (?) M30R32. 

Blumgart, Dr. Herrman L(udwig). M.D., 
Harvard, 21. Assoc, prof, medicine, Har- 
vard Univ., Cambridge; visiting physician 
and dir. med. res.. Beth Israel Hosp., 
Boston, Mass. M29F33. NBC. 

Blumgarten, Dr. A(aron) S. 9 E. 82nd 
St., New York, N. Y. M29R37. NHI. 

Blunn, Dr. Cecil T(homas). M.S., Kansas 
State, 29 ; Ph.D., California, 34. Assoc, 
animal husbandman, South Western 
Range and Sheep Breeding Lab., U. S. 
Bur. Animal Industry, Fort Wingate, 
N. Mex. M39F40. FNO. 

Blunt, Gilbert M(artirr). Dept. Zoology, 
State Col. Washington, Pullman, Wash.(?) 
M32R32. NF. 

Blunt, Dr. Katharine. Ph.D., Chicago, 07; 
LL.D., Wesleyan, 36, Mt. Holyoke, 37- 
Pres., Connecticut Col., New London, 
Conn. (320 Mohegan Ave.) M07F10L37. C. 

Bly, J(ohn) M(arius). 1212 St. Olaf Ave., 
Northfield, Minn. (M 3 iR34)M 3 6R36. QIF. 

Boak, Dr. Ruth A. Dept. Radiology, Univ. 
Rochester School Med. and Dentistry, 
Rochester, N. Y. M30R32. N. 

Boardman, Bradford. 45 E. 66th St., New 
York, N. Y. M30. 

Boardman, Harry (Clow). C.E., Illinois, 

26. Res. engineer, Chicago Bridge and 

Iron Co., Chicago. 111. (10357 S. Hoyne 

Ave.) M28F33. MAB. 

Boardman, Dr. W(alter) W(hitney). 490 

Post St., San Francisco, Calif. Mi4F33R39- 

N. 

Boas, Auguste. 1631 Euclid St. NW., 
Washington, D. C. M29. CN. 



Boas, Dr. Franz. Ph.D., Kiel, 81 ; M.D., 31 ; 
LL.D., Clark, 09; Sc.D., Oxford, 12, 
Graz, 23, Columbia, 29. Prof, emeritus 
anthropology, Columbia Univ., New York, 
N. Y. (230 Franklin Ave., Grantwood, 
N. J.) M87F88V37. HL. Vice president for 
Section on Anthropology and Psychology 
(H), 1894 and 1907 ; president, 193 1. 

Boas, Dr. George. A.M., Brown, 13, Har- 
vard, 15; Ph.D., California, 17. Prof, his- 
tory of philosophy, Johns Hopkins Univ., 
Baltimore, Md. M29. LK. 

Boatner, Dr. Charlotte H(arriet). Ph.D., 
Michigan, 36. Asst. prof, chemistry, New- 
comb Col. and Tulane Univ. Graduate 
School, New Orleans, La. M39. CBN. 

Boatright, Robert G(uy). M.S., Oklahoma 
A. and M. Box 4A, Route 1, Kaw, Okla. 
M39. CMB. 

Bobb, Prof. (Thomas) Newton. M.A., 
Wisconsin, 22. Prof, biology, Northland 
Col., Ashland, Wis. (1008 2nd Ave. W.) 
M24F33. F. 

Bobrovnikoff, Dr. Nicholas T(heodore). 
Ph.D., Chicago, 27. Assoc, prof, astron- 
omy, Ohio Wesleyan Univ.; dir. Perkins 
Observatory, Ohio State Univ., Delaware, 
Ohio. M29F30. DBA. 

Bock, Dr. A(rlie) V(ernon). M.D., Har- 
vard, 15; Ph.D., Cambridge, 39. Prof, 
hygiene, Harvard Univ., Cambridge; visit- 
ing physician, Massachusetts Gen. Hosp., 
Boston, Mass. M26F33. N. 

Bock, Dr. Joseph C(arl). Ph.D., Cornell, 
16. Prof, biochemistry and dir. Dept., 
Marquette Univ. School Med., Milwaukee, 
Wis. M40. N. 

Bock, Dr. Louis H(amilton). M.S., 
Illinois, 29; Ph.D., 31. Res. chemist, 
Rohm and Haas Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
(217 Tyson Ave., Glenside, Pa.) M39. CN. 

Bockius, Miss Doris E. M.S., Illinois. 4520 
N. Clarendon Ave., Chicago, 111. M39. CN. 

Bockstahler, Lester I(rving). M.A., 
Indiana, 21; Ph.D., Northwestern, 24. 
Assoc, prof, physics, Northwestern Univ., 
Evanston, 111. (2440 Prospect Ave.) 
M28F31. B. 

Bockus, Dr. Henry L(eRoy). M.D., Jef- 
ferson, 17. Prof, gastroenterology, Univ. 
Pennsylvania Graduate School Med., Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. M39. NHF. 
Bocskey, Stephen Charles. M.S., Notre 
Dame. 30. 1305 E. Miner St., South Bend, 
Ind. M31. F. 

Bodansky, Dr. Aaron. Ph.D., Cornell, 21. 
3900 Spuyten Duvvil Parkway, Riverdale, 
New York, N. Y. (Mi7R32)M36F36. NC. 

Bodansky, Dr. Meyer. M.A., Texas, 22; 
Ph.D., Cornell, 23. John Sealy Hosp., 
Galveston, Tex. M24F32. C. 

Bodansky, Dr. Oscar. M.A., Columbia, 22; 
Ph.D., 25; M.D., Chicago, 38. Lecturer 
biochemistrv, Graduate Div.. Brooklyn 
Col., Brooklyn. N. Y. (15 Bank St., New 
Y'ork, N. Y.) M34F34. NC. 



Individual Members 



281 



Bode, Francis. Dept. Geology, California 
Inst. Tech., Pasadena, Calif. M31R36. E. 

Bode, Dr. Hendrik W(ade). M.A., Ohio 
State; Ph.D., Columbia, 35. Bell Tele- 
phone Labs., New York, N. Y. (7 W. 16th 
St.) M39. AMB. 

Bode, Dr. Mildred J. M.D. 10 Rutland, 
Shilol St. and Middleton Ave., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. M17. N. 

Bodecker, Dr. Charles F(rancis). D.D.S., 

Buffalo, 00. Prof, oral histology, Columbia 
LTniv. School Dental and Oral Surgery, 
New York, N. Y. M29F38. NdF. 

Bodemann, Dr. Elsie. Ph.D., Texas. Instr. 
biology, East Texas State Teachers Col., 
Commerce, Tex. (1710 Live Oak St.) M38. 
FG. 

Bodenberg, Prof. E(mmett) T(heodore). 
M.Sc, Ohio State, 26; Ph.D., Washington. 
28. Prof, biology, Wittenberg Col., Spring- 
field, Ohio. M28F33. G. 

Bodenlos, Leonard Joseph. M.S., John 
Carroll, 37. Res. asst., Franz Theodore 
Stone Lab., Put-in-Bay, Ohio. M39. FC. 

Boder, Prof. David P(ablo). 4880 Sheridan 
Road, Chicago, 111. (M32R32)M36F36R37. 
IHF. 

Bodian, Dr. David. Ph.D., Chicago, 35; 
M.D., 37. Res. fellow medicine, Johns 
Hopkins Univ. School Med., Baltimore, 
Md. M38. NF. 

Bodine, Prof. Joseph Hall. Ph.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 20. Prof, and head Dept. Zoology, 
LTniv. Iowa, Iowa Citv, Iowa. (318 Ferson 
St.) M23F24. FNC. 

Bodman, Prof. G(eoffrey) B(aldwin). 
M.S., Minnesota, 24; Ph.D., 27. Prof, soil 
physics, Univ. California; soil physicist, 
Univ. California Agric. Exp. Sta., Berke- 
ley, Calif. (1S90 Le Roy Ave.) M24F31. 
OBC. 

Bodman, John W(hittlesey). Ch.E., Mis- 
souri School Mines and Engng., 17. Res. 
dir., Lever Brothers Co., Cambridge, Mass. 
(18 Wedgemere Ave., Winchester, Mass.) 
M25. CME. 

Bodman, Sister Mary Cecilia. M.S., Iowa, 
37. Teacher, Immaculata High School, 
Chicago, 111. (640 Irving Road) M40. GQ. 

Boeder, Dr. Paul Anton Kurt. M.A., 
Pennsylvania, 26; Ph.D., Gottingen, 31. 
Mathematician, Amer. Optical Co., South- 
bridge, Mass. M38F38. ABM. 

Boelter, Miss Muriel (Daphne Diana). 
A.B., California, 36. Res. fellow bio- 
chemistrv, LTniv. California, Berkeley, 
Calif. (2638 Fulton St.) M37. FC. 

Boesel, Prof. M(arion) W(aterman). 
A.M., Ohio State, 29; Ph.D., 39. Asst. 
prof, zoology, Miami Univ., Oxford, Ohio. 
M27F33. F. 

Boeshore, Dr. Irwin. Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 
20. Asst. prof, botany, Univ. Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia, Pa. M16F31. G. 



Boettger, Robert. M.E., Stevens Inst. 
Tech., 98. Vice pres. and dir., Silk Finish- 
ing Co. Amer., New York, N. Y.; dir., 
United Piece Dve Works, Lodi, N. J. 
L16. MP. 

Boetticher, Prof. A. W. M.S., Ohio State, 
29. Assoc, prof, botany, Ohio Univ., 
Athens, Ohio. (26 W. Mulberry St.) 
M24F33. GF. 

Boewe, G(ideon) H(erman). M.S., Illi- 
nois, 30. Field botanist, Illinois Natural 
History Survey, Urbana, 111. M38F40. GO. 

Bogard, Prof. A(ugustus). 1075 W. 7th 
St., Winona, Minn. M23F33R34. AD. 

Bogart, Ralph. B.S., Missouri. Dept. Ani- 
mal Husbandry, Univ. Missouri, Columbia, 
Mo. M36F40. FNO. 

Bogen, Dr. Emil. M.D., Cincinnati, 23; 
M.A., 27. Dir. labs, and res., Los Angeles 
County Tuberculosis Sanatorium, Olive 
View, Calif. M29L32F33. NCB. 

Bogert, C(harles) M(itchill). A.M., Cali- 
fornia Los Angeles, 36. Asst. curator, 
Dept. Herpetology, Amer. Mus. Natural 
History, New York, N. Y. (39 E. Hudson 
Ave., Englewood, N. J.) M40. F. 

Bogert, Col. Marston T(aylor). LL.D., 
Clark, 08; R.N.D., Charles (Prague), 28; 
Sc.D., Columbia, 29. Prof, emeritus or- 
ganic chemistry, Columbia Univ., New 
York, N. Y. (1158 5th Ave.) M98F00. C. 

Boggs, Charles Reid. M18F31D40. MPC. 

Boggs, Mrs. Emily E(loise Hannum). 
M.A., Ohio State. 49 St. Nicholas Terrace, 
New York, N. Y. M36. BMC. 

Boggs, Dr. Gilbert H(illhouse), Sr. Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania. 01. Dir. Dept. Chemistry 
and Chem. Engng., Georgia School Tech., 
Atlanta, Ga. M07F10. CQ. 

Boggs, Lawrence (Allen). M.S., Hawaii. 
Chemist, Pacific Guano and Fertilizer Co., 
Honolulu, Hawaii. M40. CGO. 

Boggs, Miss (Nannie) Isabel. A.M., Ran- 
dolph-Macon, 24. Assoc, prof, physics, 
Randolph-Macon Woman's Col., Lynch- 
burg, Va. M29F33. B. 

Boggs, S(amuel) Whittemore. M.A., 
Columbia, 24. Geographer, U. S. Dept. 
State, Washington, D. C. (219 Elm St., 
Chevy Chase, Md.) (M26F3iR3S)M38F 3 i. 
E. 

Boggs, Dr. Thomas R(ichmond). M24- 
F33D38. N. 

Bogin, Dr. Maxwell. M.D., Yale, 26. 
Pediatrician, City Dispensary. Bridgeport, 
Conn. (94 Alpine Ave.) M35F35. N. 

Bogusch, Edwin R(obert). M.A., Texas, 
28. Head Science Dept., Cuero School 
System, Cuero, Tex. (209 Avant Ave., 
San Antonio, Tex.) M39. GEO. 

Bohan, Dr. John E(mlin). West Vir- 
ginia Univ., Morgantown, W. Va. M29- 
F32R32. QI. 



282 



Directory of Members 



Bohart, Dr. Richard M(itchell). Ph.D., 
California, 38. Instr. entomology, Univ. 
California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 
Calif. M40. F. 

Bohlen, Miss Anne C(atherine). A.B.. 
Nebraska. Teacher, Norfolk Public 
Schools. Norfolk. Nebr. (1005 Norfolk 
Ave.) M38. GQ. 

Bohlin, Dr. Howard Grenville. M. A., 
Columbia. 25; Ph.D., New York, 35. 
Assoc, prof., Citv Col.. New York, N. Y. 
(43 W. 93rd St.) M32. ME. 

Bohm, Harry R. c/o Mr. Antonelli, 52 
Franklin Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. M31R3.2. 
CFG. 

Bohmert, Miss Margaret Theresa. B.A.. 
New Rochelle, 38. Graduate asst., Ford- 
ham Univ., New York, N. Y. (326 Carroll 
Ave.. Mamaroneck, N. Y T .) M39. FG. 

Bohn, Dr. J(acob) Lloyd. Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia Inst. Tech.. 28. Assoc, prof, physics. 
Temple Univ., Philadelphia, Pa. M28F33- B. 

Bohnenblust, Prof. (Henri) Frederic. 
Ph.D., Princeton, 31. Assoc, prof., Prince- 
ton Univ., Princeton, N. J. M40. A. 

Bohrer, Dr. E. Claude. West Plains, Mo. 
M38R38. NIH. 

Bohstedt, Dr. G(ustav). M.S., Wisconsin, 
16: Ph.D.. 25. Prof, animal and dairy 
husbandry. Univ. Wisconsin Col. Agric, 
Madison, Wis. M29F31. OF. 

Boileau, Willard E. Box 446, Bath, N. Y. 
M22R33. MBD. 

Boillot, B. F. Box C, Jefferson Citv. Mo. 
M31R32. F. 

Bois, Dr. J(oseph) S(amuel) A(nselme). 
M.A., McGill, 34: Ph.D., 36. Pres., Psy- 
chological Inst., Montreal, Que., Canada. 
M38. I. 

Boissevain, Dr. Charles H. M.D., Amster- 
dam. 19. Lab. dir., Colorado Foundation 
Res. Tuberculosis, Colorado Col., Colorado 
Springs, Colo. M30F38. NCG. 

Bojar, Samuel. M.A.. Rochester, 37. Stu- 
dent, Johns Hopkins School Med., Balti- 
more, Md. (51 Westford Road, Providence. 
R. 1.) M39. NI. 

Bold, Prof. Harold C(harles). M.S., Ver- 
mont, 31 ; Ph.D.. Columbia, 33. Visiting 
lecturer, Dept. Botany, Barnard Col., 
Columbia Univ., New York, N. Y. M39- 
F40. G. 

Boldt, Dr. H(ermann) J(ohannes). M.D., 
New York, 79. Prof, emeritus gynecology. 
Columbia Univ. Post Graduate Med. 
School, New York, N. V. (White Plains. 
N. Y.) M28F33. N. 

Bolduc, Dr. Antonio. M.D., Montreal, 24. 
Supt., Div. Labs., City Dept. Health, 
Montreal, Que., Canada. M32. CN. 

Boldyreff, Prof. Alexander W(illiam). 
Ph.D.. Michigan, 30. Assoc, prof, mathe- 
matics. Univ. Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. 
(2309 E. 5 th St.) M34F34- ACB. 



Boldyreff, Ephraim B(asil). Pavlov Phy- 
siological Inst., Battle Creek Sanatorium. 
Battle Creek, Mich. M28R32. NFC. 

Bole, Mrs. B. P. Lake Shore Blvd., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. M24L30. FGE. 

Bole. B(enjamin) P(atterson), Jr. A.M.. 
Western Reserve, 36. Asst. charge Dept. 
Mammalogy, Cleveland Mus. Natural His- 
tory; asst. sec. and treas., Hollenden 
Hotel Co., Cleveland, Ohio. (1712 Sheridan 
Road, South Euclid, Ohio) M38. FGE. 

Bolen, Dr. Homer R(oscoe). M.A.. In- 
diana, 25; Ph.D., Texas, 33. Prof, biology, 
Southeast Missouri State Teachers Col., 
Cape Girardeau, Mo. (1400 New Madrid 
St.) M32. F. 

Bolender, Prof. Edward L. M.S., Wis- 
consin, 27. Prof, biology. State Teachers 
Col.. Superior, Wis. (02 Maple Ave.) 
M30. FG. 

Bolger, H(enry) J(oseph). M.A., Catholic. 
Dept. Physics, Univ. Notre Dame, Notre 
Dame, hid. M38F40. B. 

Boliek, Dr. (Mildred) Irene. M.A., North 
Carolina, 33; Ph.D., 36. Instr. zoology. 
Florida State Col. Women, Tallahassee. 
Fla. M39. FG. 

Bolin, Dr. Zera Exley. D.Phar.. Philadel- 
phia Col. Pharmacy. 00; M.D., Jefferson, 
14. 262 Santa Paula St.. San Francisco. 
Calif. Mi 7. NpCL. 

Boling, Dr. John L(andrum). Ph.D.. 
Brown, 39. Res. asst. neuro-auatomy, Yale 
Univ. School Med., New Haven, Conn. 
M40. F. 

Boling, Dr. Leroy R(obb). M.S., Wash- 
ington Univ., 30; Ph.D.. 35. Asst. prof, 
anatomy and registrar, Washington Univ. 
School "Dentistry. St. Louis, Mo. M39. NF. 

Bolley, Dr. Henry L(uke). M.S., Purdue. 
89; D.Sc. 38; Dr. Agric, 39. Dean 
biology. North Dakota Agric. Col.; 
botanist and plant pathologist, North 
Dakota Agric. Exp. Sta., Fargo, N. Dak. 
(389 8th Ave. S.) M90F92E39. G. 

Boiling, Miss Diana. B.S., Sarah Lawrence 
Col. Res. fellow. New York Psychiatric 
Inst., New York, N. Y. M30. CDF. 

Boiling, Dr. George Melville. 777 Frank- 
lin Ave., Columbus, Ohio. M28F30R39. L. 

Vice president for Section on Historical and 
Philological Sciences (I.), iqj8. 

Bollinger, Prof. C(lyde) J(ohn). M.S. 
Chicago, hi. Univ. Oklahoma. Norman, 
Okla. M27F31. F.. 

Bollinger, G(iles) M(allalieu). M25F32- 
D— . C. 

Bolton, Miss Euri Belle. M.A.. George 
Peabody, 24; Ph.D., 30. Prof, education 
and psychology, Georgia State Col. 
Women, Milledgeville, Ga. M28F33- I. 
Bolton, Frank L(eonard). B.S., Michigan, 
09. Pres.. Cauyga Pock Salt Co.. Inc., 
Myers, X. Y. (Box 586, Ithaca, X. Y.) 
M25. M. 



1 ndividual Mem bers 



2S3 



Bolton. Dr. Frederick E(lmer). M.S., 
Wisconsin. 96; Ph.D., (.'lark. 98. Prof, 
education and dean emeritus, Univ. 
Washington School Education, Seattle. 
Wash. M25F15. QI. 

Bolton. Dr. Lloyd L(awrence). M.A., 
British Columbia, 24; Ph.D., Cornell. 32. 
Prof, biology, Univ. Santa Clara. Santa 
Clara, Calif. (1059 Carolyn Ave., San 
Jose. Calif.) M39. FGN. 

Bolton, Reginald Pelham. Pies, and chair- 
man Hoard Dir., R. P. Bolton Electric 
Meter Corp., New York, X. Y. (638 \V. 
158th St.) M18F28. M. 

Bolton, Dr. Thaddeus L(incoln). Ph.D., 
Clark, 114. Prof, emeritus psychology, 
Temple Univ., Philadelphia. Pa. (23 
Wayne Ave., Xarberth, Pa.) M01F01. HI. 

Bomar, Dr. Willie Melmoth. 423 W. 
120th St., New York. X. Y. M32R33. 
XKQ. 

Bomberger, Dr. F(ranklin) B(yers). Col- 
lege Park. Md. M25R34. KIO. 

Bomhard, Dr. Miriam L(ucile). Ph.D., 
Pittsburgh, 26. Assoc, forest ecologist. 
U. S. Forest Service. Washington, D. C. 
M2SF39. (i. 

Bonander, (Gustav) Orvar. M.E., Orebro 
(Sweden), jo. Designer, L. C. Smith and 
Corona Typewriters, Inc., Chicago, 111. 
14S44 Henderson St.) M30. M. 

Bonar, Dr. Lee. M.A., Michigan, jo; 
Ph.D., 22. Assoc, prof, botany, Univ. Cali- 
fornia. Berkeley, Calif. M24F25. G. 

Bonazzi. Prof. Augusto. Estacion Experi- 
mental de Agricultura, Direccion Tecnica, 
Ministero de Agricultura, Caracas, Vene- 
zuela. S. A. M25. GCO. 

Bond, Dr. Austin D(emell). A.M., Colum- 
bia, jo; Ph.D., 40. c/o I. S. Redwav. 
Adams, X. Y. M32F33. FQ. 

Bond, Donald S(pencer). S.M., Chicago, 
31. Res. physicist, RCA Mfg. Co., 
Camden, X. J. (6531 Harvard Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111.) M29F40. B. 

Bond, Dr. Eva. Ph.D., Columbia. 901 W. 
Franklin St., Richmond, Va. M39. IQ. 

Bond, Lt. Col. Francis M(arvin). 581 1 
Pimlic.i Road, Mt. Washington. Haiti- 
more, Md. M08F25. M. 

Bond. Fred C(hester). M.Sc, Colorado 
School Mines, 26. Metallurgist, A His- 
Chalmers Mfg. Co.. West Allis, Wis. 
(164s S. 80th St.) M39. DBA. 
Bond, Frederic Drew. Winsted, Conn 
M25F27. KB. 

Bond, George Meade. M84F85D3S. M. 
Secretary of Section on Engineering ([)), 

1 XX 7. 

Bond, Glenn C. 1135 Maine St., Lawrence, 
K.'iiis. M36R36. X. 

Bond, Prof. H. D. Salem Col.. Salem, 
W. Va. (M3iR33)M36R37- EG 



Bond, Prof. Helen Judy (Mrs. Perry 
Avery Bond). I'll. I)., Columbia, jo. Head 
Dept. Household Arts and Sciences. 
Columbia Univ. Teachers Col., New York. 
\. Y. (525 W. 120th St.) M34. IK- 

Bond, Prof. Otto F(erdinand). M.A., 
Ohio State, 12. Prof, teaching French and 
chairman French and Spanish in College, 
Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. M40. Q. 

Bond, Mrs. Perry A(very) (See Mrs. 
Helen Judy Bond ) . 

Bond, Prof. Perry A(very). M.S., Iowa, 
08; Ph.D., 15. Assoc, prof, inorganic 
chemistry. Univ. Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 
M1SF33.V. 

Bond, Miss Ray. M.A., Columbia, 24. 42 
Mead St., New Canaan, Conn. M25. CB. 

Bond, Dr. Richard M(arshall). Ph.D.. 
Yale. 32. Regional biologist, I'. S. Soil 
Conservation Service, Berkeley, Calif. 
(A608 Chabot Road, Oakland, Calf.) M18. 
FGE. 

Bond, Dr. W. R. 418 E. Main St.. Rich- 
mond, Va. M33F33R38. X. 

Bonde, Reiner. M.S., Maine, 26; Ph.D., 
Minnesota, 38. Assoc, plant pathologist, 
Maine Agric. Exp. Sta., Orono, Maine. 
M26F31. GO. 

Bondurant, Donald C. B.S., Missouri, 30. 
Hydrology chief, U. S. Engineers Office, 
Caddoa, Colo. (000 S. 7th St., Lamar, 
Colo. » M40. MB. 

Bondurant, Dr. Eugene DuB(ose). 166 

Conti St., Mobile, Ala. M04F09R35. X. 

Boner, Dr. C(harles) P(aul). M.A.. Texas, 
jj ; Ph.D., 29. Prof, physics, Univ. Texas, 
Austin, Tex. M29F33. B. 

Bonestell, Aileen E. 1336 Trestle Glen 
Road, Oakland, Calif. M35R35. F. 

Bonine, Charles E(dward). Consulting 
engineer, Land Title Bldg., Broad and 
Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. M17F31. 
ME. 

Bonine, Prof. C(hesleigh) A(rthur). Dept. 
Geology, Pennsylvania State Col., State 
College", Pa. M34F34R34. E. 

Bonisteel, Prof. W(illiam) J(ohn). M.A.. 
Columbia, 27; Ph.D.. 39. Prof, botany, 
Fordham Univ., Xew York, X. Y. (153 
Hrite Ave.. Scarsdale, X. Y.) M29F33. 
GNO. 

Bonn, George S(chlegel). M.S., Ohio 

State, 36. Res. engineer, City Water, Light 

ami Power Dept., Springfield, 111. M40. 
CM. 

Bonn, Norman E(ugene). B.S., Pittsburgh. 
10. Dir. res., Rubicon Co.. Philadelphia, 
Pa. (6971 Cedar Park Ave.) M39. BMC. 

Bonnar, William. 8 W. Erie St., Chicago. 
111. M21R32. 1. 

Bonnell, Clarence. Asst. principal, Town- 
ship High School, Harrisburg, 111. M20F25. 
FGN. 



284 



Directory of Members 



Bonner, Dr. C(larence) A(lden). Danvers 
State Hosp., Hathorne, Mass. M32R36. N. 

Bonner, Hubert. A.M., Ohio State, 25, 
Harvard, 29. Instr. sociology, Univ. Col., 
Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111.; lecturer 
sociology, Indiana Univ. Extension Div., 
Fort Wayne, Ind. (61 51 S. Kimbark Ave., 
Chicago, 111.) M37. KI. 

Bonner, Dr. T(om) W(ilkerson). M.A., 
Rice, 32; Ph.D., 34. Asst. prof, physics, 
Rice Inst., Houston, Tex. M35F38. BA. 

Bonnet, Dr. Frederic. M.S., Harvard, 02; 
Ph.D., 03. Chemist and dir., Textile Res. 
and Standards Lab., Amer. Viscose Corp., 
Marcus Hook, Pa. (9 Du Pont St., Ridlev 
Park, Pa.) M03F06. C. 

Bonnett, Alfred (Augest). Electrical en- 
gineer, Alaska Juneau Gold Mining Co., 
Juneau, Alaska. (Box 1006, Douglas, 
Alaska) M32. MED. 

Bonnett, Sister Jeanne Marie. M.A., 
Minnesota; Ph.D., Louvain. Educational 
dir., Col. St. Catherine, St. Paul, Minn. 
M36. IQ. 

Bonnett, Louis B(lake). M.E., Stevens 
Inst. Tech., 89. 310 W. Jersey St., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. M21. BM. 

Bonney, Merl (Edwin). M.A., Stanford; 
Ph.D., Columbia. Assoc, prof, education, 
North Texas State Teachers Col., Denton, 
Tex. (1707 W. Oak St.) M40. IQ. 

Bonnier, Prof. Gert. Ph.D., Stockholm, 24. 
Prof, genetics, Univ. Stockholm, Stock- 
holm: dir. Animal Breeding Inst., Wiad, 
Eldtomta, Sweden. M35. FGO. 

Bontrager, Dr. O(ra) Ray. M.A., Iowa, 
30; Ph.D., 33. Asst. dir. teacher training 
and dir. Reading Clinic, State Teachers 
Col., California, Pa. (825 4 th St.) M40. 
QIA. 

Boodin, Prof. John Elof. A.M., Brown, 
96; Ph.D., Harvard, 99. Prof, emeritus 
philosophy, Univ. California Los Angeles, 
Los Angeles, Calif. (Universitv Club) 
M17. I. 

Boogher, John. Mt. Pleasant, Havre de 
Grace, Md. M37R39. KIA. 

Booher, Miss Lela E(vangeline). M.Sc, 
Iowa, 22; Ph.D., Columbia, 28. Chief, 
Foods and Nutrition Div., U. S. Bur. 
Home Economics, Washington, D. C. 
(3700 Massachusetts Ave. NW.) M33F33. C. 

Book, Dr. R. D. M34D37. NF. 

Book, Prof. William F(rederick). Ph.D., 
Clark, 06. 504 N. Fess Ave., Bloomington, 
Ind. M24F25. I. 

Bookhout, Dr. Cazlyn G. M.A., Syracuse, 
29; Ph.D., Duke, 34. Instr. zoology, Duke 
Univ., Durham, N. Car. M31. F. 

Bookman, Dr. Arthur. M.D., Columbia, 
01. 25 E. 77th St., New York, N. Y. M17. N. 



Bookman, Dr. Samuel. M.A., Ph.D., Ber- 
lin, 95. Consulting chemist, Mt. Sinai 
Hosp., New York, N. Y. (624 Madison 
Ave.) M98F00. CN. 

Boomhour, Miss Elizabeth G(regory). 
M.A., Cornell, 32. Instr. biology, Mere- 
dith Col., Raleigh, N. Car. (3402 Hills- 
boro Road) M39. GQ. 

Boomhour, J(oshua) Gregory. A.M., Chi- 
cago, 07. Dean, Meredith Col., Raleigh, 
N. Car. (M 3 4F34R34)M 3 8F34. B. 

Boon, Prof. John Daniel. Methodist Univ., 
Dallas, Tex. Moi. BD. 

Boor, Dr. Alden K(inney). M.A., John B. 
Stetson, 22; S.M., Chicago, 23; Ph.D., 
Illinois, 30. Asst. prof, biochemistry, Univ. 
Chicago, Chicago, 111. M22F25. CN. 

Boord, Prof. Cecil E(rnest). M.A., Ohio 
State, 06; Ph.D., 12. Prof, chemistry, 
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. (220 
15th Ave.) (Mi7F25R33)M 4 oF25. C. 

Booth, Dr. Cecil O. 947 La Clair St., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. M35R38. N. 

Booth, Prof. Harold S(immons). A.M., 
Western Reserve, 16; Ph.D., Cornell, 19. 
Prof, chemistry, Western Reserve Univ..; 
head div. science and mathematics, Cleve- 
land Col., Western Reserve Univ., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (1494 Rvdalmount Road, 
Cleveland Heights) M28F32. C. 

Booth, Dr. Robert Lippincott. V.M.D., 
Pennsylvania, 35. Veterinarian, Middle- 
burg, Va. M38. NO. 

Booth, W. E. M.S., Oklahoma. Instr. 
botanv. Univ. Kansas, Lawrence, Kans. 
M40. G. 

Booth, W. Edwin. 824 Elm Ave., Norman, 
Okla. (?) M32R32. FG. 

Boothby, Dr. Walter M(eredith). M.D., 
Harvard, 06; A.M., 07. Head section clini- 
cal metabolism, Mayo Clinic; prof. exp. 
metabolism, Mayo Foundation, Univ. 
Minnesota, Rochester, Minn. (703 10th 
Ave. NW.) M40. NC. 

Boothroyd, R(aymond) A(tkinson). Yee 
Tsoong Tobacco Co., Ltd., Shanghai, 
China. M36R36. GCO. 

Boothroyd, Prof. S(amuel) L(atimer). 
M.S., Colorado State, 04. Prof, astronomy. 
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. (Warley 
Place, Route 2) M13F16. DB. 

Boots, Dr. John Leslie. Severance Hosp., 
Seoul, Korea. M33R37. N. 

Borchardt, L(ester) F(erdinand). B.E.E., 
Minnesota, 29. Res. physicist, Gen. Mills 
Inc., Res. Labs.. Minneapolis, Minn. (5508 
15th Ave. S.) M40F40. BCM. 

Borchelt, T(homas) C(harles). Standard 
Brands, Inc., Pekin, 111. M38R38. MPB. 

Borcherdt, W. O. M36D39. MCE. 

Borden, Miss Lydia Prichett. 1809 N. 
15th St., Philadelphia, Pa. Mn. GF. 



Individual Members 



285 



Bordley, Dr. James, III. M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 27. Assoc, prof, medicine, Johns 
Hopkins Univ.; assoc. physician, Johns 
Hopkins Hosp., Baltimore, Md. (no W. 
Univ. Parkway) M34F34. N. 

Borell, Adrey E(dwin). U. S. Soil Con- 
servation Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
M38R38. FG. 

Boreman, Prof. Robert W(ells). M.E.E.E., 
Ohio State, 12; M.S., 18. Asst. prof. 
physics, Carnegie Inst. Tech., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. (5723 Howe St.) M18F33. BMC. 

Borg, Henry L. 28 Cotton St., Newton 
Center, Mass. M30. 

Borg, Sidney C. M28D34. 

Borgia, Sister M. (See Sister M. Borgia 
Clarke). 

Borgstrom, Parry. M.S., California, 16; 
Ph.D., 19. Naval Res. Lab., Anacostia, 
Washington, D. C. M25F33. CO. 

Boring, Miss Alice M(iddleton). M.A., 
Bryn Mawr, 05; Ph.D., 10. Prof, biology, 
Yenching Univ., Peiping, China. M09- 
F13. F. 

Boring, Mrs. Edwin G. (Lucy Day). 

Ph.D., Cornell, 12. 21 Bowdoin St., 
Cambridge, Mass. M09F25. I. 

Boring, Prof. Edwin G(arrigues). M.A., 
Cornell, 12; Ph.D., 14. Prof, psychology, 
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. M11F15. 
I. Vice president for Section on Psychology 
(I), 1930. 

Borland, Prof. Andrew A(llen). M.S., 
Wisconsin, 10. Head Dairy Husbandry 
Dept., Pennsylvania State Col., State Col- 
lege, Pa. M34F34. O. 

Borman, Earle K. 150 Whitman Ave., 
West Hartford, Conn. M34F34R36. N. 

Borover, Irwin. 3408 E. 119th St., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. M35R35. C. 

Borovitch, Boris Ossipovitch. Post Books, 
339. Kharkof, 31, Ukraine, U.S.S.R. (?) 
M33R35. INQ. 

Borrego, (Garcia) Edward C. Ebano, San 
Luis Potosi, Mexico. M34R34. MDG. 

Borror, Dr. Donald J(oyce). M.S., Ohio 
State, 30; Ph.D., 35. Instr. zoology and 
ornithology. Ohio State Univ., Columbus, 
Ohio. M29F39. F. 

Borst, Prof. Harold L. Dept. Farm Crops, 
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. M29- 
F31R33. OGE. 

Borthwick, Dr. H(arry) A(lfred). Davis, 
Calif. M32R32. GO. 

Bortner, Charles Eugene. M.S.. Kentucky, 
33. Asst. agronomist, Kentucky Agric. 
Exp. Sta., Lexinerton, Ky. (703 S. Lime- 
stone St.) M36. O. 

Boschke, Guy. Apartado 6, Colima, Col., 
Mexico. M36. M. 



Boschma, Dr. H(ilbrand). Ph.D., Amster- 
dam, 20. Rijsamuseum van Natuurlijke 
Historic Leiden, Holland. M27F32. F. 

Bosee, Dr. Roland A. Ch.D., Valparaiso, 
37. Dir. labs., Endo Products, Inc., Rich- 
mond Hill, N. Y. (54 Greenwich St., 
Hempstead, N. Y.) M36. CN. 

Boshnakian, Dr. Sarkis. Bayville, N. Y. 
M31R33. EGO. 

Bosma, Miss Nelly J(eanette). M.A., 
Michigan, 27; Ph.D., 31. Teacher biology, 
Wright Junior Col., Chicago, 111. (3335 
Diversey St.) (M3iR34)M40. F. 

Boss, Dr. Andrew. D.Sc, Kansas State, 
27. Prof, emeritus agric. and farm man- 
agement, Univ. Minnesota Col. Agric, St. 
Paul, Minn. (1443 Raymond Ave.) Mio- 
F16. OKQ. 

Boss, Benjamin. Dudley Observatory, Al- 
bany, N. Y. M20F21. D. 

Boss, Prof. William. Prof, emeritus, Univ. 
Minnesota, Minneapolis; pres., Specialty 
Mfg. Co., and Boss Engng. Co., St. Paul, 
Minn. M30F33. BCM. 

Bosshard, Dr. H(einrich) M(orant). 
Ph.D., Zurich, 19; Ed.M., Harvard, 21. 
Assoc, prof. German, Clark Univ., Wor- 
cester, Mass. (9S2 Main St., Leicester, 
Mass.) M34F34. LQI. 

Bostian, Dr. C(arey) H(oyt). M.S., Pitts- 
burgh, 30; Ph.D., 33. Assoc, prof, zoology, 
North Carolina State Col. ; poultry gene- 
ticist. North Carolina Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Raleigh, N. Car. M32F33. FG. 

Bostwick, Lee G(ordon). B.S., Vermont. 
Member technical staff. Bell Telephone 
Labs., Inc., New York, N. Y. (22 Orchard 
Road, Chatham, N. J.) M29F40. BD. 

Boswell, Prof. Foster P(artridge). A.M., 
Harvard. 02; Ph.D., 04. Prof, philosophy 
and psychologv, Hobart Col., Geneva, 
N. Y. (859 S. Main St.) M10L25F28. HI. 

Boswell, Dr. Maitland C(rease). A.M., 
Harvard, 06; M.A., Toronto, 07; Ph.D., 
08. Univ. Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada. 
M08F15. C. 

Boswell, Victor R(ickman). M.S., Mary- 
land, 23; Ph.D., 26. Principal horticul- 
turist. U. S. Horticultural Sta., Beltsville, 
Md. (435 Calvert St., Hyattsville. Md.) 
M40F40. O. 

Bosworth, Alfred W(illson). A.M., Har- 
vard, 13. Asst. prof., Ohio State Univ., 
Columbus; consulting chemist, Route 4, 
Circleville, Ohio. M13F15. CN. 

Bosworth, Millard W(ilb'am). M.A.. Wes- 
leyan, 35. Teacher sciences. Brirlfton 
Acad., North Bridgton, Maine. M39. CFN. 

Bothwell, Lindley Fowler. Rancho Rin- 
conada Labs., Canoga Park, Calif. M38- 
R39. OCE. 



286 



Directory of Members 



Botkin, Prof. C(layton) W(infield). A.M., 
Wisconsin, 12. Head Dept. Chemistry, 
New Mexico Col. A. and M., State College. 
N. Mex. M33F33. CE. 

Botset, Holbrook G. U.S., Purdue, 22. 
Physicist, Gulf Res. and Development Co., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. (Waldheim Road, Fox 
Chapel) M3SF3S- BC. 

Botsford, Dr. E(mily) Frances. M.A.. 
Yale, 22 : Ph.D., 2$. Asst. prof, zoology. 
Connecticut Col., New London, Conn. 
M25F33. FN. 

Bott, Prof. Edward A(lexander). Univ. 
Toronto, Toronto, Out., Canada. M21F21- 
R32. I. Vice president for Section on Psy- 
chology (I), 192 1. 

Bottom, Prof. Curtis (Hobbs). M.A., 
Northwestern. Asst. prof, biology, Centre 
Col., Danville, Ky. M40. F. 

Bottum, Miss Frances R(anney). M.A., 
George Peabody, 26. Assoc, prof, biology, 
George Peabodv Col. Teachers, Nashville, 
Tenn. M28F33. G. 

Botwinick, Dr. Irving H(ershel). V.M.D.. 
Pennsylvania. Woodbine. N. J. M39. NOF. 

Boucek, Dr. Anthony J. M.D., Pittsburgh, 
90. 622 Chestnut St., North Side Sta.. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. M02. N. 

Bouchard, Prof. Harry. B.C.E., Michigan, 
11. Assoc, prof, geodesy and surveying, 
Univ. Michigan. Ann Arbor. Mich. (1111 
Woodlawn Ave.) M38. M. 

Boucher, Dr. Paul E(dward). M.A.. Rice, 
21 ; Ph.D., 28. Prof, physics, Colorado 
Col., Colorado Springs, Colo. (2312 N. 
Cascade) M35F35. B. 

Boucher. Dr. Robert V(aughan). A.M.. 
Missouri, 29; Ph.D., 33. Assoc, prof, agric. 
and biological chemistry, Pennsylvania 
State Col., State College, Pa. (251 Irvin 
Ave.) M35F40. CON. 

Boud, Frank L. C.E., Northwestern Archi- 
tectural and Engng. Col., 02. Principal 
engng. draftsman, District Engineer's Of- 
fice, U. S. Farm Security- Administration, 
Montgomery, Ala. (132 Catoma St.) M30. M. 

Boudin, Dr. Anna P. ^53 W. 57th St., 
New York, N. Y. M33R*33- N. 

Boudreaux, Miss Lucille Grace. M.S.. 
Louisiana State, 36. Asst. Dept. Chemistry, 
Mississippi State Col. Women, Columbus, 
Miss. (Scott, La.) M39. CNB. 

Boughton, Dr. Donald C(larke). M.S.. 
Minnesota, 28; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 32. 
Assoc. protozoologist. Regional Lab., 
U. S. Bur. Animal Industry, Auburn, Ala. 
M29F33. FN. 

Boughton, Willis A(rnold). A.M., Har- 
vard, 19. Asst. Dir. Chemical Labs., Har- 
vard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. M29F33. C. 

Boulos, Zakhari. Abu Kerkas Pharmacy, 
Abu Kerkas, Egypt. M35R35. CN. 



Boulton, (Wolfrid) Rudyerd, Jr. B.S., 
Pittsburgh. Field Mus., Chicago, 111. 
M37F38. FGE. 

Bouquet, Rev. Francis L(ester). 21 11 
Spencer St., Omaha, Nebr. M32R34. K. 

Bourland, Dr. L(angford) T(odd). Ph.D.. 
Illinois. 30. Radio engineer (contract), 
Naval Res. Lab., Anacostia, D. C. M39- 
F40. BM. 

Bourn, Dr. Janet M(acfarlane). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 28. Senior bacteriologist, Michi- 
gan Dept. Health, Lansing, Mich. (1329 
W. Grand River Ave., East Lansing, 
Mich.) (M28F33R34)M39F33. NC. 

Bourn, W(arren) S(cudder). Boyce 
Thompson Inst. Plant Res., Inc., Yonkers, 
N. Y. M27F31R35. G. 

Bourne, Prof. Arthur I. 12 E. Pleasant 
St., Amherst, Mass. M34F34R35. F. 

Bourne, Dr. Wesley. M.D.,C.M., McGill, 
1 1 ; M.Sc, 24. Lecturer anesthesia, McGill 
Univ.; consulting anesthetist. Royal Vic- 
toria Hosp. and Montreal Gen. Hosp.: 
anesthetist, St. Mary's Hosp., Montreal. 
Que., Canada. {^2 Holton Ave., West- 
mount) M24F33. N. 

Bourque, Dr. Joseph E(dward), Jr. M.S., 
New Hampshire, 30; Ph.D., Cornell, 39. 
Instr. zoology, Loyola Univ. South, New 
Orleans, La. (743 Main St., Johnson City, 
N. Y.) M40. FNH. 

Bousfield, J. H. A(lfred). M17D37. M. 

Bousfield, Dr. Weston Ashmore. A.M., 
Boston, 28; A.M., Harvard, 32; Ph.D.. 33. 
Asst. prof, psychology, Univ. Connecticut, 
Storrs, Conn. M36F40. IN. 

Bouslog, Dr. John S(amuel). M.D., Colo- 
rado, 16. Asst. prof, radiology, Univ. 
Colorado School Med., Denver, Colo. 
(6210 E. 17th Ave.) M32. X. 

Bousman, H(enry) W(oodford). B.S., 
Michigan, 24. Development engineer, Gen. 
Electric Co., Schenectadv, X. Y. (219 
Alexander Ave., Scotia, N. Y.) M28. M. 

Bouthilet, Miss Lorraine. B.A.. Minne- 
sota. 1555 Fairmount Ave.. St. Paul. Minn. 
M38. INF. 

Boutwell, John M(ason). S.M., Harvard, 
no. Continental Nat. Bank, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. M07F05. EM. 

Boutwell, Prof. Paul W(inslow). M.A.. 
Wisconsin, 12; Ph.D., 16. Prof, chemistry 
and head Dept., Beloit Col., Beloit, Wis. 
(1875 Riverside Drive) M18F25. C. 

Bovard, Dr. John F(reeman). Ph.D., 
California, 16. Prof, physical education 
and chairman Dept.; dir. Men's Gym- 
nasium, Univ. California Los Angeles. Los 
Angeles, Calif. M07F12. FI. 

Bovarnick, Dr. Max. M.D.. Harvard' 
Ph.D., Columbia. 8so W. 176th St., New 
York, X. V. M40. NC. 



Individual Members 



287 



Boveri, Mrs. Marcella. 700 Prospect St., 
New Haven, Conn. M33. F. 

Bovey, William H(oward). B.S., Massa- 
chusetts lust. Tech.. 94. 567 Chamber 
Commerce Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 
M34- D> 

Boving. Dr. Adam Giede. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
Washington, D. C. MisFisR39- F. 

Bowden, Prof. D(aniel) J(oseph). Ph.D.. 
Yale, 37. Chairman Dept. Philosophy and 
Religion, Elon College, X. Car. M38. II IK. 

Bowden, Garfield A(rthur). B.S., Chicago. 
13. Mgr. Household and Chemical Divs., 
A. S. Bovle Co. and Midway Chemical 
Co., Jersey Citv, N. J. (257 Cornelison 
Ave.) M24. CBI. 

Bowdle, Dr. Ralph A(lvin). M.D., Medical 
Col. Ohio, 00. Chief surgeon. Nevada 
Consolidated Copper Corp., McGill, 
Nevada, Nevada Northern Ry. Co. and 
Steptoe Valley Hosp., East Ely, Nevada. 
M22. X. 

Bowen, Miss Anna Cara Cornelia. A.B., 
Cornell. 210 E. Main St., Batavia, N. Y. 
M14. IQD. 

Bowen, Charles F(ranklin). M.S., Wis- 
consin, 03. 255 1st Ave., Salt Lake City, 
Utah. (.124 Kerr Aprs., Waikiki, Honolulu. 
Hawaii) M34F34. E. 

Bowen, Charles H(olbert). Antimite Co., 
\rcade Bldg.. St. Louis. Mo. M3SR3S- 
ECO. 

Bowen, Dr. Norman L(evi). Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech.; Sc.D., Harvard. 
Prof, petrology, Univ. Chicago. Chicago, 
111. M38. EC. 

Bowen, Prof. (Rufus) Earl. A.M., Har- 
vard 29; Ph.D.. 31- Prof, biology and 
head Dept., Gettysburg Col., Gettysburg, 
Pa. (34 E. Lincoln Ave.) M33- F. 
Bowen, Sherman W. Box 405. Route 1. 
Robertson, Mo. M3SR38. BM. 

Bowen, W(ilfrid) Wedgwood. B.A., 
Cambridge, 21. Curator Mus. and asst. 
prof., Dept. Biology. Dartmouth Col., 
Hanover, N. H. M34F34. F. 
Bowen, William Spencer. 720 Highland 
Ave.. Westfield. N. J. M36R38. MO. 

Bower, Mrs. Eleanor Cornell (Mrs. Ernest 
Ziegler Bower, Jr.). M.A., Smith, 38. 
Teacher Hartridge School, Plainnekl. 
\. J. M40. NFC. 

Bower, Miss Elizabeth B. M.S.. Penn- 
sylvania State, 12. Head Dept. Chemistry. 
Hood Col., Frederick, Md. M24. C. 
Bower, Dr. E(rnest) C(lare). Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia, 31. Lecturer astronomy. Griffith 
Observatory, Los Angeles, Calif. L27F27. D. 
Bower, Miss Estelle Naomi. 21 15 3rd Ave., 
Altoona, Pa. M40. NA. 
Bower, Dr. John O. M.D.. Medico- 
Chirurgical Col. 2008 Walnut St., 1 hila- 
delphia. Pa. M37- N. 



Bower, Miss Julia Wells. A.M., Syracuse, 
26; Ph.D., Chicago, 33. Asst. prof, mathe- 
matics, Connecticut Col., New London, 
Conn. (642 X. jrd St., Reading. Pa.) 
M28F38. A. 

Bower, Dr. Raymond E. M.D., Rush, 01. 
Health commissioner, Chillicothe and 
Ross Counties, Chillicothe, Ohio. (65 
E. 2nd St.) M33. N. 

Bower, R(aymond) G(ladstone). Bur- 
rough Adding Machine Co., Detroit, Mich. 
M25. M. 

Bower, Prof. William Clayton. A.M., 
Columbia, 10; LL.D., Transylvania, 35. 
Prof, religious education and chairman 
Field Practical Christianity, Univ. Chi- 
cago Divinity School. Chicago, 111. M3!- 
F32. QIK. 

Bowerman, Miss Mary L(eolin). Ph.D., 
California, 36. Univ. California Herbarium, 
Berkeley, Calif. M32. < i. 

Bowers, Chester S. isi Fairfield Ave., 
Hartford, Conn. M35R36. NO. 

Bowers, Dr. Clement G(ray). M.S., Cor- 
nell, 25; Ph.D., Columbia, 30. Private 
plant breeder and horticulturist, technical 
consultant, Maine, N. Y. (203 Main St., 
Binghamton, N. Y.) M25F33. GO. 

Bowers, Dr. Harold E. Ph.D., Chicago, 
31. Res. chemist, Libbey-Ovvens-Ford 
Glass Co.. Toledo, Ohio. (3645 Woodmont 
Road) M40. CBA. 

Bowers, Henry L. 31 N. Eastfield Ave., 
Trenton. N. J. M29R32. FGH. 

Bowers, Miss Norah K(athleen). M.A., 
Toronto, 37. Psychologist, Ontario Hosp., 
Hamilton, Out., Canada. (32s Tames St. 
S.) M39. I. 

Bowers, Lt. Comdr. R(alph) W(aldo). 
U. S. Navy, U.S.S. Sirius, c/o Post- 
master, New York, N. Y. M35. MBL 

Bowers, Dr. W. G. 1001 12th St., Greeley. 

Colo. M34F34R36. C. 

Bowers, Dr. Walter P. Clinton, Mass. 

M36R39- N. 

Bowers, Mrs. William C. Alabama Hotel, 

Winter Park, Fla. M40. 

Bowie, Edward H(all). M.S., St. John's 
(Annapolis), 20. Principal meteorologist, 
U. S. Weather Bur., San Francisco, Calif. 
(S44 Contra Costa Ave., Berkeley, Calif.) 
M34F34. B. 

Bowie, William. 2000 Connecticut Ave. 
X\V., Washington." D. C. M06F07R3S. 
DEM. 

Bowles, Prof. Edward L. S.M., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 22. Prof, electrical 
communications, Massachusetts Inst. 
Tech.; consulting engineer, Cambridge, 
Mass. (77 Glen Road, Welleslev Farms, 
Mass.) M31F32. MB. 

Bowling, Dr. R(achel). M.A., Ph.D., 
Columbia. Manhattanville Col. Sacred 
Heart, New York, N. Y. (M29R 3 2)M30. F. 



288 



Directory of Members 



Bowman, Dr. Donald H(outs). M.S., 
Kansas State, 35; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 39. 
Agent cereal investigations, U. S. Dept. 
Agric, Ohio Agric. Exp. Sta., Wooster, 
Ohio. M40F40. GO. 

Bowman, D(onald) W(hitney). 142 N. 
Westmoor Ave., Columbus, Ohio. M36- 
R36. B. 

Bowman, Dr. Ethel. M.A., Wellesley, 07; 
Ph.D., Clark, 17. Cohasset, Mass. M25- 
F25. I. 
Bowman, Dr. Harvey (Bird). Clinton, 

n. y. M37K38. F. 

Bowman, Dr. H(oward) H(iestand) 
M(innich). M.Sc, Franklin and Mar- 
shall, 14; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 17. Prof, 
and head Dept. Biology; supervisor pre- 
medical students, Univ. Toledo, Toledo, 
Ohio. M13F21. GF. 

Bowman, Dr. Isaiah. Ph.D., Yale, 08; 
M.A., 21; M.Ed., Michigan State, 27; 
Sc.D., Bowdoin, 31; LL.D., Dartmouth, 
Charleston, Dickinson, Pennsylvania, 35, 
Wisconsin, 36, Harvard, 36. Queen's, 37. 
Pres., Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, 
Md. M21F21. E. 

Bowman, Prof. J. B. M35D36. Q. 

Bowman, Jay. B.S., Valparaiso, 17. Res. 
chemist, Inst. Amer. Meat Packers, Chi- 
cago, 111. (8145 Avalon Ave.) M22F33. 
CBK. 

Bowman, John Gabbert. A.M., Iowa, 04; 
LL.D., Coe, 12, Mississippi, 14, Boston, 27, 
Rutgers, 33, Pennsylvania, 34; Litt.D., 
Oglethorpe, 24, Iowa, 34. Chancellor, 
Univ. Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. (155 N. 
Dithridge St.) M13. 

Bowman, Dr. Karl M(urdock). M.D., 
California, 13. Dir., Div. Psychiatry, Dept. 
Hosps.; prof, psychiatry, New York Univ. 
Col. Med., New York, JSf. Y. M39- NIQ. 

Bowman, Dr. LeRoy E. 41 Washington 
Square S., New York, N. Y. M38R38. 
KIQ. 

Bowman, Dr. Paul J(ay). M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 19. Chief surgeon, Redwood 
Coast Hosp.; med. dir., Union Lumber 
Co., Fort Bragg, Calif. M13. N. 

Bowman, Prof. Paul W(illiam). M.A., 
George Washington, 28; Ph.D., Virginia, 
30. Assoc, prof, biology, George Washing- 
ton Univ., Washington, D. C. (2304 Wil- 
son Blvd., Arlington, Va.) M27F33. GF. 

Bowman, R(obert) E(arl). Holston Lodge, 
Kingsport, Tenn. M32R33. MAB. 

Bowman, Dr. Russel O(scar). Ph.D., 
Western Reserve, 33. Res. biochemist, 
Rhode Island Hosp., Providence, R. I. 
(117 Grace St., Auburn, R. I.) M39. NC. 

Bowmaster, W(ylie) AflberO. Michigan 
State Col., East Lansing, Mich. M32R32. M. 

Bown, Dr. Ralph. M.M.E., Cornell, 15; 
Ph.D., 17. Radio and television res. dir., 



Bell Telephone Labs., New York, N. Y. 
(85 Pine St., Maplewood, N. J.) M22F25. 
BM. 

Bowyer, Vernon L(evi). A.M., Chicago, 
23. Dir. Works Progress Administration, 
Chicago Board Education, Chicago, 111. 
(M2 3 K37)M 4 o. Q. 

Box, Dr. Harold K. 86 Bloor St. W., 
Toronto, Ont., Canada. M34F34R35- N. 

Boyce, A(lfred) M(ullikin). M.S., Cornell, 
27; Ph.D., California, 32. Assoc, prof, 
entomology, Graduate School Tropical 
Agric; assoc. entomologist, Citrus Exp. 
Sta., Univ. California, Riverside, Calif. 
M28F33. FO. 

Boyce, F(rederick) M(ay). 154 Main 
St., Andover, Mass. M29R34. BA. 

Boyce, Miss Jessie Wadleigh. A.M., 
Minnesota, 23. Prof, mathematics and 
chairman Dept., State Teachers Col., 
Wayne, Nebr. M34F38. AQI. 

Boyce, Prof. J(ohn) S(haw). M.F., 
Nebraska, 12; Ph.D., Stanford, 17; M.A., 
Yale, 29. Prof, forest pathology, Yale 
Univ., New Haven, Conn. M31F33. GO. 

Boyce, Prof. Joseph C(anon). Ph.D., 
Princeton, 26. Assoc. prof. physics, 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., Cambridge, 
Mass. (119 Walker St.) M31F32. BDH. 

Boyce, M(offatt) G(rier). Adelbert Col., 
Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, Ohio. 
M25R32. A. 

Boyd, Bemrose. M.S., Iowa, 35. Junior 
engineer, Hazeltine Service Corp., Chi- 
cago, 111. (1261 Winnemac St.) M36. 
MBD. 

Boyd, Dr. Edith. M.D., Johns Hopkins, 
21. Asst. prof, anatomy, Univ. Minnesota, 
Minneapolis, Minn. M30F33. NH. 

Boyd, Dr. Eldon M(athews). M.A., 
Queens, 29; M.D..C.M., 32. Prof, and 
head Dept. Pharmacology. Queen's Univ., 
Kingston, Ont., Canada. M40. Np. 

Boyd, Miss Elizabeth M(argaret). M.A., 
Mt. Holvoke. Instr., Dept. Zoology. Mt. 
Holvoke" Col., South Hadley, Mass. M40. 
FNG. 

Bovd, George Addison. M.A., Austin, 29; 
M.S.. Iowa. 35. Dir. res.. Welsbach Street 
Illuminating Co., Philadelphia, Pa. M38. 
BCF. 

Bovd, Prof. George H(ugh). Dent. 
Zoology, Univ. Georgia, Athens, Ga. 
(M 2 8R32)M 3 6F36R36. F. 

Bovd, Harold E(dward). A.B.. Stanford. 
536 Lincoln St., Palo Alto, Calif. M36. E. 

Bovd. Prof. Tames EdlswortM. M.S., 
Cornell. 06. Prof, e'-ne'-itiis m»^riamV«5. 
Ohio State Univ.. Co1n"ib«s, O^ ; o. (188 
E. Frambes Ave.) M97F99L37- MB. 

Bovd. Dr. Linn KohnV Flower Hosp., 
New York, N. Y. M34F34R37. NC. 



Individual Members 



289 



Boyd, Dr. Mark Frederick. M.D., Iowa, 
11; M.S., 13; C.P.H., Harvard, 14, Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 14. Member held staff, 
International Health Div., Rockefeller 
Foundation, New York, N. Y.; dir. Sta. 
Malaria Res., Rockefeller Foundation, 
Tallahassee, Fla. (Box 997, Tallahassee, 
Fla.) M17F33. N. 

Boyd, Dr. M(ilford) J(ohn). M.D., Mich- 
igan, 18. 2347 Fairview Ave., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. M33. CN. 

Boyd, Miss Neva L(eona). Dept. Sociol- 
ogy, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, 111. 
M33R35. K. 

Boyd, Dr. Paul P(rentice). A.M., Park, 
00; M.A., Cornell, 05; Ph.D., 11. Head 
Dept. Mathematics and Astronomy and 
dean Col. Arts and Sciences, Univ. Ken- 
tucky, Lexington, Ky. (119 Waller Ave.) 
M1SF18. ADB. 

Boyd, Prof. Theodore E(lliott). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 23. Prof, and Departmental 
Chairman, Loyola Univ. School Med., 
Chicago, 111. (706 S. Lincoln St.) M24- 
F33. NpF. 

Boyd, T(homas) A(lvin). Ch.E., Ohio 

State, 38. Head Fuel Dept., Res. Labs. 

Div., Gen. Motors Corp., Detroit, Mich. 
M28F33- C. 

Boyd, William C. 78 E. Concord St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. M38. 

Boyden, Dr. Alan (Arthur). Ph.D., Wis- 
consin, 25. Assoc, prof, zoology, Rutgers 
Univ., New Brunswick, N. J. (Stelton, 
N. J.) M21F31. F. 

Boyden, B(oyd) L(ester). Senior entomol- 
ogist, U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant 
Quarantine, Whittier, Calif. M25F25. F. 

Boyden, Prof. Edward A(llen). A.M., 
Harvard, 11; Ph.D., 16. Prof, anatomy, 
Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
M13F15. NF. 

Boyden, James R(ansford). 21 17 Orange 
St., Alhambra, Calif. L18. F. 

Boyden, Dr. Mabel Gregg (Mrs. Alan 
Boyden). A.M., Wisconsin, 22; Ph.D., 25. 
Extension instr.. Rutgers Univ., New 
Brunswick, N. J. (Stelton, N. J.) M24F33. F. 

Boyer, Carl. Dir., Wagner Free Inst. 
Science, Philadelphia, Pa. (415 E. 
Hortter St., Mt. Airy) M27. G. 

Boyer, Dr. Carl B(enjamin). A.M., 
Columbia. 29; Ph.D., 39. Instr. mathe- 
matics, Brooklyn Col., Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
lecturer science, Univ. Col. Rutgers Univ., 
New Brunswick. N. J. (4449 W. 123rd St., 
New York. N. Y.) M34F38. AL. 

Boyer, Merle M. M.Ed., Oklahoma. 32. 
Instr. biology. High School, Enid, Okla. 
(636 E. Randolph St.) M38. FG. 

Bover, WGlliam) H(arold). Dept. Psy- 
chology, Univ. Idaho, Moscow, Idaho. 
M36R36. I. 



Boyle, Dr. A(lbert) C(larence), Jr. M.A., 
Columbia, 10; Ph.D., 13. Acting custodian, 
Dinosaur National Monument, Jensen, 
Utah. M35F35. MED. 

Boyle, Dr. Lytton W(esley). M.S., Wash- 
ington State, 24; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 32. 
Asst. plant pathologist, U. S. Bur. Plant 
Industry, Arlington Farm, Arlington, Va. 
M27F33. G. 

Boyle, Dr. R(obert) W(illiam). M.Sc, 
McGill, 06; Ph.D., 09; LL.D., Alberta, 
33. Dir., Div. Physics and Electrical 
Engng., Nat. Res. Council, Ottawa, Ont., 
Canada. (25 Buena Vista Road, Rock- 
cliffe) M34F34- BMP. 

Boylston, Arthur C(larence). A.M., Har- 
vard, 06. Vice pres. and gen. mgr., Mal- 
linckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Mo. 
M07F16. CE. 

Boylston, Herbert M(elville). M18F22D39. 
MQ. 

Boynton, Dr. William Hutchins. D.V.M., 
Cornell, 08. Dept. Veterinary Science, Univ. 
California, Berkeley, Calif. M26F33. N. 

Boynton, Prof. W(illiam) P(ingry). A.M., 
Dartmouth, 93; Ph.D., Clark, 97; Sc.D., 
Oregon, 37. Prof, emeritus physics, Ore- 
gon State Col., Corvallis, Oreg. (546 W. 
Beverly Blvd., Whittier, Calif.) M08F10. B. 

Boysen, Miss Helen. M.A., Texas, 28. 
Teacher science, Senior High School, 
Austin, Tex. (620 W. 35th St.) M32. F. 

Boysen, Prof. J(ohannes) Lassen. A.M., 
Syracuse, 04; Ph.D., Wurzburg, 09. Prof. 
Germanic languages, Univ. Texas, Austin, 
Tex. M28. L. 

Bozler, Dr. Emil. Ph.D., Munich, 33. 
Asst. prof., Dept. Physiology, Ohio State 
LTniv., Columbus, Ohio. M34F34. BN. 

Bozorth, Dr. Richard M. 41 Park Road. 
Millburn, N. J. M25F28R33. BCA. 

Braasch, Albert C(arl). 2923 Upton Ave. 
N., Minneapolis, Minn. M36R36. CAB. 

Brabec, Dr. Leonard B(edient). M.A., 
Columbia, 25; Ph.D., 36. 70 W. nth St., 
New York, N. Y. M37. CNF. 

Brace, James H(enry). B.S.,C.E. Vice 
pres., Fraser, Brace, Ltd., 107 Craig St. 
W., Montreal, Que., Canada. M18. M. 

Brace, Mrs. R. N. (Elizabeth M.) c/o 
Rev. W. A. Cash, 930 M St., Merced, Calif. 
M00F06R32. H. 

Braceland, Dr. Francis J. M.D., Jefferson, 
30. Asst. prof., Univ. Pennsylvania Grad- 
uate School Med.; assoc. prof., Woman's 
Med. Col., Philadelphia, Pa. M39. NI. 

Brack, Dr. Charles E(mil). 500 E. 20th 
St., Baltimore, Md. M20R34. "NQ. 

Brackebusch, Miss Frieda (Matilda). 
Bingham, 111. M35R37. FIK. 

Bracken, A. F. Utah Exp. Sta., Logan, 
Utah. M36F40. O. 



290 



Directory of Members 



Bracken, Dr. H(enry) M(artin). M34- 
F11D38. X. 

Brackett, Dr. Byron B(riggs). M97F11- 
D37. MB. 

Brackett, F(rank) Ernest. The Dingle, 
Cumberland, Md. M28R32. MAE. 

Brackett, Prof. F(rank) P(arkhurst). 
A.M., Dartmouth, 90; Sc.D., 27. Prof, 
emeritus astronomy, Pomona Col., Clare- 
mont, Calif. (Balboa Island, Calif.) Moi- 
F06. DBA. 

Brackett, Dr. Frederick S(umner). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 22. Principal physicist, 
Nat. Inst. Health, Bethesda, Md. (11 E. 
Woodbine St., Chevy Chase, Md.) M35- 
F35. B. 

Brackett, Dr. Richard N(ewman). M88- 
F91E37D37. c. 

Bradbury, Miss Dorothy. M.A., Wiscon- 
sin, 22; Ph.D., 25. Assoc, prof, biology. 
Oklahoma Col. Women, Chickasha, Okla. 
M26F26. G. 

Bradbury, Dr. N (orris) E(dwin). Ph.D., 
California, 32. Assoc, prof, physics. Stan- 
ford University, Calif. M36F38. B. 

Bradbury, Dr. O(ra) C(lare). M.A., 
Xebraska, 15; Ph.D., iq. Prof, biology and 
head Dept., Wake Forest Col., Wake 
Forest, X. Car. M22F33. F. 

Bradbury, Dr. Robert Hart. Ph.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 03. Warner Road, Colonial Vil- 
lage, Wayne, Pa. M34F34. C. 

Bradbury, Dr. Samuel. M.D., Pennsyl- 
vania, 05. Dir. outpatient, Pennsylvania 
Hosp. ; visiting physician, Germantown 
Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. (151 W. Coulter 
St.) M.3.8. XGH. 

Braddock-Rogers, Dr. K(enneth). M.S.. 
Pennsylvania, 25 ; Ph.D., 28. Head Dept. 
Chemistry, State Teachers Col., West 
Chester, Pa. (617 W. Miner St.) (M31- 
F 3 3R33)M 3 9F 3 3. CQ. " 
Braden, Spruille. 25 Broad St., New York, 
X. Y. M27R35. M. 

Bradfield, Prof. Richard. Ph.D.. Ohio 
State, 22. Head Dept. Agronomy and 
prof, soil technology, Cornell Univ.. 
Ithaca. N. Y. (711 Triphammer Road) 
M26F29. OCG. 

Bradford, D(onald) C(omnick). Dept. 
Geophysics, St. Louis Univ., St. Louis. 
Mo. M34R34. ECM. 

Bradford, James M(cClellan). M.S.. Chi- 
cago, 26. Instr. physics, Central Y.M.C.A. 
Col., Chicago, 111. (6050 Ingleside Ave.) 
M27F33. BA. 

Bradley, G(eorge) H(irst). B.S., Cornell. 
16. Entomologist, U. S. Bur. Entomology 
and Plant Quarantine, Orlando, Fla. (New 
Smyrna Beach, Fla.) M24F33. F. 

Bradley, Dr. Harold C(ornelius). Ph.D., 
Yale, 05. Prof, physiological chemistry. 
Univ. Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. M08F11. 
CN. 



Bradley, Prof. Harry C(yrus). M18F18- 
D36. AMQ. 

Bradley, H(enry) F(ranklin). Ph.B., 
Yale, 10. Chief chemist, Park Utah Con- 
solidated Mines Co., Park Citv, Utah. 
M40. CBQ. 

Bradley, Prof. J(ames) Chester. M.S.. 
California, 07; Ph.D., Cornell. 10. Prof, 
entomology and curator invertebrate zool- 
ogy, Cornell Univ.; entomologist and 
curator, New York Agric. Exp. Sta.. 
Ithaca, N. Y. (so8 E. Buffalo St.) M04- 
Fio. F. 

Bradley, James (Parks). 3747 Jackson St., 
San Francisco, Calif. M36R36. EMC. 

Bradley, John H(odgdon). Jr. Ph.D., 
Chicago, 24. Route 1, Lowell, Mass. M23- 
F31. E. 

Bradley, Miss Mary A. M.A., George 
Washington. Asst. editor indexes, Office 
Information. U. S. Dept. Agric, Wash- 
ington, D. C. M39. FGO. 

Bradley, Dr. Ralph Clarke. M.D.. Penn- 
sylvania, 29. Instr. pharmacology, Temple 
Univ. School Med.; asst. immunologist, 
Philadelphia Dept. Health ; flight surgeon, 
28th Div. Aviation, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(6457 Green St., Germantown) M35. Np. 

Bradley, Theodore J(ames). M08F27D36. 
CQX. 

Bradley, Dr. Wilmot H. Ph.D.. Yale, 27. 
Senior geologist, U. S. Geol. Survey, 
Washington, D. C. M35F31. E. 

Bradner, Donald Byal. Dir. res. and de- 
velopment. Champion Paper and Fibre 
Co.; vice pres. and gen. mgr„ Hamilton 
Labs., Inc., Hamilton, Ohio. M40. C. 

Bradshaw, Miss Dorothy Aliene. M.A.. 
Northwestern. 436 Maple Ave., Winnetka, 
111. M36. I. 

Bradshaw, Dr. Frederick. M31D — . KLQ. 

Bradshaw, Prof. G(uy) R(ead). A.M., 
Cincinnati, 18. Prof, physics, Thiel Col., 
Greenville, Pa. (299 Clinton St.) M24F33. 
BQC. 

Bradshaw, Prof. John W(illiam). A.M., 
Harvard, 02; Ph.D., Strassburg, 04. Prof, 
mathematics, Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. M11F18. A. 

Bradshaw, Dr. Marion J(ohn). 319 Union 
St., Bangor, Maine. M38R39. IQ. 

Bradshaw, Dr. R(aymond) W(atson). 
M.D., Harvard. 2?,; M.P.H.. 36. Col. phy- 
sician. Oberlin Col.; dir. Allen Hosp.. 
Oberlin, Ohio. (373 Reamer Place) M40. 
N. 

Bradt, Glenn W(arner). Dept. Zoology, 
Michigan State Col., East Lansing, Mich. 
M28F33R36. F. 

Bradt, Paul (Jay). M.A., George Wash- 
ington, 31. Junior physicist, Nat. Bur. 
Standards, Washington, D. C. (1847 Mint- 
wood Place NW.) M35F38. ABC. 



Individual Mkm bers 



291 



Bradt, Dr. Wilber E(lmore). 1 Parkview 
Apt., Orono, Maine. ( M34F34R34 ) M38- 
F34R38. CEB. 

Bradway, Miss Elizabeth Marguerite. 
M.A.. Oregon, 30; Ph.D., Iowa, 32. Instr. 
chemistry, Univ. Oregon, Eugene, Oreg 
(Jasper, Oreg.) M39. CNF. 

Bradway, Miss Louisa M(ay). M.S., Iowa. 
4942 Forest Ave., Kansas City, Mo. M38. 
FCG. 



Brady, 
BM. 



Edward J(oseph). M18F31D- 



Brady, Dr. Ewing P. D.D.S., Washington 
Univ., os. Board of Education Bldg., St. 
Louis, Mo. M33F38. NdCQ. 

Brady, George V(incent). B.S., Col. City 
New York. 180 Wellington St., Ottawa, 
Out., Canada. M38. AK. 

Brady, Lionel F(rancis). M.A.. Cambridge, 
05. Curator geology. Mus. Northern 
Arizona, Flagstaff, Ariz. (Mesa, Ariz.) 
M21. EH. 

Brady, S(amuel) M(arion). Machinist, 
U. S. Navy, U.S.S. Pinola, San Pedro. 
Calif. M40. MCB. 

Brady, T. H. 1701 Campbell St., Com- 
merce, Tex. M31R33. BCK. 

Braga, Mario Andrade. Caixa Postal 3061, 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, S. A. M39. CMNp. 

Bragg, Dr. Arthur N (orris). M.A., Boston, 
34; Ph.D., Oklahoma, 37. Instr. zoology. 
Univ. Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. M25F33. 
FG. 

Bragg, Miss Laura M(ary). 38 Chalmers 
St., Charleston, S. Car. M24F31. HQ. 

Bragger, Edgar J. Hoffman LaRoche. Inc., 
Nutley, N. J. M35R35. CN. 

Braham, Dr. Joseph M(arvin). M.S., 
Illinois, 15; Ph.D., 18. Asst. to pres.. 
Solvay Process Co., New York, N. Y. 
(165 Bon Air Ave., New Rochelle. N. Y.) 
M22F25. C. 

Brailey, Dr. Miriam (Esther). M.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 30; Dr.P.H.. 31. Assoc, 
epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Univ. School 
Hygiene and Public Health ; dir. Harriet 
Lane Tuberculosis Clinic, Johns Hopkins 
Hosp.. Baltimore, Md. (16 E. Chase St.) 
M37. NF. 

Brailo, George P. Amtorg Trading Corp., 
261 5th Ave., New York, N. Y. M34R37. M. 

Brainard, Dr. Benjamin F(ranklin). M.D., 
Chicago Col. Physicians and Surgeons, 
86. Martin City, Mo. M18. N. 

Brainin, Dr. Clement S. Ph.D., Columbia, 
17. C. S. Brainin Co., 218 W. 40th St., 
New York, N. Y. (14 Laurel Place, Glen 
Ridge, N. J.) M23F25. BDP. 

Brakefield, Dr. J(ames) L(uther). A.M., 
Baylor, 21 ; Ph.D., California, 25. Head 
Dept. Biologv, Howard Col., Birmingham, 
\la. M28F30. FN. 



Brakel, Prof. H(enry) L(ouis). M.A., 
Washington. 05; Ph.D., Cornell, 12. 4734 
Thackeray Place, Seattle, Wash. M25F31. B. 

Bralliar, Dr. Floyd (Burton). Ph.D.. 
George Peabody. Dean and prof, biology, 
Madison College, Tenn. M33F40. FGO. 

Braman, Winfred W(aite). M07F33D37. C. 

Bramann, George M(osher). M.A.. Wes- 
leyan, 26, Harvard, 28. Res. and sales 
development, advertising mgr., Niacet 
Chemicals Corp., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
(1222 Norwood Ave.) M39. CDE. 

Bramble, Prof. Charles Clinton. A.M.. 
Dickinson, 13; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 17. 
Prof, mathematics and mechanics. V. S. 
Naval Acad. Post Graduate School, Annapo- 
lis, Md. (145 Monticello Ave.) M34F34. A. 

Bramble, Prof. William C(lark). M.F., 

Yale, 30; Ph.D.. 32. Assoc, prof.. Dept. 

Forestry, Pennsylvania State Col., State 
College, Pa. M31F39. G. 

Bramhall, Dr. Ervin H(icks). M.S., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 28; Ph.D., 
Cambridge, 32. Prof, physics, Univ. 
Alaska, College, Alaska. M38. BDC. 

Bramkamp, Dr. R(ichard) A(llen). Ph.D., 
California, 35. Geologist, California Ara- 
bian Standard Oil Co., 225 Bush St., San 
Francisco, Calif. (Bahrein Island, Persian 
Gulf) M40. E. 

Bramley, Dr. Arthur. Ph.D., Princeton, 
24. Collaborator, U. S. Dept. Agric, Wash- 
ington, D. C. (121 Ocean Ave., Ocean 
City, N. J.) M 34 F34- B. 

Bramwell, George W. 32 W. 40th St 
New York, N. Y. M94E39. M. 

Branch, Arthur M. 204 Securitv Bldg., 
St. Louis, Mo. M38. M. 

Branch, Prof. Gerald E(yre) K(irkwood). 
M.Sc, Liverpool, 12; Ph.D., California, 15. 
Prof, chemistry, Univ. California, Berke- 
ley, Calif. (1303 McGee Ave.) M34F34. C. 

Branch, Miss Hazel E(lisabeth). M.A.. 
Kansas, 12; Ph.D., Cornell, 21. Prof, 
zoology and chairman Dept., Univ. 
Wichita, Wichita, Kans. (3756 E. Douglas 
Ave.) M24L31F33. FNH. 

Branch, Dr. Mary E. M.A., Chicago; 
LL.D., Howard; Ped.D., Virginia State. 
Pres., Tillotson Col., Austin, Tex. M38. 
KLQ. 

Branche, Dr. George Clayton. M.D., Bos- 
ton. Asst. clinical dir., Veterans' Admin- 
istrative Facility, Tuskegee, Ala. M40. N. 

Brand, Albert R(ich). Res. assoc. orni- 
thology, Cornell Univ., Ithaca; assoc. 
ornithology, Amer. Mus. Natural History, 
New York, N. Y. (9 East Ave., Ithaca, 
N. Y.) M33. F. 

Brand, Charles J(ohn). B.A., Minnesota. 
02. Exec. sec. and treas., Nat. Fertilizer 
Assn.. Washington, 1). C. (if>6i Crescent 
Place) M28F33. CGK. 



292 



Directory of Members 



Brand, Prof. Donald D. Ph.D., California, 
33. Prof, anthropo-geography and head 
Dept. Anthropology, Univ. New Mexico, 
Albuquerque, N. iviex. M35F38. EH. 

Brand, Dr. Erwin. Ph.D., Berlin, 20. 
Assoc, prof, biochemistry, Columbia Univ. 
Col. Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 
N. Y. M31F33. CN. 

Brand, Prof. Louis. M.A., Cincinnati, 09; 
Ph.D., Harvard, 19. Prof, mathematics and 
head Dept., Univ. Cincinnati, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. (2603 University Court) M29F32. 
ABD. 

Brandenburg, Dr. G(eorge) C(linton). 
M24F25D34. IQ. 

Brandes, Dr. E(lmer) W(alker). M.S., 
Michigan State, 15; Ph.D., Michigan, 19. 
Principal pathologist charge, Div. Sugar 
Plant Investigations, U. S. Bur. Plant In- 
dustry, Washington, D. C. (6310 Ridge- 
wood Ave., Chevy Chase, Md.) M17F23. 
GO. 

Brandes, Fred(erick) C(hristian). C.E., 
Cornell, 16. City plan engineer, White 
Plains, N. Y. (112 Mamaroneck Road) 
M22. M. 

Brandes, Walter W(illiam). M.S., North- 
western, 26; M.D., 27; Ph.D., 30. Dir. 
labs., Roosevelt Hosp., New York, N. Y. 
M29F33. N. 

Brandhorst, Dr. Otto William. D.D.S., 
Washington Univ. 4952 Maryland Ave., 
St. Louis, Mo. M36F39. Nd. 

Brandon, J(oseph) F(ranklin). U. S. 
Exp. Sta., Akron, Colo. M28F31R36. O. 

Brandt, Dr. Allen D(emmy). M.S., Har- 
vard, 32; Sc.D., 33. 137 N. Chelsea Lane, 
Bethesda, Md. M38. MNP. 

Brandt, A(lva) E(smond). M.S.. Iowa 
State, 26; Ph.D., 31. Acting chief, Con- 
servation Exp. Sta. Div.," U. S. Soil Con- 
servation Service, Washington, D. C. 
(M3oR3 4 )M38F 4 o. KOF. 

Brandt, Dr. B(artholomew) B(randner). 
M.A., Duke, 34; Ph.D., 35. Prof, biology, 
East Carolina Teachers Col., Greenville, 
N. Car. M35. FQ. 

Brandt, Dr. Herman F(rancis). A.M., 
Northwestern, 27; Ph.D., Iowa. 37. 
Prof, applied psychology and dir. Visual 
Res. Labs., Drake Univ., Des Moines, 
Iowa. M40. IB. 

Branham, Dr. Sara E(lizabeth). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 23; M.D., 34; Sc.D., Colorado, 
37- Senior bacteriologist, Nat. Inst. 
Health; professorial lecturer preventive 
medicine. George Washington Univ. 
School Med., Washington. D. C. (3100 
Dumbarton Ave. NW.) M21F33. NFC. 

Branner, George C(asper). A.M., Chicago, 
20. State geologist, Arkansas Geol. Survey, 
Little Rock, Ark. (3121 Ozark Ave.) M24- 
F25. MBE. 



Brannon, C(larence) H(am). State Col- 
lege Sta., Raleigh, N. Car. M28R32. FHL. 

Brannon, J(ames) M(arshall). M.A., 
Wisconsin, 14; Ph.D., Cornell, 20. Asst. 
prof, dairy bacteriology, Univ. Illinois, 
Urbana, 111. M25F31. GNC. 

Brannon, Melvin A(mos). M.A., Wabash, 
90; Ph.D., Chicago, 12. Res. algae, Univ. 
Florida, Gainesville, Fla. M05F09. G. 

Branom, Dr. Frederick K(enneth). M.S., 
Chicago, 16; Ph.D., Clark, 23. Chairman 
dept. Social Science, Chicago Teachers 
Col., Chicago, 111. M34F34. EK. 

Bransford, John S. M.S., California, 40. 
Assoc, Div. Agronomy, Exp. Sta., Univ. 
California, Davis, Calif. M40. OG. 

Branson, Prof. Carl C(olton). M.A., 
Missouri, 27; Ph.D., Chicago, 29. Asst. 
prof, geology, Brown Univ., Providence, 
R. I. (103 Butler Ave.) (M29F31R34)- 
M39F31. E. 

Branson, Dr. E(dwin) B(ayer). M.A., 
Kansas, 03; Ph.D., Chicago, 05. Prof, 
geology, chairman Dept. Geology and 
Geography, Univ. Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 
(301 Glenwood Ave.) M06F11. E. 

Branson, Dr. Herman (Russell). Ph.D., 

Cincinnati, 39. Instr. physics and mathe- 
matics, Dillard Univ., New Orleans, La. 
M40F40. BAQ. 

Branson, Prof. J(ohn) W(illiam). M.S., 

Purdue, 27. Prof, mathematics and head 

Dept., New Mexico A. and M. Col., State 
College, N. Mex. M35F35. ADB. 

Brant, Miss Laura. A.M., Brown, 09; 
Ph.D., Columbia. 21. 33 Capwell Ave.. 
West Warwick, R. I. M18F31. BAD. 

Branting, Briant F(erdinand). M.S., 
Utah, 26. 315 Fillmore St., Petersburg, 
Va. M32F33. C. 

Brantly, J(ohn) Edward. E.M., Alabama, 
12. Pres., Drilling and Exploration Co., 
Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., and Twin Oil 
Co., Dallas, Tex.; vice pres., Petroleum 
Exploration Co., Inc., Dallas, Tex. M38. 
EM. 

Brasch, Frederick E(dward). Library of 
Congress, Washington, D. C. M34F15R35. 
L. Secretary of Section on Historical and 
Philological Sciences (L), 1921-27. 

Brashear, Mrs. Julia J. (Miss Julia Joyce 
Harper). Scottsbluff, Nebr. M2SR32. G. 

Bratley, Dr. Cyril O (liver). Ph.D., Cornell, 
33. Assoc, pathologist, U. S. Dept. Agric, 
641 Washington St., New York, N. Y. 
M31F33. GC. 

Brattain, Dr. Walter H(auser). M.A., 
Oregon, 26: Ph.D., Minnesota, 28. Tech- 
nical staff. Bell Telephone Lab., Inc., New 
York, N. Y. M34F34. B. 

Bratten, Mrs. Florence D. 3360 Dellwood 
Road. Cleveland Heights, Cleveland. Ohio. 
M34R35. DCE. 



Individual Members 



293 



Bratton, Dr. Samuel Tilden. A.M., Mis- 
souri, 16; Ph.D., Chicago, 25. Prof, 
geography, Univ. Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 
(313 E. Parkway Drive) M20F31. E. 

Bratton, Dr. W(alter) A(ndrew). Sc.D., 
Williams, 28. Pres., Whitman Col., Walla 
Walla, Wash. (570 Boyer Ave.) M35F35. A. 

Brauer, Dr. Alfred (Charles). M.A., Okla- 
homa, 24; Ph.D., Chicago, 32. Prof, 
zoology, Univ. Kentucky, Lexington, Kv. 
M26F33. F. 

Brauer, Dr. O(scar) L(eo). Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia, 15. 364 S. 16th St., San Tose, 
Calif. M18F33. ABC. 

Braun, Dr. Annette F(rances). A.M., 
Cincinnati, 08; Ph.D., 11. 2702 May St., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. M08F15. F. 

Braun, Dr. E(mma) Lucy. A.M., Cin- 
cinnati, 12; Ph.D., 14. Assoc, prof, plant 
ecology, Univ. Cincinnati, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. (2702 May St.) M21F25. G. 

Braun, Prof. Milton L(au). M.A., North 
Carolina, 24; Ph.D., 30. Prof, mathematics 
and physics and head Dept., Catawba Col., 
Salisbury, N. Car. M31F33. BDA. 

Brautlecht, Prof. Charles A(ndrew). 
Ph.D.. Yale, 12. Prof, chemistry and 
chemical engng., Univ. Maine, Orono, 
Maine. M28F33. C. 

Bravi, Dr. Eugenio. Managing dir. and 
gen. mgr.. Soc. An. Fabbriche Fiammi- 
feri ed Affini, Via Moscova 18, Milano, 
Italy. M38. CKM. 

Bray, Prof. Archie W(ilmot) L(eslie). 
M.A., Harvard, 19. Prof, biology and head 
Dept., Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, 
N. Y. (113 Spring Ave.) M34F34. FG. 

Brav, Dr. Charles I(seard). M.Sc, Missis- 
sippi A. and M. Col., 07; Ph.D., Illinois, 
26. Animal husbandman, Louisiana Agric. 
Exp. Sta., University, La. (908 Camelia 
Ave., Baton Rouge, La.) M24F31. OQK. 

Bray, Prof. Charles W(illiam, II). Ph.D., 
Princeton, 28. Assoc, prof, psychology, 
Princeton Univ., Princeton, N. J. M30- 
F33I-37- I. 

Bray, Robert S(t'iartX 3231 N. Albemarle 
St., Arlington, Va. M40. F. 

Brav, Dr. Ulric Bannister. Ph.D.. Yale, 
25. Consultant chemistry and petroleum 
technology, 633 Via Horquilla, Palos 
Verdes Estates, Calif. M40. CM. 

Brav, Prof. William C(rowell). Ph.D., 
Leipzig. 05. Prof, chemistry, Univ. Cali- 
fornia. Berkeley, Calif. (2708 Virginia St.) 
M08F10. C. 

Brav. Dr. William L. A.M.. Lake Forest. 
01: Ph.D.. Chicago. 98. Dean, Graduate 
School, and prof, botany. Syracuse Univ., 
Syracuse. N. Y. M00F01E38. G. 

B*-ay, Dr. Willis J. 702 E. Normal Ave., 
Kirksville, Mo. M36R36. CQ. 



Brazda, Dr. Daniel S(teven). M.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 23. Blossburg, Pa. M21F21. FN. 

Breakey, Dr. E(dward) P(aul). M.A., 
Kansas, 27; Ph.D., Ohio State, 32. 
Entomologist, Western Washington Exp. 
Sta., Puyallup, Wash. M34F34. F. 

Breasted, Dr. James H(enry). M34F34D35. 
HL. 

Brecht, Dr. E(dward) A(rmond), Jr. M.S., 
Minnesota, 34; Ph.D., 39. Instr., Univ. 
North Carolina School Pharmacy, Chapel 
Hill, N. Car. (Faculty Club) M40. NpCG. 

Breckenridge, C(arlyle) G(eorge). M.A., 
Alabama, 31. Asst. prof, zoology, Univ. 
Alabama, University, Ala. M34. F. 

Bredehorn, Miss Marjorie L. 1500 N. 
Latrobe Ave., Chicago, 111. M34R34. ILK. 

Breder, Dr. Charles M(arcus). D.Sc, 
Newark, 37. Acting dir., New York 
Aquarium, New York, N. Y. M27F33. F. 

Brederode, Capt. O(tto). 200 Riouwstraat, 
The Hague, Holland. M36. ID. 

Bredin, George S(loan). M07D36. 

Breed, Dr. Frederick S(tephen). A.M., 
Harvard. 05 ; Ph.D., 09. Assoc, prof, edu- 
cation, Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. (1224 
E. 57th St.) M11F15. QI. 

Breed, Prof. Robert S(tanley). Ph.D., 
Harvard, 02. Bacteriologist and chief Div., 
New York State Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Geneva, N. Y. M02F09. GO. 

Breen, Miss Mary C(ecelia). B.S., George 
Washington. Teacher and adviser women 
students, Wilson Teachers Col., Wash- 
ington. D. C. (441 1 17th St. NW.) M25- 
F31. QEF. 

Breer, Carl. M.E., Chrysler Inst. Engng., 
33; D.Eng., Clarkson Inst. Tech., 38. 
Dir. res., Chrysler Corp., Detroit, Mich. 
M40. M. 

Breese, Dr. Burtis Burr. M04F10D39. I. 

Breeze, Prof. Frederick John. M.S., Pur- 
due, 12. 242 E. Maple Grove Ave., Fort 
Wayne, Ind. M28F33. E. 

Breg, W(illiam) Roy. Exec, sec, Allied 
Youth, Inc., Washington, D. C. (401 
Sonoma Road, Bethesda, Md.) M38. Q. 

Bregger, Thomas. Ph.D., Cornell, 28. 
Physiologist, Everglades Exp. Sta., Belle 
Glade, Fla. M22F33. FGO. 

Bregman, Dr. Elsie Oschrin. 15 Clare- 
mont Ave., New York, N. Y. M24F25R36. 
IQK. 

Bregowsky, Ivan M. M18D39. C. 

Brehme, Dr. Katherine S(uydam) (Mrs. 
Charles O. Warren). A.M.. Virginia, 32; 
Ph.D., Columbia, 38. Fellow, Carnegie 
Inst. Washington, Cold Spring Harbor, 
N. Y. M32. FG. 



294 



Directory of Members 



Breit, Prof. Gregory. A.M., Johns Hopkins. 
jo; Ph.D.. 21'. Prof, physics, Univ. Wis- 
consin. Madison, Wis.; res. assoc, Car- 
negie Inst. Washington, Washington, 
D. C. (2024 Chamberlain Ave.. Madison. 
Wis.) M24F30. A. 

Breithut, Dr. F(rederick) E(rnest). Sc.l).. 
New York. 00. Woodstock, X. Y. (M34- 
F34R37)M39F34. C. 

Breitwieser. Charles J(ohn). M.S., Cali- 
fornia Inst. Tech., 31. Consulting engineer, 
Lee De Forest Labs.. Los Angeles, Calif. 
(593 E. California St., Pasadena, Calif.) 
M40. BMA. 

Breitwieser, Dr. J(oseph) V(alentine). 
A.M., Indiana, 08; Ph.D., Columbia, 11. 
Dir., Graduate Div., and dean, School 
Education, Univ. North Dakota, Grand 
Forks, N. Dak. (MogFi5R32)M35Fi5- I. 

Breitzke, Charles F(rederick). C.E. 1060 
Broad St., Newark, N. J. (M08F10R32)- 
M30F10. KM. 

Breland, Dr. Osmond P(hilip). Ph.D.. 
Indiana. 36. Instr. zoology, Univ. Texas, 
Austin, Tex. M40. F. 

Brem, Dr. Walter V(ernon). M20F25D38. 
NIK. 

Bremer, Prof. John Lewis. M.D., Harvard, 
or. Prof, anatomy, Harvard Med. School, 
Boston, Mass. (113 Marlboro St.) M07- 
Fn. X. 

Bremer, Valentine (Charles). M.S., Colum- 
bia. 37. Chemist. Sheffield Farms Co., New- 
York, N. Y. (212 Tackson Ave., Jersey 
City, X. J.) M39. CX. 

Brenes-Mesen, Prof. R. San Jose. Costa 
Rica. M37. L. 

Brenholts, Roy. M.E., Ohio State, 07. 
I 'res., Property Rentals. Inc.. Columbus. 
Ohio. (115 S. Drexel Ave.) M40. M. 

Brenizer, Dr. Addison G. 210 Professional 
Bldg., Charlotte, X. Car. M39R39. X. 

Brenke, Prof. William C(harles). Ph.D., 

Harvard, 07. 1250 S. 21st St., Lincoln. 
Xebr. M06F08. AD. 

Brennan, Dr. James I(van). M.A.. 10; 
D.Sc, 25; D.Eng., 28. 1600 Villanova 
Road, East Libertv, Pittsburgh, Pa. M17- 
F26. MPQ. 

Brennan, Dr. Robert Emery. M.D., Louis- 
ville. 00. Prof, surgery, New York Poly- 
clinic Med. School and Hosp., New York, 
X. Y. M22. XL. 

Brennan, Ruby Shearer (See Mrs. Ruby 
Shearer Taylor). 

Brenneman, Prof. Jesse L(amar). E.E., 
Wisconsin, 13. Prof, electrical engng., 
Kansas State Col., Manhattan, Kans. Mi 7- 
F31. MBO. 

Brennen, Dr. Herbert J(oseph). 613 Jac- 
card Place, Joplin, Mo. M20F31R34. BC. 



Brenner, Dr. Edward Christopher. M.D., 
Columbia. 14 F. 68th St., New York, 
N. Y. M38. X. 

Brenon, Herbert C(yril). 1=585 Crossroads 
<>f the World, Hollywood, Calif. M37R37. 
X FC. 

Brentzel. Dr. Wanda Weniger (Mrs. 
William Edward Brentzel). M.S., Wiscon- 
sin. 16; Ph.D., Chicago, 18. North Dakota 
Agric. Exp. Sta., Fargo, N. Dak. M18- 
F25. G. 

Brentzel, W(illiam) E(dward). A.M.. 
Missouri, 17. Plant pathologist, North 
Dakota Agric. Exp. Sta.. Fargo, N. Dak. 
M20F21. GO. 

Brescia, Dr. Frank. M.A., Columbia, 33; 
Ph.D., 38. Instr., Dept. Chemistry, Col. 
City New York. New York, X. Y. M34. 
CB. 

Bressman, Dr. E. N. Dept. Farm Crops, 
Oregon State Agric. Col., Corvallis, Oreg. 
M31F32R34. OGF. 

Bretall, R(obert) W(alter). 172 Xassau 
St., Princeton. X. J. M36R36. EQ. 

Bretnall, Prof. G(eorge) H(erbert). A.M., 
Cornell Col., 97. Prof, biology, Shepherd 
State Teachers Col., Shepherdstown, W. 
Va. M07F1 1. FG. 

Brett, Prof. Axel. M.A., Minnesota. 14: 
Ph.D., Illinois, 23. Prof, philosophy and 
psychology and head Dept., Univ. Ten- 
nessee. Knoxville. Tenn. ( ^427 Alta Vista 
Way) M27. I. 

Bretz, Prof. J Harlen. Ph.D., Chicago, 13. 
Prof, geology. Univ. Chicago: geologist, 
State Geol. Survey, Chicago. 111. (21 14 
Cedar Road, Homewood. 111.) M06F11. E. 

Breukelman, Prof. John (William). Ph.D., 
Iowa, 20. Head Dept. Biol. Science, 
Kansas State Teachers Col., Emporia, 
Kans. (1405 Xeosho St.) M30F33. F. 

Brevillier. Mrs. A(rthur) W. 610 W. 6th 

St., Frie, Pa. M18. 

Brewbaker, Dr. H(arvey) E(dgar). M.S., 
Minnesota, 23; Ph.D., 26. Agronomist, 
Great Western Sugar Co., Longmont, 
Colo. M24F31. GOF. 

Brewer, Dr. George. M.D., Johns Hop- 
kins. 29. Instr. physiology, Univ. Penn- 
sylvania School Med., Philadelphia, Pa. 
M39. XFC. 

Brewer, Prof. John M(arks). A.M., Har- 
vard, 15; Ph.D.. 16. Assoc, prof, educa- 
tion. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. 
M27F31. QI. 

Brewer, Nathan. Physiology Bldg., Univ. 
Chicago, Chicago, III. M32R32. N. 

Brewer, Prof. P. Harvey. M.S.. Purdue, 
30. Asst. prof., Purdue Univ., Lafayette, 
Ind. (145 E. Oak St., West Lafayette, 
Ind.) M34F34. O. 

Brewer, Dr. R(alph) E(mmet). L T . S. Bur. 
Mines, Pittsburgh, Pa. M34F34R35. C. 



I ndividual Mem berj 



295 



Brewington, Dr. Gail Paul. M.S., Mich- 
igan, 30; Ph.D., 35. Prof, physics. Law- 
rence Inst. Tech., Highland Park, Detroit, 
Mich. M36F38. RCA. 

Brewster, Edwin T(enney). A.M., Har- 
vard, 91. X Unison Road, Andover, Mass. 
M02F21. EF 

Brewster, Frederick F(oster). 840 Whittle) 
Ave., X'ew Haven, Conn. M29. 

Brewster, Dr. George F(ranklin). North- 
port, X. Y. M38R38. XI. 

Brewster, Dr. Hyder Ford. 911 Union 
Bldg., New Orleans, La. M36R36. NO. 

Brewster, Sam F(inley). M.L.A.. Massa- 
chusetts State. U. S. Dept. Conservation, 
Xashville. Tenn. M38. EFO. 

Briansky, David. 6730 13th Ave., Brook- 
lyn, X. Y. M34R34. ABM. 

Brick, Bayard. Washington Univ., St. 
Louis. Mo. M32R32. AMC. 

Brickel, William A. B.S., Lafavette. Dallas. 
Pa. M39. FOB. 

Brickner, Dr. Richard M(ax). M.S.. 
Columhia. 17; M.D.. 23. Asst. prof, clinical 
neurology. Columbia Univ. Col. Physi- 
cians and Surgeons: assoc. neurologist, 
Neurological Inst, and Mt. Sinai Hosp.. 
X'ew York. X. Y. ( ;ooo Xetherland Ave.) 
M34F38. N. 

Brickwedde, Dr. F(erdinand) G(raft). 
M.A.. Johns Hopkins, 24; Ph.D., 25. 
Chief cryogenic lab. and lecturer physics 
Craduate School. Xat. Bur. Standards; 
lecturer physics, Craduate School, U. S. 
Dept. Agric, Washington, D. C. M29F31. 
BCA. 

Bridgeman, Dr. Oscar C(leon). Xat. 
Bur. Standards, Washington, D. C. 
M20R32. CB. 

Bridgers, Thomas F(leming). Wilson, 
X. Car. M38R38. O. 

Bridges, Dr. Calvin B(lackman). M34- 
F34D3S. FG. 

Bridges, Dr. James Winfred. A.M.. Har- 
vard, 12; Ph.D.. 15. McGill Univ., Mon- 
treal, Que., Canada. M17F25. IQ. 

Bridges, Dr. Milton A. 850 Park Ave., 
Xew York. X. Y. M36R37. N. 

Bridgham, Dr. (Mrs.) Catherine Mit- 
chell). Ph.D., Pittsburgh, 32. Assoc, prof., 
Youngstown Col., Youngstovvn, Ohio. 
(Route 1, North Tackson, Ohio) M39. 
CG. 

Bridgman, Dr. Olga. M.D., Michigan, 10; 
M.A., California. 14: Ph.D., 15; Sc.D., 
Mills, 37. Prof, psychology, LIniv. Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley; prof, pediatrics, Univ. 
California School Med.; dir. Div. Mental 
Hygiene, San Francisco Dept. Public 
Health, San Francisco, Calif. (1380 Mon- 
terey Blvd.) M39. I XI''. 



Bridgman, Prof. P(ercy) W(illiams). 
A.M.. Harvard, 05; Ph.D., 08; D.S., Har- 
vard. ,}q, Brooklyn Polytechnic Inst., 35. 
Prof, physics, Harvard Univ.. Cambridge, 
Mass. (10 Buckingham Place) M18F21. B. 
Vice president for Section on Physics (B), 
[928. 

Bridgman, Ralph P(arkhurst). MA. 

Columbia. i?i Westminster Road. Brook- 
lyn, X. Y. M39. (J IK. 

Bridwell, J(ohn) C(olburn). U. S. Nat. 
Mils., Washington, 1). C. M34F34R34. F. 

Brien, Dr. D(aniel) H(enry). M.D.. 
Hahneman, 85. Takezoicho III chome 31. 
Seoul, Chosen. Korea. M32. MCE. 

Brierley, Dr. Jean. M.S., Michigan. 31; 
Ph.D., 37. Asst. prof, biology, Texas State 
Col. Women, Denton, Tex. M38. FG. 

Brierley, Dr. Philip. M.S., Minnesota, 22: 
Ph.D., Cornell, 33. Assoc, pathologist. 
U. S. Horticultural Sta.. Beltsville, Md. 
M33F3.;. G. 

Brierley, W(ilfrid) G(ordon). Dept. of 
Horticulture. Univ. Minnesota, Univ. 
Farm. St. Paul. Minn. M30F31R36. OG. 

Briese, Reinhold R(udolph). M.A., Wis- 
consin, 30. Chemist, Div. Pathology. U. S. 
Bur. Animal Industrv, Washington, D. C. 
M40F40. CBO. 

Briggs, Dr. A(lfred) P(oyneer). M.D., 
Washington Univ., 22. 2549 Walton Way. 
Augusta, Ga. M24F33. N. 

Briggs, Alfred (Stacy), Jr. 115 Strathmore 
Road. Brookline, Upper Darby, Pa. M34- 
R34- MAC. 

Briggs, Charles H(arold). B.S., Cornell. 
Mgr. Howard Lab., Minneapolis, Minn. 
(31 17 Calhoun Blvd). M08F38. COB. 

Briggs, Dr. Clifton H. M.D.. Washington 
Univ. 2900 Blanche St.. Pasadena. Calif. 
M36. X. 

Briggs, Dr. David R(euben). M.S.. Mis- 
souri, 23: Ph.D., Minnesota, 27. Assoc, 
prof, agric. biochemistry, Univ. Minnesota, 
Univ. Farm. St. Paul. Minn. (2120 Dudlev 
Ave.) M3SF39. C. 

Briggs, Dr. Fred N. M.S.. California. 22: 
Ph.D.. 25. Assoc, prof, agronomy. L T niv. 
California, Univ. Farm, Davis, Calif. (28 
College Park) M22F29. GO. 

Briggs, Dr. Garland B. M.A.. Virginia; 
Ph.D.. Princeton. Educational Dept., In- 
ternational Business Machines Corp.. 
Endicott, N. Y. M39. MQ. 

Briggs, Mrs. J. E., Jr. (Carlotta Welles). 
2651 Visscher Place. Altadena, Calif. M38. 

Briggs, Janet (Zaph). c/o Fran Szalay. 
IV, Rainergasse 22, Vienna, Austria. (?) 
M30R35. CME. 

Briggs, Dr. Lyman J(ames). Ph.D.. Johns 
Hopkins. 01 ; Sc.D., Michigan State, 32, 
George Washington, 37, Georgetown, 39: 
D.Eng., South Dakota School Mines. 35 ; 
LL.D., Michigan, 36. Dir., Nat. Bur. 
Standards. Washington. D. C. (3208 
Newark St. NW.) M99F01. B. 



296 



Directory of Members 



Briggs, Dr. Thomas H(enry). Ph.D., 

Columbia, 14; Litt.D., Wake Forest, 19. 
Prof, education, Columbia Univ. Teachers 
Col., New York, N. Y. M13F21. Q. 

Briggs, William P. Ph.C, Massachusetts 
Col. Pharmacy, 20. Bacteriologist, Nor- 
wich Pharmacal Co., Norwich, N. Y. 
M37F38. Np. 

Brigham, Carl C(ampbell). A.M., Prince- 
ton, 13; Ph.D., 16. Prof, psychology, 
Princeton Univ.; res. sec. Col. Entrance 
Examination Board, Princeton, N. J.; con- 
sultant. Cooper Union, New York, N. Y. 
M21F25. IQ. 

Brigham, Dr. George Dexter. M.S., Con- 
necticut, 29; Ph.D., Yale. 33. Assoc, 
bacteriologist, U. S. Public Health Serv- 
ice, Albany, Ga. (910 Madison Circle) 

M36F38. N. 

Brigham, (Herbert) Storrs (Jr.). 1026 
President St., Brooklyn, N. Y. M29R32. K. 

Bright, Harold F(rederick). B.A., Lake 
Forest, 37. 1339 Howard Road, Rochester, 
N. Y. M39F40. BAG. 

Bright, James Anglin Marshal. M.A., Ohio 
State, 34. Teacher. High School, Hicks- 
ville, Ohio. M40. CBD. 

Bright, William M(ilton). Louisville 
Municipal Col., Louisville, Ky. M37R37. 
FG. 

Brightman, Dr. Charles L(ewis). A.M., 
Brown, 09; Ph.D., Clark, 15. Prof, physics, 
Syracuse Univ., Syracuse. N. Y. (852 
Ackerman Ave.) M17F31. BQ. 

Brightman, Prof. E(dgar) S(hemeldL 
A.M., Brown, 08: Ph.D., Boston. 12. Prof, 
philosophv and chairman Board Graduate 
School, Boston Univ., Boston, Mass. 
(Newton Center, Mass.) M37. IK. 

Briglia, Dr. Frank Toseph. M.D.. Jefferson. 
819 Wharton St., Philadelphia, Pa. M38. N. 

Brigman, Bennett M"(attingly). M34F34- 
D38. M. 

Brill, Dr. Abraham A(rdenL M.D., 
Columbia, 03. Lecturer, Columbia Univ.; 
consulting physician. Manhattan State 
Hosp. and U. S. Veteran's Hosp. 81, 
New York, N. Y. (15 W. 70th St.) Mi 3- 
F33. NHL 

Brill, George M(ackenzie). M.M.E., Cor- 
nell, 05. Consulting- engineer. Pongh- 
keepsie. N. Y. (19 Kingston Ave.) M02- 
F06. BMP. 

Brill, Prof. Harvey C(la^tonL Ph.D.. 
Michigan. 11. Prof, chemistry and head 
Dept. Miami Univ., Oxford, Ohio. M24- 
F33. CNO. 

Brill, Dr. Kenneth G(ray), Jr. M.S., 
Michigan. 38: Ph.D.. 39. T"str.. Dept. 
Geologv. Univ. Chattanooga, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. M40. EH. 

Brillhart, Russell E(dward). M.Sc, Phila- 
delphia Col. Pharmacy and Science, 39. 



Asst. biological sciences, Philadelphia Col. 
Pharmacy and Science, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Rosemont, Pa.) M36. GNC. 

Brilmyer, Dr. George J(oseph). M.S., 
Michigan, 18; M.D., George Washington, 
25. Assoc, prof, pathology, Georgetown 
Univ. School Med.; assoc. prof, biology, 
Catholic Univ. Amer., Washington, D. C. 
(5132 New Hampshire Ave. NW.) Mi 7- 
F35. FHN. 

Brimhall, Dr. Dean R. A.M., Columbia, 
16; Ph.D., 20. Asst. to chairman, Civil 
Aeronautics Authority; consultant. Works 
Projects Administration, Washington, 
D. C. M18F25. I. 

Brimlow, George F(rancis). M.A., Oregon. 
3019 13th Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn. M38. L. 

Brindley, Dr. Paul. M.D., Texas, 25. 
Prof, pathology, Univ. Texas School Med.; 
pathologist, John Sealy Hosp.; con- 
sultant pathologist, U. S. Marine Hosp.. 
Galveston, Tex. (4306 Sherman Blvd.) 
M40. NQ. 

Brines, Prof. M(oses"> J(ames). M.A., 
New Y'ork. 605 S. 2nd St., Highland Park, 
N. J. M37. IQ- 

Br'nk, Prof. Raymond W(oodardL M.A.. 
Harva-d. 15: Ph.D.. 16. P^of. and chair- 
man Dept. Mathematics. Univ. Minnesota, 
Minneapolis. Minn. (2243 Hoyt Ave., St. 
Paul, Minn.) M31F32. AQB. 

Brink, Dr. R(oyal) A(lexander). D.Sc, 
Harvard 23 Prof, genetics. LTrp'v. Wis- 
consin, Madison. Wis. M23F25. GO. 

Brinkhous, Dr. K(enneth) M(erle). M.D., 
Iowa, 32. Asst. prof, pathology, Univ. 
Iowa; asst. pathologist. Univ. Hosps., 
Towa City, Iowa. M39. NCF. 

Brinklev, Prof. Stuart R^obertL A.M., 
Columbia, 14; Ph.D.. Yale. 20. Assoc, 
prof, chemist'-v. Yale Univ.. New Haven, 
Conn. (334 Yale Ave.) M22F22. C. 

Brinkmeier, Dr. Ina Hill. Laton, Calif. 
M32. L. 

Br-'nlev, Dr. Flo"d J(ohn>. M.A., Penn- 
svlvania. 26; Ph.D.. 27. Assoc, biologist, 
U. S. Pubb'c Health Service, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. M22F31. F. 

Brinsmade, Dr. J(ames) B(eebee). M23- 
F31D36. B. 

Brnsmade, John C(haninL Tr. A.B.. Har- 
vard, i". Asst. agronomist. U. S. Northern 
Great Pla ; ns Field Sta., Mandan, N. Dak. 
M25F32. OG. 

Brinton, Prnf. Paul H(enrv) M(?llet > > 
P(revost). Ph.D.. Minnesota. 16. Prof. 
chemistry. Univ. Southern Califo-nia. Los 
Anpe'es: cons"'ting chemist, Pasadena, 
Calif. M17FTO. C. 

Briod. An-lre ECdo-'ardV B S.. Lp'isanne, 
10. Technical dir.. Vitamin Div., Nat. Oil 
Products Co., H-"- ;< =on. N. J. (22 Van 
Pevner Place, Belleville, N. J.) M39. 
CON. 



Individual Members 



297 



Briscoe, Dr. Charles Francis. M.A., Illi- 
nois, 05; Ph.D., 12. Prof, bacteriology, 
Mississippi State Col.; chief bacteriology, 
Mississippi Agric. Exp. Sta., State College, 
Miss. MuFib. GFO. 

Briscoe, Prof. Herman T(hompson). 
Indiana Univ., Bloomington, Ind. M34- 
F34R34. C. 

Bristol, John I(saac) D(evoe). Chap- 

paqua, N. Y. M00R32. F. 

Bristol, Dr. Leverett D(ale). M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 07; D.P.H., Harvard, 18. Health 
dir., Amer. Telephone and Telegraph Co., 

New York, N. Y. M34F34. N. 

Bristow, Dr. Walter J. 15 17 Hampton St., 
Columbia, S. Car. M38R38. N. 

Britt, Prof. Steuart Henderson. M.A.. 
Washington Univ., 32; Ph.D., Yale, 35. 
Asst. prof, psychology, George Washing- 
ton Univ., Washington, D. C. M34F37. IK. 

Brittain, Dr. William H(arold). Dept. 
Entomology, Macdonald College, Que., 
Canada. M11F20R33. F. 

Brittingham, William H(enry). 1509 
Ward Terrace, Portsmouth, Va. M31R35. 
GF. 

Britton, J(ohn) Robert. Hawaiian Electric 
Co., Ltd., Honolulu, Hawaii. M38. MPQ. 

Britton, Max Edwin. M.S., Ohio State, 37. 
Instr., Dept. Botany, Northwestern Univ., 
Evanston, 111. M39. G. 

Britton, Dr. Nathaniel L(ord). MS0F82- 
E33D34. G. Vice president for Section on 
Botany (G), 1896. 

Britton, Prof. S(ydney) W(illiam). M.D., 
McGill, 24. Prof, physiology, Univ. Vir- 
ginia, Charlottesville, Va. M38. N. 

Britton, Dr. Wilton E(verett). M04F06- 
D39. F. 

Briwa, Miss Kathryn E(lizabeth). M.A., 
Columbia, 29. Instr. chemistry, Columbia 
Univ., New York, N. Y. M30. C. 

Broadbent, Miss Bessie M(ay). B.S., 

Pennsylvania State, 16. Asst. entomologist, 
U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant Quar- 
antine. Whittier, Calif. (406 N. Greenleaf 
Ave.) M39. F. 

Broadbent, Dr. B(irdsall) Holly. D.D.S., 
Western Reserve, 19. Dir. Bolton Fund, 
Anatomical Lab., Western Reserve Univ., 
Cleveland. Ohio. (2879 Fontenay Road) 
M27F39. NdHF. 

Broadfoot, W(illiam) C(raig). Dominion 
Lab. Plant Pathology, Univ. Alberta, 
Edmonton, Alta., Canada. M29R32. GO. 

Broadhead, Leone E. State Teachers Col., 
West Chester, Pa. M35R35- 

Broadhurst, Dr. George B. D.D.S., St. 

Louis, 26. Asst. prof, oral surgery, St. 
Louis Univ., St. Louis, Mo. M40. NdL 



Broadhurst, Dr. Jean. M.A., Columbia, 08; 
Ph.D., Cornell, 14. Prof, emeritus bac- 
teriology, Columbia Univ. Teachers Col., 
New York, N. Y. M04F11. GN. 

Brobeck, William M(orrison). M.S., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 33. Res. assoc, 
Radiation Lab., Dept. Physics, Univ. Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley, Calif. (400 Hillside Ave., 
Piedmont, Calif.) M39. MB. 

Brobston, Sister M. Augustina. S.M., New 
York, 10. Head Dept. Chemistry, Col. St. 
Elizabeth, Convent, N. J. M29. CBA. 

Brock, Clarence A(rizona). M.E., Wor- 
cester Polytechnic Inst., 23. Chief en- 
gineer, Rexair, Inc., Detroit, Mich. (17581 
Indiana Ave.) M29. M. 

Brock, Rev. Henry M(atthias). S.J.M.A.. 
Woodstock, 22. Rector, St. Robert's Hall. 
Pomfret Centre, Conn. M06F31. BLQ. 

Brock, Dr. James E(phraim). A.M., In- 
diana, 23; Ph.D., 28. Nebraska State 
Teachers Col., Wayne, Nebr. M34F34- B. 

Brock, Vernon E(ugene). A.B., Stanford, 
35. Fishery biologist, Dept. Res., Oregon 
Fish Commission, Portland, Oreg. M36. 
FEB. 

Brockbank, Dr. T(homas) W(illiam). 
A.M., Catholic, 16; Ph.D., 18; M.D., 
Georgetown, 24. Dir., Catholic Charities 
Guidance Inst., New York, N. Y. M20F25. 
IN. 

Brocke, Dr. (Max Louis Frederick) 
Alfred. M.D., Chicago, 04. 307 Western 
Ave., Muskegon, Mich. Mi 7. N. 

Brockett, Halford E. B.S., Iowa State, 35- 
Chemical engineer, Continental Can Co., 
Inc., Chicago, 111. (5252 N. Kenmore Ave.) 
M39. CM. 

Brockett, Paul. Exec, sec, Nat. Acad. 
Sciences, Washington, D. C. M24. BH. 

Brockman, Dr. Katherine G. M.D., Albany 
Med. Col., 24. Creedmore State Hosp., 
Queens Village, N. Y. M33. NE. 

Brockway, P(aul) L. 1039 S. Topeka Ave., 
Wichita, Kans. M29F32R37. MEB. 

Brode, Dr. H(oward) S(tidham). Ph.D., 
Chicago. 96. Prof, emeritus biology and 
curator Mus., Whitman Col., Walla Walla, 
Wash. (433 E. Alder St.) M10F15. FG. 

Brode, J(ames) Stanley. M.S., Wash- 
ington, 29. Instr. zoology, Santa Monica 
Junior Col., Santa Monica, Calif. (478 
24th St.) M30. FGQ. 

Brode, Dr. Malcolm D(onaldson). Ph.D., 

Chicago, 27. 2001 Allston Wav, Berkeley, 
Calif. M22F33. FG. 

Brode, Prof. Robert B(igham). Ph.D., 
California Inst. Tech., 24. Prof, physics, 
Univ. California, Berkeley, Calif. M36F36. 
B. 

Broder, Dr. Julius. 200 W. 58th St., New 
York, N. Y. M36R37. NI. 



298 



Directory of Members 



Broderick, Dr. Thomas M(onteith). M.S.. 

Wisconsin, 14; Ph.D., Minnesota, 17. 
Chief geologist, Calumet and Heela Con- 
solidated Copper Co., Calumet; special 
lecturer, Michigan Col. Mining and Tech., 
Houghton, Mich. (120 Calumet Ave., 
Calumet, Mich.) M25F25. E. 

Broders, Dr. A(lbert) C(ompton). M.D., 
Med. Col. Virginia, 10; D.Sc, 29; M.S., 
Minnesota, 20. Surgical pathologist, Mayo 
Clinic; prof, pathology, Univ. Minnesota 
Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minn. M39. X. 

Brodie, Dr. Allan G. D.D.S., Pennsyl- 
vania, 19; M.S., Illinois, 34. Prof, and 
head Dept. Orthodontia, Univ. Illinois, 
Chicago, 111. M36. NdH. 

Brodie, Harold J. Dept. Plant Pathology, 
Macdonald College, Que., Canada. M32- 
R35. GF. 

Brodie, Dr. Jessie (Bruce). S.M., Colum- 
bia, 25 ; Ph.D., 30. Prof, household science, 
Univ. Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada. 
M37. CNQ. 

Brodie, Dr. Maurice. (M32F3sR36)M38- 
F35P39. N. 

Brodie, Renton Kirkwood. M.S., Chicago, 
1 1 ; D.Sc, Oregon State, 36. Vice pres. 
charge manufacture, Procter and Gamble 
Co., Ivorydale, Ohio. (3753 Vineyard 
Place, Cincinnati, Ohio) M17F33L37. C. 

Brodie, Dr. S. Steven. M.S., Ph.D., New- 
York. Res. chemist, Jewish Memorial 
Hosp., New York, N. Y. (720 Fort Wash- 
ington Ave.) M40. CNA. 

Brodman, Dr. Henry. M.D., Cornell, 01. 
124 E. 39th St., New York, N. Y. M20. N. 

Brodsky, Dr. Ralph Howard. 205 W. 57th 
St., New York, X. Y. M33R36. N. 

Brody, Dr. A(rthur) L(ouis). Ph.D., Cor- 
nell, 35. Asst. entomologist, U. S. Dept. 
Agric, Panama City, Fla. M37. F. 

Brody, David. 1106 Oliver Ave. X., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. M38R38. I. 

Brody, Dr. Henry. M.D., Rochester, 32. 
Assoc, pathologist, Beth Israel Hosp., New 
York, N. Y. M40. N. 

Brody, Leon. 1 ^82 Shakespeare Ave., Xew 
York, X. Y. M^3R3S- QLI. 

Brody, Dr. Samuel. M.A., California, 19; 
Ph.D., Chicago, 27. Assoc, prof, dairy 
husbandry, Univ. Missouri Col. Agric. 
Columbia, Mo. M23F33. CXO. 

Brogan, Prof. A(lbert) P(erley). A.M., 
Harvard, 12; Ph.D., 14. Prof, philosophy 
and dean Graduate School, Univ. Texas, 
Austin, Tex. M24F31. KI. 

Brogden, Prof. W(ilfred) J(ohn). Ph.D., 

Illinois, 36. Asst. prof, psychology, Univ. 
Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. M39. INK. 

Brokaw, Dr. Raymond Voorhees. M.D., 
Columbia, 15. 1408 Martine Ave., Plain- 
field, X. J. M25F32. X. 



Brolyer, Cecil R(obert). 4108 Spruce St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. M27F33R36. IAQ. 

Bromley, Dr. Henry Walter. M.A., Asbury, 
05, Kentucky, 24; D.D., Asbury, 16; 
Litt.D., McMurry, 32; L.H.D., Taylor, 32. 
Cynthiana, Ky. M39. QD. 

Bromley, Mrs. Stanley W. (Helen Jean 
Brown). M.A., Ohio State, 25; Ph.D., 29. 
Private res., High Ridge Road, Stamford, 
Conn. M31F33. GOQ. 

Bronfenbrenner, Dr. J(acques) J(acob). 
Ph.D., Columbia, 12; D.P.H., Harvard, 19. 
Prof, bacteriology and immunology, Wash- 
ington Univ. School Med., St. Louis, Mo. 
(761 1 Wydown Blvd., Clayton, Mo.) 
M17F23. X. 

Bronk, Prof. Detlev W(ulf). M.S.. Mich- 
igan, 22; Ph.D., 26; Sc.D., Swarthmore, 
.17. Dir., Eldridge Reeves Johnson Founda- 
tion and Inst. Xeurology; prof, biophysics 
and neurology and vice dean for neu- 
rologv, Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 
Pa. (Media, Pa.) M23F31. BN. 

Bronson, Barnard Sawyer. State Col. 
Teachers, Albany, X. Y. M17F33R39. C. 

Bronson, Charles Hotchkiss. Copperhill, 
Tenn. M38R38. MCP. 

Bronson, Dr. Howard L(ogan). Ph.D., 
Yale, 04. Prof, physics and head Dept., 
Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, X. S., Canada. 
M07F10. B. 

Bronson, Winthrop F(owler). A.B., Kan- 
sas. 8321 Drexel Ave., Chicago, 111. M39. 
CP. 

Brooke, Prof. W(illiam) E(llsworth). 
M.A., Xebraska, 96. Prof, emeritus mathe- 
matics and mechanics, Univ. Minnesota. 
Minneapolis, Minn. (416 Walnut St. SI-'..) 
M07F10. AMQ. 

Brookes, Dr. Margaret C. Hessler. A.M.. 
Columbia, 17: Ph.D., 27. Asst. prof, home 
economics, Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. 
M27F33. CXK. 

Brooks, Dr. A(lbert) Nelson. Ph.D., Wis- 
consin, 26. Plant pathologist, Florida 
\.gric. Exp. Sta., Lakeland. Fla. (314 
Pueblo Trail) M27F27. G. 

Brooks, Prof. Baylor. A.B., Stanford, 28. 
Vsst. prof, geologv, San Diego State Col., 
San Diego, Calif. (4576 Alice St.) M38. E. 

Brooks, Dr. Benjamin T. Ph.D., Got- 
tingen, 12. Consulting chemical engineer, 
114 E. 32nd St., Xew York, X. Y. (Shore 
Road, Old Greenwich, Conn.) M26F28. C. 

Brooks, Mrs. Betty Watt (Mrs. S. T. 
Brooks). Carnegie Mus., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
M34F34R34. G. 

Brooks, Dr. Chandler McC(uskey). Ph.D., 
Princeton, 31. Assoc physiology, Johns 
Hopkins Univ. School Med., Baltimore, 
Md. M36F38. XT. 

Brooks, Dr. Charles. A.M., Missouri, 08. 
Principal pathologist, U. S. Bur. Plant In- 
dustry, Washington, D. C. M03F13. G. 



I N D I V I DUAL M E M BERS 



299 



Brooks, Dr. Charles E(dward). M34F34- 
D36. A. 

Brooks, Prof. Charles F(ranklin). A.M.. 
Harvard, 12: Ph.D., 14. Prof, meteorology 
and dir. Blue Hill Meterological Observa- 
tory, Harvard Univ., Milton, Mass. M12- 
F18. HI'.. 

Brooks, Dr. Fowler D(ell). DePauw Univ., 
Greencastle, Iml. M24F25R34. TQ. 

Brooks, Prof. Frank G(ary). M.A.. Okla- 
homa, 22; Sc.D.. Johns Hopkins, jo. Prof, 
biology, Cornell Col.. Mt. Vernon, Iowa. 
M22F33. F. 

Brooks, Dr. Frederick A(ugustus). D.Sc, 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech.. 20; M.E., Illi- 
nois. 2- . Agric. engineer, California Agric. 
Exp. Sta.; assoc. prof, agric. engng., Univ. 
California, Davis, Calif. (50 College Park) 
M34F34. M. 

Brooks, Harvey. 732 Yale Station. \>\\ 
Haven, Conn. M.?;R.?7. BA. 

Brooks, Hysell Marsch. M.Sc. Ohio State, 

30. Graduate student. Univ. Washington. 
Seattle, Wash. (3875 43rd St. NE.) M39. 
CMF. 

Brooks, Prof. J. Ansel. M.E., Yale, 02. 
Prof. industrial engng., Newark Col. 
Engng.. Newark, N. J. (561 Hark Ave.. 
Muntclair, N. J.) M04F15. M. 

Brooks, James S(tanley). A.B., Indiana, 

31. Graduate asst. Dept. Botany, Cornell 
Univ.. Ithaca. N. Y. M38. G. 

Brooks. Dr. John D(avid). Wilson Col.. 
Chambersburg, Pa. M25R32. QI. 

Brooks, Dr. Lee M(arshall). A.M.. North 
Carolina, 26; Ph.D.. 20. Assoc, prof. 
sociologv, Univ. North Carolina. Chapel 
Hill. N. Car. M36. KIH. 

Brooks, Margaret Hoover (Margaret E. 
Hoover). 120 Catherine St.. Ithaca, N. Y. 
M35R38. F. 

Brooks, Maurice (Graham). M.S., West 
Virginia, 34. Asst. prof, forestry. West 
Virginia Univ.. Morgantown, W. Va. (322 
Brockway Ave.) M31. GF. 

Brooks, Melvin (Leon). 2915 Yost Place 
XK., Washington, D. C. M39R30. C. 

Brooks, Stanley T(ruman). Carnegie 
Mus.. Pittsburgh. Pa. M34F34R34. F. 

Brooks, Prof. S(umner) C(ushing). Ph.D.. 
Harvard. 16. Prof, zoology. Univ. Cali- 
fornia. Berkeley. Calif. M18F27. FGN. 

Brooks, Dr. William P(enn). M89F16D38. 
GO. 

Broomall, Miss Laura B(aker). Rural De- 
livery, Glenn Mills, Pa. M29R35. G. 

Brophy, Byron J. M.A., Michigan, 23. 
Supt., Indian Vocational School and 
Agency, Flandreavt, S. Dak. M38. QIK. 

Brophy, Dr. Dorothy H. Ph.D.. Michigan, 
20. 737 Shadowlawn Drive, Westfield, 
X. J. M31F33. C. 



Brosey, Charles L. A.M.. Indiana, 20. 
Head Dept. Physics, Arsenal Technical 
Schools, Indianapolis, Iml. (4034 Carroll- 
ton Ave.) M32. B. 

Brosnan, Dr. Cornelius J. 624 Deakin 
Ave., Moscow, Idaho. M34R34. LKE. 

Brossard, E(ugene) E(dward). A.B.. Wis- 
consin. 19. Mene Grande Oil Co.. Caracas. 
Venezuela, S. A. M36. EM. 

Brotemarkle, Robert A(rchibald). A.M.. 
Princeton. 18; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 23. 
Assoc, prof, psychology and Col. person- 
nel officer, Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. M34F34. 1. 

Brough. Dr. Glen A(mos). M.D., Illinois, 
24. 1402 David Whitney Bldg., Detroit. 
Mich. M40. NC. 

Brougher, Dr. John C. A.M.. Oregon, 27: 
M.D., 28. 320 W. 25th St., Vancouver, 
Wash. M29F33. NFG. 

Brouse, Dr. Don. M.S., Wisconsin, 25; 
Ph.D., 31. Chemical engineer, Forest 
Products Lab.. Madison, Wis. M32F33. 
CMO. 

Brousseau, Miss Kate. M14F32D38. IN. 

Browman, Dr. Ludvig G(ustav). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 35. Asst. prof.. Dept. Zoology. 
Univ. Montana. Missoula, Mont. (527 
Plymouth St.) M36. FNC. 

Brown, Dr. Aaron. M.D., Cornell, 06. Asst. 
clinical prof, medicine, New York Univ. 
Col. Med.. New- York, N. Y. M27. N. 

Brown, Albert Turney. 78 Carleton St.. 
East Orange. N. J. M31. MBA. 

Brown, Alfred (Sloan). LL.B., North- 
eastern. 28. Attorney ami counselor at 
law. Everett. Mass. (34 Mansfield St.) 
M39. C. 

Brown, Dr. Alice L(enore). M.A., Kan- 
sas. 20; Ph.D., Cornell, 20. Special res.. 
U. S. Dept. Agric. Graduate School, 
Washington, D. C. ( 1855 Ontario Place 
NW.) (M2oF33R36)M 4 oF33. FCN. 
Brown, Andrew W(ilson). 1232 E. 57th 
St.. Chicago, 111. M33F33R33. I. 

Brown, Miss Auval (Hester). M.S., Chi- 
cago, 29. 512 S. 6th St.. McAlester, Okla 
M29. G. 

Brown, Prof. Bancroft H(untington). 
Ph.D.. Harvard, 22. Prof, mathematics. 
Dartmouth Col.. Hanover. N. H. (7 Rip- 
ley Road) M24F33. A. 

Brown, Barnum. Sc.D.. Lehigh, 34- Cura- 
tor \mer. Mus. Natural History, New 
York, X. Y. M28F31. EFH. 
Brown, Prof. B(enjamin) A(rthur). M.S.. 
Wisconsin, 28. Assoc, agronomist, Univ. 
Connecticut, Storrs, Conn. M31F32. OCG. 

Brown, Mrs. Bonnie Hudson (Bonnie L. 
Hudson). M.A., Tennessee, 30. Asst. prof. 
biology, Maryville Col., Maryville, Tenn. 
(234 Indiana Ave.) ( M34F34R34 > M30F34. 
G. 



300 



Directory of Members 



Brown, C. Bradner. M.S., Kansas. 4001 
Garrow St., Houston, Tex. M39. BEA. 

Brown, Dr. Calvin S(mith). D.Sc, Van- 
derbilt, 92; Ph.D., Colorado, 99. Prof, 
modern language, Univ. Mississippi; 
archaeologist, State Geol. Survey, Uni- 
versity, Miss. M04F11. HEL. 

Brown, Carl R. 161 7 Brooklyn Ave., Ann 
Arbor, Mich. M22F33. I. 

Brown, Dr. Carlton E(rnest). M.S., Le- 
high, 29; S.D., Harvard, 31. Chemist, U. S. 
Bur. Mines, Pittsburgh, Pa. M33F38. 
CXB. 

Brown, Dr. Cecil L(angford). M.A., Mis- 
souri, 22; Ph.D., Brown, 29. Dir., Esso 
Labs., Standard Oil Co. Louisiana, Baton 
Rouge, La. (305 Beverly Drive) M30F33. C 

Brown, Charles E(dward). M.A., Emory, 
33. Instr. anatomy, Emory Univ. School 
Med., Emory University, Ga. M40. NFG. 

Brown, Dr. Charles L(eonard). M.D., 
Oklahoma, 21. Prof, medicine and head 
Dept., Temple Univ. School Med. and 
Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. (325 N. Bowman 
Ave., Merion, Pa.) M29F38. N. 

Brown, Prof. Charles Wilson. A.M., 
Brown, 01. Prof, geology, Brown Univ., 
Providence, R. I. (37 Barnes St.) M04- 
F09. E. 

Brown, Dr. Chester T(imothv). 102 X. 
6th Ave., New Brunswick, N. J. M23R36. N. 

Brown, Miss Clara M(aude). M.A., Co- 
lumbia, 22. Prof, home economics educa- 
tion. Univ. Minnesota, Univ. Farm, St. 
Paul, Minn. (1570 Vincent St.) M34F40. 
QIK. 

Brown, Dr. Clarence William. Dept. Psy- 
chology, Univ. California, Berkeley, Calif. 
M32F33R34. IX. 

Brown, Dr. Claude P. Dir. Biol. Labs.. 
Nat. Drug Co.; owner and dir.. Clinical 
and Pathological Labs., 1930 Chestnut 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. M24. CN. 

Brown, Miss Constance L(orraine). M.S., 
Cornel!. 26. Instr. chemistry, Univ. Ver- 
mont, Burlington, Vt. (196 Howard St.) 
M29. CNQ. 

Brown, Prof. Dalton Milford. M.S., Ten- 
nessee. 26; Ph.D., Duke, 39. Prof, biology, 
State Teachers Col.. Johnson City, Tenn. 
(204 Boyd St.) M35F35. G. 

Brown, D(enton) J(acobsL Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 18. Prof, chemistry. Univ. Nebraska. 
Lincoln, Nebr. (3033 Georgian Court) 
M29F33. C. 

Brown, Ed°;ar. Ph.B.. Union, 95. Princi- 
pal botanist, Div. Cereals, U. S. Bur. 
Plant Industry, Washington, D. C. (Lan- 
ham, Md.) M02F11. G. 

Brown, Dr. Edgar D(ewight). Paynes- 

ville, Minn. M08F11R37. N. 



Brown, Edward Fisher. 22 E. 40th St., 
Xew York, X. Y. M32R36. KNO. 

Brown, Edward J(ohnson). M17F33D34. F. 

Brown, Dr. Eleanor. M.A., Edinburgh, 
17; Ph.D., Radclitfe, 22. 7 Riplev Road, 
Hanover, N. H. M24F38. A. 

Brown, Dr. Elizabeth D(orothy) W(uist) 
(Mrs. Forest B. H. Brown). A.M., Mary- 
ville, 10; M.S., Michigan, 09; Ph.D., 12. 
Bishop Mus., Honolulu, Hawaii. M18F21. G. 

Brown, Dr. Elmer Ellsworth. M06F07D34. 
Q. Vice president for Section on Education 
{ L), 1907. 

Brown, Ernest W(illiam). M03F06D38. 
DAB. Vice president for Section on Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy (A), 1909. 

Brown. Eugene Price. 844 Rush St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (?) M29R33. MCE. 

Brown, Dr. F(ay) C(luff). A.M., Illinois, 
06; Ph.D., Princeton, 08. Curator, Dept. 
Physics, Mus. Science and Industry, Chi- 
cago. 111. (5830 Stony Island Ave.) M05- 
Fn. B. 

Brown, Florence (See Mrs. Florence B. 
Charlton). 

Brown, Dr. Forest B(uffen) H(arkness). 
M.S., Michigan, 03; Ph.D.. Yale, 18. 
Bishop Mus., Honolulu, Hawaii. M13F32. G. 

Brown, Prof. Frank Arthur, Jr. M.A., 
Ph.D., Harvard, 34. Asst. prof, zoology, 
Xorthwestern Univ., Evanston, 111. M34- 
F38. FG. 

Brown, Prof. F(rank) E(merson). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 18. Prof, chemistry, Iowa State 
Col.. Ames, Iowa. (138 Hyland Ave.) 
M22F25. CQB. 

Brown, Frankl'n B. M.A., Columbia. 33. 
Instr., Dept. Chemistry, City Col., New 
York, X. Y. (17 Lexington Ave.) M40. 
CBA. 

Brown, F(rederick') Marf'n. Head Science 
Dent.. Fountain Vallev School; lecturer 
anthropology, Colorado Col., Colorado 
Springs, Colo. M28F33- FHN. 

Brown, George A(lfred). 306 E. Walnut 
St., Bloomington, 111. M07F31. Q. 

Brown, Dr. George H(arold). M.S., Wis- 
consin. 31; Ph.D., 33. Res. engineer, 
RCA Mfg. Co.. Camden. N. J. (500 Chews 
Landing Road, Haddonfield, N. J.) M39. 

MBA. 

Brown. Dr. George H(endf>r*on). M.D., 
Yale, 36. Asst. instr. radiology. Univ. 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. M31F32. 
XMQ." 

Brown, G(eor° r e'> Lf-'ncolnL M.S.. Mis- 
souri, 93: Ph.D., Chicago. 02. Acting 
pres., dean faculty, and dean gen. science. 
Smith Dakota State Col., Brookings, c 
Dak. M05F07, ADB. 



Individual Members 



301 



Brown, George R(omaine). B.S., Earl- 
ham, 20. bupt. engng., Western Electric 
Co., Kearny, i\. J. 1U30. MBC. 

Brown, Giles Edwin. Hill School, Potts- 
town, ±'a. {.:) M32K32. tiUC. 

Brown, Dr. Glenn V(inton). Ph.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 10. 312 E. luam bt., Mechanics- 
burg, ha. luojno. CMB. 

Brown, Grover C(harles). M.C.E., Cor- 
nell. 09. In charge Industrial Relations 
Div., Arrier. iron and Steel Inst., 350 
Fifth Ave., New York, N. i'. (1090 Cum- 
bermead Koad, Paiisade, N. J.) M22. MK. 

Brown, H. Fletcher. A.M., Harvard, 92; 
D.Sc, Delaware, 30. Vice pres., E. I. du 
Pont de Nemours and Co., Wilmington, 
Del. M34I34. C. 

Brown, Prof. Harold Chapman. Dept. 
Philosophy, Stanford University, Calif. 
M24 1-20X36. Q. 

Brown, Harold C(hester). A.M., Colum- 
bia, 29. Psychologist, 432 E. 66th St., New 
York, N. V. M32. IKy. 

Brown, Dr. Harold P(robert). M.A., Mis- 
souri, 30; Ph.D., Nebraska, 33. Assoc, 
prof, chemistry, Univ. Kansas City, Kan- 
sas City, Mo. (,5207 Wayne Ave.) M36. C. 

Brown, Dr. H(arry) B(ates). A.M., In- 
diana, 07; Ph.D., Cornell, 10. Res. prof, 
agronomy, Louisiana Agric. Exp. Sta., 
University, La. (4601 Vanderbilt Drive, 
Baton Rouge, La.) M08F11. GO. 

Brown, Dr. H(arry) P(hilip). M.A., Cor- 
nell, 10; Ph.D., 14. Prof, wood technology, 
New York State Col. Forestry, Syracuse, 
N. Y. M13F16. G. 

Brown, Helen J. (Mrs. Stanley W. Brom- 
ley). 

Brown, H(enry) Emmett. 110 Morning- 
side Drive, New York, N. Y. M29R33. 
QBC. 

Brown, H(erbert) Eugene. M.A., Emory, 
37. Teaching asst. zoology, Univ. Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley, Calif. (522 Thomaston 
St., Barnesville, Ga.) M40. F. 

Brown, Dr. H(oward) D(exter). M.S., 
Illinois, 17; Ph.D., Michigan State, 27. 
Prof, vegetable gardening, Ohio State 
Univ.; assoc. res., Ohio Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Columbus, Ohio. M24F27. OG. 

Brown, Hubert M(cClure). Dept. Farm 
Crops, Michigan State Col., East Lansing, 
Mich. M2 4 F3iR3S- O. 

Brown, Hylton R(oller). M.E., Pennsyl- 
vania State, 23. Senior engineer, U. S. 
Dept. Agric, Washington. D. C. (9410 2nd 
Ave., Silver Spring, Md.) M39. MO. 

Brown, Miss Ina Corinne. A.B.. Chicago. 
Assoc, specialist social studies, U. S. Of- 
fice Education. Washington, D. C. (1830 
K St. NW.) M3S. HK. 



Brown, Dr. Ira. M.D., Oklahoma, 32. 1210 
h. liyde laiK Blvd., Chicago, 111. M40. N. 

Brown, J. Calvin. 704 S. Spring St., Los 
Angeles, Cant. 1SI32. M. 

Brown, Dr. James A. Lister Bldg., St. 
Louis, Mo. M30K36. N. 

Brown, Dr. James A(lbert). 402 Med. Arts 
Bidg., .Houston, Tex. AI36R36. NI. 

Brown, Prof. J(ames) G(reenlief). M.S., 
Chicago, 17; Ph.D., 20. Head Dept. Plant 
Patnoiogy, Univ. Arizona; plant pathol- 
ogist, Arizona Agric. Exp. Sta., Tucson, 
Ariz. (1733 E. 6th St.) M17F20. GO. 

Brown, Dr. J(ames) Howard. M.S., Har- 
vard, 09; Ph.D., 17; Sc.D., Illinois Col., 
29. Assoc, prof, bacteriology, Johns Hop- 
kins Univ., Baltimore, Md. (.27 Merry- 
mount Road) M18F33. FN. 

Brown, James M(anfred) D(ouglas). 
Chief chemist, Revere Sugar Refinery, 
Charlestovvn, Mass. M39. CMP. 

Brown, John A(lexander). B.A., Minne- 
sota, 30. Minnesota Mining Mfg. Co., St. 
Paul, Minn. M38. ECF. 

Brown, Dr. J(ohn) MacKenzie. M.D., 
Western Ontario, 99. Clinical prof, sur- 
gery, Univ. Southern California, Los 
Angeles, Calif. (526 S. St. Andrews Place) 

M17. N. 

Brown, John Wilson. B.M.E. Supervisor 
Purcnasnig Dept., Westinghouse Electric 
and Mfg. Co., East Pittsburgh, Pa. (207 
Woodside Road, Forest Hills, Wilkins- 
burg, Pa.) Mi 3. 

Brown, Prof. Joseph G(rant). A.M., Stan- 
ford, 03. Prof, emeritus physics, Stan- 
ford University, Calif. (1182 Arch St., 
Berkeley, Calif.) M10F16. B. 

Brown, Dr. (Joshua Robert) Callaway 
(Jr.). Ph.D., Virginia, 38. Res. chemist, 
Bell Telephone Labs., New York, N. Y. 
(4154 75th St., Jackson Heights, N. Y.) 
M39- CB. 

Brown, Julius A(rthur). A.M., Dartmouth, 
04. American Univ., Beirut, Syria. M08- 
F23. DB. 

Brown, Miss Keith. A.M., Columbia. 21 
E. 10th St., New York, N. Y. M38. FGQ. 

Brown, Dr. Lawrason. M0SF11D37. N. 

Brown, Dr. L(awrence) Wayne (worth). 
41 10 Cherokee Drive, Madison, Wis. M34- 
R35. ONG. 

Brown, Dr. L(eland) A(rthur). Transyl- 
vania Col., Lexington, Kv. M31F33R36. 
FN. 

Brown, Dr. Levi S(tanley). M.S., Okla- 
homa, 28 : Ph.D., Massachusetts Inst. 
Tech.. 3-;. Res. petrographer, Lone Star 
Cement Corp., Hudson, N. Y. M36F36. E. 



Brown, Lewis J. 304 Wood St. 
burgh, Pa. M35R35. 



Pitts- 



3Q2 



Directory of Members 



Brown, Miss Lillian Olive. M.A., Colum- 
bia, 14. Prof, mathematics. Hood Col.. 
Frederick. Md. M24F33. ADB. 

Brown, Linwood A(rnold). 819 S. Lime- 
stone St., Lexington, Ky. M08F11R32. C. 

Brown, Prof. L(ynn) T(urner). Dept. Me- 
chanical Engng., Iowa State Col., Ames, 
Iowa. M28F30. M. 

Brown, Dr. Madelaine R(ay). M.A., 
Brown, 23; M.D., Johns Hopkins, 27. 
Asst. neurology, Massachusetts Gen. 
Hosp., Boston, Mass. (43 Linnaean St., 
Cambridge, Mass.) M24F38. NI. 

Brown, Dr. Marion. Univ. High School, 
Oakland, Calif. M37~&37- IKQ. 

Brown, Dr. Mary Jane. Dept. Zoology, 
Univ. Wyoming, Laramie, Wyo. M30F33- 
R38. FG. 

Brown, Miss Maud A(nna). M.S., Iowa, 
10. Dir. health education, State Board 
Health, Helena, Mont. (M27R34)M36. 
NQF. 

Brown, Miss Mildred W(oodward). M.S.. 
Iowa, 24. Instr., Univ. Missouri, Colum- 
bia, Mo. M28. N. 

Brown, Milton Theodore. B.S., Michigan 
State, 34. Oiler, Power and Pumping Div., 
Springwells Sta., Detroit Dept. Water 
Supplv, Dearborn, Mich. (4404 Vermont 
Ave., Detroit, Mich.) M37. M. 

Brown, Dr. Muriel W(hitbeck). M.A., 
Stanford, 24; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 26. 
1 33 1 S. Delaware Ave., Tulsa, Okla. M28. 
INF. 

Brown, Miss Nellie A(dalesa). A.B., Mich- 
igan. Assoc, pathologist, U. S. Bur. Plant 
Industry. Washington, D. C. M08F16. G. 

Brown, Prof. Nelson C(ourtlandt). New 
York State Col. Forestry, Syracuse, N. Y. 
M31F32R32. O. 

Brown, Prof. Olin T(eeter). Colgate Univ., 
Hamilton, N. Y. M34F34R35. E. 

Brown, Dr. Oliver L(eonard) I(nman). 
M.S., Iowa, 33; Ph.D., California, 36. 
Instr. chemistrv, Univ. Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, Mich. (1015 Church St.) M38. C. 

Brown, Col. Orville G., U.S.A. 2017 E. 
3rd St., Tucson, Ariz. M36R39- NIK. 

Brown, Dr. Paul A. Ph.D., Pittsburgh. 
Instr. psychology, Univ. Pittsburgh, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. (400 McCargo St., New Kens- 
ington, Pa.) M35. I. 

Brown, Paul D. Methodist Hosp., In- 
dianapolis, End. M38R38. CNG. 

Brown, Prof. Percy Edgar. M14F16D37. 
O. Secretary of Section on Agriculture (O), 
1921-35; vice president, 1936. 

Brown, Dr. Rachel Fuller. M.S., Chicago, 
21 ; Ph.D., 33. Senior biochemist, Div. 
Labs, and Res., New York State Dept. 
Health, Albanv, N. Y r . (419 Manning 
Blvd.) M35. NC. 



Brown, Dr. Ralph L(yman). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago. 17. Dir. res., Pennslvania Salt Mfg. 
Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. (2 Crest Lane, 
Swarthmore, Pa.) M22F33. C. 

Brown, Reynolds D (river), Jr. Engineer 
charge Patent Dept., Philco Corp., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. (1527 Spruce St.) M37. MBA. 

Brown, Prof. Richard E(dmund). New 
York Univ.. Univ. Heights, New York. 
X. Y. M34F34R38. M. 

Brown, Dr. Robert H(eath). M.A., Clark, 
33; Ph.D., 35. Asst. prof. exp. psychology, 
Clark Univ., Worcester, Mass. M37. I. 

Brown, Prof. Robert M(arshall). A.M., 
Harvard, 02. Prof, economic geography 
and geology, Rhode Island Col. Educa- 
tion, Providence, R. I. (West Barring- 
ton, R. I.) M99F1 1. E. 

Brown, Robert V(enable). M.S., Emory, 
28; Ph.D., Chicago, 40. Asst. prof, physi- 
ology and pharmacology, Michigan State 
Col., Fast Lansing, Mich. M37. NpF. 

Brown, Dr. Roland W(ilbur). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 26. Geologist, L T . S. Geol. 
Survey, Washington, D. C. M26F32. E. 

Brown, Prof. Russell G(uy). M.S.. West 
Virginia, 30; Ph.D., Maryland, 34. Asst. 
prof, botany, Univ. Maryland, College 
Park, Md. ( M32R33)M 3 sF39. G. 

Brown, S. Melvin. Asst. chemist, Univ. 
California Citrus Exp. Sta., Riverside, 
Calif. (3448 Strong St.) M31. C. 

Brown, Dr. Samuel. M.D., Tennessee, 11. 
Asst. prof, roentgenology, Univ. Cincin- 
nati Col. Med.; dir. X-ray Dept., Jewish 
Hosp., Cincinnati, Ohio. M18. N. 

Brown, S(amuel) R(ollins). Box 1156, 
Johannesburg, S. Africa. M36R39- MKE. 

Brown, Prof. S(impson) Leroy. M.A., In- 
diana, 07; Ph.D., California, 09. Prof, 
physics and chairman Dept., Univ. Texas, 
Austin, Tex. M17F27. B. 

Brown, Dr. Theodore Henry. A.M., Yale, 
ii- PhD., 13. 25 Meadow Way, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. M18F18. AP. 

Brown, Thomas D. M.S., Virginia, 34. 
Graduate student, Univ. Virginia, Char- 
lottesville, Va. (513 Ridge St.) M39- FG. 

Brown, Col. Thomas F. Vice pres., Nat. 
Distillers Products Corp., New York, 
N. Y. (130 E. 75th St.) M33. CM. 

Brown, Dr. Thomas Richardson. M.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 97. Assoc, prof, medicine, 
Johns Hopkins Univ.; physician-in- 
charge, Gastro-intestinal Clinics, Johns 
Hopkins Hosp., Baltimore, Md. (14 Whit- 
field Road) M34F34- N. 

Brown, (Thomas) Townsend. 733 Adair 
Ave., Zanesville, Ohio. M28R36. B. 

Brown, Victor (Robert). Ontario Veteri- 
nary Col.. Guelph, Out., Canada. M36R37. 
NFO. 



Individual Members 



3°3 



Brown, Dr. Wade Hampton. M.D., Johns 
Hopkins. 07. Rockefeller Inst. Med. Res.. 
Princeton, N. J. M11F15. X. 

Brown, Dr. Wade Lynn. Ph.D., Texas, 37. 
2838 San Gabriel St.. Austin, Tex. M38. 
[Q. 

Brown, Col. Walter James. LL.M., Chi- 
cago Law School, 98. Bursar, Exec. Sec. 
and lecturer social science, Univ. Western 
Ontario. London, Ont., Canada. (1006 
Wellington St.) M38. KEO. 

Brown, Prof. Warner. M.A., California, 
06; Ph.D., Columbia, 08. Prof, psychol- 
ogy, Univ. California, Berkelev, Calif. 
M08F11. I. 

Brown, Dr. William Adams. 3041 Broad- 
way. New York, N. Y. M06R38. KQ. 

Brown, William E(llwood). 762 Hamilton 
St., Lancaster, Pa. M35R36. O. 

Brown, Dr. William E(ustis). M.D., Har- 
vard. 20. Assoc, prof, preventive medicine, 
Univ. Cincinnati Col. Med.; med. dir.. 
Committee Maternal Health; med. con- 
sultant. Med. Milk Commission, Cincin- 
nati. Ohio. (2423 Ingleside Ave.) M40. N. 

Brown, Prof. William F(uller), Jr. Ph.D.. 
Columbia, ^7. Asst. prof, physics, Prince- 
ton Univ., Princeton, N. J. M29F40. BAM. 

Brown. Dr. William Henry. M08F15L20- 
D39. G. 

Brown, Dr. William Moseley. A.M., Wash- 
ington and Lee, 15; A.M., Columbia, 22: 
Ph.D., 23. Personnel dir. Vick Chemical 
Co..; dir. Vick School Applied Merchan- 
dising. New York, X. Y. (12 Gainsbor- 
ough Road. Scarsdale, X. Y.) M20F25. 
IIIQ. 

Brown, Williamson) J(ames). M.S., 
Oklahoma A. and M., 24. Senior entomol- 
ogist, Div. Entomology. Dominion Dept. 
Agric, Ottawa, Ont., Canada. M34F34. FG. 

Brownback, Dr. J. Harold. Sc.D., Ursinus, 
38. Prof, biology. Ursinus Col., College- 
ville. Pa. (600 Main St., Trappe. Pa.) 
M27. F. 

Browne. Arthur S. M10D39. MI'. 

Browne, Prof. A(rthur) W(esley). Cor- 
nell Univ., Ithaca, X. Y. M34E34R34. C. 

Browne, Dr. C(harles) A(lbert). M.A., 
Ph.D.. Gottingen, 02; D.Sc. Williams, 24, 
Stevens Inst. Tech.. 25. Supervisor res.. 
U. S. Bur. Agric. Chemistry and Engng., 
Washington, D. C. (3408 Lowell St. NW.) 
M02F09. C. Vice president for Section on 
Chemistry (C), 193 1- 

Browne, Dr. Frederick L(incoln). M.S.. 
Wisconsin, 20; Ph.D., 21. Senior chemist. 
I'. S. Forest Products Lab., Madison, Wis. 
(119 Ash St.) M21F25. CB. 

Browne, Herbert Janvrin. M30D36. BDE. 



Browne, Dr. John S(ymonds) L(yon). 
M.D.. McGill, 29; Ph.D., .^2. Asst. prof. 
medicine and lecturer pathological chem- 
istry, McGill Univ., Montreal, Que., Can- 
ada. M39. X. 

Browne, Dr. Louise McDanell. A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 12; Ph.D., Yale. 17- 34o8 Lowell 
St. NW., Washington, D. C. M13F16. C. 

Browne, Patrick. Mt. Union Col., Alliance, 
Ohio. ( ?) M29R32. F. 

Browne, Ralph C. 123 Federal St., Salem, 
Mass. M30. 

Browne, Prof. William Hand, Jr. B.E.. 
Johns Hopkins, 27. State College Sta., 
Raleigh, N. Car. M23F28. QMB. 

Browne, William J(ames). M.S., Illinois. 
39. Educational dir., Joseph E. Seagram 
and Sons, Inc., Lawrenceburg, Ind. (111 
Berkeley Ave.. Peoria. 111.) M39- CBD. 

Browne, William M(alcolm). 3710 34th 
St. NW., Washington, D. C. M34F34- 
R36. D. 

Browne, Dr. William W(ard). A.M.. 
Brown, 00: Ph.D., 12. Prof, biology. Col. 
City Xew York, Xew York. X. Y. M21- 
F21. N. 

Browned, Dr. W(illiam) A(rthur). A.M.. 
Chicago, 2,y. Ph.D., 26. Prof, educational 
psychology, Duke Univ., Durham. X. Car. 
M31F32. QIK. 

Brownng, Charles (Armstrong). M.A., 
Chicago. 2918 Linden Ave., Knoxville, 
Tenn. M39. QB. 

Browning, Dr. Harold W(illiam). M.S.. 
Wisconsin. 1 <> : Ph.D., 20. Prof, botanj 
and dir. graduate studies, Rhode Island 
State Col., Kingston, K. I. M20F33. CC. 

Browning, Prof. Philip E(mbury). M24- 
Fo 3 D 3 7- C. 

Browning, Dr. William. M.D., Leipzig, Si. 
Prof, emeritus neurology and psychiatry. 
Long Island Med. Col., Brooklyn, X. Y. 
(54 Lefferts Place) M03F06. NLI. 

Brownlee, Dr. R(oy) H(utchison). Ph.D.. 
Chicago, 06. Pres. and dir.. R. H. Brown- 
lee Lab., 22i 4th Ave.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
M29F33. COM. 

Brownlow, Louis. LL.D., American, 38. 
Dir., Public Administration Clearing 
House, Chicago. 111. I 5805 DorchesH-i 
Ave.) M38F40. K. 

Brownson, Dr. E(dward) Ray. 912 Roose- 
velt Bldg.. Los Angeles. Calif. M33R37- 
NMC. 

Brownstein, Benjamin. =,17 4th St., Ell- 
wood City. Pa. M25. MPA. 

Broxon, James William. M.A.. Minnesota. 
20; Ph.D., 26. Prof, physics. LTniv. Col- 
orado, Boulder. Colo. M23F28. B. 

Broyles, Ralph. 7 hi E. nth St., Blooming- 
ton, hid. M39. C. 



3<H 



Directory of Members 



Brozek, Dr. Artur. M25D34. G. 

Brubaker, Dr. Elber R(obert). M.D., Cin- 
cinnati, 08. Radiologist, Rickley Memorial 
Hosp.; anaesthetist, Springfield City 
Hosp., Springfield, Ohio. M17. N. 

Brubaker, Dr. Howard W. 1929 Leaven- 
worth St., Manhattan, Kans. M26F33R34. C. 

Brubaker, Dr. M(erlin) M(artin). M.S.. 
Illinois, 26; Ph.D., 27. Res. supervisor, du 
Pont Exp. Sta., Wilmington, Del. (Linda- 
mere) (M33R 34 )M39. CNF. 

Bruce, Donald. 1205 Terminal Sales Bldg., 
Portland, Oreg. M12F16R32. O. 

Bruce, Prof. Edwin M (orris). 2108 N. 
10th St., Terre Haute, Ind. M29F33R34. 
CBQ. 

Bruce, Dr. Gordon M(urphy). M.D..C.M., 
Dalhousie, 25; D.Ophth., Oxford, 28; 
Sc.D., Columbia, 34. Assoc, ophthalmol- 
ogy, Columbia Univ. Col. Physicians and 
Surgeons; asst. attending surgeon, Pres- 
byterian Hosp., New York, N. Y. ; con- 
sulting eye surgeon, Englewood Hosp., 
Englewood, N. J., and Dover Gen. Hosp., 
Dover, N. J. M37. N. 

Bruce. Dr. Harold A(sa). M.S.. Pitts- 
burgh, 32; Ph.D., 35. Assoc, prof, biology, 
Geneva Col., Beaver Falls, Pa. (Oakville 
Road) M37. FGQ. 

Bruce, Miss Katherine L(ouise). M.A.. 
Wellesley, 31. Instr., High School, Brook- 
line, Mass. (28 Stanton Road) M40. GNF. 

Bruce, O(scar) C(layton). M.S., Kansas 
State, 23. U. S. Soil Conservation Service, 
Upper Darby, Pa. M32F33. OC. 

Bruce, Prof. Robert E(rnest). A.M., Har- 
vard, 11; Ph.D., Boston, 12. Prof, mathe- 
matics, Boston Univ., Boston, Mass. M08- 
F15. A. 

Bruce, Prof. Robert H(all). M.A., Cali- 
fornia. 29; Ph.D., Ohio State, 32. Prof, 
psychology and chairman Dept., Univ. 
Wyoming, Laramie, Wyo. (1303 Park 
Ave.) M32. I. 

Bruce, Prof. William F(ausset). A.M., 
Wesleyan, 28; A.M., Harvard, 29; Ph.D.. 
31. Asst. prof., Dept. Chemistry, Cornell 
Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. (Pine Tree Road) 
M35F35. CNB. 

Bruckner, Prof. J(acob) Herbert. Ph.D., 
Cornell, 35. Asst. prof, poultry husbandry, 
Cornell Univ.. Ithaca, N. Y. M35F40. OF. 

Brueckner, Dr. Herman J(acob). Dept. 
Dairy Industry, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, 
N. Y. M32R37. CO. 

Brueckner, Dr. Leo J. M.A., Ph.D., Iowa. 
3339 Holmes Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 
M39F40. Q. 

Bruening, Dr. E(dward) H(enry). 620 
Citv Nat. Bank Bldg.. Omaha, Nebr. M24- 
R32. N. 



Brues, Prof. Charles T(homas). M.S., 
Texas, 02. Prof, entomology, Harvard 
Univ., Cambridge, Mass. (397 South St., 
Forest Hills, Boston, Mass.) M04F06. FN. 

Brueske, George A(lbert). Engineer, Bell 
and Howell Co., Chicago, 111. (2216 Lunt 
Ave.) M40F40. BGD. 

Bruger, Dr. Maurice. M.Sc, McGill, 29; 
M.D..C.M., 29. Chief, Div. Pathological 
Chemistry, New York Post Graduate 
Hosp.; asst. clinical prof, medicine, Co- 
lumbia Univ., New York Post Graduate 
Med. School, New York, N. Y. M39. NC. 

Bruman, Henry J(ohn). A.B., California 
Los Angeles, 35. Instr. geography, Penn- 
sylvania State Col., State College, Pa. M40. 
EH. 

Brumbaugh, Dr. Arthur S(t. Clair). A.M., 

Gettysburg, 02; M.D., Pennsylvania, 02. 
Pathologist, Mercy Hosp., Altoona ; Na- 
son Hosp., Roaring Spring, Pa. (1312 
nth St., Altoona, Pa.) M31. N. 

Brumbaugh, I. V. 4931 Daggett Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. M39R39. C. 

Brumbaugh, Miss Zula B(ernice). B.S., 
Carnegie Inst. Tech. Instr. chemistry, 
Georgetown Visitation Convent, Wash- 
ington, D. C. M40. CBF. 

Brumfiel, Dr. D(aniel) M(ilton). M.A., 
Illinois, 13; Ph.D., Univ. Iowa, 17; M.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 24. Physician; instr., 
Trudeau School Tuberculosis, Saranac 
Lake, N. Y. (22 Catherine St.) M16F33. N. 

Brumfield, Dr. William Andrew. M17F33- 
D— . N. 

Brumley, Dr. Oscar Victor. D.V.M., Ohio 
State, 97. Dean, Col. Veterinary Med., 
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. (2815 
Cambridge Blvd.) M40. N. 

Brumm, Prof. John Lewis. M.A., Michi- 
gan, 06. Prof, journalism and head Dept.. 
Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. (19 16 
Cambridge Road) M37. KQ. 

Brummer, Harold M. 25 Broadway. New 
York, N. Y. M40. 

Bruner, David K(enneth). 201 Elm Ave., 
Swarthmore, Pa. M33R33. K. 

Bruner, Dr. Frank G. 5435 Magnolia Ave., 
Chicago, 111. M05F11R39. INQ. 

Bruner, Dr. H(enry) L(ane). Ph.D., Frei- 
burg, 96; Sc.D., Butler, 32. Prof, emeritus 
zoology. Butler Univ., Indianapolis, Ind. 
(324 S. Ritter Ave.) M01F06. F. 

Bruner, Richard C. B.S.. Montana State. 
31. Dir. Labs., Chappel Bros., Inc., Rock- 
ford, 111. (21 18 Princeton Ave.) M39. CN. 

Bruner, Stephen C(ole). Estacion Agro- 
nomica, Santiago de las Vegas, Havana, 
Cuba. M17F23R35. FG. 

Bruner, W(illiam) E(dward). State Teach- 
ers Col., Kearney, Nebr. M30R32. FG. 



Individual Members 



305 



Brunet, Dr. Walter M(inson). M.D., Med. 
Col. Virginia, 11. Chief staff and dir. 
Urological Div., Public Health Inst., Chi- 
cago, 111. (1014 Sheridan Road, Evanston, 
111.) M40. NK. 

Brunjes, Dr. Austin S(chiffer). M.Sc, 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Inst., 31; Ph.D., 
Vale, 35. Process design engineer, Lum- 
mus Co., New York; adjunct prof, chem- 
ical engng., Brooklyn Polytechnic Inst., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (33 Clarkson Ave, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y.) M38. CM. 

Brunn, Dr. Harold. M.D., Pennsylvania, 
95. Clinical prof, surgery and dir. Thor- 
acic Clinic, Univ. California School Med.; 
chief staff, Mt. Zion Hosp. ; chief surgery, 
San Francisco Hosp., San Francisco, 
Calif. M21. N. 

Bruno, Frank J(ohn). A.B., Williams, 99; 
S.T.B., Yale, 02. Dir., George Warren 
Brown Dept. Social Work, Washington 
Univ., St. Louis, Mo. M29F36. KH. 

Brunquist, Dr. Ernest H(erman). A.M., 
Michigan, 20; Ph.D., Stanford, 23. Asst. 
prof, physiology and pharmacology, Univ. 
Colorado School Med., Denver, Colo. 
(1364 Ash St.) M20F33. FNp. 

Brunschwig, Dr. Lily A.M., George Wash- 
ington, 30; Ph.D., Columbia, 36. Asst. 
prof, psvchology, Fisk Univ., Nashville. 
Tenn. (928 17th Ave., North) M38. IQK. 

Brunson, Dr. Arthur M(axwell). M.S., 
Illinois, 19; Ph.D., Cornell, 23. Agrono- 
mist, U. S. Bur. Plant Industry; assoc. 
botanv, Purdue Agric. Exp. Sta., La Fay- 
ette, Ind. (815 N. Grant St., West La- 
fayette, Ind.) M22F25. FGO. 

Brunson, Marvin H(oward). Moores- 
town, N. J. M29R37. F. 

Brunswick, Dr. David. Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 24. 1401 S. Hope St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. M28F31. IN. 

Brussel, Dr. James A(rnold). M.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 29. Senior asst. physician and 
chief female reception service, Pilgrim 
State Hosp., Brentwood, N. Y. M38. NI. 

Brussock, Raymond J. 908 S. 19th St., 
Milwaukee, Wis. M33R33. 

Brussolo, V(ito) A. M.S., California, 22. 
Div. mgr., North Camarines Gold Mining 
Co., Paracale, Camarines Norte, P. I. 
M25. M. 

Bruun, Charles A. 1510 Central Ave., Hot 
Springs, Ark. M21R32. BFH. 

Bryan, Dr. Alice I(sabel). 88 Morning- 
side Drive, New York, N. Y. (?) M36- 
R36. IQ. 

Bryan, Dr. Alvin W(esley). D.D.S., Iowa, 
11. Dean, Col. Dentistry, Univ. Iowa, 
Iowa City, Iowa. M33F39. Nd. 

Bryan, A(rthur) A(lfred). M30F31D39. 
OG. 



Bryan, Dr. Edith S. 1419 Walnut St., 
Berkeley, Calif. M31. IKN. 

Bryan, Edwin H(orace), Jr. M.S., Hawaii. 
24. Curator collections, Bishop Mus., 
Honolulu, Hawaii. (2721 Ferdinand Ave.) 
M22F33. F. 

Bryan, Elmer J(oseph). A.B., Harvard, 
12. Vice pres., Rafton Labs., Inc., An- 
dover, Mass. (Shawsheen Village) M29. 
CMB. 

Bryan, Dr. George S(mith). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 14. Prof, botany, Univ. Wisconsin, 
Madison, Wis. (2122 Chadbourne Ave.) 
M17F21. G. 

Bryan. Dr. J. L. Xenia, 111. M38R38. N. 

Bryan, John Stewart. M.A., Virginia, 93. 
LL.D., Richmond, Ohio, Charleston, Dart- 
mouth; Litt.D., Washington and Lee, 11. 
Pres. and publisher, News Leader, Rich- 
mond, Va. ; pres.. Col. William and Mary, 
Williamsburg, Va. ("LaBurnum," Rich- 
mond, Va.) M30. 

Bryan, Prof. Kirk. Ph.D., Yale, 20. Assoc, 
prof, physiography, Harvard Univ., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. (71 Washington Ave.) M24- 
F25. EH. Vice president for Section on 
Geology and Geography (E), 1939- 

Bryan, Dr. Mary de Garmo. Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia. Assoc, prof, household arts, Co- 
lumbia LIniv. Teachers Col., New York, 
N. Y. M40. Q. 

Bryan, Miss Mary Katherine. 3609 Nor- 
ton Place NW., Washington, D. C. Mi 3- 
F25R34. G. 

Bryan, T(homas) J(oseph). 4100 Fillmore 
St., Chicago, 111. M25F25R35. C. 

Bryan, William A(lanson). 142 S. Hay- 
worth Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. M05F08- 
R39. EF. 

Bryan, Dr. William Lowe. M.A., Indiana, 
86; LL.D., 37; Ph.D., Clark, 92; LL.D.. 
Illinois Col., 04, Hanover, 08, Notre Dame, 
17, Michigan, 18, Pittsburgh, 22, Clark, 
30, Evansville, 37; L.H.D., Ohio, 32. 
Pres. emeritus, Indiana Univ., Blooming- 
ton, Ind. M00F00. IK. 

Bryan, Dr. William Ray. Ph.D., Vander- 
bilt, 31. Res. assoc, Dept. Surgery, Duke 
Univ. School Med., Durham, N. Car. (311 
W. Trinity Ave.) M38F38. N. 

Bryan, Dr. W(illiam) Thomas. M.A., Yale, 
36; Ph.D., 37. Asst. prof, education, Univ. 
Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii. M40. QKI. 

Bryans, Prof. William R(emington). M.E., 
New York, 09. Asst. dean. Col. Engng., 
and prof, engng. mechanics, New York 
Univ., Univ. Heights, New York, N. Y. 
(15 Circle Drive, Hastings on Hudson, 
N. Y.) M24F31. MQ. 

Bryant, Dr. Alice Gertrude. M.D., 
Woman's Med. Col. New York, 00. 405 
Marlborough St.. Boston, Mass. Mi 7. 
NMK. 



306 



Directory of Members 



Bryant, A(rthur) P(eyton). M34F34D35. 



Bryant. Mrs. Carrie Kirk. M28F39D39. 
XFQ. 

Bryant, Mrs. Dora. M.S., Purdue. Clarks- 
liill, Ind. M38. FGQ. 

Bryant, Prof. Earle Ruskin. Muskingum 
Col., New Concord, Ohio. M17R33. FG. 

Bryant, Edward Schier. M.F., Harvard. 
07. Harvard Club, Boston, Mass. M08. E. 

Bryant, Dr. Edwin F(rancis). Ph.D., 
Heidelberg, 29. Res. chemist, California 
Fruit Growers Exchange, Corona. Calif. 
(1144 Vicentia St.) M31F38. CEX. 

Bryant, Emory A(ddison). M33D35. X. 

Bryant, Prof. Ernest C(alvin). Sc.D., Mid 
dleburv, 2,?. Middlebury Col., Middlebnry, 
Vt. M08F10. BD. 

Bryant, Frank L(averne). 466 E. 17th St., 
Brooklyn, X. Y. M34F34R35. E. 

Bryant, Dr. Harold C(hild). M.S., Po- 
mona, 10; Ph.D., 13. Supt., Grand Canyon 
Nat. Park, Grand Canyon Ariz M11F16 
FGQ. 

Bryant, Jay C(larke). B.S., Pennsylvania 
State. 32. Junior soil technologist, I'. S. 
Soil Conservation Service, New York 
State Agric. Exp. Sta., Geneva, X. Y. ( 572 
Castle St.) M38. OEC. 

Bryant, Prof. J(ohn) M(yron). M.S.. Illi- 
nois, 11. Prof, electrical engng. and head 
Dept., Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, 
Minn. (1430 Raymond Ave.. St. Paul. 
Minn.) M30E32. MQ. 

Bryant, Dr. Louise Stevens. Ph.D., Penn- 
sylvania. 14. isNo Midland Ave.. Bronx- 
ville. X. Y. M13F33. IXQ. 

Bryant, M(onroe) D(avid). M.S., Illinois, 
31. Prof, zoology, Schreiner Inst., Kerr- 
ville, Tex. M40. FGQ. 

Bryant, Owen. Box 403s. Tucson, \riz. 
M04F06L10. EX. 

Bryant, Prof. Ralph C(lement). M14F25- 
D39. MK. 

Bryant, WilEam L(etchworth). Dir., Park 
Mus.. Providence, R. I. M23F25. EHF. 

Brykczynski, C. H. 413 Park Ave., Brook- 
lyn. X. Y. M34R34. CGB. 

Bryngelson, Dr. Bryng. M.A., Iowa, 26; 
Ph.D., 31. Assoc, prof, speech and dir. 
Speech Clinic. Univ. Minnesota, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. M32F33. NIQ. 

Bryson, Miss Gladys (Eugenia). M.A., 
California, 27; Ph.D., 30. Assoc, prof, 
sociology, Smith Col., Northampton, 
Mass. M38. Kill. 

Bryson, James (McCrae) F(leming). Box 
230, Harland, Ky. M36R36. M. 



Bryson, Lyman. M.A.. Michigan. 15. Prof, 
education. Columbia Univ. Teachers Col.. 
New York. X. Y. M39F40. KHQ. 

Bryson, Vernon. M.A., Columbia. 36. 
Graduate student, Columbia Univ., New 
York. X. Y. M38. E. 

Buc, Hyym E(lias). B.S., Col. City New 
York, 01. Res. chemist, Standard Oil De- 
velopment Co., Bayway, X. J. (620 Locust 
St., Rosellc, X. J.) M28F32. C. 

Buch, Dr. Miguel A. Santoe. San Lazaro 
009, Habana, Cuba. M39. XPC. 

Buchanan, Dr. Archibald Ray. M.D.. 
Iowa, 33; M.S., Northwestern, 37. Assoc, 
prof, anatomy, Univ. Colorado School 
Med., Denver, Colo. (1100 Colorado 
Blvd.) M36F38. X. 

Buchanan, Dr. B(enjamin) F(ranklin). 
Ph.D.. Iowa State. Res. chemist, Tech- 
nical Service Div., Amer. Maize Products 
Co., Xew York, X. Y. M40. C. 

Buchanan, E(dward) F. B.Sc, Case, 01. 
Consulting chemist, 11416 Longwood 
Drive, Morgan Park, Chicago, 111. M08. 
CM. 

Buchanan, George R. U. Apartado 80, 
Manzanillo, Cuba. M17. M. 

Buchanan, Prof. H(erbert) E(arle). A.M.. 
Chicago, 03; Ph.D., 09; LL.D., Arkansas. 
28. Prof, mathematics, Tulane Univ., Xew 
Orleans, La. M21F23. AD. 

Buchanan, Dr. J(ames) William. Ph.D.. 
Chicago, 21. Prof, zoology, Xorth western 
Univ., Evanston, 111. M18F25. F. 

Buchanan, L(eonard) B(rown). S.B., 
Massachusetts lust. Tech., 93. Exec, 
Stone and Webster Inc., Boston, Mass.; 
chairman Board Dirs., Chicago, Wilming- 
ton and Franklin Coal Co., Chicago, 111. 
(io Bennett St., W'oburn. Mass.) M17. 
PM. 

Buchanan, Dr. R(obert) E(arle). M.S.. 
Iowa State, 06; Ph.D., Chicago. 08. Dir., 
Iowa Agric. Exp. Sta., dean Graduate 
Col., prof, and head Dept. Bacteriology, 
Iowa State Col.. Ames, Iowa. M11F13. 
XCiO. 

Buchanan, Rupert R(ochester). M.A., 
Bishops, 30. Vocational consultant, 57 
Bloor St. W., Toronto, Out., Canada. ( [9 
Nanton Ave.) M40. I. 

Buchanan, William D(avid). M.A., Chi- 
cago. SS'i Vernon Ave., St. Louis. Mo. 
M36. Q". 

Bucher, Prof. Walter H(erman). Ph.D., 
Heidelberg, 11. Head Dept. Geology, 
Univ. Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. M16- 
F21. E. Vice president for Section on Urol- 
ogy and Geography (E), 193S. 

Buchholtz, Dr. W(alter) F(rederick). 
M.S., Iowa State, 30; Ph.D., 35- Instr. 
botany, Iowa State Col.; res. asst. plant 
pathology, Iowa Agric. Exp. Sta., Ames, 
Iowa. (2906 Wood St.) M40E40. GO. 



I individual Mem bers 



307 



Buchholz, Dr. Alexander M. B.S., Illinois. 
37; M.S., M.D., 40. Interne. Cook County 
tlosp.. Chicago, 111. (5625 Kenmore Ave.) 
M40. X. 

Buchholz, Prof. John T(heodorc). M.S.. 
Chicago, 14: Ph.D., 17. Prof, botany and 

lu-ad Dept., Univ. Illinois. Urbana, 111. 
M 17K21. G. Secretary of Section on Botani- 
cal Sciences (G), iQ.17 — • 

Buchler, Dr. Clifford C(harles). Town- 
send Hotel. Casper. Wyo. M25F33R39. C. 

Buchman, Dr. Edwin R. S.M., Massachu- 
setts Inst. Tech., 25; Dr.Phil.Nat., Frank- 
furt, ,?,;. Res. assoc, Crellin Lab., Cali- 
fornia Inst. Tech.. Pasadena, Calif. M38. C. 

Buchman, Dr. Joseph, t W. 85th St.. New 
York, X. V. M36R37. N. 

Buchner, Carl Frank. 2101 Missouri Pa- 
cific Bldg.. St. Louis. Mo. M36R36. EMK. 

Buchsbaum, Dr. Ralph (Morris). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 3,2. Instr. zoology, Univ. Chi- 
cago. Chicago, 111. M32. FNA. 

Buchta, J. W(illiam). Ph.D., Minnesota. 
25. Prof, and chairman Dept. Physics, 
Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
(2271 Hoyt Ave. \\\. St. Paul, Minn.) 
M24F30. BA. 

Buck, Prof. A(lonzo) Morris. E.E., Illi- 
nois, 17. Engng. editor. "Transit Journal." 
McGraw-Hill Pub. Co., Inc., New York. 
X. Y. (714 Livingston Road. Elizabeth, 
X. J.) M07F15. M. 

Buck, Prof. F(rank) E(benezer). Univ. 
British Columbia, Vancouver. B. C, Can- 
ada. M23R32. OGC. 

Buck, Fred. M29L37D— . 

Buck, Harold W(inthrop). E.E., Colum- 
bia. Vice pres., Viele Blackwell and Buck, 
19 Rector St.. New York, N. Y. M18F31.M. 

Buck, Dr. Peter H(enry). M.D., Xew 
Zealand, 10; M.A., Yale, 36; D.Sc, New- 
Zealand, 37, Rochester, 39. Prof, anthro- 
pology, Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn.; 
dir. Bishop Mus., Honolulu, Hawaii. M37- 
F38. TL 

Buck, Dr. Solon J(ustus). M.A., Wiscon- 
sin. 05; Ph.D., Harvard, 11. Dir. publica- 
tions. Nat. Archives; lecturer Amer. his- 
torv. Amer. Univ., Washington, D. C. 
(3508 Rittenhouse St. NW.) M34F34. L. 
Vice president for Section on Historical and 
Philological Sciences (L), 1934. 

Buckell. E(dward) R(onald). B.A., Cam- 
bridge, 11. Etomologist charge Kamloops 
office Field Crop Insect Investigations in 
British Columbia, Dominion Entomologi- 
cal Lab., Kamloops, B. C, Canada. M23- 
F33. F. 

Buckingham, Dr. B(urdette) R(ose). 
\.M., Wesleyan. 00; Ph.D., Columbia, 13. 
Educational editor, Ginn and Co., Boston, 
Mass. (128 Edmunds Road. Welleslej 
Hills, Mass.) M08F31. QI. 



Buckingham, Fisher A(urelius). 3136 
Lewiston Ave., Berkeley, Calif. M25. 
KM P. 

Buckingham, Dr. Guy E(merson). M.A., 
Washington and Jefferson, 26; Ph.D., 
Northwestern, 30. Assoc, prof, education. 
Allegheny Col.. Meadville, Pa. (378 
Meadow St.) M39. Q. 

Buckley, Dr. Albert C(oulson). M17F33- 
D39. N. 

Buckley, Dr. Oliver E(llsworth). Ph.D., 
Cornell, 14; D.Sc. Grinnell, 36. Exec, vice 

tires., Bell Telephone Labs., Xew York, 
X Y. M22F25. B. 

Buckman, Harry O(liver). M.S., Iowa 
State, 08; Ph.D., Cornell, 12. Prof, soil 
technology, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. 
(118 Wait' Ave.) M18F22. GO. 

Buckman, Dr. S(tanley) J(oseph). Ph.D., 
Minnesota. Head Res. Dept.. Amer. Creo- 
soting Co., Louisville, Ky. M40. COG. 

Buckner, Dr. Chester A(rthur). Ph.D., 
Columbia. 18. Prof, education, Univ. Pitts- 
burgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. M20F31. QIK. 

Buckner, Dr. G(arrett) Davis. Kentucky 
Agric Exp. Sta., Lexington, Ky. M21- 
F32R32. C. 

Buckstaff, Ralph N(oyes). Pres. board, 
Oshkosh Public Mus.. ( )shkosh, Wis. (405 
Washington Blvd.) M25. HFD. 

Buckstein, Dr. Jacob. M.D.. Cornell, 15. 
Visiting roentgenologist, Bellevue Hosp., 
New York; consultant gastroenterology, 
Central Islip Hosp.. Central Islip, N. Y. 
M34. N. 

Bucky, Prof. Philip B(arnett). E.M., 
Pennsylvania State, 26. Assoc, prof, min- 
ing, Columbia Univ., New York, N. Y. 
( Larchmont Acres. Larchmont, X. Y.) 
M32F33. BM. 

Buddhue, John Davis. 99 S. Raymond 
Ave., Pasadena, Calif. M40. CD. 

Buddington, Prof. A(rthur) F(rancis). 
Ph.D., Princeton. 16. Prof, geology and 
chairman Dept., Princeton L T niv., Prince- 
ton, N. J. (178 Prospect Ave.) M28F31. E. 

Budington, Prof. Robert A(llyn). M.A.. 
Williams. 99; Sc.D., 20. Prof, zoology. 
Oberlin Col.. Oberlin, Ohio. Mo2Fio. F. 

Budnitz, Dr. Edward. M.D., Harvard. 32. 
Asst. medicine, Harvard Univ. Med. 
School and Beth Israel Hosp., Boston; 
asst. cardiologist, Worcester City Hosp., 
Worcester, Mass. (356 Salisbury St., Wor- 
cester, Mass.) M40. N. 

Buehler, Dr. Calvin A. Ph.D., Ohio State, 
22. Prof, chemistry, Univ. Tennessee, 
Knoxville, Tenn. M35F35. CPE. 

Buehler, H(enry) A(ndrew). M.A., Wis- 
consin, 01; D.Sc, Missouri, 25. State 
Geologist, Missouri Geol, Survey, Rolla, 
Mo. L11F13. E. 



3 o8 



Directory of Members 



Buehrer, Prof. T(heophil) F(rederic). 
M.A., Texas, 18; Ph.D., California, 21. 
Prof, agric. chemistry and chairman Dept. 
Agric. Chemistry and Soils, Univ. Ari- 
zona; physical chemist, Arizona Agric. 
Exp. Sta., Tucson, Ariz. (2715 E. 5th St.) 
M22F31. CO. 

Bueker, Elmer D. Senior High School, 
University City, Mo. M31R32. FGE. 

Buel, Miss Eva I(rene). M.Sc, Iowa State, 
34. Extension nutritionist, Purdue Univ., 
La Fayette, Ind. (.237 Sheetz St.) M40. 
CNO. 

Buel, Prof. Jack. Ph.D., California, 35. 
Asst. prof, psychology, Wesleyan Univ., 
Middletown, Conn. M38F38. IH. 

Buell, Prof. Harold D. M.S., Syracuse, 20. 
Asst. prof, chemistry, Syracuse Univ., 
Syracuse, N. Y. (142 Clarke St.) M34F34. C. 

Buell, Jesse H(oward). M.F., Yale, 24. 
Assoc, silviculturist, Appalachian Forest 
Exp. Sta., Asheville, N. Car. M27F28. O. 

Buell, Dr. Mary V(an Rensselaer). Ph.D., 

Wisconsin, 19. Assoc, medicine, Johns 
Hopkins Univ. School Med. and Johns 
Hopkins Hosp., Baltimore, Md. M40. N. 

Buell, Dr. Murray F(ife). Ph.D., Minne- 
sota, 35. Asst. prof., Dept. Botany, North 
Carolina State Col., Raleigh, N. Car. M35- 
F39. G. 

Bues, Harry W(illiam, Jr.). M.S.. Pur- 
due. 309 W. Maple St., Wabash, Ind. 
M40. QIA. 

Bueso (Sanllehi), Facundo. M.S., Chi- 
cago. Univ. Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, 
P. R. M38. BAC. 

Bugbee, (Lucian) Willis (Jr.). M.S., Pur- 
due, 22; M.A., Oxford, 25. Patent lawyer, 
Barthel and Bugbee, Detroit, Mich. (1002 
Kensington Road, Grosse Pointe, Mich.) 
M34F34. B. 

Bugbee, Dr. Robert E(arl). Ph.D., In- 
diana, 36. Asst. prof, zoology. Fort Hays 
Kansas State Col., Hays, Kansas. (402 
Ash St.) M38. F. 

Buggs, Dr. C(harles) W(esley). M.S., 
Minnesota, 32; Ph.D., 34. Dillard Univ., 
New Orleans, La. M39. FN. 

Buhrmester, Miss Catherine (Caroline). 
M.S., Illinois. 1810 W. Jackson Blvd., Chi- 
cago, 111. M39. CN. 

Buice, Dr. W. Alfred. M34F34D38. FN. 

Buie, Dr. Bennett Frank. M.S., Lehigh; 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard. Geologist, Indian 
Oil Concessions, Ltd., Karachi, India. 
M40. EQ. 

Buie, Dr. Louis A(rthur). M.D., Mary- 
land, 15. Chief Dept., Mayo Clinic; prof. 
surgery, Univ. Minnesota Mayo Founda- 
tion Med. Education and Res., Rochester, 
Minn. (720 10th Ave. SW.) M40. N. 



Buie, Dr. T(homas) S(tephen). M.S., 

Iowa State, 27; Ph.D., 28; Sc.D., Clemson, 
37. Regional conservator, U. S. Soil Con- 
servation Service, Spartanburg, S. Car. 
M38F40. OE. 

Bulger, Dr. Harold A(ten). M.D., Har- 
vard, 20. Asst. prof, medicine, Washing- 
ton Univ., St. Louis, Mo. M28F33. NH. 

Bulger, Dr. J(acob) W(ork). U. S. Horti- 
cultural Sta., Beltsville, Md. M25F33R35. 
FC. 

Bull, Miss Adelaide W(illcox). 47 Mont- 
clair Ave., Montciair, N. J. M34R34. BDC. 

Bull, Anders (Henrik). 250 Hudson St., 
New York, N. Y. M17R39. B. 

Bull, Henry. Southern Forest Exp. Sta., 
348 Baronne St., New Orleans, La. M31- 
R32. OG. 

Bull, Dr. Henry B. M.S., Minnesota, 28; 
Ph.D., 30. Asst. prof, biochemistry, North- 
western Univ. Med. School, Chicago, 111. 

M35F35. c. 

Bull, R(obert) A(lexander). M17F31- 

D37. M. 

Bull, Dr. Thomas M(arcus). M23D— . N. 

Bull, Dr. Titus. M.D., University and 
Bellevue, 94. Pres., James H. Hyslop 
Foundation, Inc., Q24 West End Ave., New 
York, N. Y. M18. N. 

Bullard, Dr. H(erbert) Hays. A.M., Mis- 
souri, 09; Ph.D., Tulane, 12; M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 16. Pathologist and dir. labs., 
St. Vincent's Hosp., Erie, Pa. M12F27. N. 

Bullard, Prof. Ralph H(adley). M.A., 
Clark, 18; Ph.D., Brown, 25. Prof, chem- 
istry, Hobart Col., Geneva, N. Y. M21F33. C. 

Buller, Dr. A(rthur) H(enry) Reginald. 
Ph.D., Leipzig, 99; D.Sc, Birmingham, 
03, Pennsylvania, 33; LL.D., Manitoba, 
24, Saskatchewan, 28; D.L., Calcutta, 38. 
Prof, emeritus botany, Univ. Manitoba, 
Winnipeg, Man., Canada. M22F25. G. 

Bullington, Dr. W(alter) E(dward). M.S., 
Tennessee, 22; Ph.D., Kansas, 25. Prof, 
biology, Randolph-Macon Col., Ashland, 
Va. M26F33. F. 

Bullis, Col. H(arold) Edmund. M.E., Cor- 
nell, 09. Exec, officer Nat. Com. Mental 
Hygiene and sec. Com. Res. Dementia 
Praecox, Rockefeller Center, New York; 
lecturer education, Hofstra Col., Hemp- 
stead, N. Y. (60 Summit Road, Port 
Washington, N. Y.) M38. EK. 

Bullitt, Dr. James B(ell). A.M., Washing- 
ton and Lee, 95; M.D., Virginia, 97. Prof. 
pathology, Univ. North Carolina, Chapel 
Hill, N. Car. M05F25. NH. 

Bullitt, W(illiam) Marshall. LL.B., Louis- 
ville, 95. Senior partner, Bruce and Bul- 
litt, Louisville, Ky. ("Oxmoor.") M27F38. 
DAB. 



Individual Members 



309 



Bullock, Dr. Dillman Samuel. M.Agr., 
Michigan State, 11; M.S., Wisconsin, 20; 
D.Sc, Pacific, 39. Dir., Escuela Agricola 
"El Vergel," Angol, Chile, S. A. M24. 
OFH. 

Bullock, James Edwin. Williams Col., 
Williamstown, Mass. M37R37. QIH. 

Bullock, Prof. Jesse L. A.M., Harvard, 
28; Ph.D., 32. Prof, organic chemistry, 
Clark Univ., Worcester, Mass. M39. C. 

Bullock, William E(dward). M.E.. Lon- 
don, 10. Consulting engineer, 65 Univer- 
sity Place, New York, N. Y. (M17F28- 
R33)M 39 F28. M. 

Bullowa, Dr. Jesse G(odfrey) M. M.D., 
Columbia, 03. Clinical prof, medicine, 
New York Univ. Col. Med.; visiting phy- 
sician, Harlem Hosp. and Willard Parker 
Hosp., New York, N. Y. M17F28. N. 

Bullwinkel, J. Treadwell. Pres., Phosphate 
Mining Co., New York, N. Y. (803 E. 17th 
St., Brooklyn, N. Y.) M36. M. 

Bumpus, Dr. Herman C(arey). Ph.D., 
Clark, 91; LL.D., 09; Sc.D., Tufts, 05, 
Brown, 05. Duxbury, Mass. M34F08. FQ. 

Bumstead, Dr. Charles H(eath). Ph.D., 
Illinois, 38. Asst. prof, psychology, Univ. 
Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. M39. IKP. 

Bunch, Dr. C(ordia) C. M.A., Iowa, 17; 
Ph.D., 20. 4915 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, 
Mo. M29F31. INB. 

Bunch, Marion E(stel). A.M., Washing- 
ton Univ., 26; Ph.D., Chicago, 34. Assoc, 
prof, psychology, Washington Univ., St. 
Louis, Mo. M30F33. IN. 

Bundick, Miss Harriet Ellen. A.M., 
George Washington, 33. Teacher, Langley 
Junior High School, Washington, D. C. 
"(1465 Columbia Road NW.) M29F31. 
QFD. 

Bunim, Dr. Joseph J. M.D., New York, 
30; Sc.D., 38. Instr. medicine, New York 
Univ. Col. Med.; asst. physician, Belle- 
vue Hosp., New York, N. Y. M39. N. 

Bunker, Prof. John W(ymond) M(iller). 
A.M., Brown, 10; Ph.D., 12. Prof, bio- 
chemistry and physiology; in charge 
course biophysics and biol. engng. ; dir., 
Biol. Res. Labs., Massachusetts Inst. 
Tech., Cambridge, Mass. (17 Locust St., 
Belmont, Mass.) M27F33. CN. 

Bunney, Dr. W(illiam) E(dward). M.S., 
Illinois, 25; Ph.D., 27. Dir., Biol. Produc- 
tion, E. R. Squibb and Sons, New Bruns- 
wick, N. J. M39. NC. 

Bunting, Dr. C(harles) H(enry). M.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 01. Prof, pathology, Univ. 
Wisconsin; pathologist, Wisconsin Gen. 
Hosp., Madison, Wis. (2020 Chadbourne 
Ave.) M07F09. N. 

Bunting, E(lmer) N(ewman). Ph.D.. Chi- 
cago, 18. Assoc, chemist. Nat. Bur. Stand- 
ards, Washington, D. C. (3726 Windom 
Place NW.) M22F22. BC. 



Bunting, Dr. George Avery. A.M., Wash- 
ington Col., 04; Sc.D., 37. Pres., Nox- 
zema Chemical Co., Baltimore, Md. (4412 
N. Charles St.) M39. CND. 

Bunting, Dr. Henry. M.A., Wisconsin, 34; 
M.D., Harvard, 36. Instr. pathology, Yale 
Univ. School Med., New Haven, Conn. 
M37. NFD. 

Bunting, Dr. Martha. Ph.D., Bryn Mawr, 
95. The Touraine, 16th and Spruce Sts., 
Philadelphia, Pa. M08F33. F. 

Bunting, Dr. R(ussell) W(elford). D.D.S., 
Michigan, 02; D.D.Sc, 07. 916 Church 
St., Ann Arbor, Mich. M24F33. NdQ. 

Bunting, Prof. T(homas) G(ordon). Dept. 
Horticulture, McGill Univ., Montreal, 
Que., Canada. M34F34R37. O. 

Bunton, Paul B. B.S., George Washing- 
ton. Sales representative, Spencer Lens 
Co., Buffalo, N. Y. (1419 H St. NW., 
Washington, D. C.) M32. E. 

Bunts, Dr. Alexander T(aylor). M.D., 
Harvard, 24. Assoc, neurosurgeon, Cleve- 
land Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. (2253 Chat- 
field Drive, Cleveland Heights) M36. N. 

Bunyan, F(rederick) W(illiam). Box 5280, 
Route 9, Sacramento, Calif. M1QR32. 
DHL. 

Bunyan, John. Ph.B., Colorado, 98. Pres., 
Berthoud Nat. Bank, Berthoud, Colo. 
M36. D. 

Bunzell, Dr. Herbert H(orace). Ph.D., 

Chicago, 10. Box 44, Gen. Post Office, 
New York, N. Y. M08F11. G. 

Burack, Benjamin. M.A., Northwestern, 
38. Instr. psychology, Schurz Evening 
Tunior Col., Chicago, 111. (3844 W. 5th 
Ave.) M40. IQ. 

Burbank, W(ilbur) S(wett). M.S., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 20. Senior geologist, 
U. S. Geol. Survev, Washington, D. C. 
M27F31. E. 

Burbidge, Frederick. Newport, Wash. 
Mi 7. MP. 

Burch, Dr. Frank E(arl). 754 Linwood 
Place, St. Paul, Minn. M37R39. N. 

Burch, Dr. George (Edward). M.D., Tu- 
lane, 33. Instr., Dept. Med., Tulane Univ. 
School Med., New Orleans, La. M40. N. 

Burch, Guy Irving. Population Refer- 
ence Bur., Washington Square E., New 
York, N. Y. M31R32. K. 

Burch, Dr. Lewis Jacob. 314 E. Broadway, 

Mt. Pleasant, Mich. M38R38. N. 

Burch, Dr. Mary C(rowell). M.L., Cali- 
fornia, 08; Ph.D., Stanford, 27. Assoc, 
prof, psychology, Mills Col., Oakland, 
Calif. M 3 3F 3 3- I. 

Burch, Prof. Paul R(andolph). M.S., Vir- 
ginia. 27; Ph.D., 30. Prof, biologv, State 
Teachers Col., Radford, Va. M26F33. F. 



3io 



Directory of Members 



Burchard, Edward M(arshall) L(orain). 
Dept. Psychology, Temple Univ., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. M32R38. IKX. 

Burckhalter, Joseph H(arold). Winns- 
boro, S. Car. M37R37. CNM. 

Burckhardt, Dr. Carlos. M34F34D35. E. 

Burda, Francis X(avier). B.S., Catholic. 
14. Teacher, Catholic Univ. Amer., Wash- 
ington, D. C. (3710 13th St. NE.) M28- 
F40. B. 

Burdette, Dr. Robert C(arlton). M34F34- 
D35. F. 

Burdick, Donald L. Albany Med Col., Al- 
bany, N. V. M32R34. FGI. 

Burdick, Dr. H(arold) O(rmand). M.A., 
Wisconsin, 25; D.Sc, Salem, 30. Prof. 
biology and chairman Dept.. Alfred Univ., 
Alfred, X. V. M38. FN. 

Burdick, Orel Z(eno). 1 uo E. 47th St., 
Chicago. 111. M29R34. ABC. 

Burdick, Prof. R(aymond) T(erry). M.S., 
Colorado State, 22. Assoc, economist. 
Colorado State Col.. Fort Collins, Colo. 
M22F24. KO. 

Burdine, Dr. N(athan) T(heodore). Ph.D.. 
Iowa State. Res. physicist, Geophysical 
Service, Inc.. Dallas, Tex. M40. B. 

Burdon, Dr. Kenneth L(ivingston). Sc.M., 
Brown, 20; Ph.D., 22. Consultant, U. S. 
Public Health Service; dir. Special Res. 
Lab., Nat. Inst. Health; asst. prof, im- 
munology and bacteriology, Louisiana 
State Univ. School Med., New Orleans, 
La. M24F33. NFG. 

Burg, Dr. Anton B(ehme). S.M., Chicago, 
28; Ph.D., 31. Asst. prof, chemistry. Univ. 
Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. 
(S47 Exposition Blvd.) M20. CBA. 

Burger, Prof. William H(enry). North- 
western Univ. School Engng., Evanston, 
111. M28F15R30. M. 

Burgess, A(lbert) F(ranklin). M.S., Mass 
achusetts State. 98. Principal entomolo- 
gist, U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant 
Quarantine, Greenfield, Mass. (43 Con- 
gress St.) M04F06. F. 

Burgess, Miss Anne E(dith). A.M., Smith. 
2<>. Curator Geol. Mus. and sec. Dept. 
Geology, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, 
X. I. (116 Livinston Ave.) (M32R33)- 
M38. EH. 

Burgess, Earle Houston. B.S.. Washing- 
ton Univ., 22. Sales mgr., Penberthy In- 
jector Co., Detroit, Mich. M40. BCM. 

Burgess, Dr. Ernest W(atson). Ph.D., 
Chicago. 13. Prof, sociology, Univ. Chi- 
cago. Chicago, 111. (5718 Dorchester Ave.) 
M24F30. K. 

Burgess, Miss (Grace) Dorothy. M.A.. 
Stanford, 26. Instr., Pomona Junior Col., 
1'omona. Calif. M20. GFN. 



Burgess, Prof. Horace T(homas). M11- 
P15L20D39. A. 

Burgess, Louis. LL.B., St. Lawrence, 10. 
Patent attorney, 233 Broadwav. New 
York, X. Y. M23F33. ABC. 

Burgess, Dr. Paul S(teere). M.S., Illi- 
nois, 11; Ph.D., California, 20. Dean, Col. 
Agric. and dir., Agric. Exp. Sta., Univ. 
Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. (2528 E. 4th St.) 
M23F24. OGC. 

Burgess, Perry. Erie Vista, Geneva-on- 
the-Lake, Geneva, Ohio. M36. 

Burgess, Dr. Robert W(ilbur). Western 
Electric Co., Xew York, X. Y. M18F22- 
R37. KA. 

Burget, Prof. G(eorge) E(manuel). M21- 
F27D38. FN. 

Burghart, Lloyd M(eeks). M.A., Maine. 
11. Chief chemist, I 7 . S. Industrial Alco- 
hol Co., Xew York, X. V. (Christie Hill 
Road. Darien, Conn.) M17F32. C. 

Burhoe, Dr. Sumner O(thniel). M.S., 
Kansas State, 26; Ph.D., Harvard, 37. 
Asst. prof, zoology, Univ. Marvland, Col- 
lege Park, Md. M28. F. 

Burington, Prof. Richard Stevens. M.A.. 
Ohio State, 26; Ph.D., 31. Assoc, prof, 
mathematics. Case School Applied 
Science, Cleveland, Ohio. (3550 Antis- 
dale Ave., Cleveland Heights) M^F^S. 
ABM. 

Burk, Prof. Dean. Ph.D., California, 27. 
Assoc, prof, biochemistry, Cornell Univ. 
Med. Col., Xew York, X. Y. ; senior chem- 
ist. Xat. Inst. Health, Bethesda, Md. 
M29F33. CX< ). 

Burk, Dr. Robert E. M.A., Harvard, 23; 
Ph.D., Oxford, 26. Prof, chemistry, West- 
ern Reserve Univ.; res. dir. Standard Oil 
Co. Ohio, Cleveland, Ohio. (3140 Berk- 
shire Road. Cleveland Heights) M40. C. 

Burke, Dr. A(lexander) W(illiam). M.D.. 
Illinois. 00. Hotel Chelsea. Xew York, 
X. Y. M33F38. X. 

Burke, Prof. Frank D. Ch.E., 17. Prof. 
chemistry, John Carroll Univ.; pres.. 
Passivation Products Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. 
1 2625 Dartmoor Road) M34F34. C. 

Burke, Dr. H(arry) E(ugene). Shade Tree 
Insect Lab.. Stanford Universitv, Calif. 
M17F20R33. F. 

Burke, Richard J. 2U)\ Glen View Ter- 
race, Altadena, Calif. (?) M31R39. E. 

Burke, Dr. Stephen P(atrick). M.A.. Co- 
lumbia, 21 ; Ph.D., 22. Visiting prof, chem- 
istry, Columbia Univ., Xew York, X. Y.; 
technical consultant, 1004 Xat. Press. 
Bldg., Washington, D. C. (445 Riverside 
Drive. Xew York. X. Y.) M25F28. CBA. 

Burke, W(illiam) E(dmund). A.B., Stan- 
ford, 07. Consulting chemist, Amer. Pot- 
ash and Chemical Corp., Xew York, X. Y. 
(Box 218, Route 1, Reno, Nev.) M05- 
F25. C. 



Individual Members 



3" 



Burkette, Miss Josephine L(ouise). M.S., 
Northwestern, 34. Instr. biology, Southern 
Seminary and Junior Col., Buena Vista, 
Va. M39. G. 

Burkhardt, Miss Anabel (Pope). A.B., 

Vassar. iSS Madison Ave., Holvoke, Mass. 
M38. P. AC. 

Burkhart, Mrs. B. Le Roy (Elizabeth K. 
Zimmerman). M.A., Brown, 31. Asst., Hull 
Zoological Lab., Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 
111. M35. F. 

Burkhart, Dr. Harvey J(acob). D.D.S., 
Baltimore Col. Dental Surgery, 90; LL.D., 
Rochester, 20; D.Sc, Maryland, 40. Dir., 
Rochester Dental Dispensary; principal, 
Rochester Dental Dispensary School Den- 
tal Hygienists, Rochester, N. Y. M40. Nd. 

Burkhart, Dr. Leland. M.S., New Hamp- 
shire; Ph.D., Chicago. New Jersey Agric. 
Exp. Sta., New Brunswick, N. J. (?) 
M38. G. 

Burkhart, Dr. W(alter) C(linton). D.V.M., 
Ohio State, 16; B.S., Georgia, 32. Prof, 
bacteriology, Univ. Georgia, Athens, Ga. 
M39F40. NOP. 

Burkholder, Dr. Walter H(agemeyer). 
Ph.D., Cornell, 17. Prof, plant pathology, 
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. M18F23. G. 

Burks, Dr. Barbara S(toddard). Ph.D., 
Stanford, 29. Res. assoc. genetics, Car- 
negie Inst. Washington, Cold Spring 
Harbor, N. Y. M39. FIK. 

Burks, Dana, Jr. Box 115, Slatersville, 
R. I. M34F34R35- C. 

Burlage, Dr. Henry M(atthew). M.A., 
Harvard, 21 ; Ph.D., Washington, 27. Prof, 
pharmacy, Univ. North Carolina School 
Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, N. Car. M37F38. 
NpCG. 

Burleigh, John Agnew. 2049 E. Newton 
St., Seattle, Wash. M27. KIQ. 

Burlew, Dr. John S(walm). Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 34. Asst. physical chemist, Geo- 
physical Lab., Carnegie Inst. Washington, 
Washington, D. C. M34. CB. 

Burley, Dr. Benjamin T. 19 High St., 
Worcester, Mass. M08R38. NI. 

Burling, Dr. (Fred) Temple. M.D., Chi- 
cago, 23. Psychiatrist, R. H. Macy and 
Co., New York, N. Y. (605 E. Saddle 
River Road, Ridgewood, N. J.) M36. NIK. 

Burling, Lancaster D(emarest). B.S., Wis- 
consin, 05. Co-worker, Bovs' and Girls' 
Town, Verdon, Va. M0SF15'. EQK. 

Burlingame, Dr. C. Charles. M.D., Gen. 
Med. Col. Chicago, 08. Psychiatrist in 
chief, Neuro-Psychiatric Inst. Hartford 
Retreat, Hartford, Conn.; assoc. psychia- 
try, Columbia Univ.; assoc. attending psy- 
chiatrist, Vanderbilt Clinic, New York, 
N. Y. (11 Fernwood Road, West Hart- 
ford, Conn.) M38. NI. 



Burlingame, Dr. (Edith) Mildred. A.M., 
Stanford, 27; Ph.D., Minnesota, 30. Asst. 
prof, psychology, San Diego State Col., 
San Diego, Calif. M32F33. 1. 

Burlingame, Dr. L(eonas) L(ancelot). 
Ph.D., Chicago, 08. Prof, biology, Stan- 
ford Uuiiversitv. Calif. ( 746 Santa Ynez 
St.) M07F15. FG. 

Burlingham, Dr. Gertrude S(immons). 
Ph.D., Columbia, 08. Teacher (retired) 
biology, Eastern District High School, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (808 Antoinette Ave., 
Winter Park, Fla.) M34F34. G. 

Burlingham, Dr. Robert M37D38. N. 

Burman, Owen K. A.B., California, 29. 
Gen. foreman, Exchange Lemon Products 
Co., Corona, Calif. (203 E. Kendall St.) 
M33. CE. 

Burmeister, Dr. William H(enry). 2512 
Lakeview Ave., Chicago, 111. M13F27R36. N. 

Burmester, Dr. Ben R(oy). M.A., Cali- 
fornia, 33; Ph.D., 36. Instr. animal physi- 
ology, Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 111. M39. 
ONF. 

Burn, Dr. Caspar G(reene). M.D., Yale, 
30. Assoc, prof, pathology, Long Island 
Col. Med., Brooklyn, N. Y. (M27R33)- 
M37F38. NF. 

Burnell, Miss Dorah (Luscombe). M.A., 
Nebraska, 25. Assoc, prof, chemistry, 
Houghton Col., Houghton, N. Y. M28- 
F33. CN. 

Burneski, Anthony Daniel. Mgr., Domin- 
ion Tire and Radio Co., Brandon, Man., 
Canada. M38. ABM. 

Burnet, R. M. P. no Mermont St., Carls- 
bad, N. Mex. M39. HE. 

Burnett, Dr. Charles T(heodore). Ph.D., 
Harvard, 03; L.H.D., Amherst, 30. Prof, 
psychology, Bowdoin Col., Brunswick, 
Maine. M04F11. IKF. 

Burnett, Dr. Edgar Albert. 3256 Hol- 
dredge St., Lincoln, Nebr. M28F31R38. O. 

Burnett, Dr. J. Clawson. Alpine, N. J. L29. 
BCN. 

Burnett, Jerome B(enjamin). Ph.D., Ne- 
braska, 21. Vacuum Oil Co., Pty. Ltd., 
Melbourne, Australia. M31F33. E. 

Burnett, Dr. Theodore C(rete). M.D., Co- 
lumbia, 87. Assoc, prof, emeritus physi- 
ology, Univ. California, Berkeley, Calif. 
(Carmel, Calif.) M12F15. N. 

Burnette, Dr. Norman L. D.So.Sc, Mon- 
treal, 2,2. Asst. sec. charge Welfare Div. 
Canada, Metropolitan Life Ins. Co., Ot- 
tawa, Ont., Canada. (203 Carling Ave.) 
M38. KI. 

Burnham, Allen M(elcomb). 268 Dog- 
wood Lane, Manhasset, N. Y. M29. FG. 

Burnham, E(noch) Lewis. A.B., Harvard, 
04; C.E., Cornell, 07. Berwyn, Pa. M29. 
BEH. 



312 



Directory of Members 



Burnham, Dr. Ernest. A.M., Albion, 02; 
Ph.D., Columbia, 12. Prof, sociology, 
Western State Teachers Col., Kalamazoo, 
Mich. (320 Burrows Road) M11F15. KQ. 

Burnham, Stewart H(enry). Asst. curator, 
Dept. Botanv, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. 
M08F11. G. 

Burnham, Dr. William H(enry). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 98. Prof, emeritus educa- 
tion and school hygiene, Clark Univ., 
Worcester, Mass. (Concord, N. H.) M07- 
Fio. IQ. 

Burns, Dr. B(eryl) I(les). Louisiana State 
Univ. School Med., New Orleans, La. 
M34F34R37. N. 

Burns, Daniel F. (E.), Jr. Student, St. 
Peter's Col. Preparatory School, Jersey 
Citv, N. J. (131 N. Essex Ave., Orange, 
N. J.) M40. CB. 

Burns, Dr. Dean Carl. M.D., Rush, 21. 
Dir., Little Traverse Hosp. and Burns 
Clinic, Petoskey, Mich. (314^2 Howard 
St.) M36. N. 

Burns, Dr. Edward L(eroy). M.D., Wash- 
ington Univ., 28. Instr. pathology and 
bacteriology, Louisiana State Univ. 
School Med.; visiting pathologist. State 
Charity Hosp. Louisiana, New Orleans, 
La. M40. N. 

Burns, Dr. Eleanor I(rene). Sc.D., Lafay- 
ette, 14. Vice pres., Amer. Col. Girls, 
Istanbul, Turkey. M07F16. BQ. 

Burns, Franklin L. Berwyn, Pa. M35F35. F. 

Burns, Dr. George P(lumer). A.M., Ohio 
Wesieyan, 98; Ph.D., Munich, 00. Univ. 
Vermont, Burlington, Vt. M07F09. G. 

Burns, George W. A.B., Cincinnati, 37. 
Teaching asst., Botany Dept., Univ. Min- 
nesota, Minneapolis, Minn. M38. GEF. 

Burns, Joseph F(rederick). 1950 Midvale 
Ave., Los Angeles, Calit. M28. BDA. 

Burns, Prof. Keivin. Ph.D., Minnesota, 
10. Astronomer, Allegheny Observatory, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. M22F23. DAB. 

Burns, Dr. Louisa. 807 Prospect Ave., 
South Pasadena, Calif. M39R39. GFH. 

Burns, Dr. Robert K(yle). Ph.D., Yale, 
24. Assoc, Dept. Embryology, Carnegie 
Inst. Washington, Baltimore, Md. M29- 
F31. FN. 

Burns, Dr. Robert Martin. A.M., Colorado, 
16; Ph.D., Princeton, 21. Asst. chemical 
dir., Bell Telephone Labs., New York, 
N. Y. M28F30. C. 

Burns, Dr. Robert O(bed). Ph.D., Illinois, 
37. Physicist, Celotex Corp., Marrero, La. 
(7316 Hurst St., New Orleans, La.) M38. B. 

Burns, Dr. Zed H(ouston). M.S., Alabama 
Polytechnic Inst., 29; Ed.D., Cincinnati, 
39. Assoc, prof, education, Appalachian 
State Teachers Col., Boone, N. Car. M38. 

IQ. 



Burnside, Dr. Carlton E. M.S., Michigan, 
25; Ph.D., 28. Assoc, apiculturist, U. S. 
Bur. Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 
Beltsville, Md. (3229 Vista St. NE, 
VVasnington, D. C.) M34F34. O. 

Burnside, Major Morris C. Box 42, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. (?) M29R32. BCM. 

Burnstan, Dr. Arthur Rowland. 104 Maple 
Ave., Northfield, Minn. M38R38. K. 

Burnstan, Mrs. Naomi Sloan (Mrs. Arthur 
Rowland Burnstan). B.Sc, Northwestern. 
Bacteriologist, 104 Maple Ave., Northfield, 
Minn. M38. NF. 

Burr, Alex(ander) C(arothers). M.Sc, 
Michigan, 22. Vice pres. and dean, James- 
town Col., lamestown, N. Dak. M35F35. 
CMQ. 

Burr, Dr. Charles W(alts). M.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 86; D.Sc, 33. Prof, emeritus 
mental diseases, Univ. Pennsylvania, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. (1527 Pine St.) L22F33. N. 

Burr, Dr. Emily Thorp. Ph.D., Columbia, 
22. Dir., Vocational Adjustment Bur.; 
instr., Columbia Univ. extension courses, 
New York; lecturer, Brooklyn Col., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. M27F28. INK. 

Burr, Dr. George Oswald. M.A., Arkansas, 
20; Ph.D., Minnesota, 23; LL.D., Hen- 
drix, 36. Prof, botany and physiological 
chemistry, Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, 
Minn. M28F30. CGN. 

Burr, Dr. Harold Saxton. Ph.D., Yale, 15. 
Prof, anatomy, Yale Univ. School Med., 
New Haven, Conn. M18F27. NF. 

Burr, Prof. Irving W(ingate). S.M., Chi- 
cago, 35. Assoc, prof, mathematics, An- 
tioch Col., Yellow Springs, Ohio. M37. 
AKF. 

Burr, I(saac) Tucker. 53 State St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. M08L09. 

Burr, James Guy. 2812 Nueces St., Aus- 
tin, Tex. M34. F. 

Burr, Maurice Holyoke. M.S., Yale, 28. 
Supt., Northeast Harbor Water Co., 
Northeast Harbor, Maine. M34. MAG. 

Burr, Vernon Randolph Cobb. Orienta 
Point Apts., Mamaroneck, N. Y. M29R36. 
CBM. 

Burr, Prof. William H(ubert). M82F83- 
D34. BM. 

Burr, William W(esley). B.Sc, Nebraska, 
06. Dean, Univ. Nebraska Col. Agric, 
Lincoln, Nebr. (1300 N. 37th St.) M13- 
F15. OC. 

Burrage, Prof. Severance. D.P.H., Val- 
paraiso, 13; Ph.D., Hanover, 14. Assoc, 
prof, emeritus bacteriology 'and public 
health, Univ. Colorado School Med., Den- 
ver, Colo. (1355 Bellaire St.) M25. NQG. 

Burrell, Prof. A(rthur) B(rotherton). 
Ph.D., Cornell, 31. Prof, plant pathology, 
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. M3iF33- GO. 



Individual Members 



313 



Burrell, Miss Charlene M. M.Sc, Ohio 
State, 29. Head Biology Dept., High 
School, Alliance, Ohio. (2334 S. Union 
Ave.) M40. FGQ. 

Burrell, G. H. B.S., Case. 1940 5th Ave., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. M39. CMN. 

Burrell, Hon. Martin. M29D38. 

Burrell, Dr. Ramon H(addock). M.D., 
Michigan, 00. Creighton, Xebr. M02. KX. 

Burrell, R(obert) W(allace). B.Sc, Mass- 
achusetts State, 27. Assoc, entomologist, 
U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant Quar- 
antine, Yokohama. Japan. M39F39. FO. 

Burrell, Dr. R(obin) C(harles). M.A., 
Ohio State, 21 ; Ph.D., 25. Assoc prof, 
agricultural chemistry, Ohio State Univ.. 
Columbus, Ohio. (195 Glenmont Ave.) 
M31F33. CGO. 

Burrett, Dr. Claude A(delbert). M.D., 
Ohio State, 05. Pres.. New York Med. 
Col., Flower-Fifth Avenue Hosp., New 
York, N. Y. do E. 88th St.) M34F34. X. 

Burrill, Prof. Alfred C(ummings). M.S.. 
Wisconsin, 15. Curator, Missouri Re- 
sources Mus., Jefferson City, Mo. M18F21. 
FGH. 

Burrill, Dr. Marie W. Ph.D., North- 
western, 37. Res. instr. physiology, Xorth- 
western Univ. Med. School, Chicago. 111. 
M38. F. 

Burrill, Dr. Meredith F(rederic). M.A.. 
Clark, 26; Ph.D., 30. Economic geogra- 
pher, General Land Office; prof, geog- 
raphy, Oklahoma A. and M. Col., Still- 
water. Okla. (220 Melrose Drive) M27- 
F33- EKB. 

Burris-Meyer, Harold. 44^ W. 23rd St., 
Xew York. X. Y. M36R36." BIM. 

Burriss, Lt. Zedford W. ( U.S.M.C.) Navy 
Yard. Philadelphia, Pa. M38. CBA. 

Burroughs, Dr. Shepard H(oney). M.D., 
Western Reserve, 04. Member surgical 
staff, Ashtabula Gen. Hosp., Ashtabula, 
Ohio. M18. N. 

Burroughs, Prof. Wilbur Greeley. Jack- 
son St., Berea, Ky. M34F34R36. E. 

Burrow, Edgar Anderson. Engineer, 
Brady, Tex. M25. MAB. 

Burrow, Dr. Trigant. M.D., Virginia, 90: 
Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins. 09. Scientific dir., 
Lifwynn Foundation, 27 E. 37th St., New 
York, N. Y. (South Morningside Drive, 
Greens Farms, Conn.) M08F25. NI. 

Burrows, Dr. George H(oward). Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 14. Prof, chem- 
istry, Univ. Vermont, Burlington, Vt. 
(393 S. Prospect St.) M08F14. C. 

Burrows, Dr. Montrose T(homas). M.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 09. Physician, 201 N. El 
Molino Ave.. Pasadena, Calif. (5202 May- 
wood Ave., Los Angeles, Calif.) M11F15. 
FN. 



Burrows, Dr. William. M.S., Illinois, 30; 

I'h. I).. Chicago, 32. Asst. prof, bacteriol- 
ogy, Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. (5728 
Drexel Ave.) M33F38. XC. 

Burruss, Dr. Julian A(shby). A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 06; Ph.D., Chicago, 21; LL.D., 
Hampden-Sydney, 37. Pres., Virginia 
Polytechnic Inst., Blacksburg, Va. M28- 
F34. QKM. 

Bursch, Dr. James F(rederick). 551 Pico 
Way, Sacramento, Calif. M31R36. QI. 

Burstein, Dr. Charles L. M.D.. Paris, 34. 
Instr. anesthesia, New York Univ.; super- 
visor anesthesia, Hosp. Ruptured and 
Crippled; asst. visiting anesthetist, Belle- 
vue Hosp., Xew York, X. Y. M40. N. 

Burt, Miss C. Pauline. M.A., Mt. Holyoke, 
16; Ph.D., Yale, 25. Prof, chemistry. 
Smith Col., Northampton, Mass. (101 
Prospect St.) M35F35. C. 

Burt, Dr. Charles E(arle). M.S., Kansas 
State, 27; Ph.D., Michigan, 30. Prof, biol- 
ogy, Southwestern Col.. Winfield, Kansas 
M28F33. F. 

Burt, Dr. Edward Angus. M01F01D39. G. 

Burt, Dr. Frederick J. M.D., Michigan, 13. 
104 Oakland St.. Holly, Mich. M35. BXC. 

Burt, Harold A. Designer, Linotype Co., 
Brooklyn, X. Y. (119-32 200th St.. St. 
Albans, X. Y.) M39. DB. 

Burt, Prof. Joseph B(ell). M.Sc. Wiscon- 
sin, 27; Ph.D., 35. Prof, pharmacy and 
chairman Dept., Univ. Nebraska Col. 
Pharmacy, Lincoln, Nebr. M35F38. XpC. 

Burt, Dr. Robert C(ady). 904 E. Cali- 
fornia St., Pasadena. Calif. M21F29R32. 
BCM. 

Burt, Stanley G(ano). Hotel Alms. Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. M29R32. EHC. 

Burt, Dr. W(illiam) H(enry). A.M.. Kan- 
sas, 27; Ph.D., California, 30. Curator of 
mammals, Mus. Zoology; instr. zoology, 
Univ. Michigan. Ann Arbor, Mich. M31- 
F33. FEG. 

Burtle, William (Ewart). 9944 Conner St., 
Detroit. Mich. M36R37. BCE. 

Burton, Arthur (Arthur Berman). 1945 A 
Haste St., Berkeley, Calif. M39R39. IQX. 

Burton, Miss Eleanor Paxton. M.S., Chi- 
cago. 37. Bacteriologist, Co-ordinating 
Lab., Illinois Dept. Public Health. Chi- 
cago. 111. (636 Hinman Ave., Evanston, 
111.) M39. X. 

Burton, Everett T. M.A., Indiana. 24. Res. 
engineer, Bell Telephone Labs., New 
York, N. Y. (97 Cypress St., Maplewood. 
N. J.) M28F33. BMA. 

Burton, Dr. Glenn W(illard). M.Sc, Rut- 
gers, 33: Ph.D., 36. Assoc, geneticist, Div. 
Forage Crops, U. S. Bur. Plant Industry, 
Tifton, Ga. (421 W. 10th St.) M36F39. 
OGC. 



3H 



Directory of Members 



Burton, H(arry) E(dward). M.S., Iowa, 
03. Principal astronomer and head Equa- 
torial Div., U. S. Naval Observatory, 
Washington, D. C. M28F30. DAB. 

Burton, Miss Helen B(rown). S.M., Chi- 
cago, 22; Ph.D., 29. Dir. School and prof, 
home economics, Univ. Oklahoma, Nor- 
man, Okla. (512 S. Crawford St.) M29- 
F33. CNF. 

Burton, Richard Cheetham. Engineer, 
Chiriqui Lar" 1 Co., Puerto Armuelles, 
Panama. M36. J[R. 

Burton, W(ayne) J(oseph). 6029 Cates 
Ave., St. Louis, Mo. M36R36. M. 

Burton, William S(tifler). Hampton Inst., 
Hampton, Va. M32R32. BA. 

Burton-Opitz, Dr. Russell. M.D., Chicago, 
95; S.M., 02; Ph.D.. 05. Lecturer physiol- 
ogy, Columbia Univ.; consulting physi- 
cian and cardiologist, 35 E. 84th St., New 
York, N. Y. (Palisade, N. J.) M02F05. 
FGN. 

Burtt, Prof. Harold E(rnest). Ph.D., Har- 
vard, 15. Prof, psychology, Ohio State 
Univ., Columbus, Ohio. M16F28. I. 

Burunjik, Dr. May. 730 3rd Ave., Havre, 
Mont. M32F33R34. GFC. 

Burwash, Dr. E(dward) M(oore Jackson). 
M.A., Toronto, 97; Ph.D., 14; Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 15. 36 Prince Arthur Ave., To- 
ronto, Ont., Canada. L22F25. EH. 

Burwell, Dr. C(harles) Sidney. M.D., Har- 
vard, 19; LL.D.. Allegheny, 36. Dean, 
Faculty Med. and Res. and prof, clinical 
medicine. Harvard Med. School; physi- 
cian, Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, 
Mass. M24F27. N. 

Burwell, Miss Lillian L(eondra). S.M., 
Chicago, 31. Assoc, prof., Tillotson Col., 
Austin, Tex. M40. FG. 

Busch, Dr. Daniel A(dolph). M.A., Ohio 
State, 36; Ph.D., 39. Instr., Dept. Geol- 
ogy, Univ. Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(4825 Baum Blvd.) M40. E. 

Busch, Henry Paul. B.S., Pennsylvania, 
93. Dir., Shoemaker and Busch, Inc., 
Philadelphia, Pa. (1006 Spruce St.) L21. 
CE. 

Busch, Dr. K(arl) G(eorge) A(dolph). 
A.M., Ohio State, 20; Ph.D., 30. Head 
Dept. Chemistry and Geology. Capital 
Univ., Columbus. Ohio. (2424 Sherwood 
Road) (M34F34R34)M 4 oF 3 4. CQE. 

Busck, August. 217 Rock Creek Church 
Road, Washington, D. C. M07F13R39. F. 

Bush, C(harles) R(ichard). Box 2831, 
Beaumont, Tex. M32R36. BME. 

Bush, Egbert T(rimmer). M13D37. O. 

Bush, Dr. Elliot T. 222 W. Church St., 
Elmira, N. Y. M36R36. N. 

Bush, Dr. Gow M(ax). M.S., Cornell, 34: 
Ph.D., Iowa, 39. Dept. Biology, North 
Carolina Col., Durham, N. Car. M40. FG. 



Bush, John M. Mgr., Cleveland-Cliffs 
Iron Co., and Michigan Mineral Land 
Co.; vice pres., Superior Realty Co., 
Negaunee, Mich. M36. CKM. 

Bush, Miss Mildred. M.A., Texas, 29; 
Ph.D., California, 32. Dept. Zoology, Univ. 
California, Berkeley, Calif. M31. F. 

Bush, Dr. V(annevar). M.S., Tufts, 13; 
Sc.D., 32; D.Eng., Massachusetts Inst 
Tech., 16, Harvard, 16; LL.D., Brown 
39. Pres., Carnegie Inst. Washington, 
Washington, D. C. M34F34. M. Secretary 
of Section on Engineering (M), 1933-37. 

Bushnell, D. I., Jr. 417-B Westchester 
Apt., Washington, D. C. M02F03. H. 

Bushnell, Horace C(arlton). M.E., Cor- 
nell, 02. Senior valuation engineer, New 
York Public Service Commission, New 
York, N. Y. (1215 E. 28th St., Brooklvn, 
N. Y.) M17. M. 

Bushnell, Dr. Leland D(avid). M.S., Kan- 
sas, 15; Ph.D., Harvard, 21. Head Dept. 
Bacteriology, Kansas State Col.; bac- 
teriologist, Kansas State Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Manhattan, Kans. M12F16. GKN. 

Bushnell, Dr. Ralph J(udson). M.S., Wis- 
consin, 32; Ph.D., 36. Asst. prof, genetics, 
Univ. Connecticut, Storrs, Conn. M37F39. 
FG. 

Bushnell, Thomas M(ark). Purdue Univ. 
Agric. Exp. Sta., West Lafavette, Ind. 
M25F31. O. 

Buso, Mrs. Hilda Elena Aboy. M.S., Cor- 
nell. Instr. biologv, Univ. Puerto Rico, 
Rio Piedras, P. R. M40. GNF. 

Buss, Prof. Fred E(arle). M.A., Stan- 
ford, 24. Prof, geology, San Jose State 
Col., San Jose, Calif. (510 Columbia St., 
Palo Alto, Calif.) M25F33. DEG. 

Bussell, Dr. Frank P(ores). Ph.D.. Cor- 
nell. 10. Prof, plant breeding, Cornell 
Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. M18F25. GO. 

Bussey, Prof. William Henry. A.M., Har- 
vard, 02; Ph.D., Chicago, 04. Prof, math- 
ematics and asst. dean, Univ. Minnesota 
Col. Science, Literature and Arts, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. (1421 E. River Road) M07- 
F09. A. 

Buswell, Prof. A(rthur) M(oses). A.M., 
Maine, 12; Ph.D.. Columbia, 17. Chief, 
Illinois State Water Survey; prof, chem- 
istry; Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 111. (205 S. 
Busey St.) M17F25. C. 

Buswell, Prof. G(uy) T(homas). A.M., 
Chicago, 16; Ph.D., 20. Prof, educational 
psychology, Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. 
M21F23. IQ. Vice president for Section on 
Education (Q), 1934. 

Buswell, Dr. J(ames) Oliver, Jr. A.M., 
Chicago, 24; D.D., Dallas Theological 
Seminarv. 27; LL.D., Houghton, 36. Pres., 
Wheaton Col., Wheaton, 111. M36. KQ. 



Individual Members 



315 



Butchart, Dr. J(ohn) H(arvey). Ph.D., 
Illinois, 32. Prof, mathematics, William 
Woods Col., Fulton, Mo. (510 Grand 
Ave.) (M36R36)M39- A. 

Butcher, Dr. Earl O(rlo). M.A., Cornell, 
26; Ph.D., 28. Prof, biology, Hamilton 
Col., Clinton, N. Y. (Griffin Road, College 
Hill) M30F31. FN. 

Butin, Dr. Mary Ryerson. M.D., North- 
western. 201) N. B St., Madera, Calif. 
M39. N. 

Butler, Dr. Albert Q(uigg). M.A., Wes- 
leyan, 24; A.M., Harvard, 26; Ph.D., 33. 
Chief analytical chemist, Mallinckrodt 
Chemical Works, St. Louis, Mo. (7634 
Springdale Drive, Pasadena Park) M38 
CN. 

Butler, Dr. Amos W(illiam). M81F85E36- 
D37. FHK. 

Butler, Bert S(ylvenus). M.S., Cornell, 
07; D.Sc, Colorado Col. Mines, 28. Univ. 
Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. M25F25. E. 

Butler, Dr. Bertram T(heodore). A.M., 
Columbia, 08; Ph.D., New York, 33. 
Assoc, prof, and chairman Dept. Geology, 
The City Col., New York, N. Y. (186 
Crescent Ave., Leonia, N. J.) M24F32. 
EGH. 

Butler, Dr. C(harles) S(t. John). M.D., 
Virginia, 97; LL.D., Emory and Henry, 
32. Rear Admiral (M.C.), United States 
Navy, retired, 848 Anderson St., Bristol, 
Tenn. M24F25. FN. 

Butler, Dr. C(ourtland) L(ivingston), Jr. 
Ph.D., Illinois, 25. Prof., Bennington Col., 
Bennington, Vt. M31F33. CN. 

Butler, Miss Elizabeth. Ph.D., Chicago, 
34. Asst. prof, zoology, Vassar Col., 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. M34. F. 

Butler, Prof. E(lmer) G(rimshaw). A.M., 
Princeton, 25; Ph.D., 27. Prof, zoology, 
Princeton Univ., Princeton, N. J. (109 
Broadmead) M26F30. F. 

Butler, Dr. G(urdon) M(ontague). Sc.D., 
Colorado School Mines, 22. Dean, Col. 
Mines and Engng., and prof, mining 
engng. ; Univ. Arizona; dir. Arizona Bur. 
Mines, Tucson, Ariz. M10F11. EM. 

Butler, H(arold) G(ordon). Bur. En- 
tomology, St. Joseph, Mo. M28F33R37. F. 

Butler, Howard Russell. M29D34. BD. 

Butler, Prof. Joe B(eatty). Missouri 
School Mines, Rolla, Mo. M34F34R39. M. 

Butler, Dr. John H(enry) Manning. A.M., 
Livingstone, 98; Pd.D., 23. Administra 
tive asst., head Graduate Course, and 
dir. Normal Col. Dept., Nat. Teachers 
Col., Manila, P. I. M30. Q. 

Butler, M(arcus) Bayard, Jr. 460 Beech- 
wood Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. M28R^. 
MAB. 



Butler, Dr. O(rmond) R(ourke). Ph. I)., 
Cornell, 10. Univ. New Hampshire. Dur- 
ham, N. H. M10F13. G. 

Butler, Dr. Thomas J. M.D., Virginia. 8 
E. 4th St., Bethlehem, Pa. M39. NIK. 

Butler, Rev. Thomas P. Weston Col., 
Weston, Mass. M33. CA. 

Butler, Wallace. B.A., Minnesota, 10. 
Agent, U. S. Dept. Agric, San Antonio, 
Tex. (325 Jennings Ave.) M25. G. 

Butler, Dr. W(illiam) J(ohn). D.V.S., 
New York, 03. Exec, officer and dir. labs., 
Montana Livestock Sanitary Board: 
chairman Montana Milk Control Board, 
Helena, Mont. (704 Stuart St.) M31. 
NFO. 

Butler, Dr. William K(ennedy). M17D38. 
N. 

Butler, William Mill. Ward Homestead, 
Maplewood, N. J. M06. DKL. 

Butner, D(aniel) W(orth). 5 ss Colusa 
Ave., Berkeley, Calif. M36R38. MB. 

Butt, F(erdinand) H(inckley). Ph.D., 
Cornell, 34. Instr. entomology, Cornell 
Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. M34. F. 

Butterfield, E(arl) C(arver). B.S., Kansas 
State. Rosslvn Station, Arlington, Va. 
M39. OM. 

Butterfield, Prof. Thomas E(dward). M.E., 
Stevens Inst. Tech., 95 ; C.E., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Inst., 97. Prof, heat power 
engng.; dir. Civilian Pilot Flight Train- 
ing, Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pa. M29- 
F32. MBQ. 

Butters, Prof. Fred(eric) K(ing). Ph.D., 
Harvard, 17. 815 S. 7th St., Minneapolis, 
Minn. M07F11. G. 

Butterworth, Carl E(lroy). B.S., Pitts- 
burgh, 24. Chemist, Texas Gulf Sulphur 
Co., Newgulf, Tex. M39. CM. 

Butterworth, G(eorge) Forrest, Jr. 14 

Wall St., New York, N. Y. M20R34. K. 

Butterworth, Dr. T(heron) H(ervey). 
3543 Avenue B, San Antonio, Tex. M 52- 
F33R38. ONP. 

Buttles, William S. 10728 S. Artesian Ave., 
Morgan Park, Chicago, 111. (M33R33)- 
M36R37. DB. 

Buttolph, Dr. L(eroy) J(ames). M.S., 
Kalamazoo, 16; Sc.D., 33. Engineer, Gen. 
Electric Co., Nela Park, Cleveland, Ohio. 
(1 Columbia Ave., Grantwood, N. I.) 
M27F28. BC. 

Butts, Donald C(harles) A(twood). M.S., 
Philadelphia Col. Pharmacy, 35; Sc.D., 
37. Dir. Emery Lab. Cancer Res., Hahne- 
mann Med. Col., Philadelphia Pa M27- 
F 3 3- B. 

Butts, Helen E. (See Mrs. Donovan S. 
Correll). 



3i6 



Directory of Members 



Butz, Dr. Lewis W(illiam). Ph.D., Illi- 
nois, 33. Biochemist, U. S. Dept. Agric, 
Beltsville, Md. (Hollywood Road. Berwyn, 
Md.) M38F39. CNO. 

Buwalda, Dr. John P(eter). Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia, 15. Chairman, Div. Geol. Sciences, 
California Inst. Tech., Pasadena, Calif. 
(2103 San Pasqual St.) M13F15. E. 

Buxton, Loran O. B.S., Purdue, 37. Res. 
chemist, Xat. Oil Products Co., Harrison, 
X. J. M39. CNP. 

Buyniski, Edward F. B.S., Massachusetts 
Col. Pharmacy. Pharmacist, Vernon Drug 
Co.; graduate fellow physiology, Clark 
Univ., Worcester, Mass. (014 Alain St.) 
M40. Np. 

Buzzati-Traverso, Dr. A(driano). D.Xat.- 
Sc, Milano. Asst., Instituto de Zoologia, 
della R. Universita, Palazzo Botta, Pavia, 
Italv. (Viale L. Maino 18, Milano, Italv) 
M35. FG. 

Byck, Dr. Harold T(heodore). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 30. Res. chemist, Produc- 
tion Res., Shell Development Co., Emery- 
ville, Calif. (1928 Hopkins St., Berkeley, 
Calif.) M27F32. BCM. 

Byerley, Jacob Roy. M.S., Illinois, 30. 
Asst. state supt. Public Instruction, 
Springfield. 111. (862^ Loraine St.) M39. 
FGQ. 

Byerly, Dr. Theodore C(arroll). Ph.D., 
Iowa. 26. Univ. Maryland. College Park, 
Md. M31F31. FG. 

Byers, Dr. C(harles) Francis. M.S., Mich- 
igan, 26; Ph.D., 29. Assoc, prof, biology, 
Univ. Florida, Gainesville, Fla. M28F33. F. 

Byers, Prof. Horace G(reeley). U. S. Bur. 
Chemistry and Soils, Washington, D. C. 
M11F14R33. C. 

Byfield, Dr. Albert H. c/o Harry Atkin- 
son, Inc., 408 S. Spring" St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. M24R37. X. 



Byington, Dr. LeUrand B. iM.JJ., Iowa, 19; 
M.P.H., Johns Hopkins, 39. Surgeon, U. S. 
Public Health Service, Washington, D. C. 
M39. XFE. 

Bynum, C(harles) H(udson), II. 2903 
Flora St., Dallas, Tex. M32R36. QIK. 

Byrd, Dr. Elon E. M.Sc, Mississippi State, 
31; Ph.D., Tulane, 34. Asst. prof, zoology, 
Univ. Georgia, Athens, Ga. M37. FG. 

Byrd, John Holt. Box 116, Coraopnlis, Pa. 
M31R34. CBA. 

Byrd, Dr. Oliver E(rasmus). M.A., Stan- 
ford, 33; Ed.D., 40. Assoc, prof, hygiene 
and physical education, Stanford Univer- 
sity. Calif. (217 Madrono Ave., Palo Alto, 
Calif.) M40. QX. 

Byrd, Dr. Wallace. CCC Camp Xorris, 
Ironwood, Mich. ( M30R34) M36R37. XF. 

Byrne, Frank. Dept. Geology, Kansas 
State Col.. Manhattan, Kans. M37R37. 
EFH. 

Byrne, John Joseph. A.B., Princeton. 107 
Louis Pasteur Ave., Boston, Mass. M38. 
XFG. 

Byrnes, C. P. 7 Midland Gardens, Bronx- 
ville, X. Y. M25. BCI. 

Byrnes, Dr. Esther F(ussell). Ph.D., 
Bryn Mawr, 98. 1803 X. Camac St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. M18F21. FG. 

Byrnes, Frank C. Student, Univ. Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. (71S7 S. Princeton Ave.) 
M40. CE. 

Byrnes, Leo M. St. Mary's Seminary, Bal- 
timore, Md. M31R32. GF. 

Byrnes, Dr. Ralph R(oy). D.D.S., Vander- 
bilt, 12. Dean, Atlanta-Southern Dental 
Col., Atlanta, Ga. (1323 Briarelirr Road 
XE.) M32. Xd. 

Bywaters, Dr. James H(umphreys). M.S., 
Kentucky, 32; Ph.D., Iowa, 36. Assoc, 
geneticist, Regional Poultry Res. Lab., 
U. S. Bur. Animal Industry, East Lansing, 
Mich. M39F40. OFA. 



Cable, Miss Louella E. M.A., South Da- 
kota, 2~ . Junior aquatic biologist, U. S. 
Bur. Fisheries, Charleston, S. Car. (12 
Gillon St.) M29F33. FEH. 

Cable, Prof. Raymond M(illard). Sc.M., 
Xew York, 30; Ph.D., 33. Assoc, prof, 
parasitologv, Purdue Univ., La Favette, 
lnd. M33. FC. 

Cabot, Dr. Clyde M(arcus). M.D., Minne- 
sota, 31; M.S., 35. Chief section ophthal- 
mology and otolaryngology, Calgary 
Assoc. Clinic, Calgary, Alta., Canada. 

(1435 5th St. XW.) M40. X. 

Cabot, Edward C. Curator, Geol. Mus., 
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. (39 
Kirkland St.) M37- E. 

Cabot, Godfrey Lowell. 77 Franklin St., 
Boston, Mass. M25. C. 



Cabot, Dr. Philippe Sidney deQuetteville. 
M.A., Xew Zealand, 26, Columbia, 31, 
Harvard, 35; Ph.D., Harvard, 36. Dir., 
Cambridge-Somerville Youth Survey, 
Cambridge; lecturer, Simmons Col., Bos- 
ton; consulting psychologist. Aloha 
Camps, Inc., Brookline, Mass. (10 Gar- 
den Terrace, Cambridge, Mass.) M37. 
INQ. 

Cabot, Samuel. A.B., Harvard. Pies., Sam- 
uel Cabot, Inc., Boston, Mass. M34F34. C. 

Cabrera, Dr. Esteban Garcia. M.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 12. Dir. and urologist, Inst, de 
Urodologia de Puerto Rico, Hosp. San 
Jose; assoc. prof, urology, Columbia Univ. 
School Tropical Med.; visiting urologist. 
Univ. Hosp., Univ. Puerto Rico, Santurce, 
P. R. M40. XCF. 



Individual Members 



31/ 



Cachot, Miss Rebeca Carrion. 3S3 Apart- 
ado de Correos, Lima, Peru, S. A. (?) 
M25R37. HK. 

Cade, Dr. Arthur R(osson). M.S., Minne- 
sota, 17; Ph.D., 33. Consulting chemist 
and bacteriologist, 4621 Beard Ave. S., 
Minneapolis, Minn. M30F33. C. 

Cadena, Francisco. Engineer, Neville 
Island Branch, Dravo Corp., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. M38. MCK. 

Cadle, Miss Elizabeth F(rances). 807 W. 
Pacific St., Springfield, Mo. M32R35. QNI. 

Cadmus, Dr. John H. M32D34. N. 

Cady, Dr. Bertha Chapman. Box 321, 
South Miami, Fla. M26F27R36. GF. 

Cady, Charles A(rthur). Gen. Radio Co., 
30 State St., Cambridge, Mass. M38R39. 
MPA. 

Cady, Dr. George H(amilton). A.M., Kan- 
sas, 28; Ph.D., California, 30. Asst. prof, 
chemistry, Univ. Washington, Seattle, 
Wash. M37. CB. 

Cady, Gilbert H(aven). M.S., Northwest- 
ern, n; Ph.D., Chicago. 17. Senior geol- 
ogist and head Coal Div., Illinois State 
Geol. Survey, L T rbana, 111. (504 W. Ore- 
gon St.) M34F34- E. 

Cady, Dr. O(sman) H(orace). M.S., 
Washington, 19; Ph.D., Stanford, 27. 
Chairman, Chemistry Dept., Los Angeles 
City Col.. Los Angeles, Calif. (922 N. 
Mariposa Ave.) M28F33. C. 

Cady, Prof. Walter B(riggs). Ypsilanti, 
Mich. M06F15R32. C. 

Cady, Dr. Walter G(uyton). M.A., Brown, 
96; D.Sc, 38; Ph.D., Berlin, 00. Prof, 
physics, Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, 
Conn. M00F06. B. 

Cady, William Hamlin. A.M., Brown, 05. 
Chief chemist, U. S. Finishing Co., Nor- 
wich, Conn. (127 Power St., Providence, 
R. I.) M06. C. 

Caffrey, Donald J(ohn). U. S. Bur. En- 
tomology and Plant Quarantine, Wash- 
ington, D. C. M17F20R38. F. 

Caffrey, Genevieve E(lizabeth). Route 11, 
Seattle, Wash. M21R36. A. 

Cagle, Fred Ray. M.S., Michigan, 38. Dir., 
Mus. Natural and Social Sciences, South- 
ern Illinois Normal Univ., Carbondale, 
111. M40. FG. 

Cahen, S. F. ( See Stanley Frederick Car- 
son) . 

Cahill, B(ernard) J. S. 3^7 12th St., Oak- 
land, Calif. M23F31R33. E. 

Cahill, Dr. George F(rancis). M.D., Yale, 
11. Prof, urology, Columbia Univ. Col. 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 
N.'Y. (121 East 60th St.) M29F38. N. 

Cahill, Dr. William M. Ph.D., Berlin, 36. 
Instr. physiological chemistry, Wayne 
Univ. Col. Med., Detroit, Mich. (3026 
Van Dyke St.) M39. N. 



Cahn, Alvin R(obert). M.S., Wisconsin. 
15; Ph.D., Illinois, 22. Forestry Bldg., 
Norris, Tenn. M13F25. FG. 

Cahn, Prof. Lester R. D.D.S., New York. 
Assoc, prof, dentistry, Columbia Univ. 
School Dental and Oral Surgery, New 
York, N. Y. M35F38. Nd. 

Cahoon, Dr. G(uybert) P(hillips). M.A.. 
California, 29; Ed.D., 37. Assoc, prof, ed- 
ucation, supervisor teaching science and 
mathematics, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, 
Ohio. (4845 N. High St.) M38. QBC. 

Cain, Louis S. E.M.. Colorado School 
Mines. Supt. Public Works, Territory of 
Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii. (4040 Koko 
Drive) M40. M. 

Cain, Dr. Stanley A(dair). 450 N. Audu- 
bon Road, Indianapolis, Ind. M31F33- 
R33. G. 

Caine, Alfred B. Iowa State College, Ames, 
Iowa. M30F32R33. O. 

Caiola, Fred. C.E., New York, 32. Asst. 
engineer and designer, Board Water Sup- 
ply, New York, N. Y. (2840 Wellman 
Ave.) M 3 9- MBI. 

Caird, James M(orton). P.E., Univ. State 
New York, 21. Sanitary engineer, Cannon 
Bldg., Broadway and 2nd St., Troy, N. Y. 
M08. CGN. 

Cairns, Dr. Stewart S(cott). A.M., Har- 
vard. 27; Ph.D., 31. Asst. prof, mathe- 
matics, Queens Col., Flushing, N. Y. (42- 
14 140th Place) M34F34. A. 

Cairns, Prof. William D(eWeese). A.M., 
Harvard, 98; Ph.D., Gottingen, 07. Prof, 
emeritus mathematics, Oberlin Col., Ober- 
lin, Ohio. (07 Elm St.) M17F18. A. Vice 
president for Section on Mathematics (A), 
1937- 

Cajori, Dr. Florian A. Ph.D., Yale, 20. 
University of Pennsylvania, Medical 
School, Philadelphia, Pa. M35F35. N. 

Calcott, Dr. W(illiam) S(tansfield). Ch.E., 
Virginia, 13; LL.D., Notre Dame, 37. Dir., 
Jackson Lab., E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Co.; res. dir. Kinetic Chemicals, Inc., 
Wilmington, Del. (164 East Ave., Woods- 
town, N. J.) M28F33. C. 

Calderone, Dr. Frank A(nothy). M.D., 
New York, 24; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins, 
37. Health officer, Lower East Side Health 
Center, New York; instr., New York Univ. 
Med. Col. Dept. Preventive Med., New 
York, N. Y. (341 E. 25th St.) M33. N. 

Calderwood, Howard N(ewton), Jr. Chem- 
istry Bldg., Univ. Wisconsin, Madison, 
Wis. M18F33R34. CMQ. 
Caldis, Dr. Panos D(emetrius). M.A., 
Michigan State. 22; M.S., 25; Ph.D., Cali- 
fornia, 26. In charge agric. research, Cali- 
fornia Packing Corp., San Francisco, 
Calif. ( 2 <o Front St.) (M2sF3iR36)M40- 
F31. GOC. 

Caldwell. Miss Alma B. Route 5, Lebanon, 
Ind. M38R38. Q. 



3i8 



Directory of Members 



Caldwell, Dr. B(enjamin) P(almer). 
Ch.E.. Tulane, 06; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 
ot. Prof, physical chemistry, Brooklyn 
Polytechnic Inst., Brooklyn, N. Y. (390 
Argylc Road) M05F09. C. 

Caldwell, Mrs. Elfreda L(arson). S.B.. 07. 
Mary Esther, Fla. M28F33. N. 

Caldwell, Floyd Franklin. State Teachers 
Col., Chico, Calif. M34R34. Q. 

Caldwell, Prof. Frank Cary. M.E., Cornell. 
91. Prof, emeritus electrical engng., Ohio 
State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. (206 16th 
Ave.) M40. BM. 

Caldwell, Dr. George T(homas). M.A., 
Ohio State. 13: Ph.D., Chicago, 18; M.D., 
Rush, 19. Prof, pathology, Baylor Univ. 
Col. Med., Dallas, Tex. (3929 Potoma 
St.) M40. N. 

Caldwell, Dr. G(eorge) T(hornhill). M.S.. 
Chicago, 23; Ph.D., 30. Prof, zoology and 
head Dept, Univ. Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. 
M21F33. F. 

Caldwell, Dr. Joseph S(tuart). A.M., Chi- 
cago, 04; Ph.D., 14. Senior physiologist, 
U. S. Horticultural Sta., Beltsville, Md. 
(211 W. Madison St., Riverdale, Md.) 
M08F11. GO. 

Caldwell, Prof. Mary L(etitia). A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 19; Ph.D., 21. Asst. prof, chemis- 
try, Columbia Univ., New York, N. Y. 
M25F28. C. 

Caldwell, Prof. Morley A(lbert). M23- 
D38. I. 

Caldwell, Dr. Morris Gilmore. M.A., Wis- 
consin, 27; Ph.D., 29. Frazee Hall, Univ. 
Kentuckv, Lexington, Ky. (M3iR35)M38. 
KHT. 

Caldwell, Dr. Otis W(illiam). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 98; LL.D., Franklin, 17. Prof, emer- 
itus education. Columbia Univ., New 
York, N. Y. (New Mihord, Conn.) Moo- 
F02L23. QG. Vice president for Section ot 
Education (Q), 1925. General Secretary, 
1935— ■ 

Caldwell, Ralph M(errill). M.S., Wiscon- 
sin, 27; Ph.D., 29. Chief, Dept. Botany 
Purdue Univ. Agric. Exp. Sta., West 
Lafayette, Ind. M29F31. G. 

Caldwell, Dr. Robert G(ranville). Ameri- 
can Embassv, Lisbon, Portugal. M32- 
R34. L. 

Caldwell, Dr. Samuel H(awks). M.S.. 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 26; D.Sc., 33. 
Asst. prof, electrical engng., Massachu- 
setts Inst. Tech., Cambridge, Mass. (53 
Cedar Road, Belmont, Mass.) M39. MAB. 

Caldwell, Dr. V(erne) V(incent). M.S., 
Idaho, 27; Ph.D., Southern California, 34. 
Prof, psychology and chairman Dept., 
Oregon Col. Education, Monmouth, Oreg. 
(275 N. Broad St.) M29. IQ. 

Caldwell, Dr. W(illiam) E(dgar). M.D., 
University and Bellevue, 04. 875 Park 
Ave., New York, N. Y. M24. N. 



Caldwell, Dr. William Elmer. M.S., Wis- 
consin, 27; Ph.D., 29. Assoc, prof, chemis- 
try, Oregon State Col., Corvallis, Oreg. 
M _ 38F39. CEM. 

Caldwell, Miss Willie V. Univ. Tennessee 
Junior Col., Martin, Tenn. M30R33. 

Caley, Dr. Earle R(adcliffe). M.Sc, Ohio 
State, 25 ; Ph.D., 28. Asst. prof, chemis- 
try, Princeton Univ., Princeton, N. J. 
M29F33. C. 

Calfee, Dr. John D(ouglas). M.S., Ten- 
nessee, 34; Ph.D., Duke, 38. Res. chemist. 
Standard Oil Development Co., Metcalf 
Res. Lab., Brown Univ., Providence, R. I. 
M39. c. 

Calhane, Prof. D(aniel) F(rancis). M.A., 
Harvard, 96; Ph.D., 04. 32 Berkmans St., 
Worcester, Mass. M34F34. C. 

Calhoun, Dr. Fred Harvey Hall. Ph.D. 
Chicago, 02. Dean School Chemistry and 
Geologv, Clemson Agric. Col., Clemson, 
S. Car."Mo 4 Fn. EOQ. 

Calingaert, Dr. George. Sc.D.. Brussels. 
21. Dir. chemical res.. Ethlvl Gasoline 
Corp., Detroit, Mich. M34F34- CBM. 

Calkins, Dr. Gary N(athan). Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia, 98; D.Sc, 29. Prof, emeritus 
protozoology, Columbia Univ., New York, 
N. Y. M00F01. F. 

Call, L(eland) E(verett). M.S., Ohio State, 
12. Dean agriculture, Kansas State Col.; 
dir., Kansas Agric. Exp. Sta.. Manhattan, 
Kans. (223 N. 14th St.) M14F23. O. Vice 
president for Section on Agriculture (0), 
1927- 

Callaghan, Eugene. U. S. Geol. Survey, 
Washington, D. C. M31F32R35. E. 

Callahan, Michael J. B.S., Worcester Poly- 
technic Inst., 11. Asst. gen. mgr., Fabrics 
and Finishes Dept.. E. I. du Pont de Ne- 
mours and Co., Wilmington, Del. M29- 
F33. CBL. 

Callaway, Mrs. Theodosia T(ucker). M.A., 
Columbia. 21. Prof, mathematics, Ste- 
phens Col., Columbia, Mo. (15 1 5 Ross St.) 
M22. A. 

Callender, Walter R(eid). M.A., Yale. 07. 
196 Hope St., Providence, R. I. L28. KNF. 

Calley, Ann Laws. 2100 Arch St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. M33R37. NQI. 

Callis, Dr. H(enry) A(rthur). M.D., Rush, 
21. Phvsician, 1943 Vermont St. NW.. 
Washington, D. C. (2306 E St. NE.) M37- 
F38. NK. 

Callister, George J. American Potash 
Inst., Inc., Washington, D. C. M35. 

Calloway, Prof. Milton Lewis. M.A., Co- 
lumbia. 24. Head Dept. and prof, zool- 
ogy, Morgan State Col., Baltimore, Md. 
M32. F. 

Calmon, Dr. Calvin. Ph.D., Yale, 38. Res. 
chemist, The Permutit Co., Birmingham, 
N. J. (11^ Garden St., Mt. Holly, N. J.) 
M40. C. 



Individual Members 



3*9 



Calor Mota, C. (See C. Calor Mota). 

Calver, Homer N(orthup). B.S., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 14. Sec., Amer. Mus. 
Health, New York, N. Y. (29 Revere 
Road, Manhasset, N. Y.) M25F25. NQK. 

Calvert, J. F. Penglyn, Irwin, Pa. (?) 
M34R34. M. 

Calvert, Prof. Philip P(owell). Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania, 95. Prof, emeritus zoology, 
Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Box 14, Cheyney, Pa.) M01F03. F. 

Calvert, Prof. Sidney. Univ. Missouri, Co- 
lumbia, Mo. M98F03R37. CB. 

Calvery, Dr. Herbert O(rion). M.S., Illi- 
nois, 23; Ph.D., 24. Chief, Div. Pharma- 
cology, U. S. Food and Drug Administra- 
tion, Washington, D. C. M28F31. NC. 

Calvo, Juan L. Carrasco. M.E., Cornell, 
20. Engineer, Fca. de Material de Guerra, 
Santiago, Chile, S. A. M36. MK. 

Camac, Dr. C(harles) N. B. M.D., Penn- 
sylvania, 95. Prof, emeritus medicine, 
Polyclinic Med. School and Hosp., Co- 
lumbia Univ., New York, N. Y. (2703 
Highland Ave., Altadena, Calif.) M28F33. 
XL. 

Cameron, Dr. Angus L. Minot, N. Dak. 
M35F35R36. N. 

Cameron, Dr. D(onald) Ewen. M.D., Glas- 
gow. Prof, neurology and psychiatry, Al- 
bany Med. Col.; neurologist and psychi- 
atrist-in-chief, Albanv Hosp., Albany, 
N. Y. M40. NIK. 

Cameron, Dr. Donald H(oover). A.M., 
Oberlin, 21; Ph.D., Cincinnati, 31. Asst. 
dir., B. D. Eisendrath Memorial Lab., 
Racine, Wis. (708 Orchard St.) M38. C. 

Cameron, Dr. D(onald) R(oss). M.Sc, 
Saskatchewan, 28; Ph.D., California, 32. 
Instr. genetics, Univ. California, Berkeley, 
Calif. M38F39. G. 

Cameron, Prof. Edward H(erbert). M18- 
F21D38. IQ. 

Cameron, Dr. Frank K(enneth). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 94. Prof, chemistry, Univ. 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. Car. (508 
North St.) M00F01. CMO. Vice presiden 
for Section on Chemistry (C), 19 11. 

Cameron, Dr. G(eorge) Harvey. Ph.D., 

California Inst. Tech., 26. Prof, physics, 
Hamilton Col., Clinton, N. Y. M28F31. B. 

Cameron, George L(aidlaw). 44 N. Moun- 
tain Ave., Montclair, N. J. M36R36. 

Cameron, Dr. Hamilton. M.D., Reliance 
Med. Col., 11; Ph.D., Chicago Law- 
School, 22. Treas., Benevians, Inc., 17 E. 
42nd St.; assoc. editor, American Histori- 
cal Co., 90 8th Ave., New York, N. Y. 
M37. ILN. 

Cameron, Miss Hazel C(rabill). M.A., Co- 
lumbia, 26. Asst. prof, physiology and nu- 
trition, West Virginia Univ.; assoc. physi- 
ologist, West Virginia Agric. Exp. Sta., 
Morgantown, W. Va. M31F33. NC. 



Cameron, Dr. Hugh S(tuart). D.V.M., 

Cornell, 31; M.S., 32; Ph.D., 35. Asst. 
prof., Dept. Veterinary Science, Univ. Cal- 
ifornia, Davis, Calif. M37F38. N. 

Cameron, Dr. J(oseph) M(axwell). M.D., 
Pittsburgh, 29. Attending neurosurgeon, 
St. Margaret Memorial Hosp., Pittsburgh, 
and Pittsburgh City Home and Hosp., May- 
view, Pa. M38. N. 

Cameron, Dr. Norman (Alexander). 
Ph.D., Michigan, 27; M.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 33. Prof, psychology and acting 
chairman Dept., Univ. Wisconsin, Madi- 
son, Wis. M28F31. IKN. 

Cameron, Norman W. State Teachers Col., 
West Chester, Pa. M3iR35- Q- 

Cameron, Prof. S(idney) H(erbert). Dept 
Agric, Univ. California Los Angeles, Los 
Angeles, Calif. M25F33R39. OGC. 

Cameron, Prof. Thomas W(right) M(ore). 
M.A., Edinburgh, 21; Ph.D., 23; D.Sc, 
26. Dir., Inst. Parasitology, Macdonald 
College, Que.; prof, parasitology, McGill 
Univ., Montreal, Que., Canada. M34F40. 
FNO. 

Cameron, Walter Scott. A.M., Columbia, 
11. Asst. physical science, Wadleigh High 
School, New York, N. Y. (2625 Grand 
Ave.) M07. CGB. 

Cameron-Wright, Horace. International 
Clinic, Sherwood Park, Tunbridge Wells, 
Kent, England. M27F32. BN. 

Camp, Dr. A(rthur) F(orrest). Ph.D., 
Washington, 23. Horticulturist in charge, 
Citrus Exp. Sta., Lake Alfred, Fla. M24- 
F31. G. 

Camp, Prof. Charles Lewis. A.M., Colum- 
bia, 16; Ph.D., 23. Assoc, prof, paleon- 
tology and dir. Mus. Paleontology, Univ. 
California, Berkeley, Calif. (978 Grizzly 
Peak Blvd.) M34F34- F. 

Camp, Prof. Chester Claremont. A.M., 
Cornell, 15; Ph.D., 17. Prof, mathematics, 
Univ. Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebr. M28F29. 
ABM. 

Camp, E. W., Jr. Gen. Delivery, Emory 
University, Ga. M32R32. 

Camp, Frederick A. M.A., Columbia, 87. 
Lake Waccabuc, N. Y. M06F21. E. 

Camp, George Dashiell. B.S., A. and M. 
Col. Texas, 14, Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 
16, Harvard, 16. Consulting engineer, 
Apartado 1005, Mexico, D. F., Mexico. 
M31. MEB. 

Camp, Prof. Thomas R(inggold). S.M., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 25. Assoc, prof, 
sanitary engng., Massachusetts Inst. 
Tech., Cambridge, Mass. (33 Copley St., 
Newton, Mass.) M36. MCN. 

Camp, W(endell) H(olmes). Dept. Bot- 
any, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. 
M24F33R35. GE. 



\20 



Directory of Members 



Camp, Dr. William G(ordon). Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia, 37. 435 Riverside Drive, New 
York, N. Y. M40. GQF. 

Campbell, Arthur Forward. 115 Petenbon 
St., Boston, Mass. M34R34. 

Campbell, Dr. Arthur S(hackleton). A.M., 
Harvard, 24; Ph.D., California, 26. Prof, 
zoology, St. Mary's College, Calif. (301 1 
Regent St., Berkeley, Calif.) M28F30. FGN. 

Campbell, Dr. Berry. Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins. Asst. prof, antomy, Univ. Oklahoma, 
Oklahoma City, Okla. (801 N. East 13th 
St.) M39. NHF. 

Campbell, Dr. Charles D(uncan). M.S., 
Michigan, 31; Ph.D., Stanford, 34. Instr. 
petrology, State Col. Washington, Pull- 
man, Wash. M37. E. 

Campbell, Charles G. Pres. and gen. mgr., 
Kewaunee Mfg. Co., Kewaunee, Wis. 
(1107 Milwaukee St.) M39. CM. 

Campbell, Charles L(incoln). B.S., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 09. Chairman board 
directors, E. B. Badger and Sons Co., 
Boston, Mass. (Box 1142, Greenwich, 
Conn.) M39. CBL. 

Campbell, Dr. C(harles) Macfie. M.A., 
Edinburgh, 97; M.D., 11. Prof, psychiatry, 
Harvard Med. School; med. dir. Boston 
Psychopathic Hosp., Boston, Mass. M17- 
F23. NI. 

Campbell, C(larence) B(arton). B.S. in 
M.E., Michigan, 19. Mgr., Land Turbine 
Engng., Westinghouse Electric and Mfg. 
Co., Lester, Pa. (8 College Ave., Swarth- 
more, Pa.) M40. MBA. 

Campbell, Dr. C(larence) G(ordon). M.D., 
University and Bellevue, 90. 455 Madison 
Ave., New York, N. Y. M34F34. HFK. 

Campbell, C(larence) J(ames). Dartmouth 
Med. School, Hanover, _N. H. M28F33- 
R34. NBF. 

Campbell, Dr. Coyne Herbert. M.D., Rush, 
28. Chief staff, Coyne Campbell Clinic and 
Sanatarium ; instr. neuropsychiatry, Univ. 
Oklahoma School Med., Oklahoma City, 
Okla. (717 N. Robinson St.) M38. NHI." 

Campbell, Dr. Dan H(ampton). M.S., 
Washington Univ., 32; Ph.D., Chicago, 
35. Asst. prof., Dept. Bacteriology and 
Parasitologv, Univ. Chicago, Chicago. 111. 
M39. CN. 

Campbell, Dr. David Kenneth. D.D.S., 
Pennsylvania, 05. Ridgebury Road, Dan- 
bury, Conn. M33. Nd. 

Campbell, Dr. Don M. M.D., Detroit 
Col. Med. 161 3 David Whitney Bldg., De- 
troit, Mich. M37. NQI. 

Campbell, Dr. Donald F(rancis). M.A., 
Harvard, 95 ; Ph.D., 98. Consulting ac- 
tuary, 160 N. La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
(1209 Hinman Ave., Evanston, 111.) M34- 
F34. ABC. 



Campbell, Dr. Douglas Gordon. M.D., To- 
ronto, 28. Psychiatrist, 231 E. 54th St., 
New York, N. Y. M39. NHI. 

Campbell, Dr. Douglas H(oughton). 
Ph.D., Michigan, 86. Stanford University, 
Calif. M85F88V37. G. President of Pacific 
Division, 1930. 

Campbell, Dr. Eva G(albreath). M.A., 
Ohio State, 19; Ph.D., 31. Prof, biology, 
Guilford College, N. Car. M21F33. N. 

Campbell, Dr. F(rank) L(eslie). M.S., 
Rutgers, 24; D.Sc, Harvard, 26. Assoc, 
prof, entomology, Ohio State Univ., Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. M27F33. F. 

Campbell, F(rank) S. Lago Oil and 
Transport Co., Ltd., Aruba, D. W. I. 
M38R38. CM. 

Campbell, George A(shley). Ph.D., Har- 
vard, 01. Res. engineer (retired), Amer. 
Telephone and Telegraph Co., New York, 
N. Y. (129 Bellevue Ave., Upper Mont- 
clair, N. J.) M11F13. ABM. 

Campbell, Dr. Gilbert (Whitney). M36- 
D38. IQ. 

Campbell, H. Louise. M.S., Columbia, 19; 
Ph.D., 28. Res. asst. chemistry, Columbia 
Univ., New York, N. Y. (435 W. 119th 
St.) M30. C. 

Campbell, H(erbert) G(rant). M21D34. 
HI. 

Campbell, Dr. Ian. A.M., Oregon, 24; 
Ph.D., Harvard, 31. Assoc, prof, petrology, 
California Inst. Tech., Pasadena, Calif. 
(405 S. Bonnie Ave.) M24F31. E. 

Campbell, J(ames) K(enneth). no W. 
40th St., New York, N. Y. M25R34. M. 

Campbell, Miss Jessie Louise. M.A.. Rad- 
cliffe, 36. Instr., Western Maryland Col., 
Westminster, Md. M39. G. 

Campbell, Miss Jessie R(uth). A.B., Syra- 
cuse, 99. Teacher, High School, Holly- 
wood, Calif. (5400 Brynhurst Ave., Los 
Angeles, Calif.) M22. A. 

Campbell, John N(elson). B.V.Sc, To- 
ronto. Practicing veterinarian, Truman, 
Minn. M31. NOQ. 

Campbell, Prof. J(ohn) W(illiam). M.A., 
Queen's, 13; Ph.D., Chicago, 15. Prof, 
mathematics, Univ. Alberta, Edmonton, 
Alta., Canada. M31F32. ABD. 

Campbell, Dr. Leslie L(yle). M.A., Wash- 
ington and Lee, 87; Ph.D., 91; A.M., 
Harvard, 04. Prof, emeritus physics, Sim- 
mons Col., Boston; res. fellow, Wash- 
ington and Lee Univ., Lexington, Va. 
(101 E. Washington St., Lexington, Va.) 
M99F10. B. 

Campbell, Miss Marion I(sabell). To- 
peka State Hosp., Topeka, Kans. (M31- 
R 3 4)M 3 8R 3 9. INK. 

Campbell, Mr. M(arion) S(am) A. Senior 
bacteriologist, Indiana State Board 
Health, Indianapolis, Ind. M36. NCG. 



Individual Members 



3 21 



Campbell, Miss Mildred F(lorence). M.A.. 
Michigan, 36. High school teacher. Short- 
ridge High School, Indianapolis. Ind. (29 
X. Hawthorne Lane) M40. FGH. 

Campbell, Prof. Percy A. M.S. A., Iowa 
State, 06. Dir. feed research, Eastern 
States Farmers Exchange, Springfield, 
Mass. (120 Spruceland Ave.) M30. OC. 

Campbell, Dr. R(obert) S(amuel). M.S., 
Chicago, 29 ; Ph.D., 32. Senior forest ecol- 
ogist, U. S. Forest Service, Washington, 
D. C. (4545 32nd Road N., Arlington, Va.) 
M2SF31. GFO. 

Campbell, Roy E(lliott). M.S., California, 
25. Entomologist, U. S. Bur. Entomology 
and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C. 
(Alhambra, Calif.) M.34F25. FG. 

Campbell, Prof. Roy J(ones). Salem Col., 
Winston-Salem, X. Car. M34F34R34. X. 

Campbell, T(homas) N(olan). M.A., 

Texas, 36. Instr. anthropology, Univ. 

Texas, Austin, Tex. (isi8 Preston Ave.) 
M39. H. 

Campbell, Thomas P(atterson). Sc.D., 
Colorado School Mines, 24. Pres.. Camp- 
bell Investment Co., Denver, and Creede 
Mills, Inc., Creede, Colo. M25F33. CM. 

Campbell, Prof. William. M34F34D36. M. 

Campbell, William H. Dir. research. 
Desert Lab. Southwest Mus., Tweutvnine 
Palms. Calif. M39. HE. 

Campbell, Dr. William W(allace). Moi- 
F01L03D38. D. President, 1915- 

Campkin, Wilbert (Lee). 2136 Angus St., 
Regina, Sask., Canada. M37R37. M. 

Campos, Prof. Juan D. Central Philippine 
Col., Jaro, Iloilo, P. I. M40. G. 

Campsen, Herman M., Jr. A.M., Columbia, 
23. Chairman. Dept. Physical Science, 
Bronx High School Science, New York, 
X. Y. (643 E. 234th St.) M 3 9- CB. 

Camsell, Dr. Charles. LL.D., Queens, 22, 
Alberta, 29, Manitoba, 36. Deputy Minis- 
ter, Dominion Dept. Mines and Resources, 
Ottawa, Ont., Canada. (240 Mariposa 
Road, Rockclifre Park) M38. E. 

Canaie, Dr. Luiz. Commissao Technica de 
Piscicultura, Caixa 25, Fortalez, Ceara, 
Brazil, S. A. M36R36. F. 

Canavan, Dr. Myrtelle M(ay). M.D., 
Woman's Med. Col. Pennsylvania, 05. 
Curator. Warren Mus., Harvard Med. 
School ; pathologist, Massachusetts Dept. 
Mental Health, Boston, Mass. (240 Long- 
wood Ave.) M13F27. IKN. 

Canavan, Dr. William Paul. School Tropi- 
cal Med., San Juan, P. R. M26F33R37. 
FN. 

Candela, Dr. P(ompeo) B(enjamin). 576 
18th St., Brooklyn, X. Y. M39R39. HLN. 



Candon, Prof. Basil H(arte). B.S., Ford- 
ham, 15. Prof, biology, St. Michaels Col., 
Winooski Park, Vt. M39. FGX. 

Candy, Prof. Albert Luther. Univ. Xe- 
braska, Lincoln. Xebr. M19F33R35. A. 

Canfield, David H. B.A.. Minnesota, 28. 
Supt, Rockv Mountain Xat. Park, Estes 
Park, Colo. M38. EHF. 

Canfield, Dr. R(obert) H(awthorne). U. S. 
Naval Res. Lab., Bellevue, Anacostia, 
D. C. M32F33R33. BA. 

Canfield, Roy H(yer). M.F., Yale, 30. 
1 155 E. Waverlv St., Tucson, Ariz. M27- 
F 3 r. G. 
Canis, Edward N. M12D33. 

Canisia, Sister Mary. Mt. Mary Col., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. M36R36. K. 

Cann, Prof. Jessie Y(ereance). A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 10; Ph.D., 11. Prof, chemistry, 
Smith Col., Northampton, Mass. M29F33. 
CBA. 

Cann, Dr. Sarah D(unlap) (Mrs. Charles 
S.). Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 34. 4502 Ro- 
land Ave., Baltimore, Md. M36. I. 

Cannaday, D. A. Univ. Richmond, Rich- 
mond, Va. (?) M32R32. 

Cannan, Prof. R. Keith. D.Sc, London, 
29. Prof., Xew York Univ. Col. Med., Xew 
York, X. Y. M35F35. CX. 

Canney, Charles G. B.Sc, Northeastern, 
38. Observer, Amer. Steel and Wire Co., 
Worcester. Mass. (55 S. Village Green. 
Ipswich. Mass.) M40. CMB. 

Canning, Graeme A(lexander). M.A., Co- 
lumbia, 24; Ph.D., Chicago, 28. 1933 W. 
Cumberland Ave., Knoxville, Tenn. M32- 
F33. FX. 

Canning, Prof. John B(ennet). Stanford 
University, Calif. M32F36R37. KA. 

Cannon, Miss Annie J(ump). D.Sc, Del- 
aware, 18, Oxford, 25, Oglethorpe, 35, Mt. 
Holyoke, 37; D.Astr., Groningen, 21; 
LL.D., Wellesley, 25. Curator and astron- 
omer, Harvard Observatorv, Cambridge 
Mass. M13F18. D. 

Cannon, Edward E. B.S., Chicago. 6901 
S. Loomis Blvd., Chicago, 111. M38. XIF. 

Cannon, Howard J. A.B., Western Re- 
serve, 24. Dir. lab. vitamin technology, 
141 1 E. 60th St., Chicago, 111. (1545 E. 
60th St.) M32. CX. 

Cannon, Dr. Paul R(oberts). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 21 ; M.D., Rush, 26. Prof, pathology, 
Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. M31F33. XF. 
Vice president for Section on Medical 
Sciences (N ), 1940. 

Cannon, Dr. Walter B(radford). A.M., 
Harvard, 97; M.D., 00. Prof, physiology, 
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. M04- 
F06. XF. President, 1939. 



322 



Directory cf Members 



Cannon, Dr. W(illiam) A(ustin). A.M., 
Stanford, oo ; Ph.D., Columbia, 02. Lec- 
turer botany, Stanford University, Calif. 
M02F05. G. 

Cano, J(uan) E(lisco) Osorio. Doca 465, 
Of. 7, Lima, Peru, S. A. M40. KH. 

Canon, Prof. Helen. M.S., Cornell, 27; 
Ph.D., 30. Prof, home economics, Cornell 
Univ., Ithaca, N. Y. (204 Cayuga Heights 
Road) M33. K. 

Canovas (-Garcia), Dr. Cirilo. Callo Nave- 
las 8, Valencia, Spain. M35R36. FG. 

Cantarow, Prof. Abraham. M.D., Jefferson, 
24. Assoc, prof, medicine, Jefferson Med. 
Col.; biochemist, Jefferson Hosp., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. M34F34. NCG. 

Cantelo, Dr. Robert Charles. M.Sc, 
Queens, 20; M.A., Toronto, 22; Ph.D., 
Cincinnati, 26. Asst. prof, chemical engng., 
West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, W. Va. 
M31F33. CAB. 
Canter, Prof. Hall. M04F09D39. C. 

Cantley, Col. Thomas. LL.D., Dalhousie, 
19. New Glasgow, N. S., Canada. M08- 
L23F40. MLP. 

Cantor, A(braham). M.A., Pennsylvania, 
37. Instr. bacteriology, Labs. Public 
Health and Preventive Med., Univ. Penn- 
sylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. M40. NCF. 

Cantrell, William (Fletcher). M.S., 
Georgia, 39. Instr. zoology, Univ. Georgia, 
Athens, Ga. M40. F. 

Cantwell, Dr. William Findlay. M.D., Min- 
nesota, 21. Gen. surgeon, International 
Falls, Minn. (909 Riverside St.) M39. BN. 

Canty, Alan. 171 1 Barium Tower, Detroit, 
Mich. M38. I. 

Canzanelli, Dr. Attilio. M.D., Tufts, 36. 
Assoc, prof. physiology, Tufts Med. 
School, Boston, Mass. -'(37 Walnut St., 
Arlington, Mass.) M36F38. N. 

Cape, Miss Jane. M.S., Wisconsin, 24; 
Ph.D., 32. Prof, home economics, Antioch 
Col., Yellow Springs, Ohio. M39. CN. 

Capecelatro, Dr. Ettore. M.D., Naples, 13. 
Dir., Neotherapic Res. Lab., New York, 
N. Y. M34. NC. 

Capell, Dr. Leonard T(homas). M.S., 
Ohio State, 22; Ph.D., 25. Assoc, editor, 
Chemical Abstracts, Ohio State Univ., 
Columbus, Ohio. (159 Tibet Road) M38. C. 

Capell, Robert G(oode). B.S., Georgia 
School Technology, 35. Chief chemist, 
Floridin Co., Warren, Pa. (220 Liberty 
St.) M40. MCA. 

Capen, Dr. Samuel P(aul). M.A., Tufts, 
98; A.M., Harvard, 00; Ph.D., Pennsyl- 
vania, 02; LL.D., Lafayette, 20, Chicago, 
32, Pennsylvania, 33, McMaster, 38; 
L.H.D., Tufts, 21, Hobart, 25; Litt.D., 
Clark, 1,7 ; Sc.D., George Washington, 27. 
Chancellor, Univ. Buffalo, Buffalo, N. Y. 
M23F25. MQ. 



Caplain, Philip. B.S., Massachusetts Inst. 
Tech., 22. Pres., Capson Hat Co., Fall 
River, Mass. M25. 

Caplan, Herman. 5561 Woodmont St., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. M22L24. 

Caplan, Maurice. 3304 Forest Park Ave., 
Baltimore, Md. M39. PQ. 

Caplan, Samuel James. B.S., Carnegie 
Inst. Tech., 20. Chief chemist, Peerless 
Soap and Chemical Co., Detroit, Mich. 
(225 Merton Road) M39. CNP. 

Caplin, Samuel M(ilton). B.S., Akron, 39- 
Graduate asst. botany, Univ. Akron, Ak- 
ron, Ohio. (158 S. Balch St.) M40. GE. 

Caporale, Peter. 1603 Ellsworth St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. M32R32. BAM. 

Capp, Seth Bunker. Box 2054, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. MML15. KQ. 

Capps, Edna Ward. 1823 Jefferson Place 
NW, Washington, D. C. M30R34. LED. 

Capps, Brother Emmett R. A.B., Illinois, 
37. Graduate student, Catholic Univ. 
Amer., Washington, D. C. (1326 Quincy 
St. NE.) M38. FNQ. 

Capps, Harry M(arcellus), Jr. M.S., Chi- 
cago, 52. 1553 Mound Ave., Jacksonville, 

111. M35. IQ. 

Capps, Dr. Joseph A(lmarin). M.D., Har- 
vard, 95; A.M., 96; D.Sc, Illinois Col., 30. 
Prof, clinical medicine, Univ. Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. (121 5 E. 56th St.) M07F09. N. 

Capps, Prof. Julian H. M.A., Princeton, 
14. Prof, chemistry, Berea Col., Berea, Ky. 
M35F35. CHF. 

Capt, Miss Lucile. S.M., Chicago, 26. 
Asst. prof, biology, Mary Hardin-Baylor 
Col., Belton, Tex. M29. GFE. 

Caraballo, Dr. Cristobal (Julian). Phar.D.. 
D.D.S. Maryland. Dental surgeon, 416 
Tampa St., Tampa, Fla. M40. NdlC. 

Carbys, J(ohn) O(tto). Thiensville, Wis. 
M29. EB. 

Cardarelli, Eugene J(ames). S.M., Har- 
vard, 10. Dir. chemical research, Aro- 
matic Products, Inc.. Springdale, Conn. 
(Soundview Drive, Shore Acres, Mama- 
roneck, N. Y.) M18. C. 

Carder, Frederick. 249 Pine St., Corning, 
N. Y. M17. CM. 

Cardiff, Dr. Ira D. Ph.D., Columbia, 06. 
Pres., Washington Dehydrated Food Co., 
Yakima, Wash. M07F11. G. 

Cardon, P(hilin) V(incent). M.S., Cali- 
fornia. 33. Asst. Chief, U. S. Bur. Plant 
Industry, Washington, D. C. (1730 Crest- 
wood Drive NW.) M29F31. OK. 

Cardwell, Prof. A(lvin) B(oyd). M.S., 
Wisconsin. 27; Ph.D., 30. Head Dept. 
Physics, Kansas State Col., Manhattan 
Ka'ns. M34F34- B. 



Individual Members 



323 



Cardwell, Prof. John C(rean). M.D., New 
York, 88. Prof, emeritus physiology and 
pharmacology, Long Island Col. Med., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (350 Henry St.) M17- 
F28. NpHF. 

Carel, Hubert C. B.S., Minnesota. 2304 La 
Mesa Drive, Santa Monica, Calif. M36. C. 

Carey, Prof. Clifton O'Neal. C.E., Michi- 
gan, 14. Assoc, prof, geodesy and survey- 
ing, Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
M.27F32. MDA. 

Carey, Prof. Cornelia Lee. M.A., Colum- 
bia, 21 ; Ph.D., 23. Asst. prof, botany, Bar- 
nard Col., New York, N. Y. M19F27. G. 

Carey, Dr. Eben J(ames). M.S., Creigh- 
ton, 18; D.Sc, 20; M.D., Rush, 25. Dean 
and prof, anatomy, Marquette Univ. 
School Med., Milwaukee, Wis. (61 19 W. 
Wisconsin Ave., Wauwautosa, Wis.) Mi 5- 
F25. NHQ. 

Carey, Elmer Ellsworth. 6018 La Prada 
Park, Los Angeles, Calif. M3iR34- N. 

Carey, J. Lloyd. 154 N. Pershing St., 
Wichita, Kans. M40. EGC. 

Carhart, F(rank) M(ilton). S.M., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 05. Gen. partner, 
Jackson and Moreland, Park Square Bldg. 
Boston, Mass. M36. M. 

Carhart, Miss Grace M(erle). A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 24. Instr. geology, Hunter Col., 
New York, N. Y. (400 W. 119th St.) 
M29. E. 

Carita. Sister M. (See Sister M. Carita 
Koon). 

Carithers. (Louis) Ward. B.S., Washing- 
ton State, 37. Junior geologist, Howe 
Sound Co., Holden, Wash. M39. EM. 

Carl, Howard F(rederick). M.S., Lehigh, 
35. Junior physicist, U. S. Bur. Mines, 
College Park, Md. (1844 Ontario Place 
NW., Washington, D. C.) M40. BDC. 

Carleton, Dr. Paul W(hittier). Ph.D., 
Harvard, 11. Chemist, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Co., Wilmington, Del. (307 
State St., Penns Grove, N. J.) M28F32. C. 

Carlisle, Dr. Chester L. M.D., Western 
Reserve, 98. Clinical dir. (psychiatrist), 
Veterans' Administration Hosp., Palo 
Alto, Calif. M34F34- N. 

Carlisle, Dr. J(ames) Mallory. M.D.. Tem- 
ple. Member med. staff, Rahway Memo 
rial Hosp. and med. dir., Merck and Co., 
Inc., Rahwav; physician and consultant, 
Westfield, N.'j. M38. NPC. 

Carlisle, Dr. John Howe. M.D., Columbia, 
13. 199 Aycrigg Ave., Passaic, N. J. M36. N. 

Carlson, Dr. Anders J(ohan). M.S.. Min- 
nesota, 25 ; Ph.D., California, 29. Assoc, 
prof, petroleum engng., Univ. California 
Col. Mining, Berkeley, Calif. M39. MCA. 

Carlson, Dr. Anton J(ulius). A.M.. Augus- 
tana, 99; LL.D., 23; Ph.D., Stanford, 02, 



M.D., Lund, 18. Prof, physiology and 
chairman Dept., Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 
111. M02F06. N. Vice president for Section 
on Medical Sciences (N), 1925- 

Carlson, Prof. C(arl) O(lof). A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 18. Prof, biology and curator 
Mus., Doane Col., Crete, Nebr. M17F33. 
FGE. 

Carlson, Dr. Hjalmar E(dwin). 3925 
Adams St., Kansas City, Kans. M33R34- N. 

Carlson, Dr. J(ames) Gordon. Ph.D., 

Pennsylvania, 35- Asst. prof, zoology, 
Univ. Alabama, University, Ala. M31. F. 

Carlson, Dr. Margery C(laire). M.S., Wis- 
consin, 20; Ph.D., 25. Asst. prof, botany, 
Northwestern Univ., Evanston, 111. (M28- 
F 3 iR36)M 3 9F3i. G. 

Carlsson, Miss Victoria (Emma). M.A., 
M.Sc, Columbia, 23; Ph.D., 29. Prof, hy- 
giene and head Dept., Women's Col., 
Univ. North Carolina, Greensboro, N. Car. 
(130 Tate St.) M27F33. CQ. 

Carlton, Dave P. A.B., Stanford, 15. Geol- 
ogist, Humble Oil and Refining Co., 
Houston, Tex. M32. E. 

Carlton, Guy W(illiam). M27D38. M. 

Carlton, H(enry) Clyde. 42 Grassmere 
Park, Rochester, N. Y. M25F33R37. CBD. 

Carman, Prof. Albert P(ruden). A.M., 

Princeton, 83; D.Sc, 86. Prof, emeritus 
phvsics, Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 111. (910 
W. California St.) M07F10. B. 

Carman, Dr. J(oel) Ernest. M.Di., Iowa 
State Teachers Col., 03; Ph.D., Chicago, 
15. Prof, geology and chairman Dept., 
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. Mn- 
F15. E. 

Carman, Dr. Katharine W(oodley). Ph.D.. 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech., 33. Co-mgr. 
and geologist, North Central Oil Corp., 
Evansville, Ind. (123 S.E. 1st St.) M39. E. 

Carmichael, Prof. Emmett B(ryan). M.S., 
Colorado, 22; Ph.D., Cincinnati, 27. Prof. 
physiological chemistry, Univ. Alabama 
School Med., University, Ala. M28F29. 
NC. 

Carmichael, H (enry) St.G(eorge) 
T(ucker). Kyrock, Ky. M27. EKM. 

Carmichael, Dr. Leonard. Ph.D., Harvard, 
24; Sc.D., Tufts, 37; LL.D., Boston, 38, 
Colgate, 38; Litt.D., Portia, 39- Pres., 
Tufts Col., Medford, Mass. M24F30. I. 
Secretary of Section on Psychology (I), 
1937— ■■ 

Carmichael, Norman. Rancho Santa Fe, 
Calif. M36R38. M. 

Carmichael, Dr. R(obert) D(aniel). Ph.D., 
Princeton, 11. Dean Graduate School and 
prof, mathematics, Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 
111. (207 W. Washington St.) M06F08. AL. 
Vice president for Section on Mathematics 
(A), 1934. 



3 2 4 



Directory of Members 



Carmody, Dr. Don Richard. 1815 La 
Porte Ave., Whiting, Ind. M38R39. CBP. 

Carmody, Dr. Walter R(obert). M.S.. 
Catholic, 24, Ph.D., 26. Asst. prof, chem- 
istry, Reed Col., Portland, Oreg. M37. C. 

Carney, Prof. Frank. M07F10D34. E. 

Carney, W. F. Hobbs Hotel, Joliet, 111. 
M39. C. 

Carolan, Edgar A. Bidart, Basses-Pyrenees, 
France. Mi 7. M. 

Carothers, Dr. E(stella) Eleanor. M.A., 
Kansas, 12; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 16. Res. 
assoc. zoology, Univ. Iowa, Iowa City, 
Iowa. M12F20. F. 

Carothers, Wallace H(ume). M24F25- 
D37. C. 

Carp, Dr. Louis. M.D., Columbia, 15. Dir. 
surgery, Riverside Hosp. ; visiting sur- 
geon, Welfare Hosp.; consulting surgeon, 
U. S. Marine Hosp., Ellis Island, New 
York, N. Y. M36. N. 

Carpenter, Albert C. Pres., Lesh Oil Co., 
Ottawa, Kans. (304 E. nth St.) M26. EH. 

Carpenter, Dr. A(llen) F(uller). M.A., 
Nebraska, 09; Ph.D., Chicago, 15; D.Sc, 
Hastings, 37. Prof, mathematics, Univ. 
Washington, Seattle, Wash. M18F18. A. 

Carpenter, Prof. Arthur Howe. A.M., 
Ohio, 14. 811 Bell Ave., LaGrange, 111. 
M25F31. MED. 

Carpenter, Arthur (Wiltse). Explorers 
Club, 10 W. 72nd St., New York, N. Y. 
M28L 3 iF33- EBG. 

Carpenter, Charles K(napp). Ph.B., Mich- 
igan, 96. Pastor, Gary Memorial Methodist 
Church, Wheaton, 111. (216 N. Main St.) 
M05. FG. 

Carpenter, Prof. C(larence) R(aymond). 
M.A., Duke, 29; Ph.D-., Stanford, 32. 
Assoc, prof., Dept. Education and Psy- 
chology, Pennsylvania State Col., State 
College, Pa. M36F36. I. 

Carpenter, Prof. Clark B. M.S., Massa- 
chusetts Inst. Tech., 32. Prof, metallurgy, 
Colorado School Mines, Golden, Colo. 
(1809 Ford St.) M39. ABC. 

Carpenter, Prof. Clifford D. Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 15. Columbia Univ., New York, 
N. Y. M13F33. CBA. 

Carpenter, Dr. Edwin F(rancis). A.M., 
Harvard, 23; Ph.D., California, 25. Prof, 
astronomy and dir. Steward Observatory, 
Univ. Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. M23F26. DB. 
Secretary of Southwestern Division, 19 30- 
35; president, 1939. 

Carpenter, Miss Esther. M.S., Wisconsin, 
27; Ph.D., Yale, 32. Asst. prof, zoology, 
Smith Col., Northampton, Mass. M34. FN. 

Carpenter, Floyd F. Roosevelt High 
School, Dayton, Ohio. M30R32. FCI. 

Carpenter, George O. M20D39. PCM. 



Carpenter, Harry A(llen). M.S., Roches- 
ter, 12; A.M., Columbia, 13. Specialist in 
science, Public Schools; lecturer educa- 
tion, Univ. Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. 
(Nichols Road, Spencerport, N. Y.) M33- 
F34. QC. 

Carpenter, John Tyer. 1219 N. 8th St., 
Boise, Idaho. M32R36. E. 

Carpenter, Leonard. Veritas Orchards, 
Route 4, Medford, Oreg. M06L31. OM. 

Carpenter, Louis G(eorge). M83F89D35. 
MLO. 

Carpenter, Roswell D. East Douglas, Mass. 
M31. O. 

Carpenter, Dr. Thome M(artin). Ph.D., 
Harvard, 15. Acting dir., Nutrition Lab., 
Carnegie Inst. Washington, 29 Vila St.. 
Boston, Mass. M11F21. CF. 

Carpenter, W r arwick S(tevens). Box 819, 
Santa Barbara, Calif. M29R37- OFE. 

Carr, Arthur B(laine). 510 N. Buxton St., 
Indianola, Iowa. M30R32. B. 

Carr, Prof. E(dward) L(ivingston). 109 
Camden St., Jackson, Tenn. M29R33. AB. 

Carr, Miss Emma P(erry). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 10; D.Sc, Alleghany, 39. Prof, 
chemistry, and chairman Dept., Mt. Hol- 
voke Col., South Hadlev, Mass. (27 Wood- 
bridge St.) M24F28. C. 

Carr, Prof. F(rancis) Easton. A.M., Ober- 
lin, 12; Ph.D., Chicago, 22. Prof, mathe- 
matics and astronomy, Oberlin Col., 
Oberlin, Ohio. (284 Forest St.) M29F30. 
DAQ. 

Carr, Miss Genevieve M(argaret). Roose- 
velt Federal Road, Hollywood, Fla. Mi 8- 
R35. QK. 

Carr, Prof. Harvey A. Univ. Chicago, Chi- 
cago, 111. M32F33R35. I. 

Carr, Dr. Henry P(ardee). M.D., Harvard, 
20. Member field staff, International 
Health Div., Rockefeller Foundation, New 
York, N. Y. (Apartado 157, Havana, 
Cuba) M32. N. 

Carr, Dr. James Gray. M.D.. Northwest- 
ern. 30 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
M39. N. 

Carr, Prof. Jesse L(aurence). Asst. prof, 
pathology, Univ. California Med. School; 
city and county pathologist; dir. labs., 
Franklin Hosp.; visiting pathologist, San 
Francisco City and County Hosp., San 
Francisco, Calif. (<U San Andreas Way) 
M36F38. N. 

Carr, Miss Katherine. Morehead State 
Teachers Col., Morehead, Ky. M33R.35- 
FH. 

Carr, Dr. L(owell) J(uilliard). Ph.D., 
Michigan, 25. Dir., Michigan Child Guid- 
ance Inst.; assoc. prof, sociology, Univ. 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. ( Hampstead 
Lane) M40. K. 



Individual Members 



3 2 5 



Carr, Dr. Malcolm Wallace. D.D.S., Penn- 
sylvania, 22. Dir. oral surgery and visiting 
oral surgeon, Metropolitan Hosp. and 
Knickerbocker Hosp.; attending oral sur- 
geon, New York Polyclinic Med. School 
and Hosp., New York, N. Y. (28 E. 70th 
St.) M34F39. Nd. 

Carr, M(aurice) L(eroy). E.E., Illinois, 
11. Dir., Pittsburgh Testing Lab., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. M18F31. MPB. 

Carr. Paul R. 3023 Packard St., Long 
Island City, X. Y. M29R32. HLK. 

Carr, Dr. Ralph Howard. M.S.. Wisconsin, 
06; Ph.D.. 13. Prof, agric. chemistry, Pur- 
due Univ., La Fayette, Ind. (27 N. Salis- 
bury St., West Lafayette, Ind.) M17F24. C. 

Carragan, Prof. G(eorge) Howard. M.E.. 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., 18; Ph.D., 
Chicago, 25. Prof, physics. Rensselaer 
Polvtechnic Inst., Trov, N. Y. M27F33. 
BMD. 

Carrasco Calvo, Juan L. (See Juan L. 
Carrasco Calvo). 

Carraway, Thomas W. 3636 Lovers Lane, 
Dallas, Tex. M32. ABD. 

Carrel, Dr. Alexis. M.D., Lyon, 00; Sc.D., 
Columbia, 13, Brown, 20, Princeton, 20; 
M.D., Queens (Belfast), 19; LL.D.. Cali- 
fornia, 36, L T niv. State New York, 37. 
Manhattan, 38. Member emeritus. Rocke- 
feller Inst. Med. Res., New York, N. Y. 
M28F31. x. 

Carreon, Dr. Manuel L(ingad). M.A., 
Minnesota. 21; Ph.D., Columbia, Chicago. 
Minnesota, 23. Technical asst., Dept. Pub- 
lic Instruction; exec, officer and sec, Nat. 
Council Education, Manila, P. I. (M34- 
F34R38)M 4 oF 3 4. QIK. 
Carrero, Jose O(riol). B.S.. Illinois. Asst. 
chemist, U. S. Dept. Agric, Puerto Rico 
Agric. Exp. Sta., Mavaguez, P. R. (57 
S. R. Palmer St.) M40. CO. 

Carrick, Prof. C. W. Purdue Univ., La 
Fayette, Ind. M34F34R34- O. 

Carrick, Prof. D(oak) B(ain). Cornell 
Univ., Ithaca, X. Y. M28F28R32. G. 

Carrie, G. M. 1050 Canada Cement Bldg., 
Montreal, Que., Canada. M36R37. M. 

Carrington, Dr. Evelyn M(aurine). M.A., 
Texas, 20; Ph.D., 30. Prof, education. 
Sam Houston State Teachers Col., Hunts- 
ville, Tex. (1614 15th St.) M31. QF 
Carroll, Rev. Anthony G., S.J. M.A.. Bos- 
ton Col.. 29; M.S., Holy Cross, 30; S.T.L., 
Gregorian, 36. Prof, chemistry. Boston 
Col., Chestnut Hill, Mass. M40. CQ. 
Carroll, Francis E. M.S., Wisconsin. Agi- 
cide Labs.. 4668 Teutonia Ave., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. M38. F. 

Carroll, Dr. Franklin B(ache). Ph.D., 
Pennsvlvania, 17- Head Dept. Science, 
Frankford High School, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(17 Elmwood Ave., Xarberth, Pa.) M17- 
F31. G. 



Carroll, Dr. George Gregory. M24D35. X. 

Carroll, Prof. H(erbert) A(llen). South 
Berwick, Maine. M34F34R34. IQ. 

Carroll, Prof. I(saac) S(quire). M.A., Co- 
lumbia, 20. 511 Comstock Ave., Syracuse, 
X. Y. M28F33. AQ. 

Carroll, J(ames) J(udson). (M28R35)- 
M38D38. F. 

Carroll, Prof. Joseph S. 811 Hamilton 
Ave., Palo Alto, Calif. M35F35. M. 

Carroll, Matthew E. Lincoln High School, 
Kansas City, Mo. M31R32. FNC. 

Carroll, Dr. Mitchel. Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 
19. 540 President Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 
M19F25. F. 

Carroll, Rev. Paul L(oyola). M.A., St. 

Louis. 21 ; M.Sc, 22; Ph.D., 31. Asst. prof, 
biologv, Creighton UJniv., Omaha, Nebr. 
M30F33. FN. 

Carroll, Lt. Col. Robert P(atrick). M.A., 
Virginia, 25. Asst. prof, pre-medical biol- 
ogy. Virginia Military Inst., Lexington, 
Va. (513 Jackson Ave.) M31F33. GFQ. 

Carroll, Dr. Robert S(proul). M.D., St. 
Louis, 93, Rush, 97. Med. dir.. Highland 
Hosp., Asheville, N. Car. M13. IN. 

Carroll, Prof. W(illiam) E(rnest). M.S., 
Illinois, 11; Ph.D., 14. Prof, swine hus- 
bandry and head Dept. Animal Hus- 
bandry, UJniv. Illinois; chief swine hus- 
bandry, Illinois Agric. Exp. Sta., Urbana, 
111. M12F21. OCF. 

Carroll, Dr. William R(ichard). M.S.. 
Wisconsin, 25; Ph.D., Minnesota, 32. 
Prof, bacteriologv. Univ. Florida, Gaines- 
ville, Fla. (M34F34R34)M36F 3 4. GNO. 

Carroll, Zoe Wells (See Mrs. Howard John 
Black). 

Carrothers, Dr. George E(zra). 1128 
Olivia Ave., Ann Arbor, Mich. M38R38. Q. 

Carruth, Dr. Frank E(verett). Ph.D., Cor- 
nell, 17. May wood Chemical Works, Mav- 
wood, N. J. M18F33. C. 

Carruth, Dr. R(obert) McG(insey). New 
Roads, La. M32R32. IHE. 

Carruth, Prof. W(illiam) M(assey). A.B., 
Cornell. 01. Prof, mathematics. Hamilton 
Col., Clinton, X. Y. (College Hill) M28- 
F33. A. 

Carruthers, Richard Tallant. Pres., Bio- 
products, Inc., Port Terminals, Astoria. 
Oreg. M37. AH. 

Carsner, Dr. Eubanks. M.S., Wisconsin. 
14; Ph.D., 17. Senior pathologist, U. S. 
Dept. Agric, Riverside, Calif. M17F21. G. 

Carson, Dr. Charles M(acdonald). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 07. Michigan Col. Mining and 
Tech., Houghton, Mich. M18F28. C. 

Carson Dr. C(hester) C(ecil). 951 Wash- 
ington Ave., Miami Beach, Fla. M24R35. 
01. 



326 



Directory of Members 



Carson, Hampton L(awrence). A.B., 

Pennsylvania, 36. Instr. zoology, Univ. 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. (Newtowr 
Square, Pa.) M38. FGH. 

Carson, John R(enshaw). M.S., Prince- 
ton. Box 316, New Hope, Pa. M28F30. AB. 

Carson, Louis. Asst. valuation engineer, 
State Public Service Commission, New 
York, N. Y. (73 W. 68th St.) M28. MBC. 

Carson, S(tanley) F(rederick). Ph.D., 
Stanford, 40. Microbiologist, Hopkins Ma- 
rine Sta., Pacific Grove, Calif. M38. CBN. 

Carson, Dr. William J. M.D., Maryland, 
13. Instr. surgery, Marquette Univ.; pre- 
ceptor surgeon, 425 E. Wisconsin Ave., 
Milwaukee, Wis. M36F36. N. 

Carssow, Charles. Sales engineer, Wash- 
ington Water Power Co., Moscow, Idaho. 
M34. M. 

Carstarphen, Fred(erick) C(harles). 
D.Eng., Colorado School Mines, 32. Con- 
sulting mining and civil engineer; vice 
pres., Tenderfoot Mining Co., 1010 First 
Nat. Bank Bldg., Denver, Colo. (721 Ma- 
rion St.) M18. BCM. 

Carstens, Carl C. M33D39. KIH. 

Cart, Dr. Jacob F(rederick). D.D.S., 
Northwestern, 17. Dentist, 509 Jefferson 
Bldg., Peoria, 111. (322 W. Carrington 
Ave.) M40. Nd. 

Carter, Dr. Albert S(mith). M.S., Wis- 
consin, 25 ; Ph.D., 27. Res. chemist, E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours and Co., Wilming- 
ton, Del. (111 S. Bancroft Parkway) M29- 
F33. CQ. 

Carter, Mrs. Bettina B(ush) (Mrs. H. A. 
Carter). 329 S. McDonough St., Decatur, 
Ga. M33R33. FGI. 

Carter, Dr. B(urr) Noland. M.D., Vir- 
ginia, 19; Ph.D., Cincinnati, 24. Assoc, 
prof, surgery, Univ. Cincinnati, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. M31F33. N. 

Carter, Prof. Charles. M.S., Parsons, 97. 
Parsons Col., Fairfield, Iowa. M08. EFG. 

Carter, Dr. Charles William. Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins. Asst. geologist, Illinois State 
Geol. Survev, Urbana, 111. (806 W. Main 
St.) M40. EBC. 

Carter, Dr. David W(endel), Jr. 11 22 Med. 
Arts Bldg., Dallas, Tex. M37R37. N. 

Carter, Edgar B(rock). A.B., Indiana, 11. 
Dir., Biol. Div., Abbott Labs., North 
Chicago, 111. (2092 S. Sheridan Road, 
Highland Park, 111.) Mi8F 3 3- C. 

Carter, Prof. Edna. Ph.D., Wiirzberg, 06. 
Prof, phvsics, Vassar Col., Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y. M08F15. B. 

Carter, Dr. Edward P(erkins). M.D., 

Pennsylvania, 94; M.A., Williams, 16. 602 
E. 84th St., New York, N. Y. M08. N. 



Carter, Edwin R. Actuary, Washington 
Nat. Ins. Co., Evanston, 111. (735 Ash- 
land Ave., River Forest, 111.) M29F38. AD. 

Carter, Miss Frances. A.B., California, 38. 
Technical asst., Inst. Exp. Biology, Univ. 
California, Berkelev, Calif. (1626 LeRoy 
Ave.) M33- FN. 

Carter, Dr. Fred(eric) E(dward). D.Ing., 
Karlsruhe, n. Chief, Physical Res. Dept., 
Baker and Co., Inc., Newark, N. J. (54 
Austin St.) M25F25. MBC. 

Carter, G(eorge) R(ichmond). 420 N. 
Charles St., Carlinville, 111. M 3 5R37- MAC. 

Carter, George S(elden). Genetics Lab. 
Supplies, Clinton, Conn. M24F40. FGO. 

Carter, George W. Wayne Univ., Detroit, 
Mich. M32F40. B. 

Carter, George W(illiam). 1886 Lincoln 
St., Salt Lake City, Utah. M37R39. MKE. 

Carter, Dr. Harold D. Dept. Psychology, 
Stanford University, Calif. M31R32. IAQ. 

Carter, Prof. Horace M(itchell). 115 W. 
68th St., New York, N. Y. M 3 sF35R35- C. 

Carter, Dr. Hugh. M.A., Minnesota; 
Ph.D., Columbia. 900 19th St. NW., Wash- 
ington, D. C. M39. KHI. 

Carter, Dr. (James) Hal. Ph.D., Iowa 
State, 31. Instr. chemistry, Western Illi- 
nois State Teachers Col., Macomb, 111. 
(104 Sherman Ave.) M40. CBA. 

Carter, Dr. Jerry Williams, Jr. M.A., In- 
diana, 34; Ph.D., 38. Senior clinical psy- 
chologist, Psychological Clinic, Riley 
Hosp., Indiana Univ. Med. Center; instr. 
psychology, Indiana Univ. Extension Cen- 
ter, Indianapolis, Ind. (M37R38)M40. 
IHN. 

Carter, John D(arlington). M.A., Haver- 
ford, 01. Res. chemist, Philadelphia 
Quartz Co., Philadelphia, Pa. (Lansdowne, 
Pa.) M39. CFE. 

Carter, Miss Marjorie Estelle. B.S., Wil- 
liam and Mary. Georgia State Womans 
Col., Valdosta, Ga. M39. F. 

Carter, Prof. Thomas C. 729 Locust St., 
Alva, Okla. M28F33. F. 

Carter, Dr. Thomas M(ilton). M.A., 
Northwestern, 21 ; Ph.D., Chicago, 23. 
Head Dept. Education and Psychology, 
Albion Col., Albion, Mich. (410 Elizabeth 
St.) M31F33. IQ. 

Carter, Dr. Walter. M.S., Minnesota, 24; 
Ph.D., 28. Entomologist, Pineapple Exp. 
Sta.; prof, entomology, Univ. Hawaii, 
Honolulu, Hawaii. (3^34 Woodlawn 
Drive) M25F33. FG. 

Carter, William T(homas). B.S.. Texas A. 
and M. Col., 98. Senior soil scientist and 
inspector soil surveys, U. S. Bur. Plant 
Industry, Washington, D. C. ; chief, Div. 
Soil Survev, Texas Agric. Exp. Sta., Col- 
lege Station, Tex. M28F31. EGO. 



Individual Members 



327 



Cartier, Henry L. La Salle Inst., Glencoe, 
Mo. M36R36. 

Cartledge, Prof. G(roves) H(oward). 
A.M., Davidson, 11; Sc.D., 37; Ph.D., 
Chicago, 16. Prof, chemistry and head 
Dept., Univ. Buffalo, Buffalo. N. Y. (194 
Cayuga Road. Williamsville, N. Y.) M34- 
F34. C. 

Cartledge, Dr. J(oseph) Lincoln. M.A., 
Pennsylvania, 21 ; Ph.D., Pittsburgh, 28. 
Asst. prof, genetics, West Virginia Univ.; 
asst. geneticist, West Virginia Agric. Exp. 
Sta., Morgantown, W. Va. M23F31. GF. 

Cartwright, W(illiam) B(ell). B.S., Van- 
derbilt. Senior entomologist, U. S. Bur. 
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, La 
Fayette, Ind. M17F26. F. 

Carver, Fred S. Prop., Carver Engng. 
Co., 395 Hudson St., New York, N. Y. 
(Box 49, Short Hills, N. J.) M39. MP. 

Carver, Prof. G(ail) L(uke). A.M., Michi- 
gan. 08. Prof, biology and chairman Pre- 
medical Div., Mercer Univ., Macon, Ga. 
(796 Patterson St.) M91F95E39. FGO. 

Carvin, Dr. Frank Dana. M.E., Pennsyl- 
vania, 24; M.A., Columbia, 30; Ph.D., 
New York, 38. Prof, mechanical engng. 
and head Dept., Newark Col. Engng., 
Newark, N. J. (25 Manor Hill Road, Sum- 
mit, N. J.) M39. MBQ. 

Cary, Benjamin F. 29 Orange St., Wav- 
erly, N. Y. M32R35. N. 

Cary, Prof. Lewis Robinson. 153 Jeffer- 
son Road, Princeton, N. J. (M31F15R34)- 
M37F15. FG. 

Casals-Ariet, Dr. J. M.D., Barcelona, 34. 
Asst. pathology and bacteriology, Rocke- 
feller Inst. Med. Res., New York, N. Y. 
M39. N. 

Casamajor, Dr. Louis. M.A., M.D., Colum- 
bia, 06. Prof, clinical neurology, Columbia 
Univ. Col. Physicians and Surgeons; at- 
tending neurologist and chief Div. Child 
Neurology, Neurological Inst. New York, 
New York, N. Y. M22F27. N. 

Case, Albert Herman. M.S., Michigan 
State, 02; E.M., Columbia, 05. Vice pres. 
and gen. mgr., U. S. Phosphoric Prod- 
ucts Corp., New York, N. Y. (409 W. 
Davis Blvd., Tampa, Fla.) M40. CMO. 

Case, Earl C. Dept. Geology, Univ. Cin- 
cinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. M21F31R37. E. 

Case, Prof. E(rmine) C(owles). M.S., 
Kansas, 93, Cornell, 95; Ph.D., Chicago, 
96. Chairman, Dept. Geology; prof, his- 
torical geology and paleontology; dir. and 
curator fossil vertebrates, Mus. Paleontol- 
ogy, Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
M01F06. E. 

Case, George S(essions). B.S., Case, 04. 
Chairman board, Lamson and Sessions 
Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. (17414 S. Woodland 
Road, Shaker Heights) M39. MK. 



Case, Dr. H(arold) C(layton) M. M.S., 
Illinois, 19; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 31. Prof, 
agric. economics and head Dept., Univ. 
Illinois, Urbana, 111.; dir. LI. S. Farm 
Credit Administration, St. Louis, Mo. 
M37F40. KO. 

Case, Leslie C(line). M.A., Missouri, 25. 
Chief chemist, Gypsy Div., Gulf Oil Corp., 
Tulsa, Okla. (1608 N. Cheyenne Ave.) 
M31. ECM. 

Case, Leslie Verne. M31D38. HEL. 

Case, Mary Elizabeth (See Mrs. Mary 
Case Warner). 

Case, Nelson P(erry). E.E., Stanford, 26. 
Engineer charge, Engng. Service Lab., 
Hazeltine Service Corp., New York, N. Y 
(75 Radnor Road, Great Neck, N. Y.) 
M40. BMD. 

Case, Theodore W(illard). M.Sc, George 
Washington, 18. Pres., Case Res. Lab.. 
Auburn; vice-pres., Pan-American Trade 
Comm., New York, N. Y. ("Casawasco.'' 
Moravia, N. Y.) L17F25. BM. 

Casellas, Ramon Ramos. Box 1589, San 
Juan, P. R. M28R32. M. 

Caselli, Albert V(ergilius). Ch.E., Colum- 
bia, 37. Res. chemist, Shell Development 
Co., Emeryville, Calif. (5527 Shattuck 
Ave., Oakland, Calif.) M40. CM. 

Casey, Dr. Albert E(ugene). M.D., St. 
Louis, 27. Louisiana State Univ. Med. 
Center, New Orleans, La. M32F33. NHA. 

Casey, Dr. John Francis. M.D., Colum- 
bia, 09. Visiting physician, St. Elizabeth's 
Hosp. ; consulting physician, Boston State 
Hosp., Boston, Mass. M23. N. 

Casey, Robert S(abert). M.S., Trinity, 20. 
Chemist, W. A. Sheaffer Pen Co., Fort 
Madison, Iowa. (Denmark Hill) M39. 
CMB. 

Cash, Miss Edith K(atherine). U. S. Bur. 
Plant Industry, Washington, D. C. M26- 
F38. G. 

Cash, Miss Lillian C(laire). B.A., George 
Washington, 09. Asst. pathologist, U. S. 
Bur. Plant Industry, Washington, D. C. 
(126 Tennessee Ave. NE.) M29F31. OG. 

Casler, Fred Q. 810 Atlas Life Bldg., 
Tulsa, Okla. M38. MEA. 

Caslick, Dr. Edward A(lbert). D.V.M., 
Cornell, 22. Veterinarian, Claiborne and 
Ellerslie Farms, Paris, Ky. M24. N. 

Casman, Dr. E. P. Abington Memorial 
Hosp., Abington, Pa. M35F35R36. N. 

Cason, Dr. Hulsey. Ph.D., Columbia, 22. 
Prof, psychology, LTniv. Wisconsin, Madi- 
son, Wis. (3780 Wilshire Blvd., Los An- 
geles, Calif.) M23F25. I. 

Caspari, Dr. Charles E(dward). Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 00. 4588 Parkview Place, 
St. Louis, Mo. M11F16. C. Secretary of Sec- 
tion on Chemistry (C), 1919-20. 



328 



Directory of Members 



Caspari, Dr. Ernst (Wolfgang). Ph.D.. 

Gottingen, 33. Res. fellow biology, La- 

favette Col., Easton, Pa. (522 March St.) 
M40. F. 

Casparis, Dr. Horton Ryan. M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 19. Vanderbilt Hosp., Nashville, 

Term. M27. N. 

Cass, Miss R(uth) Elizabeth. M.A., Syra- 
cuse, 33. Instr. biology, Russell Sage Col., 
Trov, X. Y. (4S9 Pawling Ave.) M40. 
FNG. 

Cassaday, Mrs. Jack T. (Sara Anne). 
A.M., Columbia, 36. Graduate student or- 
ganic chemistry, Columbia Univ., Xew 
York, X. Y. (100 Strawberry Hill, Stam- 
ford, Conn.) M40. C. 

Cassaretto, Frank P. B.S., Loyola (Chi- 
cago). 3704 X. Magnolia Ave., Chicago, 
111. M36. CAB. 

Cassel, Dr. Hans M. Dr. Phil., Berlin. 14. 
Phvsical chemist, Colgate-Palmolive-Peet 
Co., Jersey City, X. J. M38. CBX. 

Cassel, Dr. Homer D. M.D., Western Re- 
serve, 21. Phvsician, 1909 Salem Ave., 
Dayton, Ohio. M36. XH. 

Cassell, Mrs. Irene (Irene McDermott). 
1436 Ravmond Ave., St. Paul, Minn. M30- 
R37. 

Casselman, Dr. A(rthur) J(ay). 30 X. 
2nd St., Camden, X. J. M24F33R35. FGN. 

Casselman, Ralph, n Hvde Road, Bloom- 
field. X. J. M33- CM. 

Cassidy, Dr. Harold G(omez). M.A., Ober- 
lin, 32; Ph.D., Yale. 39. Instr., Dept. 
Chemistrv, Yale Univ., Xew Haven, Conn. 
(161 Mansfield St.) M40. CFQ. 

Cassidy, James P(orter). Carnegie Mus., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. M31. H. 

Castellani, Dr. (Sir) Aldo. M.D., Flor- 
ence, 00. 23 Harlev St., London W. i, 
England. M29F31. XC. 

Castellano, Frank S. 129- Barr Ave.. Hud- 
son Heights, X. J. M33R33- ABC. 

Castelli, Joseph. B.S., Missouri State 
Teachers Col. (Springfield). Box 178, Pa- 
cific, Mo. M39. G. 

Casten, Dr. Virgil G(lenn). M.D., Har- 
vard, 28. Instr. ophthalmology. Harvard 
Med. School; ophthalmic surgeon, Massa- 
chusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Mass- 
achusetts Gen. Hosp., Boston; consultant 
Newton Hosp., Newton, Mass., and Faulk- 
ner Hosp., Boston, Mass. (1038 Centre 
St.. Xewton Centre, Mass.) M40. X. 

Caster, Dr. Kenneth E(dward). M.S., 
Cornell, 31 ; Ph.D., 32. Curator Mus., Univ. 
Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. (2226 Park 
Ave.) M35. EF. 

Castetter, Dr. E(dward) F(ranklin). M.S., 
Pennsylvania State. 21; Ph.D., Iowa State, 
24. Prof, and head Dept. Biology, Univ. 
Xew Mexico. Albuquerque, N. Mex. M21- 
F23. FGH. 



Castle, Edward S(ears). Ph.D.. Harvard, 
29. Asst. prof. gen. physiology, Harvard 
Univ., Cambridge, Mass. M25F33. GF. 

Castle, Prof. Gordon B(enjamin). M.A., 
California, 30; Ph.D., 34. Prof, zoology 
and chairman Dept. and dir. Biological 
Sta., Montana State Univ., Missoula, 
Mont. M35. F. 

Castle, Prof. Hempstead. M.A., Cornell, 
23: Ph.D., Yale, 26. Assoc, prof, botany, 
Yale Univ., Xew Haven, Conn. 1M31R33)- 
M30F40. G. 

Castle, Northrup H(aviland). 3089 Pacific 
Heights Road, Honolulu, Hawaii. M29. 
FE. 

Castle, S(amuel) N(orthrup). Kalaniana- 
ole Highwav, Honolulu, Hawaii. Mi 8- 
F22. M. 

Castle, William A(ugustus). Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 28. Box 04, Granville, Ohio. M29- 
F33. F- 

Castle, Dr. W(illiam) B(osworth). M.D.. 
Harvard, 21, Utrecht, 36; M.S., Yale, 33. 
Prof, medicine, Harvard Med. School; 
assoc. dir., Thorndike Memorial Lab., 
Boston City Hosp., Boston, Mass. (165 
Aspinwall Ave., Brookline, Mass.) M35- 
F35. X- 

Castle, Dr. William E(rnest). M.A., Har- 
vard, 94; Ph.D., 95; LL.D., Denison; 
D.Sc, Wisconsin, 21. Prof, emeritus zool- 
ogy, Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass.: 
res. assoc. genetics, Univ. California Col. 
Agric, Berkeley. Calif. M02F03. F. 

Casto, Dr. E(arle) Ray. M.S., West Vir- 
ginia Wesleyan, 13; M.A., George Pea- 
body, 18; Ph.D.. Clark, 26. Prof, geogra- 
phy and geology. Emory and Henry Col., 
Emory, Va. M27. E. 

Caswell, Dr. A(lbert) E(dward). Ph.D., 

Stanford. 11. Prof, and head Dept. 

Physics, Univ. Oregon, Eugene, Oreg. 
(i960 University St.) M11F16. B. 

Caswell, Prof. Anne T(aylor). M.A., 
Wellesley, 21. Prof, chemistry, Milwaukee- 
Downer Col., Milwaukee, Wis. M21. CQ. 

Caswell, Dr. Robert G(amble). Ph.D.. 
Brown, 14. 30 Charles River Road. Cam- 
bridge, Mass. M31F33. CBX. 

Cates, Walter Herbert. is3 Sierra View 
Road, Pasadena. Calif. M38R38. MDP. 

Catharine, Sister (See Sister Catharine 
Marie). 

Cathcart, Charles S(anderson). M.Sc, 
Rutgers. 89. State chemist. Xew Jersey 
Agric. Exp. Sta.. Xew Brunswick, X. J. 
M34F34. C. 

Catherine, Sister Anna (See Sister Cath- 
erine Lawlor). 

Caton, Dr. William P. M.D. Route 1, 
Alexandria, Va. M39. NFG. 

Catron, Dr. Lloyd (Fullenwider). M.D.. 
Rush. 2585 Gladstone St., Ann Arbor, 
Mich. M39. X. 



Individual Members 



329 



Cattell, Dr. J(ames) McKeen. A.M., La- 
fayette, 83; LL.D., 07; Ph.D., Leipzig, 86; 
Sc.D., Arizona, 24. Editor, "Science," 
Grand Central Terminal, New York, N. Y. 
(Garrison, N. Y.) M95F96L9S. I. Vice 
president for Section on Anthropology and 
Psychology (11), 1898, and for Section on 
Education (L), 1912. Member of the Execu- 
tive Committee, 1921 — (Chairman, 1925 — ). 
/'resident, 1924. 

Cattell, Mrs. J(ames) McKeen. Garrison, 
X. Y. M22L30. 

Cattell, Jaques. Vice pres. and treas., 
Science Press Printing Co.; editor, 
"American Men of Science" and "Ameri- 
can Naturalist," Lancaster, Pa. M27. F. 

Cattell, Dr. McKeen. A.M., Harvard, 17; 
Ph.D., 20; M.D., 24. Assoc, prof, pharma- 
cology, Cornell Univ. Med. Co!., New 
York," X. Y. M14F25. Xp. 

Cattell, Owen. L16D40. 

Cattell, Dr. Psyche. A.M.. Cornell, 25; 
Ed.M., Harvard, 25; Ed.D., 27. Lancaster, 
Pa. M30F33. IQ. 

Cattell, Ware. Managing editor, "Scientific 
Monthly," Smithsonian Inst. Bldg., Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; independent investigator 
biology, George Washington Univ., Wash- 
ington, D. C. M22F33. FB. 

Catto, Alan T. Woodlands Dept., Lake 
Sulphite Co., Nipigon, Ont.. Canada. M37- 
R37. ABC. 

Cauble, Laura A. s=u 5th Ave., New York. 
X. Y. M29R32. K. 

Caudell, A(ndrew) N(elson). M08F13- 
D36. F. 

Caulkins, Asa L(eonard). Route 2, Stock- 
ton, Calif. M22R35- CB. 

Caum, E(dward) L(eonard). M.A., 
Swarthmore, 24. Assoc, botanist, Hawaiian 
Sugar Planters Assoc. Exp. Sta., Hono- 
lulu, Hawaii. M19F33. G. 

Causey, Dr. David. A.M., Illinois, 22; 
Ph.D., California, 25. Prof, zoology, Univ. 
Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. M31F33. FN. 

Causey, Dr. Ottis R(embert). Sc.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 31. Member field staff, Inter- 
national Health Div., Rockefeller Founda- 
tion, Caixa Postal 49, Rio de Janeiro. 
Brazil, S. A. (S.M. N.E. Fortaleza, Brazil, 
S. A.) M37. FN. 

Cauwenberg, Dr. Winfred J(oseph). M.A., 
Buffalo, 28; Ph.D., Columbia, 30. Dir. res., 
Virginia Chemical Corp., Piney River, Va. 
M34F34. c. 

Cave, Prof. H(arry) W(infield). M.S.. 
Kansas State, 16. Prof, dairying and head 
Dept., Oklahoma A. and M. Col., Still- 
water, Okla. M31F33. ONC. 
Cavelti, Dr. John E(lmer). M.S., Wes- 
levan, 20; Ph.D., Yale, 29. Prof, chemistry, 
Allegheny Col., Meadville, Pa. M24F33. 
CQ. 



Cavett, Dr. Jesse W(illiam). M.A., In- 
diana, 24; Ph.D., Iowa, 30. Biochemist, 
Dr. Salsbury's Labs., Charles City, Iowa. 
(203 Clark St.) M36. CN. 

Cayco, Florentine M.A., Columbia, 22. 
Pres., Nat. Univ., Manila, P. I. (Malabon, 
Rizal, P. I.) M39. 

Caylor, Dr. Harold D(elos). M.S., Minne- 
sota, 27; M.D., Rush, 21. Surgeon, Caylor- 
Xickel Clinic and Clinic Hosp., Bluffton, 
Ind. (411 W. Market St.) M31. N. 

Cecelia, Sister Mary (See Sister Mary 
Cecelia Bodman). 

Cech, Anton John. 2726 S. 26th St., 
Omaha, Nebr. M39. CB. 

Cecil, Dr. Rodney. M.S., Iowa State, 26; 
Ph.D., Ohio State, 30. Assoc, entomolo- 
gist, U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant 
Quarantine, Washington, D. C. (Box 
'330. Ventura, Calif.) M27F33. FO. 

Cecil, Dr. Russell L(aFayette). M.D.. 
Med. Col. Virginia, 06; Sc.D., 28. Prof, 
clinical medicine, Cornell LIniv. Med. 
Col.; assoc. attending physician, New 
York Hosp., New York, N. Y. M20F25. N. 

Ceder, Dr. Elmer T. M.D., Minnesota, 30. 
In charge Clinical Res. Lab., V. S. Marine 
Hosp., Baltimore. Md. M39. N. 

Cederberg, Dr. W(illiam) E(manuel). 
Ph.D., Wisconsin, 22. Prof, mathematics, 
Augustana Col., Rock Island,. 111. (2542- 
22'A Ave.) M34F.34- ADB. 

Celeste, Sister Marie (See Sister Marie 
Celeste Stang). 

Celestine, Brother. M.S., Manhattan, 22. 
Head Biology Dept., Manhattan Col., New 
York, N. Y. M37. FG. 

Cendaha, Dr. S(ilverio) M. M.S., Califor- 
nia, 32; Ph.D., 34. Asst. prof, entomology, 
LTniv. Philippines, Agricultural College. 
Laguna, P. I. M34F39. FG. 

Cerecedo, Dr. Leopold R(aymond). Ph.D., 

Munich, 21. Prof, biochemistry, Fordham 
Univ.. Xew York, N. Y. M40. N. 

Chace, Arnold B(uffum). Albion, R. I. 
M08F11R32. A. 

Chace, Edward M(acKay). L.L.M., Na- 
tional, 07. Principal chemist charge Lab. 
Fruit and Vegetable Chemistry, U. S. Bur. 
Agric. Chemistry and Engng., Los An- 
geles, Calif. (1842 N. Gramercv Place) 
M28F33. CO. 

Chace, Dr. Fenner Albert. M.D., Harvard, 
05. Lawton Ave., Tiverton, R. I. M18. N. 

Chace, Dr. Robert R(hodes). M.D., Yale, 
37. Resident ophthalmology, Presbyterian 
Hosp., New York, X. Y. M40. N. 

Chadbourn, Erlon R. Printer, 394 Pleas- 
ant St., Melrose, Mass. M80E34. E. 

Chadwell, Prof. H (arris) Marshall. M.A., 
Harvard, 21; Ph.D., 24. Prof, chemistry 
and chairman Dept., Tufts Col., Medforcl. 
Mass. (52 Forest St., Lexington, Mass.) 
M29F32. CBQ. 



330 



Directory of Members 



Chadwick, Dr. Claude S(impson). M.S., 
Vanderbilt, 28; Ph.D., 36. Asst. prof, biol- 
ogy, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, Tenn. 
(1820 Sweetbriar Ave.) M38. F. 

Chadwick, Prof. George H(alcott). 175 
Bridge St., Catskill, N. Y. M04F08R38. E. 

Chadwick, J. Whitcomb. 501 1 Elmwood 
Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. M32R33. 

Chadwick, L(ewis) C(harles). Dept. Hor- 
ticulture, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, 
Ohio. M29F33R34. GO. 

Chaffee, Dr. E(mory) Leon. Cruft Lab., 
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. M28- 
F30R37. BMA. 

Chaikelis, Dr. Alexander S(arant). M.A., 
Columbia, 27; Ph.D., 33. Asst. prof, biol- 
ogy, City Col., New York, N. Y. M36- 
F3S. NCG. 

Chaikoff, Dr. I(srael) Lyon. M.A., To 
ronto, 25; Ph.D., 27; M.D., 30. Assoc, 
prof, phvsiology, Univ. California School 
Med., Berkeley, Calif. M40. N. 

Chain, Dr. John N(olan). M.D., Cali- 
fornia, 04. Eureka, Calif. M22. FN. 

Chakmakjian, Prof. H(aroutioun) H(o- 
vanes). 5 Blossom St., Arlington Heights, 
Mass. M34F34. C. 

Chako, Nicholas Q. Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 34. Research, Physics Lab., Harvard 
Univ., Cambridge, Mass. (Box 608, Lynn, 
Mass.) M37. BAD. 

Chalkley, Dr. H(arold) W(illiam). M.A., 
Johns Hopkins, 26; Ph.D., 27. Nat. Cancer 
Inst., Bethesda, Md. M31F32. FNG. 

Chalkley, Dr. Lyman. Ph.D., Chicago, 22. 
Box 461, Point Pleasant, N. J. M21F28. 
CBxN". 

Challis, Miss Bertha M(ary). 11 74 Beverly 
Way, Altadena, Calif. M34R37. NO. 



Chalmers, Arthur A. 
M29. 



Broadalbin, N. Y. 



Chalmers, Charles Henry. E.E., Minne- 
sota, 03. Gen. nigr., Chalmers Oil Burner 
Co., Minneapolis, Minn. (523 7th St. SE.) 
M29. MHI. 

Chalmers, James A(masz). B.S., Maine, 
24. Asst. plant supt., Pacific Alkali Co., 
Bartlett, Calif. (142 S. Lone Pine Ave., 
Lone Pine, Calif.) M38. CME. 

Chamberlain, Allen. 121 Granite St., 
Pigeon Cove, Mass. M29. ELO. 

Chamberlain, Dr. Charles J(oseph). A.M., 
Oberlin, 94; D.Sc, 23; Ph.D., Chicago. 97. 
Prof, emeritus botany, Univ. Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. (6127 Greenwood Ave.) Moi- 
F02. G. Secretary of Section on Botany (G), 
1902; vice president, 1923. 

Chamberlain, Dr. C(lark) W(ells). Ph.D., 
Columbia, 10; LL.D., Linfield, 24. Prof, 
physics, Michigan State Col., East Lans- 
ing, Mich. (627 Ardson Road) M03F07. B. 



Chamberlain, Dr. Claude William. 6124 
Cermak Road, Chicago, 111. M35R35. INQ. 

Chamberlain, Glen D(avid). 22 Academy 
St., Presque Isle, Maine. M32R35. FGQ. 

Chamberlain, Glenn J(ohn). Box 5805. 
Route 1, Sacramento, Calif. M34R37. 
MBA. 

Chamberlain, Prof. Joseph P(erkins). 
Ph.D., Columbia, 23; LL.D., 29. LL.D., 
Western Reserve. Prof, public law, Colum- 
bia Univ., New York, N. Y. M32F33. K. 

Chamberlain, Dr. Joseph S(cudder). 
M.Sc, Iowa State, 92; Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins, 99. Prof, organic chemistry, Massa- 
chusetts State Col., Amherst, Mass. M07- 
Fio. C. 

Chamberlain, Dr. Lowell H(olbrook). 
Phar.D., Philadelphia Col. Pharmacy, 99; 
M.D., Jefferson, 00. Pres., Chamberlain 
Labs., Des Moines, Iowa. (3520 Grand 
Ave.) M30. Np. 

Chamberlain, Paul M. Keene Essex Co., 
New York, N. Y. M39. 

Chamberlain, Robert (Ward). 11 18 W. 
7th St., Grand Island, Nebr. M28R32. C. 

Chamberlain, Stuart H(ay). Pupin 
Physics Labs., Columbia Univ., New 
York, N. Y. M34F34R3/. B. 

Chamberlain, Thomas K(night). Brevard, 
N. Car. (M2 9 F33R34)M 3 6F 3 3R36. F. 

Chamberlain, Dr. W(illiam) Edward. 
M.D., California, 16. Prof, radiology, Tem- 
ple Univ. School Med.; radiologist in 
chief. Temple Univ. Hosp., Philadelphia, 
Pa. M32F33. NB. 

Chamberlin, Dr. Edwin Martin. A.M., 
Harvard, 14; Ph.D., 17. Prof, and head 
Dept. Psychology, Boston Univ. Col. 
Business Administration, Boston, Mass. 
(17 Bow Road, Belmont, Mass.) M35 
F35. I. 

Chamberlin, Dr. Joseph C(onrad). M.A., 
Stanford, 24; Ph.D., 29. Assoc, entomolo- 
gist, U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant 
Quarantine, Forest Grove, Oreg. M24F33. 
FG. 

Chamberlin, Dr. Ralph V(ary). Ph.D.. 
Cornell, 05. Univ. LTtah, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. (MoiFioR32)M35Fio. F. 

Chamberlin, Dr. Rollin T(homas). Ph.D., 
Chicago, 07; Sc.D., Beloit, 29. Prof, geol- 
ogy, Univ. Chicago, Chicago, 111. (9300 
Pleasant Ave.) M00F09L20. E. Secretary of 
Section on Geology and Geography (E), 
1917-20; vice president, 1933. Member Ex- 
ecutive Committee, 1936-37. 

Chamberlin, T(homas) R(oscoe). B.A., 
Utah, 20. Assoc, entomologist, U. S. Bur. 
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Univ. 
Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. M34F34. FG. 

Chamberlin, Dr. Veil B. iqsi W. Madison 
St., Chicago, 111. M36R36. K. 



Individual Members 



33i 



Chambers, Dr. Arthur Douglas. Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 96. Mgr., Dyestuffs Div., 
Organic Chemicals Dept., E. I. du Pont 
de Nemours and Co., Wilmington, Del. 
(509 Lore Ave., Gordon Heights) M17- 
F25. C. 

Chambers, Dr. Carl C(ovalt). 79 W. 
Drexel Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. M36R36. 
MBA. 

Chambers, Miss Evelyn Constance. M.S., 
Illinois, 38. Instr., Univ. Minnesota, St. 
Paul, Minn. (2264. Commonwealth Ave.) 
M39. CQ. 

Chambers, Franklin S(mith). B.S., Penn- 
sylvania, 04. Pres. and gen. mgr., Joseph J. 
White, Inc., New Lisbon, N. J. M13. MO. 

Chambers, Dr. George Gailey. M07F15- 
D35. AIQ. 

Chambers, Miss Gladys (Mabel). Touga- 
loo Col., Tougaloo, Miss. M32R34. GF. 

Chambers, Dr. Leslie A(ddison). M.S., 
Texas Christian, 28; Ph.D., Princeton, 30. 
Lecturer biophysics, Univ. Pennsylvania; 
assoc. med. physics and pediatrics, Univ. 
Pennsylvania School Med., Philadelphia, 
Pa. (347 Clearbrook Ave., Lansdowne, 
Pa.) M30F33. FC. 

Chambers, Dr. M(erritt) M(adison). M.A., 
Ohio State, 27; Ph.D., 31. Member staff, 
Amer. Youth Comm., Amer. Council Edu- 
cation, Washington, D. C. (Route 4, Mt. 
Vernon, Ohio) M30F34. QKL. 

Chambers, Dr. Othniel R(obert). Dept. 

Psychology, Oregon State Col., Corvallis, 
Oreg. M29R32. INK. 

Chambers, Robert. M.A., Queens, 02; 
Ph.D., Munich, 08. Res. prof, biology, New 
York Univ., Washington Square Col., 
New York. N. Y. M11F15. F. 

Chambers, Prof. Robert F(oster). M.S., 
Brown, 10; Ph.D., 12. Prof, chemistry. 
Brown Univ., Providence, R. I. (254 Irv- 
ing Ave.) M17F33. C. 

Chambers, Dr. W. H. 21S 6th Ave., Mc- 
Keesport, Pa. M36R36. N. 

Chambers, Dr. Will G(rant). M.A., La- 
fayette, 97; Litt.D., 17; Sc.D., Gettys- 
burg, 34. Dean emeritus, Pennsylvania 
State Col. School Education, State Col- 
lege, Pa. M02F13. HQ. 

Chambers, Dr. William H(arold). M.S., 
Illinois, 17; Ph.D., Washington Univ., 20. 
Assoc, prof, phvsiology, Cornell Univ. 
Med. Col., New York, N. Y. M29F31. N. 

Chambliss, Charles E(dward). M.S., Ten- 
nessee, 94. Agronomist, U. S. Dept. Agric, 
Washington, D. C. M02F06. FGO. 

Chambliss, Prof. Hardee. Catholic Univ. 
Amer.. Washington, D. C. M26F10R38. 
CM. 

Chamelin, Isidor. Chemist and acting 
chief, Welfare Hosp. Chronic Diseases, 
Welfare Island; res. asst. biochemistry, 
City Col., New York, N. Y. (2710 Sedg- 
wick Ave.) M29. CNF. 



Champlin, Dr. Carroll D. A.M., Haver- 
ford, 15; Ph.D., Pittsburgh, 25. Prof, edu- 
cation, Pennsylvania State Col., State Col- 
lege. Pa. (627 W. Fairmount Ave.) M39. 
QIH. 

Champlin, Prof. Manley (Jerome). M.S., 
South Dakota State, 14. Senior prof, field 
husbandry, Univ. Saskatchewan, Saska- 
toon, Sask., Canada. (724 Saskatchewan 
Crescent E.) M22F22. O. 

Champney, Dr. Horace. M.A., Ohio State, 
33; Ph.D., 39. Res. psychologist, Samuel 
S. Fels Res. Inst., Antioch Col., Yellow 
Springs, Ohio. (912 Livermore St.) M38. 
IKQ. 

Chan, Frank Lai-ngi. M.S., Washington; 
D.Sc, Michigan. Shanghai Muncipal 
Council, Shanghai, China. M37. CM. 

Chance, Col. Edwin (Mickley). 442 Mont- 
gomery Ave., Haverford, Pa. M30R38. M. 

Chance, Dr. H(arrison) L(evi). M.S., 
Cornell, 28; Ph.D., 30. Dept. Botany, 
Univ. Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. M34- 
F38. G. 

Chancellor, Prof. William E(stabrook). 
A.M., Amherst, 95. Head Dept. Eco- 
nomics, Xavier Univ., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
(1934 Williams Ave., Norwood, Ohio) 
M35F40. K. 

Chandler, Prof. Asa C(rawford). M.Sc, 
California, 12; Ph.D., 14. Prof, biology, 
Rice Inst., Houston, Tex. (6315 Vander- 
bilt St.) M18F25. FN. 

Chandler, Dr. David C(ulbertson). M.A., 
Michigan, 30; Ph.D., 34. Asst. prof, zool- 
ogy, Franz Theodore Stone Lab., Put-in- 
Bay, Ohio. M38. FG. 

Chandler, Prof. E(lwyn) F(rancis). M.A., 
Ripon, 97. Prof, civil engng. and dean 
emeritus Col. Engng., Univ. North Da- 
kota, Grand Forks, N. Dak. M01F09. DM. 

Chandler, Everett R(oller). M.A., Duke, 
36. Head Dept. Science, High School, 
Chester, W. Va. (239 Virginia Ave.) 
M35. F. 

Chandler, Frank Randolph. M29D — . 
HKL. 

Chandler, Dr. F(rederick) B(arker). 
Ph.D., Maryland, 39. Assoc, physiologist, 
Maine Agric. Exp. Sta., Orono, Maine. 
M30F33. GO. 

Chandler, Prof. George (Anthony). M.A., 
Wisconsin, 31. Prof, philosophy and psy- 
chology, Principia Col., Elsah, 111. M36. 
IKH. 

Chandler, Major George M(oseley). B.S., 
Michigan, 98. U. S. Army. 1998 Vallejo 
St., San Francisco, Calif. M24. M. 

Chandler, Dr. J(oseph) P(axton). Ph.D., 
Michigan, 30. Instr., Dept. Biochemistry, 
Cornell Univ. Med. Col., New York, 
N. Y. M39. CN. 



3V 



Directory of Members 



Chandler, Dr. Loren Roscoe. M.D., Stan- 
ford, 23. Dean and prof, surgery, Stan- 
ford Univ. School Med., San Francisco, 
Calif. M40. X. 

Chandler, Dr. S(imon) B. A.M., North- 
western, 26; M.D., 27. Prof, anatomy. 
West Virginia Univ. School Med., Mor- 
gantown, W. Va. M29F33. NF. 

Chandler, Dr. Wallace Larkin. M.S., Cali- 
fornia, 15; Ph.D., Cornell, 18. 626 Ahbott 
Road, East Lansing, Mich. M28F33. NOF. 

Chandler, W(illiam) H(enry). M.S., Mis- 
souri, 06; Ph.D., 14. Prof, horticulture and 
asst. dean, Col. Agric. Univ. California 
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif. M12F15. 
O. Vice president for Section on Agriculture 
(0), 1940. 

Chaney, Dr. Albert L. 7347 Andenes 
Drive, Glendale, Calif. M35F35. CN. 

Chaney, Dr. Lucian W. M34F34D35. K. 

Chaney, Dr. Margaret S. M.A.. California. 
23; Ph.D., Chicago, 25. Chairman Dept. 
Home Economics, Connecticut Col.. New 
London, Conn. (4 North Ridge) M38. XX. 

Chaney, Dr. N(ewcomb) K(inney). M.A.. 
Carleton, 05; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 12. 
Dir. res., United (las Improvement Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. (Possum Hollow Road, 
Rose Valley, Moylan, Pa.) M34F34. CBM. 

Chaney, Dr. Ralph Works. Ph.D., Chi- 
cago, 19. Prof, paleontology and curator 
paleobotany. Mus. Paleontology, Univ. 
California, Berkeley, Calif. M22F23. EG. 

Chaney, Samuel Emmons. 1550 Bel-Aire 
Drive, Glendale, Calif. M30R37. M. 

Chang, Dr. Chun. Nat. Med. Col. Shang- 
hai, Shanghai, China. M30R36. X. 

Chant. Prof. C(larence) A(ugustus). M.A., 
Toronto. 00; LL.D.. 35; Ph.D., Harvard, 
01. Prof, emeritus astrophysics and dir. 
emeritus, David Dunlap Observatory, 
Univ. Toronto, Richmond Hill, Ont., 
Canada. M04F06. DBA. 

Chapel, L(eslie) T(homas). Box 3026. 
Cristobal. Canal Zone. M29R36. B. 

Chapin, Prof. F(rancis) Stuart. A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 10; Ph.D., 11. Prof, sociology and 
chairman Dept.; dir. graduate course so- 
cial work, Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, 
Minn. M21F31. KIL. 

Chapin, Maria Bowen. M29D34. 

Chapin, Miss Mildred Ruth. Dept. Home 
Economics. Univ. Illinois, Urbana, 111. 
M.5XR3Q. CNK. 

Chapline, W(illiam) R(idgely). B.S.. Ne- 
braska, 13. Chief, Div. Range Res., U. S. 
Forest Service, Washington, D. C. (3802 
Albemarle St. XW.) M18F31. GO. 
Chapman, Dr. Arthur B(arclay). M.S., 
Iowa State, 31; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 35- 
Asst. prof., Dept. Genetics, Univ. Wis- 
consin, Madison, Wis. (Westmorland) 
M34F40. O. 

Chapman, Arthur (C). Hollister, Mo. 
M32R32. BD. 



Chapman, Dr. A(rthur) G(lenn). M.S., 
Ohio State, 32; Ph.D., 33. Silviculturist, 
Central States Forest Exp. Sta., U. S. 
Forest Service, Columbus, Ohio. (240 
Westwood Road) M39- GEO. 

Chapman, Prof. C(harles) W(illis). B.S., 
Chicago, 10. Dept. Physics, Michigan 
State Col., East Lansing, Mich. M39F40. 
BAC. 

Chapman, Dr. C(lifford) W(arren). M.Sc, 
Med. School London (Canada), 25; Ph.D., 
McGill, 35. Prof., Univ. Maryland School 
Pharmacy, Baltimore, Md. M39- NpCF. 

Chapman, Dr. Conrad. M.A., Oxford, 23; 
D.es lettres, Paris (Sorbonne), 26. Writer, 
Edgewater, Barrytown on Hudson, N. Y. 
M22L23. L. 

Chapman, Dr. Dwight W(estley, Jr.). 
Ph.D., Harvard, 30. Teacher psychology, 
Bennington Col., Bennington, Vt. M34- 
F34. I- 

Chapman, Dr. Earle MacArthur. M.D.. 
Tohns Hopkins, 29. Asst. medicine, Har- 
vard Univ. Med. School, Boston, Mass. 
(6 Xetherland Road, Brookline, Mass.) 
M36. X. 

Chapman, G. H. 122 University Drive, 
Kent, Ohio. M35R36. 

Chapman, Dr. George Andrew. 2,1 Elm 

St., (dens Falls, X. Y. M36R36. N. 

Chapman, George H(erbert). Dir., Clini- 
cal Res. Lab.; res. bacteriologist, Light- 
house Eve Clinic, Xew York, X. Y. M28- 
F38. X. 

Chapman, Prof. Herman H(aupt). 205 
Prospect St., Xew Haven, Conn. M24F34- 

R35. o. 

Chapman, Dr. H(omer) D(wight). M.S.. 
Wisconsin, 25; Ph.D., 27. Assoc, chemist, 
Univ. California Citrus Exp. Sta., River- 
side, Calif. (4721 Somerset Drive) (M34- 
F34R35>M 4 oF34. OG. 

Chapman, James E(verett). M.S., Minne- 
sota. 15. Junior soil technologist, U. S. 
Soil Conservation Exp. Sta., Ithaca, N. Y. 
(402 X. Geneva St.) (M22F3iR36)M39- 
F31. OQC. 

Chapman, James W(ittenmyer). Sc.D., 
Harvard. 13. Silliman Inst., Dumaguete, 
Xegros Oriental, P. I. M13F33. F. 

Chapman, Kenneth M. Lab. Anthropol- 
ogy, Santa Fe. X. Mex. M35F35. HK. 

Chapman, Dr. (Mary) Jeannette. D.Sc. 

Johns Hopkins. 2S. Prof, bacteriology, 
phvsiology and hygiene. Mississippi State 
Col. Women, Columbus, Miss. (.1103 Col- 
lege St.) M40. XQ. 

Chapman, Dr. P(aul) J(ones). Ph.D., Cor- 
nell, 28. Prof, entomology, Cornell Univ., 
Ithaca: chief research entomology, New 
York State Agric. Exp. Sta., and agent. 
U. S. Bur. Entomology and Plant Quar- 
antine. Geneva. X. V. M20F33. F. 



Individual Members 



333 



Chapman, Prof. Royal N(orton). Mi8- 
F20D39. F. 

Chapman, Dr. W(ilbert) M(cLeod). M.Sc, 
Washington, 33; Ph.D., 37. Biologist, 
Washington State Dept. Fisheries; lec- 
turer, Univ. Washington School Fisheries, 
Seattle, Wash. (6021 26th St. NE.) M35. F. 

Chappel, Dr. Harry G(eorge). D.D.S., 

California, 96. 402 Staten Ave., Oakland, 
Calif. Mos. HG. 

Chappelear, George W(arren), Jr. M.S., 
Virginia Polytechnic Inst., 13. Head Dept. 
Biology, Madison Col., Harrisonburg, Va. 
M13F31. G. 

Chappell, E(ugene) L(indsay). M.S., 
Massachusetts Inst. Tech. Cheswick, Pa. 
M37. CM. 

Chappell, Dr. John T. John Brown Uni\., 
SiK. am Springs. Ark. M30R35. CBQ. 

Chappell, Dr. Matthew N. Columbia Univ., 
New York, N. Y. M31R32. IFN. 

Chappell, Dr. Walter M(iller). M.Sc, 
Washington, 31; Ph.D., 36. Geologist, 
Foreign Div., Standard Oil Co. California, 
Apartado Nacional 2760, Bogota, Colom- 
bia, S. A. M38. E. 

Chappelle, Dr. B(enjamin) F(ranklin). 
A.M., Dickinson, 11; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 
17. Head Dept. Foreign Languages, Univ. 
Nevada, Reno, Nevada. (576 Ridge St.) 
M27F32. LHR. 

Chappie, Eliot Dismore. Harvard Univ., 
Cambridge, Mass. (?) M32R32. H. 

Charbonnel, Dr. Ernst A. D.D.S., Mary- 
land, 97. Dentist, 334 Westminster St.; 
dir., Joseph Samuels Dental Clinic, Rhode 
Island Hosp., Providence, R. I. M34. BN. 

Charch, Dr. William Hale. Du Pont 
Rayon Co., Buffalo, N. Y. M34F34R34. C. 

Chard, Walter G(oodman). M.A., Colum- 
bia, 15. Cazenovia, N. Y. M14. OKQ. 

Chargaff, Dr. Erwin. Ph.D., Vienna, 28. 
Asst. prof, biochemistry, Columbia Univ. 
Col. Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 
X. Y. M37F38. NC. 

Chargin, Dr. Louis. M.D. 1 W. 85th St., 
New York, N. Y. M18. N. 

Charipper, Prof. Harry A(dolph). M.Sc, 
New York, 27; Ph.D., 29. Prof, biology 
and chairman Dept., New York Univ., 
Washington Scmare Col., New York, N. Y. 
(236-B 149th St., Neponsit, N. Y.) M34- 
F34. FN. 

Charles, Dr. C(ecil) M(arvin). M.A., Ken- 
tucky, zy\ Ph.D., Washington Univ., 29; 
M.D., 33. Asst. prof, anatomy and asst. 
clinical medicine, Washington Univ., St. 
Louis, Mo. (5237 Waterman St.) (M32- 
F33R33)M 3 6F 3 3- HNI. 

Charles, Donald R. Columbia Univ., New 
York, N. Y. M29R32. F. 



Charles, Miss Grace M(iriam). A.M., 
Chicago, 05; Ph.D., 10. Teacher, Austin 
High School, Chicago, 111. (934 Park 
Ave., River Forest, 111.) M10F21. FG. 

Charles, Prof. Rollin L(andis). A.M., Le- 
high, 10. Prof, physics, Franklin and 
Marshall Col., Lancaster, Pa. (510 Race 
Ave.) M07F16. BAM. 

Charles, Miss Vera K. U. S. Bur. Plant 
Industry, Washington, D. C. M06F15. G. 

Charlton, David B(erry). M.S., Cornell; 
Ph.D., Iowa State. Dir. and owner, Charl- 
ton Labs., Portland, Oreg. (1610 S. West 
Clifton St.) M29F38. NC. 

Charlton, Mrs. Florence B. (Florence 
Brown). M35D38. G. 

Charlton, John Felder. Box 20S7, Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla. M33R33- MOE. 

Charlton, Prof. Orlando C(larke). A.M., 
Hanover, 85. 1736 Bennett Ave., Dallas, 
Tex. M02F1 1. G. 

Charnock, Dr. Leonard W. H. Hotel Web- 
ster Hall, Detroit, Mich. M37R37. NCI. 

Charo, Walter J. 6536 Rogers Ave., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. M39. 

Charters, Prof. Werrett Wallace. Ph.M., 
Chicago, 03; Ph.D., 04; LL.D., McMaster, 
23. Dir., Bur. Educational Res., Ohio 
State Univ., Columbus, Ohio. (1927 In- 
dianola Ave.) M19F21. Q. 

Charvoz, Dr. Elton Ralph. M.D., Cali- 
fornia. 90 W. Portland St., Phoenix, Ariz. 
M38. N. 

Chase, Mrs. Agnes. Custodian grasses, 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, D. C. 
(5403 41st St.) M04F11. G. 

Chase, Dr. Aurin M(oody). M.A., Am- 
herst, 29; Ph.D., Columbia, 35. Res. assoc, 
Biol. Labs., Princeton Univ., Princeton, 
N. J. (23 Linden Lane) M35. F. 

Chase, Prof. Carl T(rueblood). New 
York Univ., University Heights, New 
York, N. Y. M34F34R36. BDF. 

Chase, C(arlos) Louis. Ph.B., Wisconsin. 
Junior geologist, Texas Co., Midland, 
Tex. M40. E. 

Chase, Eleanor F(rances). M.Sc, Massa- 
chusetts State, 25; Ph.D., Columbia, 29. 
45 Highland St., Amesburv, Mass. M31- 
F33. C. 

Chase, Miss Ethel W(inifred) B(ennett). 
A.M., Michigan, 15. Assoc prof, botany 
and adviser to women, Liberal Arts Col., 
Wayne Univ., Detroit, Mich. (4404 Com- 
monwealth Ave.) M18F33. G. 

Chase, Dr. Florence Meier. D.Sc, Geneva, 
28. Assoc, plant physiologist, Div. Radia- 
tion and Organisms, Smithsonian Inst., 
Washington, D. C. (1813 Farkside Drive 
NW.) M30F33. G. 



334 



Directory of Members 



Chase, Frank L(ynton). B.S., Massachu- 
setts Inst. Tech. 2512 Maple Ave., Dallas, 
Tex. M25. M. 

Chase, F(ranklin) D(udley). M2SD38. 
CEM. 

Chase, Frederick, S(tarkweather). 165 
Grove St., Waterbury, Conn. M08R32. M. 

Chase, Prof. George H(enry). A.M., Har- 
vard, 97; Ph.D., 00; L.H.D., Oberlin, 35; 
D.Litt., Boston, 39. Dean and prof, archae- 
ology, Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. 
(1 Bryant St.) M34F34. H. 

Chase, Dr. H(arry) W(oodburn). Ph.D., 
Clark, 10